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The Homework System That Really Works

Adhd and homework mix like oil and water. all of the little details — from writing down assignments to remembering due dates — require intense focus and memory. with these routines, teachers and parents can replace after-school tantrums with higher grades..

A teenage boy with ADHD doing homework in the living room

Doing homework when you have ADHD is painful. Students have to copy assignments, bring home the right books, and keep track of due dates — all difficult tasks for children with poor focus, attention, or memory.

But can you give your child some homework help? Yes, by creating consistent routines at home and school. While it may take a few months for the new routines to become habits, the payoff will come in better work skills, a sense of accomplishment, and lots of after-school smiles.

ADHD Homework Solutions at School

Allow time to write down homework assignments.

Teachers should post the day’s assignments on the board, and read them aloud to reinforce the information. If attention or language deficits make it hard for some kids to copy down the homework , give everyone a typed assignment sheet to take home.

Establish “study buddies”

Partner children so they can check each other’s assignment books and make sure everything is correct and in the right place. At the end of the day, buddies can help each other pack up the planners and books they’ll need at home.

Create a “completed work” folder

This folder will serve as a reminder for what needs to go back to school. For kids who have trouble remembering their homework, include a sheet for parents to sign once the work is finished and packed in the child’s school bag.

[ Self-Test: Could My Child Have a Learning Disability? ]

Lighten the homework load

Children with ADHD work slowly and can get easily frustrated. Try cutting down their work load by assigning just the odd-numbered math problems, for example. This way, the student can demonstrate what he’s learned without being pushed too hard.

ADHD Homework Solutions at Home

Make sure homework comes home.

If your child has trouble copying down homework assignments, tell his teacher. She may have ideas on how to help him remember, or may be willing to e-mail you the assignments at home.

child yawns while doing homework

Have homework time

Some children need to take a break after school while others work best while still in ‘school mode.’ If after-school activities make a regular schedule difficult, help your child’s time management by posting a weekly calendar that lists homework start and end times each day.

Create a homework spot

Find a place where your child can work comfortably. Some background music can help kids focus, but otherwise, keep distractions to a minimum.

Don’t let her procrastinate

Make sure your child understands the assignment and gets started. Stay nearby so you can coach him and offer support.

[ Free Download: Top 5 Homework Frustrations — and Fixes for Each ]

Schedule breaks

Concentration takes a lot of energy for kids with ADHD. A five-minute break every 20 minutes helps them recharge.

How Can Parents Keep Homework Time Positive?

Respect your child’s “saturation point”.

If he’s too tired, stressed or frustrated to finish his homework, let him stop. Write a note to the teacher explaining the situation, and if it happens every night talk to her about reducing the homework load.

Check to see that your child is organized for school and that finished homework is packed in his book bag — and that the bag is placed by the front door.

Praise your child’s efforts

Some kids benefit from a token system: When your child finishes his homework on time, add a star to a chart. The stars can then be redeemed for special privileges or items from a wish list.

[ Read: 15 Tips for Reducing Homework Stress & Finishing Assignments Faster ]

Homework & Studying: Read These Next

Two siblings with ADHD, working together to get their homework done faster.

How to Cut Homework Time in Half

A boy and his father use ADHD homework strategies to finish assignments together.

12 Schoolwork Shortcuts for Kids Who Hate Homework

ADHD student's notebooks, calculator and pen on wooden table

15 Tips for Reducing Homework Stress & Completion Time

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A Homework Reboot: Math Strategies and Writing Tips for ADHD Brains

Adhd newsletter, success @ school, strategies for homework, accommodations, ieps, working with school & more..

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Why Do I Yawn?

Everybody yawns — from unborn babies to the oldest great-grandparent. Animals do it, too. But why, exactly, do people and animals yawn? No one knows for sure. But there are many theories (ideas) about why people yawn. 

One is that when we are bored or tired, we just don't breathe as deeply as we usually do. As this theory goes, our bodies take in less oxygen because our breathing has slowed. Therefore, yawning helps us bring more oxygen into the blood and move more carbon dioxide out of the blood.

Yawning, then, would be an involuntary reflex (something we can't really control) to help us control our oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. Sounds good, but other studies have shown that breathing more oxygen does not decrease yawning. Likewise, breathing more carbon dioxide does not increase yawning. Hmmm. Now what?

Another theory is that yawning stretches the lungs and lung tissue. Stretching and yawning may be a way to flex muscles and joints, increase heart rate, and feel more awake.

Other people believe that yawning is a protective reflex to redistribute the oil-like substance called surfactant (say: sur-FAK-tint) that helps keep lungs lubricated inside and keeps them from collapsing. So, if we didn't yawn, according to this theory, taking a deep breath would become harder and harder — and that would not be good!

But there is one idea about yawning that everyone knows to be true. It seems contagious. If you yawn in class, you'll probably notice a few other people will start yawning, too. Even thinking about yawning can get you yawning. How many times have you yawned while reading this article? We hope not many!

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How to Help Your Child Study

Regardless of a child’s age or challenges, parents can encourage sound homework routines for a successful start to the school year.

By Brian Platzer and Abby Freireich

Every cartful of new school supplies is loaded with promise: binders organized by subject, crisp homework folders and pristine notebooks. But for many parents it can feel like it’s just a short hop from those freshly sharpened pencils to a child in full meltdown over a barely started English essay.

You don’t have to let go of the optimism. As parents, teachers and tutors, we have some concrete advice for staving off the tears — for both parents and children.

Regardless of a child’s age or challenges, parents can encourage sound homework routines for a successful start to the school year. First, students should consider how to create organized work spaces, backpacks and lockers cleared of clutter and systematized for easy retrieval of important assignments. Second, nightly to-do checklists are a must to help prioritize and plan ahead.

But many students still struggle when it comes to homework. Their stress tends to be exacerbated by three primary challenges: procrastinating , feeling overwhelmed and struggling to retain information . Ideally, parents can help elementary school children develop effective homework habits so they will not need as much guidance as they get older. Parents who are not home during their kids’ prime homework hours can try out some of these ideas on the weekends and pass along the best practices to their caregivers.

child yawns while doing homework

For Procrastination

Reduce potential distractions..

Many students finish reading a sentence, and then refresh their Instagram feed. Ideally, their phones should be nowhere near them during homework time. Or they should disable or mute apps and texting functions on the phone and computer while they work. We know this will mean a grumpy adolescent. But it’s a battle worth fighting. Establish a family tech-space where phones and laptops go when not in use. And model these boundaries by leaving your devices there, too!

Remember that consistency is key.

Kids ultimately thrive in the comfort and reliability of a structured approach to homework, so each afternoon they should follow the same steps in roughly the same order.

For Students Overwhelmed by Workload

Plan ahead..

