Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs) (amended up to 11 December 2017), Netherlands (Kingdom of the)

Available materials.

www.boip.int

Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs)1

1 As amended by the Protocol of 11-12-2017 (into force: 01-03-2019). The official text of the BCIP is in French and Dutch. This English translation is provided by BOIP for information purposes. BOIP is not responsible for typing or translation errors.

The Kingdom of Belgium,

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg,

The Kingdom of the Netherlands,

Inspired by the desire to:

• replace the conventions, uniform laws and amending protocols relating to Benelux trademarks and designs with a single convention systematically and transparently governing both trademark law and design law;

• provide quick and effective procedures that will allow Benelux regulations to be brought into line with Community regulations and international treaties already ratified by the three High Contracting Parties;

• replace the Benelux Trademark Office and the Benelux Designs Office with the Benelux Organization for Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs) carrying out its mission through decision-making and executive bodies provided with their own and additional powers;

• provide the new Organization with a structure consistent with current views on international organizations and guaranteeing its independence, in particular through a protocol on privileges and immunities;

• bring the new Organization closer to undertakings by fully developing its powers to enable it to undertake new tasks in the field of intellectual property and open decentralized branches;

• provide the new Organization, non-exclusively, with a right of evaluation and initiative in respect of the adaptation of Benelux legislation on trademarks and designs;

Have resolved to enter into a convention for the said purpose and have designated to that end as their Plenipotentiaries:

His Excellency Mr. K. de Gucht, Minister for Foreign Affairs,

His Excellency Mr. B. R. Bot, Minister for Foreign Affairs,

His Excellency Mr. J. Asselborn, Minister for Foreign Affairs,

who, upon production of their full credentials found to be in due and proper form, have agreed upon the following provisions:

1Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

TITLE I: GENERAL AND INSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS

Article 1.1 Abbreviated expressions

The following meanings shall apply for the purposes of this convention:

• Paris Convention: the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property of March 20, 1883; • Madrid Agreement: the Madrid Agreement concerning the International Registration of Marks of April 14, 1891; • Madrid Protocol: the Protocol relating to the Madrid Agreement concerning the International Registration of Marks of June 27, 1989; • Nice Agreement: the Nice Agreement concerning the International Classification of Goods and Services for the Purposes of the

Registration of Marks of June 15, 1957; • Hague Agreement: the Hague Agreement concerning the International Deposit of Industrial Designs of November 6, 1925; • European Union trade mark regulation: Regulation (EU) 2017/1001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 June 2017

on the European Union trade mark (codification); • EU trademark: a European Union trade mark, as provided for in the European Union trade mark regulation; • Union legislation: legislation of the European Union; • Community Design Regulation: Council Regulation (EC) No 6/2002 of 12 December 2001 on Community designs; • TRIPS Agreement: the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights of April 15, 1994; Annex 1C of the

Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization; • International Bureau: the International Bureau of Intellectual Property established by the Convention Establishing the World

Intellectual Property Organization of July 14, 1967.

Article 1.2 Organization

1. A Benelux Organization for Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs), hereinafter referred to as “the Organization”, shall be established.

2. The executive bodies of the Organization shall be: a. the Committee of Ministers referred to in the Treaty establishing the Benelux Union, hereinafter referred to

as “the Committee of Ministers”; b. the Executive Board of the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs), hereinafter referred to

as “the Executive Board”; c. the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs), hereinafter referred to as “the Office”.

Article 1.3 Objectives

The Organization shall be responsible for:

a. the execution of this convention and the implementing regulations; b. promoting the protection of trademarks and designs in the Benelux countries; c. performing additional tasks in other fields of intellectual property law as decided by the Executive Board; d. continually evaluating and, if necessary, adapting Benelux legislation on trademarks and designs in the light of international,

Community and other developments.

2 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 1.4 Legal personality

1. The Organization shall have international legal personality with a view to performance of the mission entrusted to it. 2. The Organization shall have national legal personality and shall therefore have, on the territory of the three Benelux countries,

the legal powers recognized for national corporate bodies, insofar as is necessary for the accomplishment of its tasks and the fulfillment of its objectives, in particular the ability to enter into contracts, to acquire and dispose of movable and immovable assets, to receive and dispose of private and public funds and to be a party in court proceedings.

3. The Director General of the Office, hereinafter referred to as “the Director General”, shall represent the Organization in matters in and out of court.

Article 1.5 Headquarters

1. The Organization shall have its headquarters in The Hague. 2. The Office shall be located in The Hague. 3. Branches of the Office may be established elsewhere.

Article 1.6 Privileges and immunities

1. The privileges and immunities necessary for the accomplishment of the Organization’s tasks and the fulfilment of its objectives shall be laid down in a protocol to be concluded between the High Contracting Parties.

2. The Organization may conclude supplementary agreements with one or more of the High Contracting Parties relating to the establishment of services of the Organization on the territory of that State or those States, with a view to implementing the provisions of the protocol adopted in accordance with the first paragraph in respect of that State or those States, as well as other arrangements in order to ensure the proper functioning of the Organization and the safeguarding of its interests.

Article 1.7 Powers of the Committee of Ministers

1. The Committee of Ministers shall have the power to make such amendments to this convention as are necessary to ensure that this convention complies with an international treaty or with European Union regulations on trademarks and designs. Amendments shall be published in the official journal of each of the High Contracting Parties.

2. The Committee of Ministers shall have the power to make amendments to this convention other than those mentioned in the first paragraph. These amendments shall be submitted to the High Contracting Parties for consent or approval.

3. The Committee of Ministers shall have the power, following consultation with the Executive Board, to provide the Director General with a mandate to negotiate on behalf of the Organization and, with its authorization, to conclude agreements with States and intergovernmental organizations.

Article 1.8 Composition and functioning of the Executive Board

1. The Executive Board shall comprise of members appointed by the High Contracting Parties, on the basis of one full board member and two deputy board members per country.

2. It shall take its decisions by unanimous vote. 3. It shall adopt its own rules of procedure.

3Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 1.9 Powers of the Executive Board

1. The Executive Board shall have the power to make proposals to the Committee of Ministers relating to amendments to this convention, which are necessary in order to ensure that this convention complies with an international treaty or European Union regulations, and relating to other amendments to this convention which it considers desirable.

2. It shall establish the implementing regulations. 3. It shall establish the rules of procedure and financial regulations of the Office. 4. It shall designate additional tasks, as referred to in Article 1.3 (c), in other fields of intellectual property law. 5. It shall decide on the establishment of branches of the Office. 6. It shall appoint the Director General and, following consultation with the Director General, the deputy Directors General,

and shall exercise disciplinary powers in respect of such officials. 7. It shall adopt the annual income and expenditure budget, as well as any modifications or additions thereto, and shall specify

in the financial regulations the manner in which the budgets and implementation thereof shall be supervised. It shall approve the annual accounts drawn up by the Director General.

Article 1.10 The Director General

1. Management of the Office shall be the responsibility of the Director General who shall answer to the Executive Board with regard to the Office’s activities.

2. The Director General shall have the power, following consultation with the Executive Board, to delegate exercise of some of the powers entrusted to him to the Deputy Directors General.

3. The Director General and the Deputy Directors General shall be nationals of the Member States. The three nationalities shall be represented in the management.

Article 1.11 Powers of the Director General

1. The Director General shall make proposals to the Executive Board with a view to amending the implementing regulations. 2. He shall take all steps, including administrative steps, to ensure that the tasks of the Office are properly performed. 3. He shall execute the rules of procedure and financial regulations of the Office and shall make proposals to the Executive Board

with a view to amending those regulations. 4. He shall appoint agents and exercise hierarchical authority and disciplinary powers with respect to them. 5. He shall prepare and execute the budget and draw up the annual accounts. 6. He shall take all other steps that he considers to be appropriate in the interests of the functioning of the Office.

Article 1.12 Finances of the Organization

1. The operating costs of the Organization shall be covered by its income. 2. The Executive Board may request a contribution from the High Contracting Parties to cover extraordinary expenditure.

Half of this contribution shall be borne by the Kingdom of the Netherlands and half by the Belgium-Luxembourg Economic Union.

Article 1.13 Involvement of national administrations

1. A percentage of the fees collected in respect of operations performed through the national administrations shall be distributed to the said administrations to cover the cost of such operations; this percentage shall be fixed by the implementing regulations.

2. No national fees relating to these operations may be levied by national regulations.

4 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 1.14 Acceptance of court decisions

The authority of court decisions handed down in one of the three States pursuant to this convention shall be recognized in the other two States and court ordered cancellation shall be carried out by the Office at the request of the most diligent party, if: a. in accordance with the legislation of the country in which the decision was handed down, the extract of the order resulting from it

meets the conditions regarding its authenticity; b. the decision is no longer open to opposition or appeal or to reversal by a court of cassation.

Article 1.15 Benelux Court of Justice

The Benelux Court of Justice as mentioned in Article 1 of the Treaty concerning the establishment and status of a Benelux Court of Justice shall have the power to hear questions concerning the interpretation of this convention and the implementing regulations, with the exception of questions of interpretation relating to the protocol on privileges and immunities mentioned in Article 1.6 (1).

Article 1.15bis Appeal

1. Any person who is a party to a procedure that has led to a final decision by the Office in the execution of its official taks pursuant to Titles II, III and IV of this Convention may lodge an appeal against that decision with the Benelux Court of Justice in order to have that decision annulled or reviewed. The timeframe for filing an appeal is two months from notification of the final decision.

2. The Organisation may be represented in proceedings before the Benelux Court of Justice relating to decisions made by the Office by a member of staff appointed for this purpose.

Article 1.16 Scope of application

Application of this convention shall be restricted to the territories of the Kingdom of Belgium, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Europe, hereinafter referred to as “Benelux territory”.

5Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

TITLE II: TRADEMARKS

Chapter 1. Validity of a trademark

Article 2.1 Signs that may constitute a trademark

A trademark may consist of any signs, in particular words, including personal names, or designs, letters, numerals, colours, the shape of goods or of the packaging of goods, or sounds, provided that such signs are capable of: a. distinguishing the goods or services of one undertaking from those of other undertakings; and b. being represented on the register in a manner which enables the competent authorities and the public to determine

the clear and precise subject matter of the protection afforded to its proprietor.

Article 2.2 Acquisition of the right

Without prejudice to the right of priority provided for by the Paris Convention or the TRIPS Agreement, the exclusive right in a trademark under this convention shall be acquired by registration of the trademark that has been filed in Benelux territory (Benelux trademark) or results from registration with the International Bureau designating the Benelux territory (international trademark).

Article 2.2bis Absolute grounds for refusal or invalidity

1. The following shall not be registered or, if registered, shall be liable to be declared invalid: a. signs which cannot constitute a trademark; b. trademarks which are devoid of any distinctive character; c. trademarks which consist exclusively of signs or indications which may serve, in trade, to designate the kind, quality, quantity,

intended purpose, value, geographical origin, or the time of production of the goods or of rendering of the service, or other characteristics of the goods or services;

d. trademarks which consist exclusively of signs or indications which have become customary in the current language or in the bona fide and established practices of the trade;

e. signs which consist exclusively of: i. the shape, or another characteristic, which results from the nature of the goods themselves; ii. the shape, or another characteristic, of goods which is necessary to obtain a technical result; iii. the shape, or another characteristic, which gives substantial value to the goods;

f. trademarks which are contrary to public policy or to accepted principles of morality; g. trademarks which are of such a nature as to deceive the public, for instance, as to the nature, quality or geographical origin

of the goods or service; h. trademarks which have not been authorised by the competent authorities and are to be refused or invalidated pursuant

to Article 6ter of the Paris Convention; i. trademarks which are excluded from registration pursuant to Union legislation or the internal law of one of the Benelux

countries, or to international agreements to which the European Union is party or which have effect in a Benelux country, providing for protection of designations of origin and geographical indications;

j. trademarks which are excluded from registration pursuant to Union legislation or international agreements to which the European Union is party, providing for protection of traditional terms for wine;

k. trademarks which are excluded from registration pursuant to Union legislation or international agreements to which the European Union is party, providing for protection of traditional specialities guaranteed;

6 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

l. trademarks which consist of, or reproduce in their essential elements, an earlier plant variety denomination registered in accordance with Union legislation or the internal law of one of the Benelux countries, or international agreements to which the European Union is party or which have effect in a Benelux country, providing protection for plant variety rights, and which are in respect of plant varieties of the same or closely related species.

2. A trademark shall be liable to be declared invalid where the application for registration of the trademark was made in bad faith by the applicant.

3. A trademark shall not be refused registration in accordance with paragraph 1 (b), (c) or (d) if, before the date of application for registration, following the use which has been made of it, it has acquired a distinctive character. A trademark shall not be declared invalid for the same reasons if, before the date of application for a declaration of invalidity, following the use which has been made of it, it has acquired a distinctive character.

Article 2.2ter Relative grounds for refusal or invalidity

1. A trademark shall, in case an opposition is filed, not be registered or, if registered, shall be liable to be declared invalid where: a. it is identical with an earlier trademark, and the goods or services for which the trademark is applied for or is registered

are identical with the goods or services for which the earlier trademark is protected; b. because of its identity with, or similarity to, the earlier trademark and the identity or similarity of the goods or services

covered by the trademarks, there exists a likelihood of confusion on the part of the public; the likelihood of confusion includes the likelihood of association with the earlier trademark.