It might be helpful for you to model the planning process, so your kids can see how you schedule a series of tasks. Try to make a point of letting them in on the process when you’re running errands, preparing for a trip or completing a project for work. Then take advantage of some set time (Sunday tends to work best) to plan the coming week.

Students should break down large assignments into more manageable chunks and then backplan from the due date, recording on a calendar what they’ll need to do when in order to complete each major task and its components.

In the early grades, this could mean reading a book by Tuesday in order to write a book report on Wednesday. By middle school, it could translate to finishing the research for a science project with enough time to make a compelling poster to display at the science fair. The more practice students get with planning, the sooner they’ll become self-sufficient.

Use time estimates.

Students should estimate how long each assignment will take and develop a schedule accordingly. Even if the estimate is wrong, the process of thinking through timing will allow them to internalize how best to proceed when juggling multiple tasks. It will give them a better gauge of how long future assignments will take and make the evening ahead less intimidating.

Begin with the most difficult task.

Most kids’ instinct will be to complete the fun or easy to-dos first. But they should start with the hardest work. Otherwise it will be later when, energy depleted, they begin trying to outline their term paper. Encouraging them to do the most challenging work first will allow them to devote attention and energy to the demanding assignments — then they can coast through the easy tasks.

For Students Who Struggle to Retain Information

Use a cumulative approach..

Memorize information in stages that build upon one another. When students are confronted with vast swaths of material, it can be overwhelming and difficult to recall. Suggest that they break it up into a series of discrete parts based on the number of topics and the number of days they have to study for the test. For example, students might divide a history test study sheet into sections 1 to 3. The first day should be for studying section 1. The second day, section 2. The third day, reviewing sections 1 and 2, before moving to section 3 the following day. This way, by the time students get to section 3, they haven’t forgotten what they learned in the first section. This cumulative approach reinforces retention of content through review and repetition.

S ummarize with concise lists, identify keywords and use mnemonics.

A big block of text on a study sheet can be difficult for students to absorb and memorize. Instead, they should break the sentence or paragraph up into a series of points, highlighting the keywords and then creating their own mnemonic device to remember it. Sometimes the silliest mnemonics stick the best, and remembering the first letters of words will help trigger ideas that they might otherwise forget. (Remember the DR & MRS VANDERTRAMP verbs from French class, or Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge when learning musical notes?)

Employ visual aids and narratives.

Some students can best synthesize information by creating charts or other graphic organizers. Rather than feeling overwhelmed by writing several paragraphs with important information about how a cell works, for example, students might present the same data in streamlined form with a chart. Charts distill and organize numerous sources (parts of a cell) according to the same set of criteria (form, function, location), creating a categorized snapshot that’s easier to memorize.

Other students prefer narratives that link ideas to their context. Instead of trying to memorize various inventors, students could recall how they built on one another’s accomplishments. Most students thrive when both these approaches are used simultaneously.

Make study materials.

We know it’s old-fashioned, but writing out information helps commit content to memory far better than typing it. If writing out the material longhand is too onerous, kids should still create their own study sheet digitally, rather than borrowing one from a friend. The work of creating the study sheet is a crucial step in internalizing its content. Active is always better than passive studying. Most students benefit from being orally quizzed on the material so they can determine both the information they know inside-out, and what they still need to review. Online resources like Quizlet can work well to prepare for straightforward vocabulary quizzes, but is less helpful when it comes to tests covering more complex information. Most importantly, students should generate their own study material to make the most of using Quizlet, rather than relying on pre-existing content that others have posted.

child yawns while doing homework

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How Much Studying Is Enough?

Some kids believe they’ll never be prepared, even after hours of studying. Others barely crack a book open and declare they’re done.

Use practice tests.

The best way to know that study time is over is when students are able to perform the task that will be asked of them on the in-class test, quiz or essay. Initially, children can review the material orally. They should write down any material they missed to help commit it to memory. Then, they can take a sample test from a textbook, or create a mock test with class notes, homework and study guides. When students demonstrate a verbal and written command of the information, studying should be complete.

Talk through these study habits now, so that on the first day of school, your child will not only have the requisite sharpened pencils, but also a plan of action.

Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer are the founders of Teachers Who Tutor | NYC and the authors of a book about homework to be published next summer.

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Why Do We Yawn? Science Explains

Cats and other vertebrate animals yawn. Cats can even catch yawns from people.

People yawn from before they are born until old age. We yawn when we’re tired. We yawn when we’re bored. We yawn when we see other people or our pets do it. Other vertebrate animals do it too, including cats, dogs, fish, birds, and snakes. Science hasn’t completely nailed down an explanation for why we yawn, but we understand the factors that cause yawning and have theories about contagious yawns.

How Yawning Works

First, it’s worth knowing the medical term for yawning. Actually, there are two words. Oscitation is the term for opening the mouth. Pandiculation refers to the act of yawning and stretching. The average yawn lasts 6 to 8 seconds. Yawning may occur in unborn babies, but contagious yawning doesn’t start until a child is about 4 years old.

You can fake a yawn (and even fool others into contagious yawning), but natural yawns are an involuntary reflex. A yawn is much more than just opening your mouth (oscitation). During a yawn, the tensor tympani muscle in the middle ear contracts, producing the rolling sound within the head. In people and other animals, yawning is generally accompanied by stretching other parts of the body besides the mouth. Stretching the jaw increases heart rate and blood flow to the head, neck, and face, while deep breathing forces down blood and spinal fluid from the head. Results of a 2007 study by Andrew Gallup at the University of Albany indicate yawning cools the brain, which may make it a method of thermoregulation in vertebrates.

Why We Yawn

A study in parakeets found birds yawned more as temperature increased, while a study in humans found people are more likely to yawn in cold weather than in hot weather. While seemingly contradictory, the results could mean the birds use yawning to try to cool their brains and humans yawn more when the temperature is low enough to have a chilling effect.

While temperature change is associated with yawning, it’s not the only stimulus. Sleepiness, stress, and boredom are associated with yawning. Anecdotal reports indicate yawning can help increase alertness, helping to fight off fatigue or increase performance when a person is nervous or stressed.

Yawning often accompanies any change in the state of the body that affects neurotransmitters. Increased yawning is associated with an increase or decrease in serotonin, nitric oxide, dopamine, or glutamic acid. An increase in levels of endorphins and other opioid neurotransmitters, on the other hand, is associated with decreased yawning.

The commonly held belief that yawning increases tissue oxygenation actually hasn’t stood up to research. Studies in humans have shown yawning can reduce oxygen intake and that either increasing oxygen or decreasing carbon dioxide in air does not decrease yawning. However, other animals do yawn to increase oxygenation. For example, some fish yawn to intake more oxygen.

How Catching Yawns Works

Yawning also seems to be a method of nonverbal communication or an expression of herd instinct. Some species of penguins yawn at each other as part of their courtship ritual. Siamese fighting fish yawn at their reflections or other fighting fish as a show of aggression. People and their pets catch yawns from each other. However, in people, only about 60-70% catch yawns. Older people, young animals and people, and persons with autism and schizophrenia are less likely to catch yawns. People are more likely to catch yawns from friends and family members than from strangers. Psychologists believe this has to do with empathy. Multiple studies have connected increased empathy with increased contagious yawning. Young children and animals have not yet developed the skill, while older people may be less affected by the actions of others.

Yawning as a Disease Symptom

Excessive yawning could mean something more serious than being tired. Yawning more than once per minute may be a symptom of a medical condition or a side effect of certain medications. Yawning may be a symptom of:

  • Brain dysfunction (e.g., tumor, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis)
  • Problems with homeostasis to regulate body temperature
  • Liver failure
  • Stimulation of the vagal nerve by a heart attack or other cardiac problem

Gallup, Andrew C.; Gallup (2007). “Yawning as a brain cooling mechanism: Nasal breathing and forehead cooling diminish the incidence of contagious yawning”. Evolutionary Psychology . 5 (1): 92–101.

Shepherd, Alex J.; Senju, Atsushi; Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M. (2008). “Dogs catch human yawns”. Biology Letters . 4 (5): 446–8.

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My Child Yawns all the Time! Should I be Worried?

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Do you notice your child yawning more than usual? Are you worried there might be some underlying causes causing this yawning?

In most cases, you have nothing to worry about. The reason your child is yawning all the time is likely because he/she is tired, overheated, or fatigued in some way. Another reason could be that he/she is experiencing anxiety.

We will discuss these more later in this article. Meanwhile…

Get them plenty of rest, and if the problem persists, take your child to a doctor. You’ll get more peace of mind once you go consult a professional.

FREE CLASS: Discover how to get kids to listen without yelling, nagging, or losing control .

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★ How to get kids to listen without nagging , yelling, or losing control… ★ How to prevent arguments and misbehavior… ★ How to fill your child’s attention and power buckets positively… ★ Amy’s proven 5-step process to implementing consequences…

It’s quite rare that excessive yawning in children turns into any serious issue.

I want to stress that what you’re about to read is not medical advice. If you feel there is something wrong with your child, please consult your doctor as soon as possible.

Why do kids yawn?

After studying this question for many years, scientists still don’t know for sure.

We do know is that most yawns start at the para ventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (a part of your brain). This is like the nerve center of yawns!

There are many theories around why we yawn. One theory says that when relaxed, or tired, our body takes in less oxygen. As a result, yawning helps us take in more oxygen and expand our lungs.

According to an article by Professor Mark Andrews on Scientific American , our lungs actually don’t track or sense oxygen levels.

Kid yawn

He noticed that even a fetus can yawn before the lungs are developed. He did observe that yawning happens when the brain is low in oxygen .

So, yawning might be linked to oxygen, but not in the way we first thought.

Another traditional way of thinking is that yawning happens when you’re bored. But even this theory has not shown conclusive scientific evidence.

A study asked teenagers to stare at a colored line, while they asked another group to stare at a music video! It turns out that the colored line starers yawned more.

Another study, based around monkeys, seemed to come to the conclusion that the yawning they observed was caused by the status change or activity change in the monkeys (rather than boredom or any other of the reasons given for yawning).

More recently, in 2014, it was reported that scientists now believe that yawning is a way to cool off your brain . When the brain gets too hot to work, we start to yawn.

According to this study, when you’re tired or fatigued, the temperature of your brain increases.

This explains why we yawn in these situations.

What is excessive yawning?

Harvard Health Publications have done studies and concluded that the typical person averages around 20 yawns per day!

Healthy individuals yawn about 20 times per day. This is more of a range than a set number. Some people yawn a bit more than 20 times a day. Other people might go days without yawning.

Anything over 5 yawns every 30 minutes is excessive yawning.

Most common causes of yawning.

  • Sleepiness or tiredness (most common)
  • Vitamin B-12 Deficiency
  • Sleep conditions such as sleep apnea
  • Increased temperature
  • Side effects from certain medications

Other more serious medical conditions might be linked to yawning excessively. Again, if you are worried or notice other symptoms, it is best to consult your doctor.

Is yawning contagious?

This is the most interesting part of yawning.

We have all been there when someone else yawns, and we can’t help but follow. Some people even yawn when they see a picture of someone yawning! Or even when they read the word “yawn”.

There are no clear scientific studies on why we imitate yawning. Some theories suggest it might be an adaptation to communication and bonding .

Contagious yawning is also linked to empathy, tiredness, or energy levels.

Some research considers it a social phenomenon. This is because contagious yawning is not observed in children until after four years old.

Is there any meaning behind excessive yawning?

When some parents see their child yawning a lot, they may start to worry about the possible meaning. Does it mean my child is sick? Do they have a rare condition?

All these ideas and worries might be rushing through your head now.

There are certain conditions linked to excessive yawning. Like I mentioned before, it is best to consult your doctor.

Can we do anything about excessive yawning ?

In most cases, if you notice your child yawning excessively, the first step is to make sure he/she is well-rested. This is the most common cause of yawning, and one that most scientists seem to agree with.

There are many other conditions that have been linked to yawning. If you notice this pattern continuing, I would recommend taking your child to see a doctor.

What a yawn fest!

I hope you didn’t yawn too much while reading this article.

The topic of yawning is a complex and misunderstood one, with many scientists. No one seems to be sure of the primary reasons for yawning.

We are still at the experimental phase for most of the scientific findings. In most cases, your child yawning is nothing to worry about.

If you have any expertise in this field, we would love to hear all about it in the comments section below.

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Victoria is a parenting expert, teacher, and consultant with three amazing children of her own (Jason, Jessica, Jordan).

She is the co-founder of BestCaseParenting.com, where she aims to be the go-to source of information for parents who want to raise confident, healthy, and successful children.

Parenting is not an easy job, but it can be incredibly rewarding. Remember, no matter how tough things get, we're here for you!

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Bryan Gardiner

Big Question: Why Do I Yawn When I'm Nervous or Stressed?

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Athletes do it before competition. Concert violinists do it before going onstage. Paratroopers even do it before throwing themselves out of a plane for the first time. Of all the involuntary physical reflexes humans experience before stressful events, yawning seems not only improbable, but also kind of ridiculous—like sneezing a lot before a knife fight.

Most of us (rightly) associate these 3 to 6-second oscitations with sleepiness and boredom---not feats of daring and skill. According to Robert Provine , a University of Maryland, Baltimore County, neuroscientist and author of Curious Behavior: Yawning, Laughing, Hiccupping, and Beyond , we really do yawn most when we're tired. "Right after waking and before bedtime," he says, "which is consistent with yawning's role in facilitating state changes: sleep to wakefulness, wakefulness to sleep, arousal to de-arousal, or vice versa."