2. ‘Earlier trademarks’ within the meaning of paragraph 1 means: a. trademarks of the following kinds with a date of application for registration which is earlier than the date of application

for registration of the trademark, taking account, where appropriate, of the priorities claimed in respect of those trademarks: i. Benelux trademarks and international trademarks designating the Benelux territory; ii. EU trademarks, including international trademarks designating the European Union;

b. EU trademarks which validly claim seniority, in accordance with European Union trade mark regulation, of a trademark referred to under (a) (i), even when the latter trademark has been surrendered or allowed to lapse;

c. applications for the trademarks referred to under (a) and (b), subject to their registration; d. trademarks which, on the date of application for registration of the trademark, or, where appropriate, of the priority claimed

in respect of the application for registration of the trademark, are well known in the Benelux territory, in the sense in which the words ‘well-known’ are used in Article 6bis of the Paris Convention.

3. Furthermore, a trademark shall, in case an opposition is filed, not be registered or, if registered, shall be liable to be declared invalid where: a. it is identical with, or similar to, an earlier trademark irrespective of whether the goods or services for which it is applied

or registered are identical with, similar to or not similar to those for which the earlier trademark is registered, where the earlier trademark has a reputation in the Benelux territory or, in the case of an EU trademark, has a reputation in the European Union and the use of the later trademark without due cause would take unfair advantage of, or be detrimental to, the distinctive character or the repute of the earlier trademark;

b. an agent or representative of the proprietor of the trademark applies for registration thereof in his own name without the proprietor’s authorisation, unless the agent or representative justifies his action;

c. and to the extent that, pursuant to Union legislation or the internal law of one of the Benelux countries providing for protection of designations of origin and geographical indications: i. an application for a designation of origin or a geographical indication had already been submitted in accordance with

Union legislation or the internal law of one of the Benelux countries prior to the date of application for registration of the trademark or the date of the priority claimed for the application, subject to its subsequent registration;

ii. that designation of origin or geographical indication confers on the person authorised under the relevant law to exercise the rights arising therefrom the right to prohibit the use of a subsequent trademark.

4. A trademark may not be refused registration or declared invalid where the proprietor of the earlier trademark or other earlier right consents to the registration of the later trademark.

7Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.2quater Grounds for refusal or invalidity relating to only some of the goods or services

Where grounds for refusal of registration or for invalidity of a trademark exist in respect of only some of the goods or services for which that trademark has been applied or registered, refusal of registration or invalidity shall cover those goods or services only.

Article 2.3

Article 2.4

Chapter 2. Filing, registration and renewal

Article 2.5 Filing

1. A Benelux trademark shall be filed, either with the national administrations or with the Office, in the manner specified by the implementing regulations and against payment of the fees due. A check shall be made to ensure that the documents produced satisfy the conditions specified for fixing the filing date and the filing date shall be fixed. The applicant shall be informed, without delay and in writing, of the date of filing or, where applicable, of the grounds for not fixing a filing date.

2. If other provisions of the implementing regulations are not satisfied at the time of filing, the applicant shall be informed without delay and in writing of the conditions which are not fulfilled and shall be given the opportunity to respond.

3. The application shall have no further effect if the provisions of the implementing regulations are not satisfied within the period granted.

4. Where filing takes place with a national administration, the national administration shall forward the application to the Office, either without delay after receiving the application or after establishing that the application satisfies the specified conditions.

5. The Office shall publish the application, in accordance with the provisions of the implementing regulations, when the conditions for fixing a filing date have been fulfilled and the goods or services mentioned have been classified in accordance with Article 2.5bis.

Article 2.5bis Designation and classification of goods and services

1. The goods and services in respect of which trademark registration is applied for shall be classified in conformity with the system of classification established by the Nice Agreement (‘the Nice Classification’).

2. The goods and services for which protection is sought shall be identified by the applicant with sufficient clarity and precision to enable the competent authorities and economic operators, on that sole basis, to determine the extent of the protection sought.

3. For the purposes of paragraph 2, the general indications included in the class headings of the Nice Classification or other general terms may be used, provided that they comply with the requisite standards of clarity and precision set out in this Article.

4. The Office shall reject an application in respect of indications or terms which are unclear or imprecise, where the applicant does not suggest an acceptable wording within a period set by the Office to that effect.

5. The use of general terms, including the general indications of the class headings of the Nice Classification, shall be interpreted as including all the goods or services clearly covered by the literal meaning of the indication or term. The use of such terms or indications shall not be interpreted as comprising a claim to goods or services which cannot be so understood.

8 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

6. Where the applicant requests registration for more than one class, the applicant shall group the goods and services according to the classes of the Nice Classification, each group being preceded by the number of the class to which that group of goods or services belongs, and shall present them in the order of the classes.

7. Goods and services shall not be regarded as being similar to each other on the ground that they appear in the same class under the Nice Classification. Goods and services shall not be regarded as being dissimilar from each other on the ground that they appear in different classes under the Nice Classification.

Article 2.6 Claiming priority

1. A right of priority provided for by the Paris Convention or the TRIPS Agreement shall be claimed at the time of filing. 2. The right of priority referred to in Article 4 of the Paris Convention shall also apply to service marks. 3. A right of priority may also be claimed in the month following filing, by means of a special declaration submitted to the Office

in the manner laid down by the implementing regulations and against payment of the fees due. 4. If no such claim is made, the right of priority shall lapse.

Article 2.7 Search

1. The Office may offer a search for prior registrations as a service. 2. The Director General will determine the modalities thereof.

Article 2.8 Registration

1. Without prejudice to the application of Articles 2.11, 2.14 and 2.16, the filed trademark is registered for the goods or services indicated by the applicant if the requirements set out in the implementing regulations are met. The Office shall confirm the registration to the proprietor of the trademark.

2. If all the requirements referred to in Article 2.5 have been met, the applicant may request the Office to proceed with the registration of the trademark without delay in accordance with the provisions of the implementing regulations. Articles 2.11, 2.14 and 2.16 apply to trademarks registered in this manner, on the understanding that the Office is authorised to decide to cancel the registration.

Article 2.9 Term and renewal of registration

1. Registration of a Benelux trademark shall be for a period of 10 years, with effect from the date of filing. 2. The sign constituting the trademark may not be modified either during the period of registration or at the time of its renewal. 3. The registration may be renewed for further periods of 10 years by the proprietor of the trademark or any person authorised

to do so by law or by contract. 4. Renewal will take place upon payment of the renewal fees. Where the fees are paid in respect of only some of the goods or services

for which the trademark is registered, registration shall be renewed for those goods or services only. The fees should be paid within a period of six months immediately preceding the expiry of the registration or of the subsequent renewal thereof. Failing that, the fees can be paid within a further period of six months immediately following the expiry of the registration or of the subsequent renewal thereof, if an additional fee is paid simultaneously.

5. Six months prior to the expiry of a registration, the Office shall send a reminder of the expiry date to the proprietor of the trademark.

9Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

6. For this reminder, the Office uses the latest contact details of the proprietor of the trademark known to the Office. Failure to send or receive such reminder shall not constitute dispensation from the obligations resulting from paragraphs 3 and 4. It may not be invoked in court proceedings or against the Office.

7. Renewal shall take effect from the day following the date on which the existing registration expires. The Office shall record the renewal in the register.

Article 2.10 International filing

1. International filing of trademarks shall take place in accordance with the provisions of the Madrid Agreement and the Madrid Protocol. The fee provided for by Article 8 (1) of the Madrid Agreement and the Madrid Protocol, and the fee provided for by Article 8 (7) (a) of the Madrid Protocol, shall be specified by the implementing regulations.

2. Without prejudice to the application of Articles 2.15bis, 2.13 and 2.18, the Office shall register international filings in respect of which application has been made for the extension of protection to Benelux territory.

3. The applicant may request the Office, in accordance with the provisions of the implementing regulations, to proceed with registration without delay. Article 2.8 (2), applies to trademarks registered in this manner.

Chapter 3. Examination on absolute grounds

Article 2.11 Refusal on absolute grounds

1. The Office shall refuse to register a trademark if, in its opinion, one of the absolute grounds referred to in Article 2.2bis (1) applies. 2. Refusal to register a trademark must relate to the sign that constitutes a trademark as a whole. 3. The Office shall notify the applicant without delay, in writing and stating reasons, of its intention to wholly or partially refuse

registration and shall allow the applicant to respond to such notification within a period laid down in the implementing regulations. 4. If the Office’s objections to the registration are not resolved within such period, the registration of the trademark shall be wholly

or partially refused. The Office shall notify the applicant of its refusal without delay, in writing, stating the grounds for refusal and mentioning the legal remedies against this decision as provided by Article 1.15bis.

5. The refusal shall not become final until such time as the decision is no longer subject to appeal.

Article 2.12

Article 2.13 Refusal of international filings on absolute grounds

1. Article 2.11 (1) and (2) shall apply to international filings. 2. The Office shall inform the International Bureau as soon as possible of its intention to refuse registration, in writing and

stating reasons, by means of a provisional total or partial refusal of protection for the trademark, at the same time allowing the applicant the opportunity to respond to said notice in accordance with the provisions of the implementing regulations. Article 2.11 (4) and (5) shall apply.

3. Repealed 4. Repealed

10 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Chapter 4. Opposition

Article 2.14 Initiation of the procedure

1. Within two months following publication of the application, an opposition may be filed in writing at the Office on the relative grounds referred to in Article 2.2ter.

2. Opposition may be filed: a. in the cases referred to in Article 2.2ter (1) and (3) (a), by the proprietors of earlier trademarks and the licensees authorised

by those proprietors; b. in the case referred to in Article 2.2ter (3) (b), by the proprietors of trademarks referred to therein. In this case,

the assignment referred to in Article 2.20ter (1) (b), may also be requested; c. in the case referred to in Article 2.2ter (3) (c), by persons authorised, under the applicable law, to exercise these rights.

3. Opposition may be filed on the basis of one or more earlier rights and on the basis of part or the totality of the goods or services in respect of which the earlier right is protected or applied for, and may be directed against part or the totality of the goods or services in respect of which the contested mark is applied for.

4. An opposition shall not be deemed to have been entered until the fees due have been paid.

Article 2.15

Article 2.16 Course of the proceedings

1. The Office shall deal with an opposition within a reasonable timeframe in accordance with the provisions laid down in the implementing regulations and shall respect the principle that both sides should be heard.

2. The opposition proceedings shall be suspended: a. where the opposition is based on Article 2.14 (2) (a), if the earlier mark:

i. has not yet been registered; ii. was registered without delay in accordance with Article 2.8 (2) and is the subject of proceedings for refusal

on absolute grounds or opposition; iii. is the subject of an action for invalidation or revocation;

b. where the opposition is based on Article 2.14 (2) (c), when it is based on an application for a designation of origin or geographical indication, until a final decision has been taken on it;

c. if the opposed trademark: i. is the subject of proceedings for refusal on absolute grounds; ii. was registered without delay in accordance with Article 2.8 (2) and is the subject of a judicial action for invalidation

or revocation; d. at the joint request of the parties; e. if other circumstances justify such a suspension.

11Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

3. The opposition proceedings shall be closed: a. where the opponent has lost the capacity to act; b. where the defendant does not react to the opposition lodged. In this case the application shall come without effect; c. where the opposition has become without cause, either because it has been withdrawn or because the application

against which the opposition is directed has come to be without effect; d. where the earlier trademark or earlier right is no longer valid; e. if the opposition is based on Article 2.14 (2) (a), and the opponent has not produced within the prescribed period proof of

use of his earlier trademark as referred to in Article 2.16bis; In such circumstances, part of the fees paid shall be refunded.

4. After examination of the opposition is completed, the Office shall reach a decision as soon as possible. If the opposition is held to be justified, the Office shall refuse to register the trademark in whole or in part or shall decide to record in the Register the transfer referred to in Article 2.20ter (1) (b). Otherwise, the opposition shall be rejected. The Office shall inform the parties in writing and without delay, and will mention the right of appeal against this decision contained in Article 1.15bis. The decision of the Office will become final only once it is no longer subject to appeal. The Office will not be a party to any appeal against its decision.

5. Costs shall be borne by the losing party. They shall be fixed in accordance with the provisions of the implementing regulations. Costs shall not be due if the opposition is partly successful. The Office’s decision concerning costs shall constitute an enforceable order. Its forced execution shall be governed by the rules in force in the State where it takes place.

Article 2.16bis Non-use as defence in opposition proceedings

1. Where in opposition proceedings pursuant to Article 2.14 (2) (a), at the filing or priority date of the later trademark, the five-year period within which the earlier trademark must have been put to genuine use as provided for in Article 2.23bis had expired, at the request of the applicant, the opponent shall furnish proof that the earlier trademark has been put to genuine use as provided for in Article 2.23bis during the five-year period preceding the filing or priority date of the later trademark, or that proper reasons for non-use existed.

2. If the earlier trademark has been used in relation to only part of the goods or services for which it is registered, it shall, for the purpose of the examination of the opposition as provided for in paragraph 1, be deemed to be registered in respect of that part of the goods or services only.

3. Paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article shall also apply where the earlier trademark is an EU trademark. In such a case, the genuine use shall be determined in accordance with Article 18 of the European Union trade mark regulation.

Article 2.17

Article 2.18 Opposition to international filings

1. During a period of two months to be calculated from publication by the International Bureau, an opposition may be submitted with the Office against an international filing for which protection in Benelux territory has been requested. Articles 2.14 to 2.16bis apply accordingly.

2. The Office shall inform the International Bureau of the submitted opposition without delay and in writing, mentioning the provisions of Articles 2.14 to 2.16bis and the relevant provisions of the implementing regulations.

3. Repealed

12 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Chapter 5. Rights of the proprietor

Article 2.19 Obligation to register

1. With the exception of the holder of a trademark which is well known within the meaning of Article 6bis of the Paris Convention, and regardless of the nature of the action brought, no one may claim in court protection for a sign deemed to be a trademark as defined in Article 2.1, unless that claimant can provide evidence of registration of the trademark which it has filed.

2. If appropriate, non-admissibility may be raised ex officio by the court. 3. The provisions of this title shall not in any way detract from the right of the users of a sign which is not regarded as a trademark

within the meaning of Article 2.1, to invoke ordinary law insofar as this allows an objection to be raised to unlawful use of that sign.

Article 2.20 Rights conferred by a trademark

1. The registration of a trademark referred to in Article 2.2 shall confer on the proprietor exclusive rights therein. 2. Without prejudice to the rights of proprietors acquired before the filing date or the priority date of the registered trademark,

and without prejudice to the possible application of ordinary law in matters of civil liability, the proprietor of that registered trademark shall be entitled to prevent all third parties not having his consent from using any sign where such sign: a. is identical with the trademark and is used in the course of trade in relation to goods or services which are identical

with those for which the trademark is registered; b. is identical with, or similar to, the trademark and is used in the course of trade in relation to goods or services which

are identical with, or similar to, the goods or services for which the trademark is registered, if there exists a likelihood of confusion on the part of the public; the likelihood of confusion includes the likelihood of association between the sign and the trademark;

c. is identical with, or similar to, the trademark irrespective of whether it is used in relation to goods or services which are identical with, similar to, or not similar to, those for which the trademark is registered, where the latter has a reputation in the Benelux territory and where use in the course of trade of that sign without due cause takes unfair advantage of, or is detrimental to, the distinctive character or the repute of the trademark;

d. is used for purposes other than those of distinguishing goods or services, where use of the sign without due cause, would take unfair advantage of or be detrimental to the distinctive character or the repute of the trademark.

3. The following, in particular, may be prohibited under paragraph 2 (a) to (c): a. affixing the sign to the goods or to the packaging thereof; b. offering the goods or putting them on the market, or stocking them for those purposes, under the sign, or offering

or supplying services thereunder; c. importing or exporting the goods under the sign; d. using the sign as a trade or company name or part of a trade or company name; e. using the sign on business papers and in advertising; f. using the sign in comparative advertising in a manner that is contrary to Directive 2006/114/EC of the European Parliament

and of the Council of 12 December 2006 concerning misleading and comparative advertising. 4. Without prejudice to the rights of proprietors acquired before the filing date or the priority date of the registered trademark, the

proprietor of that registered trademark shall also be entitled to prevent all third parties from bringing goods, in the course of trade, into the Benelux territory, without being released for free circulation there, where such goods, including the packaging thereof, come from third countries and bear without authorisation a trademark which is identical with the trademark registered in respect of such goods, or which cannot be distinguished in its essential aspects from that trademark. The entitlement of the trademark proprietor pursuant to the first subparagraph shall lapse if, during the proceedings to determine whether the registered trademark has been infringed, initiated in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 608/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 June 2013 concerning customs enforcement of intellectual property rights and repealing Council Regulation (EC) No 1383/2003, evidence is provided by the declarant or the holder of the goods that the proprietor of the registered trademark is not entitled to prohibit the placing of the goods on the market in the country of final destination.

13Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

5. Where the risk exists that the packaging, labels, tags, security or authenticity features or devices, or any other means to which the trademark is affixed, could be used in relation to goods or services and that use would constitute an infringement of the rights of the proprietor of a trademark under paragraph 2 and 3, the proprietor of thattrademark shall have the right to prohibit the following acts if carried out in the course of trade: a. affixing a sign identical with, or similar to, the trademark on packaging, labels, tags, security or authenticity features or devices,

or any other means to which the mark may be affixed; b. offering or placing on the market, or stocking for those purposes, or importing or exporting, packaging, labels, tags,

security or authenticity features or devices, or any other means to which the mark is affixed. 6. The exclusive right to a trademark expressed in one of the national or regional languages of the Benelux territory extends

automatically to its translation into another of those languages. Evaluation of the similarity arising from translations into one or more languages foreign to the aforesaid territory shall be a matter for the courts.

Article 2.20bis Reproduction of trademarks in dictionaries

If the reproduction of a trademark in a dictionary, encyclopaedia or similar reference work, in print or electronic form, gives the impression that it constitutes the generic name of the goods or services for which the trademark is registered, the publisher of the work shall, at the request of the proprietor of the trademark, ensure that the reproduction of the trademark is, without delay, and in the case of works in printed form at the latest in the next edition of the publication, accompanied by an indication that it is a registered trademark.

Article 2.20ter Prohibition of the use of a trademark registered in the name of an agent or representative

1. Where a trademark is registered in the name of the agent or representative of a person who is the proprietor of that trademark, without the proprietor’s consent, the latter shall be entitled to do either or both of the following: a. oppose the use of the trademark by his agent or representative; b. demand the assignment of the trademark in his favour.

2. Paragraph 1 shall not apply where the agent or representative justifies his action.

Article 2.21 Compensation for damages and other actions

1. Subject to the same conditions as in Article 2.20 (2), the exclusive right in a trademark shall allow its proprietor to claim compensation for any prejudice which he has suffered following use within the meaning of that provision.

2. The court which sets the damages: a. shall take into account all appropriate aspects, such as the negative economic consequences, including lost profits, which

the injured party has suffered, any unfair profits made by the infringer and, in appropriate cases, elements other than economic factors, such as the moral prejudice caused to the proprietor of the trademark as a result of the infringement; or

b. as an alternative to (a), it may, in appropriate cases, set the damages as a lump sum on the basis of elements such as at least the amount of royalties or fees which would have been due if the infringer had requested authorization to use the trademark.

3. Furthermore, the court may order, at the request of the proprietor of a trademark and by way of compensation, that ownership of goods which infringe a trademark right, as well as, in appropriate cases, the materials and implements principally used in the manufacture of those goods, be transferred to the proprietor of the trademark; the court may order that the transfer shall only take place upon payment by the claimant of a sum which it shall fix.

4. In addition to or instead of the action for compensation, the proprietor of a trademark may institute proceedings for transfer of the profits made following the use referred to in Article 2.20 (2), and for the provision of accounts in this regard. The court shall reject the application if it considers that this use is not in bad faith or the circumstances of the case do not justify such an order.

5. The proprietor of a trademark may institute proceedings for compensation or transfer of profits in the name of the licensee, without prejudice to the right granted to the licensee in Article 2.32 (5) and (6).

14 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

6. The proprietor of a trademark may require reasonable compensation from a party which has carried out acts such as those mentioned in Article 2.20 (2) during the period between the date of publication of the filing and the date of registration of the trademark, insofar as the proprietor of the trademark has acquired exclusive rights in this regard.

Article 2.22 Additional claims

1. Without prejudice to any damages due to the proprietor of a trademark by reason of the infringement, and without compensation of any sort, the courts may order, at the request of the proprietor of a trademark, the recall from the channels of commerce, the definitive removal from the channels of commerce or the destruction of goods which infringe a trademark right, as well as, in appropriate cases, materials and implements principally used in the manufacture of those goods. Those measures shall be carried out at the expense of the infringer, unless there particular reasons for not doing so. In considering a request as referred to in this paragraph, the proportionality between the seriousness of the infringement and the remedies ordered as well as the interests of third parties shall be taken into account.

2. The provisions of national law relating to steps to preserve rights and the enforcement of judgments and officially recorded acts shall apply.

3. Insofar as not provided for by national law and at the request of the proprietor of a trademark, the courts may, under this provision, issue an interlocutory injunction against the alleged infringer or against an intermediary whose services are used by a third party to infringe a trademark right, in order to: a. prevent any imminent infringement of a trademark right, or b. forbid, on a provisional basis and subject, where appropriate, to a recurring penalty payment, the continuation of

the alleged infringements of a trademark right, or c. make continuation of the alleged infringements subject to the lodging of guarantees intended to ensure the compensation

of the proprietor of the trademark. 4. At the request of the proprietor of a trademark in proceedings concerning an infringement of his rights, the courts may order the

party infringing the proprietor’s right to provide the proprietor with all information available concerning the origin and distribution networks of the goods and services which have infringed the trademark and to provide him with all the data relating thereto, insofar as this measure seems justified and proportionate.

5. The order referred to in paragraph 4 may also be issued against anyone who is in possession of the infringing goods on a commercial scale, who has used the infringing services on a commercial scale or who has provided, on a commercial scale, services used in infringing activities.

6. The courts may, at the request of the proprietor of a trademark, issue an injunction for the cessation of services against intermediaries whose services are used by a third party to infringe its trademark right.

7. The courts may order, at the request of the claimant and at the expense of the infringer, that appropriate measures be taken to disseminate information concerning the decision.

Article 2.23 Limitation of the effects of the exclusive right

1. A trademark shall not entitle the proprietor to prohibit a third party from using, in the course of trade: a. the name or address of the third party, where that third party is a natural person; b. signs or indications which are not distinctive or which concern the kind, quality, quantity, intended purpose, value,

geographical origin, the time of production of goods or of rendering of the service, or other characteristics of goods or services; c. the trademark for the purpose of identifying or referring to goods or services as those of the proprietor of that trademark,

in particular, where the use of the trademark is necessary to indicate the intended purpose of a product or service, in particular as accessories or spare parts;

provided that such use is made in accordance with honest practices in industrial or commercial matters. 2. A trademark shall not entitle the proprietor to prohibit a third party from using, in the course of trade, an earlier right which only

applies in a particular locality, if that right is recognised by the law of one of the Benelux countries and the use of that right is within the limits of the territory in which it is recognised.

15Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

3. A trademark shall not entitle the proprietor to prohibit its use in relation to goods which have been put on the market in the European Economic Area under that trademark by the proprietor or with the proprietor’s consent, unless there exist legitimate reasons for the proprietor to oppose further commercialisation of the goods, especially where the condition of the goods is changed or impaired after they have been put on the market.

Article 2.23bis Genuine use of the trademark

1. If, within a period of five years following the date of the completion of the registration procedure, the proprietor has not put the trademark to genuine use in the Benelux territory in connection with the goods or services in respect of which it is registered, or if such use has been suspended during a continuous five-year period, the trademark shall be subject to the limits and sanctions provided for in Article 2.16bis (1) and (2) 2.23ter, 2.27 (2) and 2.30quinquies (3) and (4), unless there are proper reasons for non-use.

2. In the case referred to in Article 2.8 (2), the five-year period referred to in paragraph 1 shall be calculated from the date when the mark can no longer be subject of a refusal on absolute grounds or an opposion or, in the event that a refusal has been issued or an opposition has been lodged, from the date when a decision decision lifting the Office’s objections on absolute grounds or terminating the opposition proceedings became final or the opposition was withdrawn.

3. With regard to international trademarks having effect in the Benelux territory, the five-year period referred to in paragraph 1 shall be calculated from the date when the mark can no longer be subject to refusal or opposition. Where an opposition has been lodged or when a refusal on absolute grounds has been notified, the period shall be calculated from the date when a decision terminating the opposition proceedings or a ruling on absolute grounds for refusal became final or the opposition was withdrawn.

4. The date of commencement of the five-year period, as referred to in paragraphs 1 and 2, shall be entered in the register. 5. The following shall also constitute use within the meaning of paragraph 1:

a. use of the trademark in a form differing in elements which do not alter the distinctive character of the mark in the form in which it was registered, regardless of whether or not the trademark in the form as used is also registered in the name of the proprietor;

b. affixing of the trademark to goods or to the packaging thereof in the Benelux territory solely for export purposes. 6. Use of the trademark with the consent of the proprietor shall be deemed to constitute use by the proprietor.

Article 2.23ter Non-use as defence in infringement proceedings

The proprietor of a trademark shall be entitled to prohibit the use of a sign only to the extent that the proprietor’s rights are not liable to be revoked pursuant to Article 2.27 (2) to (5) at the time the infringement action is brought. If the defendant so requests, the proprietor of the trademark shall furnish proof that, during the five-year period preceding the date of bringing the action, the trademark has been put to genuine use as provided in Article 2.23bis in connection with the goods or services in respect of which it is registered and which are cited as justification for the action, or that there are proper reasons for non-use, provided that the registration procedure of the trademark has at the date of bringing the action been completed for not less than five years.

Article 2.23quater Intervening right of the proprietor of a later registered trademark as defence in infringement proceedings

1. In infringement proceedings, the proprietor of a trademark shall not be entitled to prohibit the use of a later registered mark where that later trademark would not be declared invalid pursuant to Article 2.30quinquies (3), Article 2.30sexies or Article 2.30septies (1).

2. In infringement proceedings, the proprietor of a trademark shall not be entitled to prohibit the use of a later registered EU trademark where that later trademark would not be declared invalid pursuant to Article 60 (1), (3) or (4), Article 61 (1) or (2) or Article 64 (2) of the European Union trade mark regulation.

3. Where the proprietor of a trademark is not entitled to prohibit the use of a later registered trademark pursuant to paragraph 1 or 2, the proprietor of that later registered trademark shall not be entitled to prohibit the use of the earlier trademark in infringement proceedings, even though that earlier right may no longer be invoked against the later trademark.

16 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.24

Chapter 6. Termination of the right

Article 2.25 Surrender

1. The proprietor of a Benelux trademark may surrender its registration at any time. 2. However, if a license has been recorded, registration of the trademark may be surrendered only at the joint request of the proprietor

of the trademark and the licensee. The provisions of the preceding sentence shall apply where a right in rem or a levy of execution has been recorded.