But yawning does more than just engender physiological state changes. Human fetuses begin yawning in the womb after about 20 weeks; dogs frequently yawn when asked to do things they find difficult (bath time, fella!); and there's a good chance you've yawned just from reading this article (seeing, reading about, and hearing yawns also causes them). In short, yawning remains one of the least understood common behaviors among vertebrates---and this is especially true of stress and anxiety yawning.

"Nervous people will definitely yawn more," says Provine, "but there haven't been a lot of formal studies investigating why." While that hasn't stopped agencies like the TSA from including "exaggerated yawning" in its 92-point checklist of suspicious passenger behaviors ( perhaps they should focus more on weapons? ), it has meant that the emotional significance of yawning has remained a something of a scientific mystery.

Here's what is known: Reptiles, birds, mammals, and fish all tend to yawn a lot before—and in some cases during—conflict or other stress-inducing activities. In one study, male Siamese fighting fish were observed yawning multiple times during different aggressive encounters with one another. Similarly, numerous studies have shown that macaques will yawn in response to various male threats, bouts of sexual jealousy, and anxiety. In a recent study published in Neuroscience Letters , Japanese researchers used classic fear conditioning to successfully induce yawning in rats. Still, while scientists have repeatedly demonstrated the link between stress and yawning, they don't know much beyond the fact that the hypothalamus, a part of the brain involved in functions like feeding, metabolic balance, blood pressure, heart rate, and sexual behavior, seems to be involved.

Some psychologists, including Provine, suggest that anxious yawning could be an example of what's known as a displacement activity—i.e., behavior that results from an uncomfortable or stressful situation and that seems out of context. Examples in humans include scratching one's head, stroking a non-existent beard, or repeatedly tugging on an earlobe. Animals do it too. Ever see a cat go after a bird, miss, and then immediately start grooming itself? That's not some awkward attempt to play it cool. It's a displacement behavior.

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Insofar as they signal stress and involve actions meant to have a calming effect, displacement behaviors also fit the whole state-changing model of yawning. But that still leaves a number of fundamental questions unanswered: Does yawning itself cause the activity changes, or do those activity changes cause the yawning? Also, what physiological purpose does yawning actually serve in these scenarios? If it's stress reduction, how exactly does that work?

One possible clue relates to yawning's perceived role in thermoregulation . According to Andrew Gallup, an assistant professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Oneonta, yawning may help keep the brain at its optimal 98.6 degree temperature. Gallup believes this is important because our brains hate being hot. A so-called hot head can result in everything from slower reaction times to poor memory performance, he says.

In a 2010 study on the impact of yawning on brain temperature, Gallup implanted probes in the brains of rats and found that even a rise in temperature of 0.18 degrees Fahrenheit triggered yawning. He also found that the skull temperature fell immediately after the rats finished their yawns—sometimes by as much as 0.7 degrees.

Gallup believes that our human brains react similarly. His theory is that when we yawn, our gaping jaws increase circulation to our skulls, effectively forcing warm blood out of the brain. The deep inhalation of our yawns also brings a flood of air into our nasal and oral cavities, which cools the cranial arteries through heat dissipation, he says.

So far, there seems to be some support for this idea. A number of recent studies have shown people do in fact yawn more in the summer than in the winter, and that cold weather and doing things like jumping in a cold pool can greatly diminish yawning frequency.

As it so happens, stress and anxiety also cause our brains to get hotter, Gallup says. And Simon Thompson, a neuroscientist and clinical psychologist at Bournemouth University in the UK, agrees with him that the yawn may be our brain's way of countering these unwelcome temperature rises.

Thompson's own research has shown that yawns often seem to be triggered by a rise in blood cortisol levels, and that they in turn serve to elevate these levels even further. Of course, our bodies also produce the hormone cortisol when we're stressed, and this spike, Thompson believes, stimulates both the production of adrenaline to make us more alert, and tells the tempearture-control portion of our brain, the hypothalamus, to cool down the brain.

It's far from a definitive scientific explanation of stress yawning, but it does seem to indicate that cool heads really do prevail.

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Am I the only one who tries to ‘swallow my head’ as my Nana used to say while exercising? For a while, I thought so! But a Google search told me I'm not alone. Many people suffer from constant yawning when they are physically active. So why do we yawn when we exercise? Well, why do we yawn at all?

Well, yawning is a touch of a mystery . Even fetuses can experience yawns ( click here to see that ), though I’d doubt they’re doing so due to physical activity. It was once thought that animals yawned to increase the oxygen in their bodies, especially in their brains, but studies giving patients more or less oxygen found it did not affect the frequency of yawning. It is also theorized that yawning is used to keep organisms alert, an idea that explains why yawns are contagious- to remind other nearby animals to stay alert as well.  In some animals, notably dogs, yawns are used to communicate anxiety or nervousness.

Another theory is that yawning is another way for bodies to thermoregulate, via the action of neurotransmitters. Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter in the regulation of skin blood flow, and the thermoregulation this blood flow does. Increases of serotonin have been shown to increase body and brain temperatures, a change that causes the body to trigger more yawns, in an attempt to cool itself. The effects of serotonin on thermoregulation are especially obvious in the case of patients who suffer from serotonin syndrome, a condition caused by an excess of serotonin in their systems, usually from taking several serotonin-affecting drugs in tandem. Some of the biggest signs of serotonin syndrome are hyperthermia, shivering, sweating and vasoconstriction. This process is also obvious to SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) or SNRI (selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) users who experience a relatively (~11%) common side effect of the medications- excessive yawning. While the users may not be aware of it, the increased serotonin levels in their body increases its temperature, and therefore its yawn rate. Case studies have shown patients to experience as many as 200 yawns per day! 

Less innocently however than heat or medication induced yawns are yawns as a clinical symptom. The main reason we yawn consciously is to relieve pressure in our skulls, like when you try to 'pop your ears' on an airplane, so an increased rate of yawning can be a body's attempts to relieve intracranial hypertension (too much pressure on the brain), migraines, or even heart or kidney problems. So if you’re not warm, taking SS/SNRIs, sleepy or anxious, and are experiencing excessive yawning, it may be worth mentioning to your doctor. Finally, at least my mystery is solved; Run fast, get warm, start yawning. Maybe I should try running in the winter? 

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Dyslexia and Fatigue

Why is it that some students with dyslexia yawn so much when they are reading and spelling? Why do they yawn during anything that involves these activities, such as school, dyslexia tutoring and dyslexia treatment? Parents of children with dyslexia often ask me this question. They may observe that their child is in a completely alert state, but once they are asked to start reading or spelling, they suddenly seem tired. Dyslexia tutors, and anyone who works in dyslexia treatment or dyslexia tutoring, tends to notice this issue. The reason why students with dyslexia yawn a lot is something that I like to call “word fatigue”. This isn’t an official term, but a phrase I started using after observing this phenomenon.

For a child with dyslexia, reading and spelling can be exhausting activities. To read a few pages, or even a paragraph or two, they often have to dedicate a great amount of focus and energy. The same focus and energy are required when they are spelling. As a result of this effort, the child may become tired and start yawning. This does not mean that the child is lazy, not paying attention, or lacking in focus; rather, it simply means that reading and spelling are still tiring activities for them. Additionally, this yawning should not be taken as an indicator of the student being bored. Quite often, the child may be enjoying what they are doing, but reading and spelling still cause them to become fatigued.

Is there a solution for all this fatigue and yawning? After all, if you are a teacher, parent, or dyslexia tutor, you may find that all of this yawning is a bit of a distraction. The only effective, long-term solution for this issue of dyslexia fatigue is to help the child make progress with their reading and spelling. When a child with dyslexia receives the instruction that they need from a dyslexia tutoring and dyslexia treatment program, reading and spelling will start to be easier for them. Eventually, as they make more and more progress, reading and spelling will not tire them out so much, and the yawns will lessen or disappear completely.

In the short term, there are also techniques that you can use to help a student with dyslexia remain alert. You can intersperse breaks involving physical activity with activities involving reading and spelling. You can also play reading and spelling games with a child. Even though these activities will still involve reading and spelling, the change  of pace may be enough to perk them up. We use a lot of games in our online dyslexia tutoring program, because they help reinforce everything we are teaching, and also help keep our students engaged.

22 thoughts on “Dyslexia and Fatigue”

My daughter’s teacher keeps telling me my daughter yawns in class all the time. She never yawns at home, unless it’s close to bed time. Now she’s started tutoring online, and as soon as she’s on with her tutor she yawns. This article made me realize I’m not crazy lol and that her yawning makes sense. I think her teachers feel she is not getting enough sleep, but that is not the case.

She has not officially been diagnosed with dyslexia, but her assessment with her tutor showed definite signs.

Thanks for your comment, Marnie. That’s very interesting!

My son has a very similar experience, Marnie! Now with the at-home learning, I’m seeing what his teachers have been describing.

I’m thinking I might need to test my son for dyslexia. He has difficulty reading and spelling, so this might be the root of what’s happening.

Thanks for your comment, Tara!

My son is dyslexic and with home schooling, I have noticed with anything challenging he yawns constantly, so this is really interesting. It is off putting and can feel like he’s not paying attention, so very good to have a reason why. Although it does seem to start immediately rather than after a short while…. and much worse when under any pressure.

Thanks for your comment, Charlotte. I’m glad that our post was helpful! Yes, for some students, the yawning may start immediately. I have observed this, as well.

Have a great day,

Thank you very much for the information! Since distance learning and the summer slide, I’ve noticed my son yawning more and more. I’m glad he’s not the only one!

I’m glad the information was helpful! Thanks for your comment!

Hi – I picked up a book today and immediately started yawning. It made me think about dyslexia. As soon as I stopped reading I no longer yawned. I think it could be something down to how the brain has to work that much harder in order to process the words especially when it is a subject you need a lot of concentration with.

I liked the idea of doing exercise for something else in between to give your mind a break. I do find the yawning can start to reduce after I have been reading for some time. This could be down to the brain waves settling into the new process. It’s a bit like crossing a ravine. When I can get o er the yawning it’s a lot easier to read for longer periods. In the evening when I am tired I just get put to sleep by reading even if the book is very engaging. I hope that helps in some way.

Thanks for your comment, Robert!

I’m 30 in nursing school. Self diagnosed with Dyslexia. I’m reading with a classmate and have noticed during this entire year we’ve been studying together I yawn all the time while reading out loud. I’m not tired and it distracting to me. So I googled it and this site came up. Absolutely amazing yawning is tied to dyslexia. It makes me happy the parents above have had their children diagnosed. I never even knew what dyslexia was when I was working on my first degree at 18-22 yo.

Thanks for your comment, Briana!

Hello there. I have a 9 year old daughter with a special learning disability. She is using Bartons at school to help her overcome these challenges. Today I was face timing her while she was having a story read to her and she followed along (she is doing e-learning today due to the snow). Within 35 seconds of the story I watch her eyes close and was immediately exhausted and just minutes before she was full of energy..

Reading zaps her.

Thanks for your comment!

Hi I am a 62 year-old female was diagnosed with dyslexia at 37 whilst undertaking a degree. I have struggled with low self esteem and feel exhausted when having to read information. Now everything is on line …life is more difficult than ever!! Overloaded with information and lack of human contact.

Hi, Jane. I definitely understand! Which country do you live in? I may be able to suggest some resources. Have a great day!

My son is dyslexic and yawns when reading out loud or when listening to an audiobook. It interesting to see how hard the brain works. It has taken a few years, but now he doesn’t yawn for at least 10 minutes into reading. It used to be instantaneous.

Thanks for your comment! That’s very interesting. Sometimes when a student’s reading starts to improve, they yawn less, because reading is less exhausting for them. Have a great day!

Hi, I am 52 years old and I’ve never been tested but I have these problems..I wanted to go back to school to get my GED but could never concentrate I’m all over the place how can I find help?

Hi, Olivia. Thank you for your comment. It’s never too late to improve in reading and spelling. If you are interested in online dyslexia tutoring, we work with individuals of all ages, including adults. You may also find it helpful to contact the International Dyslexia Association.

I have a similar challenge even as I am in high institution. Immediately I start reading expecially academic books, I start yawning and my nose starts running before I know it I will loose interest in what am reading meanwhile it is of great importance that I read. Please help!

Thanks for your comment! Have you ever been tested for dyslexia?

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Neuroscience For Kids

Yawning...and why yawns are contagious.

Updated: July 31, 2007

Before you read any more of this page, get a pencil (or pen) and paper.

I will wait...I'm still waiting...Did you get it?

With your pencil and paper, keep track of the number of times you yawn while you are reading this page. I hope reading this page is not boring, but you may find that just thinking and reading about yawning makes you yawn. The results may surprise you. Did you yawn yet? If you did, make sure you count it.

  • The average duration of a yawn is about 6 seconds.
  • In humans, the earliest occurrence of a yawn happens at about 11 weeks after conception - that's BEFORE the baby is born!
  • Yawns become contagious to people between the first and second years of life.
  • A part of the brain that plays an important role in yawning is the hypothalamus. Research has shown that some neurotransmitters (for example, dopamine, excitatory amino acids, nitric oxide) and neuropeptides increase yawning if injected into the hypothalamus of animals.

As you might have expected, people who watched the color test bar pattern yawned more (5.78 yawns in 30 minutes) than those who watched the "MTV-like" video (3.41 yawns in 30 minutes.) The average duration of yawns was also slightly longer in the test bar viewing group. One unexpected finding was that yawns in male students had a longer duration than those in female students.