3. Surrender shall have effect for the whole of Benelux territory. 4. Renunciation of the protection resulting from an international filing, which is restricted to part of Benelux territory,

shall have effect for the whole of the territory, notwithstanding any statement to the contrary by the proprietor. 5. Surrender may be restricted to one or more of the goods or services for which the trademark is registered.

Article 2.26 Lapse of the right

The right to a trademark shall lapse:

a. through surrender or expiry of the trademark’s registration; b. through cancellation or expiry of the international registration, or through renunciation of protection for Benelux territory or,

in accordance with the provisions of Article 6 of the Madrid Agreement and Madrid Protocol, as a result of the fact that the trademark no longer benefits from legal protection in the country of origin.

2. Repealed 3. Repealed

Article 2.27 Revocation of the right

1. A trademark shall be liable to revocation if, after the date on which it was registered: a. as a result of acts or inactivity of the proprietor, it has become the common name in the trade for a product or service

in respect of which it is registered; b. as a result of the use made of it by the proprietor of the trademark or with the proprietor’s consent in respect of the goods

or services for which it is registered, it is liable to mislead the public, particularly as to the nature, quality or geographical origin of those goods or services.

2. A trademark shall also be liable to revocation if no genuine use has been made of it in accordance with Article 2.23bis. 3. Revocation of the right in a trademark in accordance with paragraph 2, may no longer be invoked where, during the interval

between expiry of the five-year period referred to in Article 2.23bis and submission of the claim for revocation, genuine use of the trademark has been started or resumed. However, commencement or resumption of use within a period of three months prior to submission of the claim for revocation shall be disregarded where preparations for the commencement or resumption occur only after the holder becomes aware that the claim may be filed;

4. The proprietor of the right in a trademark whose revocation can no longer be invoked under paragraph 3, shall have no grounds under Article 2.20 (1) (a), (b) and (c) to contest the use of a trademark filed during the period in which the prior right in the trademark could have been revoked pursuant to paragraph 2.

17Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

5. The proprietor of the right in a trademark whose revocation can no longer be invoked under paragraph 3 may not, on the basis of the provisions of Article 2.28 (2), claim invalidity of the registration of a trademark filed during the period in which the prior right in the trademark could have been revoked pursuant to paragraph 2.

Chapter 6bis. Invalidation or revocation action filed before the courts

Article 2.28 Invocation of invalidity or revocation before the courts

1. Invalidity on absolute grounds may be invoked by any interested party, including the Public Prosecutor. 2. Invalidity on relative grounds may be invoked by any interested party where the proprietor of the earlier trademark referred to

in Article 2.2ter (1) and (3) (a) or (b) or the person who, under the applicable law, is entitled to exercise the rights referred to in Article 2.2ter (3) (c), participates in the proceedings.

3. When an action for invalidation pursuant to paragraph 1 is brought by the Public Prosecutor, only the courts of Brussels, the Hague and Luxembourg shall have jurisdiction. Action brought by the Public Prosecutor shall stay any other action brought on the same grounds.

4. Revocation of the right in a trademark may be invoked by any interested party.

Article 2.29

Article 2.30

Chapter 6ter. Invalidation or revocation action filed with the Office

Article 2.30bis Lodging of the application

1. An application for invalidation or revocation of the registration of a trademark may be filed with the Office: a. based on the absolute grounds for invalidity referred to in Article 2.2bis and on the grounds for revocation referred to in

Article 2.27, by any natural or legal person and any group or body set up for the purpose of representing the interests of manufacturers, producers, suppliers of services, traders or consumers, and which, under the terms of the law governing it, has the capacity to sue in its own name and to be sued;

b. based on the relative grounds for invalidity referred to in Article 2.2ter: i. in the cases referred to in Article 2.2ter (1) and (3) (a), by the proprietors of earlier trademarks and the licensees authorised

by those proprietors; ii. in the case referred to in Article 2.2ter (3) (b), by the proprietors of trademarks referred to therein. In this case,

the assignment referred to in Article 2.20ter (1) (b), may also be requested; iii. in the case referred to in Article 2.2ter (3) (c), by persons authorised, under the applicable law, to exercise these rights.

2. An application for invalidation or revocation is deemed to have been lodged only after payment of the applicable fees.

18 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.30ter Course of the proceedings

1. The Office will process the application for invalidation or revocation within a reasonable timeframe in accordance with the provisions of the implementing regulations and shall respect the principle that both sides should be heard.

2. The procedure shall be suspended: a. where the application is based on Article 2.30bis (1) (b) (i) and the earlier trademark:

b. where the application is based on Article 2.30bis (1) (b) (iii), when it is based on an application for a designation of origin or geographical indication, until a final decision has been taken on it;

c. if the challenged trademark: i. has not yet been registered; ii. was registered without delay in accordance with Article 2.8 (2) and is the subject of proceedings for refusal on

absolute grounds or opposition; iii. is the subject of a judicial action for invalidation or revocation;

d. at the joint request of the parties; e. if other circumstances justify such a suspension.

3. The procedure shall be closed: a. if the applicant has lost the capacity to act; b. if the defendant does not respond to the application lodged. In this case, the registration shall be cancelled; c. if the application has become without cause, either because it has been withdrawn, or because the registration against

which the application is directed has become without effect; d. if the application is based on Article 2.30bis (1) (b), and the earlier trademark or earlier right is no longer valid; e. if the application is based on Article 2.30bis (1) (b) (i), and the applicant has not produced within the prescribed period proof

of use of his earlier trademark as referred to in Article 2.30quinquies; In these situations, part of the fees paid shall be refunded.

4. After the examination of the application for invalidation or revocation is completed, the Office shall reach a decision as soon as possible. If the application is held to be justified, the Office shall fully or partially cancel the registration or shall decide to record in the Register the transfer referred to in Article 2.20ter (1) (b). Otherwise, the application shall be rejected. The Office will inform the parties in writing and without delay, and will mention the right of appeal against this decision contained in Article 1.15bis. The decision of the Office will become final only once it is no longer subject to appeal. The Office will not be a party to any appeal against its decision.

5. Costs shall be borne by the unsuccessful party. They shall be fixed in accordance with the provisions of the implementing regulations. Costs shall not be due if the application is only partially successful. The Office’s decision concerning costs shall constitute an enforceable order. Its forced execution shall be governed by the rules in force in the State where it takes place.

Article 2.30quater Application for invalidation or revocation of international filings

1. An application for invalidation or revocation may be lodged with the Office against an international filing for which protection in the Benelux territory has been requested. Articles 2.30bis and 2.30ter apply accordingly.

2. The Office shall inform the International Bureau of the application submitted, in writing and without delay, mentioning the provisions of Articles 2.30bis and 2.30ter, as well as the related provisions in the implementing regulations.

19Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Chapter 6quater. Defences and significance of invalidity and revocation

Article 2.30quinquies Non-use as a defence in proceedings seeking a declaration of invalidity

1. In proceedings for a declaration of invalidity based on a registered trademark with an earlier filing date or priority date, if the proprietor of the later trademark so requests, the proprietor of the earlier trademark shall furnish proof that, during the five-year period preceding the date of the application for a declaration of invalidity, the earlier trademark has been put to genuine use, as provided for in Article 2.23bis, in connection with the goods or services in respect of which it is registered and which are cited as justification for the application, or that there are proper reasons for non-use, provided that the registration process of the earlier trademark has at the date of the application for a declaration of invalidity been completed for not less than five years.

2. Where, at the filing date or date of priority of the later trademark, the five-year period within which the earlier trademark was to have been put to genuine use, as provided for in Article 2.23bis, had expired, the proprietor of the earlier trademark shall, in addition to the proof required under paragraph 1 of this Article, furnish proof that the trademark was put to genuine use during the five-year period preceding the filing date or date of priority, or that proper reasons for non-use existed.

3. In the absence of the proof referred to in paragraphs 1 and 2, an application for a declaration of invalidity on the basis of an earlier trademark shall be rejected.

4. If the earlier trademark has been used in accordance with Article 2.23bis in relation to only part of the goods or services for which it is registered, it shall, for the purpose of the examination of the application for a declaration of invalidity, be deemed to be registered in respect of that part of the goods or services only.

5. Paragraphs 1 to 4 of this Article shall also apply where the earlier trademark is an EU trademark. In such a case, genuine use of the EU trademark shall be determined in accordance with Article 18 of the European Union trade mark regulation.

Article 2.30sexies Lack of distinctive character or of reputation of an earlier trademark precluding a declaration of invalidity of a registered trademark

An application for a declaration of invalidity on the basis of an earlier trademark shall not succeed at the date of application for invalidation if it would not have been successful at the filing date or the priority date of the later trademark for any of the following reasons:

a. the earlier trademark, liable to be declared invalid pursuant to Article 2.2bis (1) (b), (c) or (d), had not yet acquired a distinctive character as referred to in Article 2.2bis (3);

b. the application for a declaration of invalidity is based on Article 2.2ter (1) (b) and the earlier trademark had not yet become sufficiently distinctive to support a finding of likelihood of confusion within the meaning of Article 2.2ter (1) (b);

c. the application for a declaration of invalidity is based on Article 2.2ter (3) (a) and the earlier trademark had not yet acquired a reputation within the meaning of Article 2.2ter (3) (a).

Article 2.30septies Preclusion of a declaration of invalidity due to acquiescence

1. Where the proprietor of an earlier trademark as referred to in Article 2.2ter (2) or (3) (a) has acquiesced, for a period of five successive years, in the use of a later registered trademark while being aware of such use, that proprietor shall no longer be entitled on the basis of the earlier trademark to apply for a declaration that the later trademark is invalid in respect of the goods or services for which the later trademark has been used, unless registration of the later trademark was applied for in bad faith.

2. In the case referred to in paragraph 1, the proprietor of a later registered trademark shall not be entitled to oppose the use of the earlier right, even though that right may no longer be invoked against the later trademark.

20 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.30octies Invocation of invalidity or revocation of a trademark on which seniority has been claimed

Where the seniority of a trademark registered under this convention, which has been surrendered or allowed to lapse, is claimed for an EU trademark, the invalidity or revocation of the trademark providing the basis for the seniority claim may be established a posteriori, provided that the invalidity or revocation could have been declared at the time the mark was surrendered or allowed to lapse.

Article 2.30nonies Significance of invalidity and revocation

1. Invalidity or revocation shall apply to the sign constituting the trademark in its entirety. 2. An application for a declaration of invalidity or revocation may be directed against some or all of the goods or services for

which the contested trademark is registered and may be based on one or more earlier rights, provided that they all belong to the same proprietor.

3. Where a ground for invalidity or revocation of a trademark exists in respect of only some of the goods or services for which that trademark has been registered, invalidity or revocation shall cover those goods or services only.

4. A registered trademark shall be deemed not to have had, as from the date of the application for revocation, the effects specified in this convention, to the extent that the rights of the proprietor have been revoked. An earlier date, on which one of the grounds for revocation occurred, may be fixed in the decision at the request of one of the parties.

5. A registered trademark shall be deemed not to have had, as from the outset, the effects specified in this convention, to the extent that the trademark has been declared invalid.

Chapter 7. Trademarks as objects of property

Article 2.31 Transfer

1. A trademark may be transferred, separately from any transfer of the undertaking, in respect of some or all of the goods or services for which it is registered.

2. The following shall be null and void: a. assignments between living persons not laid down in writing; b. assignments or other transfers not made for the whole of Benelux territory.

3. A transfer of the whole of the undertaking shall include the transfer of the trademark except where there is agreement to the contrary or circumstances clearly dictate otherwise. This provision shall apply to the contractual obligation to transfer the undertaking.

Article 2.32 Licence

1. A trademark may be licensed for some or all of the goods or services for which it is registered and for the whole or part of the Benelux territory. A licence may be exclusive or non-exclusive.

2. The proprietor of a trademark may invoke the rights conferred by that trademark against a licensee who contravenes any provision in his licensing contract with regard to: a. its duration; b. the form covered by the registration in which the trademark may be used; c. the scope of the goods or services for which the licence is granted; d. the territory in which the trademark may be affixed; or e. the quality of the goods manufactured or of the services provided by the licensee.

3. Entry of a licence in the register may be cancelled only at the joint request of the proprietor of the trademark and the licensee.

21Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

4. Without prejudice to the provisions of the licensing contract, the licensee may bring proceedings for infringement of a trademark only if its proprietor consents thereto. However, the holder of an exclusive licence may bring such proceedings if the proprietor of the trademark, after formal notice, does not himself bring infringement proceedings within an appropriate period.

5. The licensee shall have the right to intervene in an action brought by the proprietor of the trademark, as referred to in Article 2.21 (1) to (4), in order to obtain compensation for damages directly incurred by him or to be allocated a proportion of the profit made by the defendant.

6. The licensee may bring independent action as referred to in the preceding paragraph only if he has obtained the permission of the proprietor of the trademark for that purpose.

7. The licensee shall be authorized to exercise the powers referred to under Article 2.22 (1), provided that these are in order to protect the rights which he has been permitted to exercise and provided that it has obtained permission from the proprietor of the trademark for that purpose.

Article 2.32bis Rights in rem and levy of execution

1. A trademark may, independently of the undertaking, be given as security or be the subject of rights in rem. 2. A trademark may be levied in execution.

Article 2.33 Opposability against third parties

The assignment or other transfer or the licence shall become opposable against third parties only after recordal of an extract from the document establishing this or a corresponding declaration signed by the parties involved in the manner specified by the implementing regulations and following payment of the fees due. The provision in the preceding sentence shall apply to rights in rem and levy of execution as referred to in Article 2.32bis.

Article 2.33bis Applications for a trademark as an object of property

Articles 2.31 to 2.33 shall apply to applications for trademarks.

Chapter 8. Collective marks

Article 2.34bis Collective marks

1. A collective mark is a trademark which is described as such when the mark is applied for and is capable of distinguishing the goods or services of the members of an association which is the proprietor of the mark from the goods or services of other undertakings. Associations of manufacturers, producers, suppliers of services or traders, which, under the terms of the law governing them, have the capacity in their own name to have rights and obligations, to make contracts or accomplish other legal acts, and to sue and be sued, as well as legal persons governed by public law, may apply for collective marks.

2. By way of derogation from Article 2.2bis (1) (c), signs or indications which may serve, in trade, to designate the geographical origin of the goods or services may constitute collective marks. Such a collective mark shall not entitle the proprietor to prohibit a third party from using, in the course of trade, such signs or indications, provided that third party uses them in accordance with honest practices in industrial or commercial matters. In particular, such a mark may not be invoked against a third party who is entitled to use a geographical name.

3. Unless provided otherwise in this chapter, collective marks shall be subject to all the provisions of this convention that apply to trademarks.

22 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.34ter Regulations governing use of a collective mark

1. An applicant for a collective mark shall submit regulations governing use with the application. 2. However, in the case of an international filing, the applicant shall have a period of six months following notification of

the international registration provided for by Article 3 (4) of the Madrid Agreement and Madrid Protocol to file those regulations. 3. The regulations governing use shall specify at least the persons authorised to use the mark, the conditions of membership of

the association and the conditions of use of the mark, including sanctions. The regulations governing use of a mark referred to in Article 2.34bis (2) shall authorise any person whose goods or services originate in the geographical area concerned to become a member of the association which is the proprietor of the mark, provided that the person fulfils all the other conditions of the regulations.

Article 2.34quater Refusal of an application

1. In addition to the grounds for refusal provided for in Article 2.2bis, with the exception of Article 2.2bis (1) (c) concerning signs or indications which may serve, in trade, to designate the geographical origin of the goods or services, an application for a collective mark shall be refused where the provisions of Article 2.34bis or 2.34ter are not satisfied, or where the regulations governing use of that collective mark are contrary to public policy or to accepted principles of morality.

2. An application for a collective mark shall also be refused if the public is liable to be misled as regards the character or the significance of the mark, in particular if it is likely to be taken to be something other than a collective mark.

3. An application shall not be refused if the applicant, as a result of amendment of the regulations governing use of the collective mark, meets the requirements referred to in paragraphs 1 and 2.

Article 2.34quinquies Use of collective marks

The requirements of Article 2.23bis shall be satisfied where genuine use of a collective mark in accordance with that Article is made by any person who has authority to use it.

Article 2.34sexies Amendments to the regulations governing use of a collective mark

1. The proprietor of a collective mark shall submit to the Office any amended regulations governing use. 2. Amendments to the regulations governing use shall be mentioned in the register unless the amended regulations do not satisfy

the requirements of Article 2.34ter or involve one of the grounds for refusal referred to in Article 2.34quater. 3. For the purposes of this convention, amendments to the regulations governing use shall take effect only from the date of entry

of the mention of those amendments in the register.

Article 2.34septies Persons entitled to bring an action for infringement

1. Article 2.32 (4) and (5) shall apply to every person who has the authority to use a collective mark. 2. The proprietor of a collective mark shall be entitled to claim compensation on behalf of persons who have authority to use

the mark where those persons have sustained damage as a result of unauthorised use of the mark.

23Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.34octies Additional grounds for revocation

In addition to the grounds for revocation provided for in Article 2.27, the rights of the proprietor of a collective mark shall be revoked on the following grounds: a. the proprietor does not take reasonable steps to prevent the mark being used in a manner that is incompatible with the conditions

of use laid down in the regulations governing use, including any amendments thereto mentioned in the register; b. the manner in which the mark has been used by authorised persons has caused it to become liable to mislead the public in the

manner referred to in Article 2.34quater (2); c. an amendment to the regulations governing use of the mark has been mentioned in the register in breach of Article 2.34 sexies (2),

unless the proprietor of the mark, by further amending the regulations governing use, complies with the requirements of that Article.

Article 2.34nonies Additional grounds for invalidity

In addition to the grounds for invalidity provided for in Article 2.2bis, with the exception of Article 2.2bis (1) (c) concerning signs or indications which may serve, in trade, to designate the geographical origin of the goods or services, and Article 2.2ter, a collective mark which is registered in breach of Article 2.34quater shall be declared invalid unless the proprietor of the mark, by amending the regulations governing use, complies with the requirements of Article 2.34quater.

Chapter 8bis. Certification marks

Article 2.35bis Certification marks

1. An certification mark is a trademark which is described as such when the mark is applied for and is capable of distinguishing goods or services which are certified by the proprietor of the mark in respect of material, mode of manufacture of goods or performance of services, quality, accuracy or other characteristics, with the exception of geographical origin, from goods and services which are not so certified.

2. Any natural or legal person, including institutions, authorities and bodies governed by public law, may apply for certification marks provided that such person does not carry on a business involving the supply of goods or services of the kind certified.

3. Unless provided otherwise in this chapter, certification marks shall be subject to all the provisions of this convention that apply to trademarks.

Article 2.35ter Regulations governing use of a certification mark

1. An applicant for a certification mark shall submit regulations governing use with the application. 2. However, in the case of an international filing, the applicant shall have a period of six months following notification of the

international registration provided for by Article 3 (4) of the Madrid Agreement and Madrid Protocol to file those regulations. 3. The regulations governing use shall specify the persons authorised to use the mark, the characteristics to be certified by the mark,

how the certifying body is to test those characteristics and to supervise the use of the mark. Those regulations shall also specify the conditions of use of the mark, including sanctions.

24 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.35quater Refusal of the application

1. In addition to the grounds for refusal provided for in Article 2.2bis, an application for a certification mark shall be refused where the conditions set out in Articles 2.35bis and 2.35ter are not satisfied, or where the regulations governing use are contrary to public policy or to accepted principles of morality.

2. An application for an certification mark shall also be refused if the public is liable to be misled as regards the character or the significance of the mark, in particular if it is likely to be taken to be something other than a certification mark.

3. An application shall not be refused if the applicant, as a result of an amendment of the regulations governing use, meets the requirements of paragraphs 1 and 2.

Article 2.35quinquies Use of the certification mark

The requirements of Article 2.23bis shall be satisfied where genuine use of a certification mark in accordance with that Article is made by any person who has authority to use pursuant to the regulations governing use referred to in Article 2.35ter.

Article 2.35sexies Amendment of the regulations governing use of the mark

1. The proprietor of a certification mark shall submit to the Office any amended regulations governing use. 2. Amendments shall not be mentioned in the register where the regulations as amended do not satisfy the requirements of

Article 2.35ter or involve one of the grounds for refusal referred to in Article 2.35quater. 3. For the purposes of this convention, amendments to the regulations governing use shall take effect only as from the date

of entry of the mention of the amendment in the register.

Article 2.35septies Transfer

By way of derogation from Article 2.31 (1), a certification mark may only be transferred to a person who meets the requirements of Article 2.35bis (2).

Article 2.35octies Persons who are entitled to bring an action for infringement

1. Only the proprietor of a certification mark, or any person specifically authorised by him to that effect, shall be entitled to bring an action for infringement.

2. The proprietor of a certification mark shall be entitled to claim compensation on behalf of persons who have authority to use the mark where they have sustained damage as a consequence of unauthorised use of the mark.

25Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 2.35nonies Additional grounds for revocation

In addition to the grounds for revocation provided for in Article 2.27, the rights of the proprietor of a certification mark shall be revoked on the following grounds: a. the proprietor no longer complies with the requirements set out in Article 2.35bis (2); b. the proprietor does not take reasonable steps to prevent the certification mark being used in a manner that is incompatible with the

conditions of use laid down in the regulations governing use, including any amendments thereto mentioned in the register; c. the manner in which the certification mark has been used by the proprietor has caused it to become liable to mislead the public in

the manner referred to in Article 2.35quater (2); d. an amendment to the regulations governing use of the certification mark has been mentioned in the register in breach

of Article 2.35sexies (2), unless the proprietor of the mark, by further amending the regulations governing use, complies with the requirements of that Article.

Article 2.35decies Additional grounds for invalidity

In addition to the grounds for invalidity provided for in Articles 2.2bis and 2.2ter, a certification mark which is registered in breach of Article 2.35quater shall be declared invalid, unless the proprietor of the mark, by amending the regulations governing use, complies with the requirements of Article 2.35quater.

Chapter 9. (Repealed)

Article 2.45

Article 2.46

Article 2.47

26 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

TITLE III: DESIGNS

Chapter 1. Designs

Article 3.1 Designs

1. A design shall be protected to the extent that it is new and has individual character. 2. The appearance of the whole or a part of a product shall be regarded as a design. 3. The appearance of a product shall be imparted, in particular, through the features of the lines, contours, colours, shape,

texture and/or materials of the product itself and/or its ornamentation. 4. A product shall mean any industrial or handicraft item, including inter alia parts intended to be assembled into a complex product,

packaging, get-up, graphic symbols and typographic typefaces. Computer programs shall not be regarded as a product.

Article 3.2 Exception

1. The following shall be excluded from the protection provided for by this title: a. the features of appearance of a product which are solely dictated by its technical function. b. the features of appearance of a product which must necessarily be reproduced in their exact form and dimensions in order

to permit the product in which the design is incorporated or to which it is applied to be mechanically connected to or placed in, around or against another product so that either product may perform its function.

2. Notwithstanding paragraph 1 (b), the features of appearance of a product serving the purpose of allowing multiple assembly or connection of mutually interchangeable products within a modular system shall be protected as a design, under the conditions laid down in Article 3.1 (1).

Article 3.3 Novelty and individual character

1. A design shall be considered new if no identical design has been made available to the public before the date of filing of the application or the date of priority. Designs shall be deemed to be identical if their features differ only in immaterial details.

2. A design shall be considered to have individual character if the overall impression it produces on the informed user differs from the overall impression produced on such a user by any design which has been made available to the public before the date of filing or the date of priority. In assessing individual character, the degree of freedom of the designer in developing the design shall be taken into consideration.

3. In order to assess novelty and individual character, a design shall be deemed to have been made available to the public if it has been published following registration or otherwise, or exhibited, used in trade or otherwise disclosed, except where these events could not reasonably have become known in the normal course of business to the circles specialised in the sector concerned, operating within the European Community or the European Economic Area, before the date of filing or the date of priority. The design shall not, however, be deemed to have been made available to the public for the sole reason that it has been disclosed to a third person under explicit or implicit conditions of confidentiality.

27Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

4. In order to assess novelty and individual character, a disclosure shall not be taken into consideration if a design for which protection is claimed under a registered design right has been made available to the public during the 12-month period preceding the date of filing of the application or the date of priority: a. by the designer, his successor in title, or a third person as a result of information provided or action taken by the designer,

or his successor in title; and b. if the design has been made available to the public as a consequence of an abuse in relation to the designer or his successor

in title. 5. Right of priority shall mean the right provided for under Article 4 of the Paris Convention. This right may be claimed by anyone

who properly submits an application for a design or utility model in one of the countries which is a party to the said Convention or the TRIPS Agreement.

Article 3.4 Parts of complex products

1. A design applied to or incorporated in a product which constitutes a component part of a complex product shall only be considered to be new and to have individual character: a. if the component part, once it has been incorporated into the complex product, remains visible during normal use of the latter;

and b. to the extent that those visible features of the component part fulfil in themselves the requirements as to novelty and

individual character. 2. For the purposes of this title, complex product shall mean a product which is composed of multiple components which can

be replaced permitting disassembly and re-assembly of the product. 3. Normal use within the meaning of paragraph 1 shall mean use by the end user, excluding maintenance, servicing or repair work.

Article 3.5 Acquisition of rights

1. Without prejudice to the right of priority, the exclusive right in a design shall be acquired by registration of the application that has been filed in Benelux territory with the Office (Benelux filing) or with the International Bureau (international filing).

2. Where two or more filings are made for the same design, if the first filing is not followed by the publication provided for by Article 3.11 (2) of this convention or Article 6 (3) of the Hague Agreement, the succeeding filing shall acquire the status of first filing.

Article 3.6 Restrictions

Within the limits of Articles 3.23 and 3.24 (2), registration shall not grant the right to a design where: a. the design is in conflict with a prior design which has been made available to the public after the date of filing or the date of priority,

and which is protected from a date prior to the said date by an exclusive right deriving from a Community design, the registration of a Benelux filing, or an international filing;

b. a prior trademark is used in the design without the consent of proprietor of that trademark; c. a work protected by copyright is used in the design without the consent of the copyright owner; d. the design constitutes an improper use of any of the items listed in Article 6ter of the Paris Convention; e. the design is contrary to is contrary to public policy or to accepted principles of morality in one of the Benelux countries; f. the filing does not sufficiently reveal the features of the design.

28 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 3.7 Claim of the application

1. During a period of five years following publication of the registration of a filing, the designer of the design or the person who, under to Article 3.8, is deemed to be the designer, may claim the right to the Benelux application or the rights in Benelux territory deriving from the international filing of that design, if the filing was made by a third party without the designer’s consent; the designer may on the same grounds and at any time invoke the invalidity of the registration of the filing or of the rights referred to. The action to claim shall be registered with the Office at the claimant’s request in the manner laid down by the implementing regulations and on payment of the fees due.

2. If the applicant referred to in paragraph 1 has requested the total or partial surrender of the registration of the Benelux filing or has renounced the rights in Benelux territory deriving from an international filing, such surrender or renunciation shall, subject to paragraph 3, not have effects vis-à-vis the designer or the person deemed to be the designer under Article 3.8, provided that the filing has been claimed within one year from the date of publication of the surrender or renunciation and before the expiry of the five-year period referred to in paragraph 1.