Many people assume that we yawn because our bodies are trying to get rid of extra carbon dioxide and to take in more oxygen. This may make some sense. According to this theory, when people are bored or tired, they breathe more slowly. As breathing slows down, less oxygen makes it to the lungs. As carbon dioxide builds up in the blood, a message to the brain results in signals back to the lungs saying, "Take a deep breath," and a yawn is produced.

The only problem with the excess carbon dioxide theory is that research shows that it may not be true. In 1987, Dr. Robert Provine and his coworkers set up an experiment to test the theory that high carbon dioxide/low oxygen blood content causes yawning. Air is normally made up of 20.95% oxygen, 79.02% nitrogen, 0.03% carbon dioxide and a few other gases in low concentrations. The researchers gave college students the following gases to breathe for 30 minutes:

Gas #1 = 100% Oxygen

Gas #2 = 3% Carbon dioxide, 21% Oxygen

Gas #3 = 5% Carbon dioxide, 21% Oxygen

Gas #4 = Normal Air

Breathing 100% oxygen (Gas #1) or either carbon dioxide gas (Gas #2 and #3) did cause the students to breathe at a faster rate. However, neither carbon dixoide gas nor 100% oxygen caused the students to yawn more. These gases also did not change the duration of yawns when they occurred.

The researchers also looked for a relationship between breathing and yawning by having people exercise. Exercise, obviously, causes people to breathe faster. However, the number of yawns during exercise was not different from the number of yawns before or after exercise. Therefore, it appears that yawning is not due to CO 2 /O 2 levels in the blood and that yawning and breathing are controlled by different mechanisms.

So, the question remains - why do we yawn? Dr. Provine suggests that perhaps yawning is like stretching. Yawning and stretching increase blood pressure and heart rate and also flex muscles and joints. Evidence that yawning and stretching may be related comes from the observation that if you try to stifle or prevent a yawn by clenching your jaws shut, the yawn is somewhat "unsatisfying." For some reason, the stretching of jaw and face muscles is necessary for a good yawn.

In 2007, researchers proposed that yawning is used to cool the brain. They found that people yawned more often they pressed a warm or room temperature towel against their heads than when they pressed a cold towel against their heads. People who breathed through their noses (thought to reduce brain temperature) did not yawn at all.

It is possible that yawns are contagious because at one time in evolutionary history, the yawn served to coordinate the social behavior of a group of animals. When one member of the group yawned to signal an event, all the other members of the group also yawned. Yawns may still be contagious these days because of a leftover response (a "vestigial" response) that is not used anymore. None of this has been proven true and yawns are still one of the mysteries of the mind.

So, how many times did you yawn?

Still interested in yawns? Try an experiment to keep track of your own yawning.

Did you know?

Here's a new vocabulary word for you: pandiculation . Pandiculation is the act of stretching and yawning.

They said it!

References and further information:

  • Contagious Yawning , Those who feel for others catch yawns. - Neuroscience for Kids
  • Provine, R.R. Contagious yawning and infant imitation. Bulletin Psychonomic Soc., 27:125-126, 1989.
  • Provine, R.R. Yawning: effects of stimulus interest. Bulletin Psychonomic Soc., 24:437-438, 1986.
  • Provine, R.R. Faces as releasers of contagious yawning: an approach to face detection using normal human subjects. Bulletin Psychonomic Soc., 27:211-214, 1989.
  • Provine, R.R. Yawning as a stereotyped action pattern and releasing stimulus. Ethology, 72:109-122, 1986.
  • Provine, R.R., Hamernik, H.B. and Curchack, B.B. Yawning: relation to sleeping and stretching in humans. Ethology, 76:152-160, 1987.
  • The neuropharmacology of yawning
  • Yawning: no effect of 3-5% CO 2 , 100% O 2 , and exercise
  • What Makes Us Yawn - from How Stuff Works
  • Gallup, A.C. and Gallup, G.G., Yawning as a brain cooling mechanism: Nasal breathing and forehead cooling diminish the incidence of contagious yawning, Evolutionary Psychology , 5:92-101, 2007.

Copyright © 1996-2012, Eric H. Chudler All Rights Reserved.

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Why Do I Yawn?

Everybody yawns — from unborn babies to the oldest great-grandparent. Animals do it, too. But why, exactly, do people and animals yawn? No one knows for sure. But there are many theories (ideas) about why people yawn. 

One is that when we are bored or tired, we just don't breathe as deeply as we usually do. As this theory goes, our bodies take in less oxygen because our breathing has slowed. Therefore, yawning helps us bring more oxygen into the blood and move more carbon dioxide out of the blood.

Yawning, then, would be an involuntary reflex (something we can't really control) to help us control our oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. Sounds good, but other studies have shown that breathing more oxygen does not decrease yawning. Likewise, breathing more carbon dioxide does not increase yawning. Hmmm. Now what?

Another theory is that yawning stretches the lungs and lung tissue. Stretching and yawning may be a way to flex muscles and joints, increase heart rate, and feel more awake.

Other people believe that yawning is a protective reflex to redistribute the oil-like substance called surfactant (say: sur-FAK-tint) that helps keep lungs lubricated inside and keeps them from collapsing. So, if we didn't yawn, according to this theory, taking a deep breath would become harder and harder — and that would not be good!

But there is one idea about yawning that everyone knows to be true. It seems contagious. If you yawn in class, you'll probably notice a few other people will start yawning, too. Even thinking about yawning can get you yawning. How many times have you yawned while reading this article? We hope not many!

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Images sourced by The Nemours Foundation and Getty Images.

Is It Normal To Yawn When I’m Working Out?

child yawns while doing homework

When it comes to exercising, especially high-intensity efforts, pushing yourself to the point of fatigue is how you build muscle and get stronger . So it’s little wonder that you may feel exhausted by the end of a weightlifting session , sprint intervals, or HIIT class.

But what about when you find yourself yawning during workouts? This is something that happens to me on occasion—once repeatedly in front of a coach who asked me if I was bored and needed to do more burpees….

In case you’re unfamiliar with what those are:

I'm not alone: Yawning during exercise is a common phenomenon—and it's most likely to happen during our most hardcore workouts. Seeing as high-intensity exercise offers about the same energetic boost as a cup of coffee , it’s unlikely that we’re yawning because we’re tired—or disinterested in what we’re doing. Likely, this reflex is being activated by something else entirely, according to science.

  • Chelsea Long, CSCS , Chelsea Long, MS, CSCS, TPI, is an exercise physiologist at the Hospital for Special Surgery.
  • Sharon Gam, PhD, CSCS , Orlando-based certified personal trainer and health coach

The physiological reason you may be yawning during workouts

“It’s a common misconception that yawning is about getting more oxygen,” explains Florida-based exercise physiologist Sharon Gam , PhD, CSCS. That myth is largely based on a 1987 study that’s since been debunked by further research, she says. Instead, while science doesn’t currently know exactly what causes yawning in general (it’s an involuntary reflex, after all), when it happens during a workout, yawning is likely your body’s way of trying to cool down.