3. If, during the interval between the surrender or renunciation referred to in paragraph 2 and the registration of the action to claim, a third party, acting in good faith, has exploited a product that is identical in appearance or that does not produce a different overall impression on an informed user, that product shall be considered to have been lawfully put on the market.

Article 3.8 Rights of employers and commissioning parties

1. If a design has been developed by an employee in the execution of his duties, the employer shall, unless otherwise agreed, be deemed to be the designer.

2. If a design has been created on commission, the commissioning party shall, unless specified otherwise, be deemed to be the designer, provided that the commission was given with a view to commercial or industrial use of the product in which the design is incorporated.

Article 3.9 Filing

1. A Benelux application for designs shall be filed, either with the national administrations or with the Office, in the manner specified by the implementing regulations and against payment of the fees due. A Benelux application may comprise either a single design (single filing) or several (multiple filing). A check shall be made to ensure that the documents produced satisfy the conditions specified for fixing the filing date and the filing date shall be fixed. The applicant shall be informed, without delay and in writing, of the date of filing or, where applicable, of the grounds for not fixing a filing date.

4. Where filing takes place with a national administration, the national administration shall forward the Benelux application to the Office, either without delay after receiving the application or after establishing that the application satisfies conditions specified in paragraphs 1 to 3.

5. Without prejudice in the case of Benelux filings to the application of Article 3.13, filings of designs may not be the subject, as far as substance is concerned, of any examination giving rise to findings which could be binding on the applicant by the Office.

29Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 3.10 Claiming priority

1. A right of priority shall be claimed at the time of filing or in the month following filing, by means of a special declaration submitted to the Office in the manner laid down by the implementing regulations and against payment of the fees due.

2. If no such claim is made, the right of priority shall lapse.

Article 3.11 Registration

1. The Office shall register, without delay, Benelux filings and also international filings which have been the subject of publication in the “Bulletin International des dessins ou modèles – International Design Gazette” and in respect of which the applicants have requested that these should have effect in Benelux territory.

2. Without prejudice to the provisions of Articles 3.12 and 3.13, the Office shall publish registrations of Benelux filings in accordance with the implementing regulations as soon as possible.

3. If the publication does not sufficiently disclose the features of the design, the applicant may request the Office to make another publication within the period specified for the purpose without charge.

4. Following publication of a design, the public may inspect the registration and the documents produced at the time of filing.

Article 3.12 Deferment of publication on request

1. When making a Benelux filing, the applicant may request that publication of the registration be deferred for a period of not more than twelve months from the date of filing or the date on which the right of priority arises.

2. If the applicant makes use of the possibility provided for under paragraph 1, the Office shall defer publication in accordance with the request.

Article 3.13 Contraventions of public policy and morality

1. The Office shall defer publication if it considers that the design falls within the scope of Article 3.6 (e). 2. The Office shall notify the applicant of this and invite it to withdraw the application within a period of two months. 3. If the party in question has not withdrawn the application on the expiry of that period, the Office shall refuse to publish

the registration. The Office shall inform the applicant in writing and without delay, indicating the reasons for the refusal to publish and mentioning the right of appeal against this decision contained in Article 1.15bis.

4. The refusal to publish shall become final only once the decision of the Office is no longer subject to appeal. This will result in the nullity of the application.

Article 3.14 Term and renewal of registration

1. Benelux filings shall be registered for a term of five years from the date of filing. Without prejudice to the provisions of Article 3.24 (2), the design to which a filing relates may not be modified either during the term of the registration or at the time of renewal.

2. The registration may be renewed for four successive periods of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. 3. Renewal shall be effected by payment of the fee specified for that purpose. This fee must be paid during the twelve months

preceding expiry of the registration; it may still be paid during the six months following the expiry date of the registration, subject to simultaneous payment of an additional fee. Renewal shall have effect from expiry of the registration.

4. Renewal may be restricted to only part of the designs included in a multiple filing. 5. Six months before expiry of the first to the fourth periods of registration, the Office shall provide a reminder of that expiry date

by means of notification addressed to the holder of the design and to third parties whose rights in the design have been entered in the register.

30 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

6. Office reminders shall be sent to the last known address of the interested parties. Failure to send or receive such notices shall not constitute dispensation from the obligations resulting from paragraph 3. It may not be invoked either in court proceedings or against the Office.

7. The Office shall register renewals and publish them in accordance with the implementing regulations.

Article 3.15 International filings

International filings shall be made in accordance with the provisions of the Hague Agreement.

Chapter 3. Rights of the holder

Article 3.16 Scope of protection

1. Without prejudice to the application of ordinary law relating to civil liability, the exclusive right in a design shall allow its right holder to challenge the use of a product in which the design is incorporated or on which the design is applied, which has an identical appearance to the design as filed, or which does not produce a different overall impression on an informed user, taking into consideration the designer’s degree of freedom in developing the design.

2. Use shall cover, in particular, the making, offering, putting on the market, sale, delivery, hire, importing, exporting, exhibiting, or using or stocking for one of those purposes.

Article 3.17 Compensation for damages and other actions

1. The exclusive right shall allow the holder to claim compensation for the acts listed in Article 3.16 only if those acts took place after the publication referred to in Article 3.11, adequately disclosing the features of the design.

2. The court which sets the damages: a. shall take into account all appropriate aspects, such as the negative economic consequences, including lost profits,

which the injured party has suffered, any unfair profits made by the infringer and, in appropriate cases, elements other than economic factors, such as the moral prejudice caused to the holder of the exclusive right in a design as a result of the infringement; or

b. as an alternative to (a), it may, in appropriate cases, set the damages as a lump sum on the basis of elements such as at least the amount of royalties or fees which would have been due if the infringer had requested authorization to use the design.

3. Furthermore, the court may order, at the request of the holder of the exclusive right in a design and by way of compensation, that ownership of goods which infringe a design right, as well as, in appropriate cases, the materials and implements principally used in the manufacture of those goods, be transferred to this holder; the court may order that the transfer shall only take place upon payment by the claimant of a sum which it shall fix.

4. In addition to or instead of the action for compensation, the holder of the exclusive right in a design may institute proceedings for transfer of the profits made following the use referred to in Article 3.16, and for the provision of accounts in this regard. The court shall reject the application if it considers that this use is not in bad faith or the circumstances of the case do not justify such an order.

5. The holder of the exclusive right in a design may institute proceedings for compensation or transfer of profits in the name of the licensee, without prejudice to the right granted to the licensee in Article 3.26 (4).

6. With effect from the filing date, reasonable compensation may be required from a party which, being aware of the filing, has engaged in acts such as those mentioned in Article 3.16, insofar as the holder has acquired exclusive rights in this regard.

31Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 3.18 Additional claims

1. Without prejudice to any damages due to the holder of the exclusive right in a design by reason of the infringement, and without compensation of any sort, the courts may order, at the request of the holder of the exclusive right in a design, the recall from the channels of commerce, the definitive removal from the channels of commerce or the destruction of goods which infringe a design right, as well as, in appropriate cases, materials and implements principally used in the manufacture of those goods. Those measures shall be carried out at the expense of the infringer, unless there particular reasons for not doing so. In considering a request as referred to in this paragraph, the proportionality between the seriousness of the infringement and the remedies ordered as well as the interests of third parties shall be taken into account.

3. Insofar as not provided for by national law and at the request of the holder of the exclusive right in a design, the courts may, under this provision, issue an interlocutory injunction against the alleged infringer or against an intermediary whose services are used by a third party to infringe a design right, in order to: a. prevent any imminent infringement of a design right, or b. forbid, on a provisional basis and subject, where appropriate, to a recurring penalty payment,

the continuation of the alleged infringements of a design right, or c. make continuation of the alleged infringements subject to the lodging of guarantees intended to ensure

the compensation of the holder. 4. At the request of the holder of the exclusive right in a design in proceedings concerning an infringement of his rights, the courts may

order the party infringing the holder’s right to provide the holder with all information available concerning the origin and distribution networks of the goods and services which have infringed the design and to provide him with all the data relating thereto, insofar as this measure seems justified and proportionate.

6. The courts may, at the request of the holder of the exclusive right in a design, issue an injunction for the cessation of services against intermediaries whose services are used by a third party to infringe its design right.

Article 3.19 Limitation of the effects of the exclusive right

1. The exclusive right to a design shall not imply the right to contest: a. acts done privately and for non-commercial purposes; b. acts done for experimental purposes; c. acts of reproduction for the purpose of making citations or of teaching, provided that such acts are compatible with fair trade

practice and do not unduly prejudice the normal exploitation of the design, and that mention is made of the source. 2. Furthermore, the exclusive right in a design shall not imply the right to contest:

a. the equipment on ships and aircraft registered in a third country when these temporarily enter the Benelux territory; b. the importation in the Benelux territory of spare parts and accessories for the purpose of repairing such craft; c. the execution of repairs on such craft.

3. The exclusive right in a design constituting a part of a complex product shall not imply the right to contest use of the design for the purposes of repair of that complex product in order to restore to its initial appearance.

4. The exclusive right in a design shall not imply the right to contest the acts mentioned in Article 3.16 relating to products which have been placed in circulation in one of the Member States of the European Community or European Economic Area, either by the holder or with the holder’s consent, or the acts mentioned in Article 3.20.

5. Actions may not relate to products which were put on the market in Benelux territory prior to the filing.

32 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 3.20 Rights of prior use

1. A right of prior use shall be recognized for third parties who, prior to the filing date for a design or to the priority date, manufactured on Benelux territory products that are identical in appearance to the design filed or that do not produce a different overall impression on an informed user.

2. The same right shall be recognized for those who, in the same conditions, have started to carry out their intention to manufacture. 3. However, this right shall not be recognized for third parties who have copied the design in question without the designer’s consent. 4. The right of prior use shall permit the holder of it to continue or, in the circumstances referred to in paragraph 2, to undertake

manufacture of those products and to carry out all the other acts mentioned in Article 3.16, notwithstanding the right deriving from the registration, with the exception of importing.

5. The right of prior use may be transferred only together with the business in which the acts which gave rise to it took place.

Chapter 4. Surrender, lapse and invalidity

Article 3.21 Surrender

1. The holder of the registration of a Benelux filing may at any time request surrender of that registration, unless third parties have legal contractual rights which have been notified to the Office.

2. In the case of multiple filings, surrender may relate only to part of the designs included in the filing. 3. If a license has been recorded, registration of the design may be surrendered only at the joint request of the holder of the design

and the licensee. The provisions of the previous sentence shall apply where a pledge or attachment has been recorded. 4. Surrender shall have effect for the whole of Benelux territory, notwithstanding any declaration to the contrary. 5. The rules laid down in this Article shall also apply to renunciation of the protection deriving for Benelux territory from

an international filing.

Article 3.22 Lapse of right

Subject to the provisions of Article 3.7 (2), the exclusive right in a design shall lapse: a. through surrender or expiry of the registration of the Benelux filing; b. through expiry of the registration of the international filing or through renunciation of the rights for Benelux territory deriving from

the international filing, or through ex officio cancellation of the international filing as referred to in Article 6 (4) (c), of the Hague Agreement.

Article 3.23 Invalidation

1. Any interested party, including the Public Prosecutor, may invoke the invalidity of the registration of a design if: a. if the design does not correspond to the definition under Article 3.1 (2) and (3); b. the design does not satisfy the conditions specified in Article 3.1 (1) and Articles 3.3 and 3.4; c. the design falls within the scope of Article 3.2; d. the registration does not grant a right in the design pursuant to Article 3.6 (e) or (f).

2. Only the applicant or the holder of an exclusive right in a design deriving from the registration of a Community design, a Benelux registration or an international filing may invoke the invalidity of the registration of the later filing of a design which is in conflict with its right, if registration of the filing does not grant the right in the design in accordance with Article 3.6 (a).

3. Only the holder of a prior trademark right or the owner of a prior copyright may invoke the invalidity of the registration of the Benelux filing or of the rights deriving for Benelux territory from an international filing of the design, if no right in the design has been acquired in accordance with Article 3.6 (b) or (c).

33Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

4. Only the interested party may invoke the invalidity of the registration of a design, if no right in the design has been acquired in accordance with Article 3.6 (d).

5. Only the designer of a design as referred to under Article 3.7 (1) may, in the conditions referred to under that Article, invoke the invalidity of the registration of the filing of a design made by a third party without his consent.

6. Registration of the filing of a design may be declared invalid even after the right has lapsed or been surrendered. 7. When an action for invalidation is brought by the Public Prosecutor, only the courts of Brussels, The Hague and Luxembourg

shall have jurisdiction. Action brought by the Public Prosecutor shall stay any other action brought on the same grounds.

Article 3.24 Scope of invalidity, surrender and renunciation

1. Subject to the provisions of paragraph 2, invalidation, surrender and renunciation shall apply to the design in its entirety. 2. If the registration of the filing of a design may be invalidated in accordance with Article 3.6 (b), (c), (d) or (e), or Article 3.23 (1) (b) and

(c), filing may be maintained in an amended form if, in that form, the design complies with the requirements for protection and the identity of the design is retained.

3. Maintenance as referred to in paragraph 2 may be understood as registration accompanied by a partial disclaimer by the holder or the registration or a court order which is no longer open to opposition or appeal or to reversal by a court of cassation declaring the partial invalidity of the right.

Chapter 5. Transfer, licence and other rights

Article 3.25 Transfer

1. The exclusive right in a design may be transferred. 2. The following shall be null and void:

a. assignments between living persons not laid down in writing; b. assignments or other transfers not made for the whole of Benelux territory.

Article 3.26 Licence

1. The exclusive right in a design may be the subject of a license. 2. The holder of a design right may invoke the exclusive right in a design against a licensee who contravenes the clauses of

the licensing agreement in respect of its term, the form covered by the registration in which the design may be used, the products for which the licence is granted and the quality of the products put on the market by the licensee.

3. Entry of a licence in the register may be cancelled only at the joint request of the holder of the design right and the licensee. 4. The licensee shall have the right to act in an action brought by the holder of the exclusive right in a design, as mentioned in

Article 3.17 (1) to (4), in order to obtain compensation for a prejudice directly incurred by him or to be allocated a proportion of the profit made by the defendant. The licensee may bring independent action as mentioned in Article 3.17 (1) to (4) only if it has obtained the permission of the holder of the exclusive right for that purpose.

5. The licensee shall be authorized to exercise the powers referred to under Article 3.18 (1), provided that these are in order to protect the rights which it has been permitted to exercise and provided that it has obtained permission from the holder of the exclusive right in a design for that purpose.

34 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 3.27 Opposability against third parties

The assignment or other transfer or the licence shall become opposable against third parties only after filing of an extract from the document establishing this or a corresponding declaration signed by the parties involved has been registered in the manner specified by the implementing regulations and following payment of the fees due. The provision in the preceding sentence shall apply to rights of pledge and attachments.

Chapter 6. Cumulation with copyright

Article 3.28 Cumulation

1. Authorization given by the designer of a work protected by copyright to a third party to file a design in which that work is incorporated shall imply the assignment of the copyright attached to that work insofar as it is incorporated in the design.

2. The party filing a design shall be presumed also to be the owner of the copyright relating thereto; this presumption shall not, however, apply in respect of the true designer or his beneficiary.

3. The assignment of the copyright relating to a design shall result in the assignment of the right in the design and vice versa, without prejudice to the application of Article 3.25.

Article 3.29 Copyright of employers and commissioning parties

Where a design is created in the circumstances referred to in Article 3.8, the copyright relating to the design shall belong to the party deemed to be the designer, in accordance with the provisions of that Article.

35Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

TITLE IV: OTHER PROVISIONS

Chapter 1. (Repealed)

Article 4.1

Article 4.2

Article 4.3

Chapter 2. Other tasks of the Office

Article 4.4 Tasks

In addition to the tasks entrusted to it by the preceding titles the Office shall be responsible for: a. making modifications to filings and registrations which are required by holders, or which result from notifications by

the International Bureau or from court orders, and, where appropriate, informing the International Bureau of these; b. publishing registrations of Benelux filings of trademarks and designs, as well as all other reports required by

the implementing regulations; c. issuing copies of registrations at the request of any interested party; d. Repealed.

Article 4.4bis i-DEPOT

1. The Office may provide proof under the heading ‘i-DEPOT’ of the existence of documents on the date of receipt thereof. 2. The documents will be retained on file by the Office for a certain period of time. This will take place on a strictly confidential basis,

unless the party submitting the documents explicitly waives confidentiality. 3. The modalities of this service will be provided for in implementing regulations.

36 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Chapter 3. Jurisdiction

Article 4.5 Settlement of disputes

1. Without prejudice to the provisions of Articles 2.14 and 2.30bis, only the courts shall have jurisdiction to rule upon actions brought on the grounds of this convention.

2. Inadmissibility deriving from absence of registration of the filing of a trademark or design shall be covered by registration or renewal of the trademark or design in the course of proceedings.

3. The court shall order ex officio the cancellation of registrations that have been declared invalid or revoked.

Article 4.6 Territorial jurisdiction

1. Unless the territorial jurisdiction of the courts is expressly stated in a contract, this shall be determined in cases involving trademarks or designs by the address for service of the defendant or by the place where the obligation in dispute has arisen, or has been or should be executed. The place in which the trademark or design is filed or registered shall not under any circumstances be used as the sole basis for determining territorial jurisdiction.

2. Where the criteria mentioned above are insufficient to determine territorial jurisdiction, the petitioner may bring the case before the court of his address for service or residential address, or, if he has no address for service or residential address in Benelux territory, before the court of his choice, in either Brussels, the Hague or Luxembourg.

3. The courts shall apply ex officio the rules specified in paragraphs 1 and 2 and shall expressly confirm their jurisdiction. 4. The court before which the main claim is pending shall receive applications for warranty, applications for inclusion and related

applications, as well as reconventional claims, unless it does not have jurisdiction over the matter. 5. The courts of one of the three countries shall, if one of the parties so requests, refer disputes brought before them to the courts of

one of the other two countries where these disputes are already pending there or when they are associated with other disputes placed before these courts. Referral may only be requested when the actions are pending at first instance. This shall apply to the benefit of the first court in which an action is initially brought, unless another court has given a decision in the matter other than just an internal provision, in which case referral shall be to the other court.

Chapter 4. Other provisions

Article 4.7 Direct effect

Nationals of Benelux countries and nationals of countries that are not members of the Union established by the Paris Convention, who are resident in or who have a real and effective industrial or commercial establishment on Benelux territory may, in the context of this convention, claim application of the provisions of the Paris Convention, the Madrid Agreement and Madrid Protocol, the Hague Agreement and the TRIPS Agreement for their benefit throughout the said territory.

Article 4.8 Other applicable rights

The provisions of this convention shall not adversely affect application of the Paris Convention, the TRIPS Agreement, the Madrid Agreement and Madrid Protocol, the Hague Agreement and the provisions of Belgian, Letzeburgisch or Dutch law giving rise to prohibitions on the use of a trademark.

37Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Article 4.8bis Applicable rights on trademarks and designs as objects of property

1. A trademark or a design as an object of property shall be governed in its entirety, and for the whole Benelux territory, by the internal law of the Benelux country in which, according to the Register: a. the proprietor had his seat or his domicile on the filing date of the application for registration; b. where point (a) does not apply, the proprietor had an establishment on the filing date of the application for registration.

2. In cases which are not provided for by paragraph 1, the law of the Kingdom of the Netherlands shall apply. 3. If two or more persons are mentioned in the register as joint proprietors, paragraph 1 shall apply to the joint proprietor first

mentioned; failing this, it shall apply to the subsequent joint proprietors in the order in which they are mentioned. Where paragraph 1 does not apply to any of the joint proprietors, paragraph 2 shall apply.

Article 4.9 Fees and time limits

1. All fees due in respect of operations carried out with the Office or by the Office shall be laid down in the implementing regulations. 2. All time limits applicable to operations carried out with the Office or by the Office which are not specified in this convention shall be

laid down in the implementing regulations.

38 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

TITLE V: TRANSITIONAL PROVISIONS

Article 5.1 The Organization as successor to the Benelux Offices

1. The Organization shall be the successor to the Benelux Trademark Office established under Article 1 of the Benelux Convention Concerning Trademarks of March 19, 1962 and the Benelux Designs Office established under Article 1 of the Benelux Designs Convention of October 25, 1966. The Organization shall be the successor to the Benelux Trademark Office and the Benelux Designs Office in respect of all rights and all obligations with effect from the date on which this convention enters into force.

2. The Protocol relating to the legal personality of the Benelux Trademark Office and the Benelux Designs Office of November 6, 1981 shall be repealed with effect from the date on which this convention enters into force.

Article 5.2 Repeal of the Benelux Conventions relating to trademarks and designs

The Benelux Convention Concerning Trademarks of March 19, 1962 and the Benelux Designs Convention of October 25, 1966 shall be repealed with effect from the date on which this convention enters into force.

Article 5.3 Maintenance of existing rights

The rights which existed under the Uniform Benelux Law on Marks and the Uniform Benelux Designs Law respectively shall be maintained.

Article 5.4 Initiation of opposition-related proceedings by class

Article III of the Protocol amending the Uniform Benelux Law on Marks of December 11, 2001 shall continue to apply.

Article 5.5 First Implementing Regulations

As an exception to Article 1.9 (2), the Executive Board of the Benelux Trademark Office and the Executive Board of the Benelux Designs Office shall have the power jointly to establish the first implementing regulations.

39Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

TITLE VI: FINAL PROVISIONS

Article 6.1 Ratification

This convention shall be ratified. The ratification instruments shall be deposited with the Government of the Kingdom of Belgium.

Article 6.2 Entry into force

1. Subject to paragraphs 2 and 3, this convention shall enter into force on the first day of the third month after the third ratification instrument has been deposited.

2. Repealed. 3. Article 5.5 shall apply on a provisional basis.

Article 6.3 Term of the Convention

1. This convention shall be entered into for an unspecified period. 2. This convention may be denounced by each of the High Contracting Parties. 3. Denunciation shall take effect no later than on the first day of the fifth year following the year of receipt of notification by the other

two High Contracting Parties, or on some other date fixed by joint agreement between the High Contracting Parties.

Article 6.4 Protocol on privileges and immunities

The protocol on privileges and immunities shall be an integral part of this convention.

Article 6.5 Implementing regulations

1. This convention shall be implemented through implementing regulations. The Director General shall publish these on the Office’s website.

2. If there should be any inconsistencies between the text of this convention and the text of the implementing regulations, the text of the convention shall prevail.

3. Amendments to the implementing regulations will not take effect until such time as publication has taken place as referred to in paragraph 1.

4. The High Contracting Parties shall also announce these amendments in their official journals.

40 Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles)1

1 Telle que modifiée par le Protocole du 11-12-2017 (date d’entrée en vigueur : 01-03-2019). Version non officielle, compilée par le BOIP.

Le Royaume de Belgique,

Le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg,

Le Royaume des Pays-Bas,

Animés du désir de:

• remplacer les conventions, les lois uniformes et les protocoles modificatifs en matière de marques et de dessins ou modèles Benelux par une seule convention régissant à la fois le droit des marques et le droit des dessins ou modèles de manière systématique et transparente;

• prévoir des procédures rapides et efficaces que possible pour adapter la réglementation Benelux à la réglementation communautaire et aux traités internationaux déjà ratifiés par les trois Hautes Parties Contractantes;

• remplacer le Bureau Benelux des Marques et le Bureau Benelux des Dessins ou Modèles par l’Organisation Benelux de la Propriété intellectuelle (marques, dessins ou modèles) assumant sa mission au travers d’organes de décision et d’exécution dotés de compétences propres et complémentaires;

• donner à la nouvelle Organisation une structure conforme aux conceptions actuelles en matière d’organisations internationales et garantissant son indépendance, notamment au travers d’un protocole sur les privilèges et immunités;

• rapprocher la nouvelle Organisation des entreprises en mettant pleinement ses compétences à profit pour lui permettre d’assumer de nouvelles tâches dans le domaine de la propriété intellectuelle et d’ouvrir des dépendances délocalisées;

• d’attribuer à la nouvelle Organisation, à titre non exclusif, une compétence d’évaluation ainsi qu’un droit d’initiative en ce qui concerne l’adaptation du droit Benelux des marques, dessins ou modèles;

Ont décidé de conclure une convention à cet effet et ont nommé leurs Plénipotentiaires, à savoir:

Son Excellence Monsieur K. de Gucht, Ministre des Affaires étrangères,

Son Excellence Monsieur B. R. Bot, Ministre des Affaires étrangères,

Son Excellence Monsieur J. Asselborn, Ministre des Affaires étrangères,

lesquels, après avoir communiqué leurs pleins pouvoirs trouvés en bonne et due forme, sont convenus des dispositions suivantes:

1 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

TITRE I: DISPOSITIONS GENERALES ET INSTITUTIONNELLES

Article 1.1 Expressions abrégées

Aux fins de la présente convention, on entend par: • Convention de Paris: la Convention de Paris pour la protection de la propriété industrielle du 20 mars 1883; • Arrangement de Madrid: l’Arrangement de Madrid concernant l’enregistrement international des marques du 14 avril 1891; • Protocole de Madrid: le Protocole relatif à l’Arrangement de Madrid concernant l’enregistrement international des marques

du 27 juin 1989; • Arrangement de Nice: l’Arrangement de Nice du 15 juin 1957 concernant la classification internationale des produits et services

aux fins de l’enregistrement des marques; • Arrangement de La Haye: l’Arrangement de La Haye concernant le dépôt international des dessins ou modèles industriels

du 6 novembre 1925; • Règlement sur la marque de l’Union européenne: le Règlement (UE) 2017/1001 du Parlement européen et du Conseil

du 14 juin 2017 sur la marque de l’Union européenne (texte codifié); • Marque de l’Union européenne: une marque de l’Union européenne, telle que visée dans le Règlement sur la marque

de l’Union européenne; • Législation de l’Union: la législation de l’Union européenne; • Règlement sur les dessins ou modèles communautaires: le Règlement (CE) n° 6/2002 du Conseil du 12 décembre 2001 sur

les dessins ou modèles communautaires; • Accord ADPIC: l’Accord sur les aspects des droits de propriété intellectuelle qui touchent au commerce du 15 avril 1994;

annexe 1C à l’Accord instituant l’Organisation mondiale du Commerce; • Bureau international: le Bureau international de la propriété intellectuelle, tel qu’institué par la Convention du 14 juillet 1967

instituant l’Organisation mondiale de la Propriété intellectuelle.

Article 1.2 Organisation

1. Il est institué une Organisation Benelux de la Propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), dénommée ci-après “l’Organisation”.

2. Les organes de l’Organisation sont: a. le Comité de Ministres visé au Traité instituant l’Union Benelux, dénommé ci-après “le Comité de Ministres”; b. le Conseil d’Administration de l’Office Benelux de la Propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles),

dénommé ci-après “le Conseil d’Administration”; c. l’Office Benelux de la Propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), dénommé ci-après “l’Office”.