“Yawning has been linked as a physiological response to higher brain temperatures ,” says Chelsea Long , CSCS, TPI, an exercise physiologist at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. “The moments before and after a yawn are thought to promote a better temperate climate in the brain.”

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Because HIIT and strength training both often recruit a lot of major muscle groups, your body tends to heat up quickly, Dr. Gam says. “You may yawn as a response to that rapid rise in temperature to stop from overheating.” 

Everybody has a different response to increases in body temperature and dissipates heat differently, Long says. “Some individuals are heavy sweaters, or they turn bright red or purple instead of sweating,” she adds. This could explain why not everyone yawns during workouts. If you do, however, both Long and Dr. Gam say it’s not necessarily something to worry about.

When yawning during workouts is cause for concern

“Yawning doesn’t seem to be correlated to a lack of safety or signify a big health concern,” Long says, “but taking note of how you’re feeling and what your breathing mechanics are could help stimulate a better brain cooling mechanism.”

If yawning seems to be a recurring thing and bothers you, she says, utilizing a forehead ice pack, wiping your sweat with towels, drinking cooler water, and being well-hydrated for a workout could help. Dr. Gam adds that if you experience excessive yawning, you should get it checked by a doctor just to be sure nothing else is going on you need to know about.

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Yawning During Your Workouts? Here's What Your Body Is Trying to Tell You

Woman lifting a dumbbell and yawning during her workout

Exercise is hard work and it can be tiring. But exercise can also help improve sleep and maintain more regular sleep patterns, Paul M. Gallo, EdD , a fellow at the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and director of exercise science and wellness at Norwalk Community College, tells LIVESTRONG.com

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"People who exercise sleep more consistently throughout the evenings," he says.

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A yawn, which is usually associated with being tired or bored, is an innate reflex by the central nervous system — namely, the brain. That means you can't control when and where you yawn, Gallo explains. So just because you yawn a couple of times during a workout, it doesn't mean you should try to make it stop.

But here's why you might find yourself yawning ‌ during ‌ a workout.

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Why You're So Tired After a Workout and What to Do About It

1. You're Stressed or Anxious

The idea that yawning increases the amount of oxygen you take in — you're gulping a big breath of air, right? — has been debunked, Gallo says, according to a November 1987 study published in ‌ Behavioral and Neural Biology ‌ . A yawn can, however, increase blood flow to the brain, which can improve focus and concentration, he says.

Perhaps you're about to start a workout or a big athletic event, or you're a few minutes into it, Gallo says, you might start yawning as a way to improve your focus and concentration. That's because yawning can cool your brain temperature, he explains.

"Before a workout, game or event, you might have anxiety and stress — but the good kind of stress — and that might elicit a yawn," Gallo says. "Your body's fight-or-flight response kicks in, and a yawn opens the jaw, which increases blood flow for the working muscles."

A runner, for example, might yawn in the moments leading up to a race due to anxiety. That yawning should stop once she's moving, Gallo says, because running is a steady-state exercise .

"When you're in a steady-state of aerobic exercise your brain knows you need to breathe consistently," he says.

A yawn, he points out, disrupts that consistent breathing. In other words, your body prioritizes breathing over increasing blood flow or cooling down your body temperature — another reason you might be yawning during a workout.

2. You're Too Hot

Perhaps the biggest reason you might yawn during a workout is to bring your core body temperature down, Gallo says. This is called thermoregulation.

"When you inhale a large amount of ambient air that's cooler than your body temperature, it helps lower your core temperature and brain temperature," he explains.

This happens because when you yawn, your jaw musculature contracts, increasing blood flow to those muscles. When you gulp in cool air, it cools the blood in the jaw muscles, which is then delivered to the brain and other parts of the body, Gallo explains.

This is a type of insensible perspiration — perspiration that does not involve a loss of pure water or associated loss of solute.

"A major way we cool is by breathing," Gallo says.

Case in point: Researchers in a May 2014 study in ‌ Physiology & Behavior ‌ recruited 120 pedestrians to walk during the winter (December to March) and summer (June to October) and found that the participants who walked in the summer reported more yawning than those in the winter. This study supports evidence that yawning is used as a means of thermoregulation.

But when the ambient temperature is hotter than your core temperature, yawning will subside, according to Gallo and a January 2013 review published in the ‌ International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research . ‌

Why Do I Sweat So Much During Exercise?

3. You're Doing High-Intensity Work

Whether you yawn during a workout depends on what you're actually doing, Gallo says. The exercises that most commonly cause yawning include high-intensity interval training (during the rest interval) and those that target large muscle groups, like heavy lifting for the lower body .

"You're using more musculature, which increases the core temperature," Gallo says.

Gallo explains that if you yawn during a HIIT workout, it will be during the rest or lighter workload interval.

"If you really feel that you must reduce your yawn frequency, you can try methods to better thermoregulate," Gallo says. "Methods that have worked are drinking cold water/liquids, doing an ice water mouth rinse (shown to be very effective for disease populations, such as multiple sclerosis), wearing moisture-wicking clothing and using appropriate ventilation to lower environmental temperatures."

When to See a Doctor

Because yawning is a reflex, there usually isn't any reason to try to stop it from happening, Gallo says. But if you're experiencing excessive yawning during a workout, it might indicate something more serious.

"If you're yawning excessively during moderate to vigorous activity, that yawning can lead to lightheadedness or dizziness," Gallo says. It could mean very low blood pressure or a hyperactive vagus nerve.

Low blood pressure is associated with a host of underlying medical conditions, according to the American Heart Association . Some of those include pregnancy, bed rest, medications, allergic reactions and problems with hormone-producing glands.

A hyperactive vagus nerve can be caused by extreme stress. The nerve works overtime to decrease heart rate and blood pressure, but in some cases, it brings down blood pressure too much, causing severe low blood pressure, according to an article from Society for Science and the Public .

"If you're yawning during exercise but not experiencing any negative side effects, don't worry too much," he says. "But if you're dizzy or lightheaded, that warrants a conversation with your doctor."

  • Behavioral and Neural Biology: "Yawning: No Effect of 3–5% CO2, 100% O2, and Exercise"
  • International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research: "Yawning and Its Physiological Significance"
  • Society for Science and the Public: "Explainer: What is the Vagus?"
  • American Heart Association: "Low Blood Pressure—When is Low Blood Pressure Too Low"
  • Physiology & Behavior: "A Thermal Window for Yawning in Humans: Yawning as a Brain Cooling Mechanism"

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  6. Schoolgirl Girl Yawns while Sitting at the Table Doing Homework at Home

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COMMENTS

  1. Doing Homework When You Have ADHD Is Painful

    School & Learning. Homework & Studying. The Homework System That Really Works. ADHD and homework mix like oil and water. All of the little details — from writing down assignments to remembering due dates — require intense focus and memory. With these routines, teachers and parents can replace after-school tantrums with higher grades.

  2. Yawning Causes & Treatment

    Yawning is a common but perplexing human function. Scientists have several theories for why we yawn, but none of them are certain. Common triggers of yawning include tiredness, boredom, waking up and stress. Seeing or hearing other people yawn can also cause you to yawn. Contents Overview Function Conditions and Disorders.

  3. Why Do I Yawn? (for Kids)

    No one knows for sure. But there are many theories (ideas) about why people yawn. One is that when we are bored or tired, we just don't breathe as deeply as we usually do. As this theory goes, our bodies take in less oxygen because our breathing has slowed. Therefore, yawning helps us bring more oxygen into the blood and move more carbon ...

  4. Kidshealth: Why Do I Yawn?

    But there are many theories (ideas) about why people yawn. One is that when we are bored or tired, we just don't breathe as deeply as we usually do. As this theory goes, our bodies take in less oxygen because our breathing has slowed. Therefore, yawning helps us bring more oxygen into the blood and move more carbon dioxide out of the blood.

  5. How to Help Your Child Study

    Regardless of a child's age or challenges, parents can encourage sound homework routines for a successful start to the school year. First, students should consider how to create organized work ...

  6. Why do I yawn so much and how can I stop?

    This is the more obvious reason, says a Marshfield Clinic sleep medicine and neurology specialist. "If it's 8 in the morning and you're yawning after being up for only a few hours, that's a sign of being tired," Boero said. He says consistent yawning can be a sign a person is extremely fatigued. "Most likely, if you are exhausted ...

  7. Why Do I Yawn?

    If you yawn in class, you'll probably notice a few other people will start yawning, too. Why is that? Refer a Patient; Careers; Giving. Donate Now Ways to Give; Get Involved; Request an Appointment; MyChart (opens in a new tab) Pay My Bill (phone number) 727-898-7451 ...

  8. Why Do We Yawn? Science Explains

    Pandiculation refers to the act of yawning and stretching. The average yawn lasts 6 to 8 seconds. Yawning may occur in unborn babies, but contagious yawning doesn't start until a child is about 4 years old. You can fake a yawn (and even fool others into contagious yawning), but natural yawns are an involuntary reflex.

  9. Why Do I Yawn? (for Kids)

    Everybody yawns — from unborn babies to the oldest great-grandparent. Animals do it, too. But why, exactly, do people and animals yawn? No one knows for sure. But there are many theories (ideas) about why people yawn. One is that when we are bored or tired, we just don't breathe as deeply as we usually do.

  10. My Child Yawns All The Time! Should I Be Worried?

    The reason your child is yawning all the time is likely because he/she is tired, overheated, or fatigued in some way. Another reason could be that he/she is experiencing anxiety. We will discuss these more later in this article. Meanwhile…. Get them plenty of rest, and if the problem persists, take your child to a doctor.

  11. Big Question: Why Do I Yawn When I'm Nervous or Stressed?

    Human fetuses begin yawning in the womb after about 20 weeks; dogs frequently yawn when asked to do things they find difficult (bath time, fella!); and there's a good chance you've yawned just ...

  12. Why Do We Yawn When We Exercise?

    The main reason we yawn consciously is to relieve pressure in our skulls, like when you try to 'pop your ears' on an airplane, so an increased rate of yawning can be a body's attempts to relieve intracranial hypertension (too much pressure on the brain), migraines, or even heart or kidney problems.

  13. yawning

    yawning. Yawning is usually an involuntary act associated with fatigue or boredom; mouth opens wide and a slow, deep breath is taken; purpose is unknown but might be body's response to raised levels of carbon dioxide in the blood, since the act increases oxygen level and decreases carbon dioxide level; sometimes accompanied by stretching of ...

  14. Dyslexia and Fatigue

    As a result of this effort, the child may become tired and start yawning. This does not mean that the child is lazy, not paying attention, or lacking in focus; rather, it simply means that reading and spelling are still tiring activities for them. Additionally, this yawning should not be taken as an indicator of the student being bored.

  15. Child Yawn Videos and HD Footage

    Browse 675 child yawn videos and clips available to use in your projects, or search for tired child yawn to find more footage and b-roll video clips. 00:07. CU of young girl yawning as she works on her online homework. 00:24. SLO MO Sleepy girl doing homework.

  16. Whenever i try to study, i yawn a lot and eventually feel tired

    For me I'm taking online classes over the summer with a full time job including sever ADD. To give you an example of how I plan and create a schedule i'll share mine. -Wake up at the same time everyday (mon-fri) at 5:55am. -Workout, eat, take meds, shower, leave to work. -Get home at 6:30pm and relax for 30 min-hour.

  17. What's a Yawn? (for Kids)

    Yawn. Yawning is when you stretch your mouth open wide. No one really knows why we do it, but it seems to be contagious. If you yawn in class, you'll probably notice a few other people will start yawning too. Even thinking about yawning can get you yawning. Even though we yawn when we're tired or bored, we hope you didn't yawn while reading ...

  18. Neuroscience For Kids

    With your pencil and paper, keep track of the number of times you yawn while you are reading this page. I hope reading this page is not boring, but you may find that just thinking and reading about yawning makes you yawn. ... Neuroscience for Kids; Provine, R.R. Contagious yawning and infant imitation. Bulletin Psychonomic Soc., 27:125-126, 1989.

  19. Why Do I Yawn? (for Kids)

    Everybody yawns — from unborn babies to the oldest great-grandparent. Animals do it, too. But why, exactly, do people and animals yawn? No one knows for sure. But there are many theories (ideas) about why people yawn. One is that when we are bored or tired, we just don't breathe as deeply as we usually do.

  20. Yawning During Workouts Happens for This Reason

    The physiological reason you may be yawning during workouts. "It's a common misconception that yawning is about getting more oxygen," explains Florida-based exercise physiologist Sharon Gam ...

  21. 623 Kid Studying Yawning Images, Stock Photos & Vectors

    Asian father is yawning and bored while teaching a little daughter to do homework for homeschooling, concept of role of parenting to support the child for home learning. Young calm male kid school boy 5-6 years old wear t-shirt backpack yawn sleepy sit near books isolated on green wall chalk blackboard background.

  22. Yawning While Working Out? Here's Why and What to Do About It

    That's because yawning can cool your brain temperature, he explains. "Before a workout, game or event, you might have anxiety and stress — but the good kind of stress — and that might elicit a yawn," Gallo says. "Your body's fight-or-flight response kicks in, and a yawn opens the jaw, which increases blood flow for the working muscles."