Article 1.3 Objectifs

L’Organisation a pour mission: a. l’exécution de la présente convention et du règlement d’exécution; b. la promotion de la protection des marques et des dessins ou modèles dans les pays du Benelux; c. l’exécution de tâches additionnelles dans d’autres domaines du droit de la propriété intellectuelle que

le Conseil d’Administration désigne; d. l’évaluation permanente et, au besoin, l’adaptation du droit Benelux en matière de marques et de dessins ou modèles,

à la lumière, entre autres, des développements internationaux et communautaires.

2 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 1.4 Personnalité juridique

1. L’Organisation est dotée de la personnalité juridique internationale en vue de l’exercice de la mission qui lui est confiée. 2. L’Organisation est dotée de la personnalité juridique nationale et possède donc, sur le territoire des trois pays du Benelux,

la capacité juridique reconnue aux personnes morales nationales, dans la mesure nécessaire à l’accomplissement de sa mission et à la réalisation de ses objectifs, en particulier la capacité de conclure des contrats, d’acquérir et d’aliéner des biens mobiliers et immobiliers, de recevoir des fonds privés et publics et d’en disposer et d’ester en justice.

3. Le Directeur général de l’Office, dénommé ci-après “le Directeur général”, représente l’Organisation en matière judiciaire et extrajudiciaire.

Article 1.5 Siège

1. L’Organisation a son siège à La Haye. 2. L’Office est établi à La Haye. 3. Des dépendances de l’Office peuvent être établies ailleurs.

Article 1.6 Privilèges et immunités

1. Les privilèges et immunités nécessaires à l’exercice de la mission et à la réalisation des objectifs de l’Organisation sont fixés dans un protocole à conclure entre les Hautes Parties Contractantes.

2. L’Organisation peut conclure, avec une ou plusieurs des Hautes Parties Contractantes, des accords complémentaires en rapport avec l’établissement de services de l’Organisation sur le territoire de cet Etat ou de ces Etats, en vue de l’exécution des dispositions du protocole adopté conformément à l’alinéa premier en ce qui concerne ce ou ces Etats, ainsi que d’autres arrangements en vue d’assurer le bon fonctionnement de l’Organisation et la sauvegarde de ses intérêts.

Article 1.7 Compétences du Comité de Ministres

1. Le Comité de Ministres est habilité à apporter à la présente convention les modifications qui s’imposent pour assurer la conformité de la présente convention avec un traité international ou avec la réglementation de l’Union européenne en matière de marques et de dessins ou modèles. Les modifications sont publiées au journal officiel de chacune des Hautes Parties Contractantes.

2. Le Comité de Ministres est habilité à arrêter d’autres modifications de la présente convention que celles visées à l’alinéa premier. Ces modifications seront présentées pour assentiment ou approbation aux Hautes Parties Contractantes.

3. Le Comité de Ministres est habilité, le Conseil d’Administration entendu, à mandater le Directeur général pour négocier au nom de l’Organisation et, avec son autorisation, conclure des accords avec des Etats et des organisations intergouvernementales.

Article 1.8 Composition et fonctionnement du Conseil d’Administration

1. Le Conseil d’Administration est composé des membres désignés par les Hautes Parties Contractantes à raison d’un administrateur effectif et de deux administrateurs suppléants par pays.

2. Il prend ses décisions à l’unanimité des voix. 3. Il arrête son règlement d’ordre intérieur.

3 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 1.9 Compétences du Conseil d’Administration

1. Le Conseil d’Administration est habilité à faire au Comité de Ministres des propositions concernant les modifications de la présente convention qui sont indispensables pour assurer la conformité de la présente convention avec un traité international ou avec la réglementation de l’Union européenne et concernant d’autres modifications de la présente convention qu’il juge souhaitables.

2. Il établit le règlement d’exécution. 3. Il établit les règlements intérieur et financier de l’Office. 4. Il désigne les tâches additionnelles, telles que visées à l’article 1.3 sous c, dans d’autres domaines du droit de la propriété

intellectuelle. 5. Il décide de l’établissement de dépendances de l’Office. 6. Il nomme le Directeur général et, le Directeur général entendu, les Directeurs généraux adjoints et exerce à leur égard les pouvoirs

disciplinaires. 7. Il arrête annuellement le budget des recettes et dépenses et éventuellement les budgets modificatifs ou additionnels et précise,

dans le règlement financier, les modalités du contrôle qui sera exercé sur les budgets et leur exécution. Il approuve les comptes annuels établis par le Directeur général.

Article 1.10 Le Directeur général

1. La direction de l’Office est assurée par le Directeur général qui est responsable des activités de l’Office devant le Conseil d’Administration.

2. Le Directeur général est habilité, le Conseil d’Administration entendu, à déléguer aux Directeurs généraux adjoints l’exercice de certains des pouvoirs qui lui sont dévolus.

3. Le Directeur général et les Directeurs généraux adjoints sont des ressortissants des Etats membres. Les trois nationalités sont représentées au sein de la Direction.

Article 1.11 Compétences du Directeur général

1. Le Directeur général fait au Conseil d’Administration les propositions tendant à modifier le règlement d’exécution. 2. Il prend toutes les mesures, notamment administratives, en vue d’assurer la bonne exécution des tâches de l’Office. 3. Il exécute les règlements intérieur et financier de l’Office et fait au Conseil d’Administration les propositions tendant à les modifier. 4. Il nomme les agents et exerce l’autorité hiérarchique ainsi que le pouvoir disciplinaire à leur égard. 5. Il prépare et exécute le budget et établit les comptes annuels. 6. Il prend toutes autres mesures qu’il juge opportunes dans l’intérêt du fonctionnement de l’Office.

Article 1.12 Finances de l’Organisation

1. Les frais de fonctionnement de l’Organisation sont couverts par ses recettes. 2. Le Conseil d’Administration peut solliciter auprès des Hautes Parties Contractantes une contribution destinée à couvrir des

dépenses extraordinaires. Cette contribution est supportée pour moitié par le Royaume des Pays-Bas et pour moitié par l’Union économique belgo-luxembourgeoise.

4 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 1.13 Intervention des administrations nationales

1. Sur le montant des taxes perçues à l’occasion d’opérations effectuées par l’intermédiaire des administrations nationales, il est versé à celles-ci un pourcentage destiné à couvrir les frais de ces opérations; ce pourcentage est fixé par le règlement d’exécution.

2. Aucune taxe nationale concernant ces opérations ne peut être établie par les réglementations nationales.

Article 1.14 Reconnaissance des décisions judiciaires

L’autorité des décisions judiciaires rendues dans un des trois Etats en application de la présente convention est reconnue dans les deux autres et la radiation prononcée judiciairement est effectuée par l’Office à la demande de la partie la plus diligente, si: a. d’après la législation du pays où la décision a été rendue, l’expédition qui en est produite réunit les conditions nécessaires à son

authenticité; b. la décision n’est plus susceptible ni d’opposition, ni d’appel, ni de pourvoi en cassation.

Article 1.15 Cour de Justice Benelux

La Cour de Justice Benelux telle que visée à l’article 1er du Traité relatif à l’institution et au statut d’une Cour de Justice Benelux connaît des questions d’interprétation de la présente convention et du règlement d’exécution, à l’exception des questions d’interprétation relatives au protocole sur les privilèges et immunités visé à l’article 1.6, alinéa 1er.

Article 1.15bis Recours

1. Toute personne qui est partie à une procédure ayant conduit à une décision finale prise par l’Office dans l’exécution de ses tâches officielles en application des titres II, III et IV de la présente Convention, peut introduire un recours contre cette décision auprès de la Cour de Justice Benelux, afin d’obtenir l’annulation ou la révision de cette décision. Le délai pour l’introduction d’un recours est de deux mois à compter de la notification de la décision finale.

2. L’Organisation peut être représentée par un membre du personnel désigné à cette fin dans les procédures devant la Cour de Justice Benelux qui concernent les décisions de l’Office.

Article 1.16 Champ d’application

L’application de la présente convention est limitée au territoire du Royaume de Belgique, du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg et du Royaume des Pays-Bas en Europe, dénommé ci-après “territoire Benelux”.

5 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

TITRE II: DES MARQUES

Chapitre 1. Validité d’une marque

Article 2.1 Signes susceptibles de constituer une marque

Peuvent constituer des marques tous les signes, notamment les mots, y compris les noms de personnes, ou les dessins, les lettres, les chiffres, les couleurs, la forme d’un produit ou de son conditionnement, ou les sons, à condition que ces signes soient propres à: a. distinguer les produits ou les services d’une entreprise de ceux d’autres entreprises; et b. être représentés dans le registre d’une manière qui permette aux autorités compétentes et au public de déterminer précisément et

clairement l’objet bénéficiant de la protection conférée à leur titulaire.

Article 2.2 Acquisition du droit

Sans préjudice du droit de priorité prévu par la Convention de Paris ou du droit de priorité résultant de l’Accord ADPIC, le droit exclusif à la marque en vertu de la présente convention s’acquiert par l’enregistrement de la marque, dont la demande a été effectuée en territoire Benelux (marque Benelux) ou résultant d’un enregistrement auprès du Bureau international (marque internationale) dont la protection s’étend au territoire Benelux.

Article 2.2bis Motifs absolus de refus ou de nullité

1. Sont refusés à l’enregistrement ou sont susceptibles d’être déclarés nuls s’ils sont enregistrés: a. les signes qui ne peuvent constituer une marque; b. les marques qui sont dépourvues de caractère distinctif; c. les marques qui sont composées exclusivement de signes ou d’indications pouvant servir, dans le commerce, à désigner

l’espèce, la qualité, la quantité, la destination, la valeur, la provenance géographique ou l’époque de la production du produit ou de la prestation du service, ou d’autres caractéristiques de ceux-ci;

d. les marques qui sont composées exclusivement de signes ou d’indications devenus usuels dans le langage courant ou dans les habitudes loyales et constantes du commerce;

e. les signes constitués exclusivement: i. par la forme ou une autre caractéristique imposée par la nature même du produit; ii. par la forme ou une autre caractéristique du produit qui est nécessaire à l’obtention d’un résultat technique; iii. par la forme ou une autre caractéristique qui donne une valeur substantielle au produit;

f. les marques qui sont contraires à l’ordre public ou aux bonnes mœurs d’un des pays du Benelux; g. les marques qui sont de nature à tromper le public, par exemple, sur la nature, la qualité ou la provenance géographique

du produit ou du service; h. les marques qui, à défaut d’autorisation des autorités compétentes, sont à refuser ou à invalider en vertu de l’article 6ter

de la Convention de Paris; i. les marques exclues de l’enregistrement en application de la législation de l’Union ou du droit interne d’un des pays

du Benelux, ou d’accords internationaux auxquels l’Union européenne est partie ou ayant effet dans un pays du Benelux, qui prévoient la protection des appellations d’origine et des indications géographiques;

j. les marques exclues de l’enregistrement en application de la législation de l’Union ou d’accords internationaux auxquels l’Union européenne est partie qui prévoient la protection des mentions traditionnelles pour les vins;

k. les marques exclues de l’enregistrement en application de la législation de l’Union ou d’accords internationaux auxquels l’Union européenne est partie qui prévoient la protection des spécialités traditionnelles garanties;

6 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

l. les marques qui consistent en une dénomination d’une variété végétale antérieure enregistrée conformément à la législation de l’Union ou au droit interne d’un des pays du Benelux, ou d’accords internationaux auxquels l’Union européenne est partie

ou ayant effet dans un pays du Benelux, qui prévoient la protection des droits d’obtention végétale, ou la reproduisent dans leurs éléments essentiels, et qui portent sur des variétés végétales de la même espèce ou d’une espèce étroitement liée.

2. Une marque est susceptible d’être déclarée nulle si sa demande d’enregistrement a été faite de mauvaise foi. 3. Une marque n’est pas refusée à l’enregistrement en application de l’alinéa 1er, sous b, c ou d, si, avant la date de la demande

d’enregistrement et à la suite de l’usage qui en a été fait, elle a acquis un caractère distinctif. Une marque n’est pas déclarée nulle pour les mêmes motifs si, avant la date de la demande en nullité et à la suite de l’usage qui en a été fait, elle a acquis un caractère distinctif.

Article 2.2ter Motifs relatifs de refus ou de nullité

1. Une marque faisant l’objet d’une opposition est refusée à l’enregistrement ou, si elle est enregistrée, est susceptible d’être déclarée nulle: a. lorsqu’elle est identique à une marque antérieure et que les produits ou les services pour lesquels la marque a été demandée

ou a été enregistrée sont identiques à ceux pour lesquels la marque antérieure est protégée; b. lorsqu’en raison de son identité ou de sa similitude avec la marque antérieure et en raison de l’identité ou de la similitude

des produits ou des services que les marques désignent, il existe, dans l’esprit du public, un risque de confusion; ce risque de confusion comprend le risque d’association avec la marque antérieure.

2. Aux fins de l’alinéa 1er, on entend par “marques antérieures»: a. les marques dont la date de dépôt est antérieure à celle de la date de dépôt de la marque, compte tenu, le cas échéant,

du droit de priorité invoqué à l’appui de ces marques, et qui appartiennent aux catégories suivantes: i. les marques Benelux et les marques internationales dont la protection s’étend au territoire Benelux; ii. les marques de l’Union européenne, en ce compris les marques internationales dont la protection s’étend

à l’Union européenne; b. les marques de l’Union européenne qui revendiquent valablement l’ancienneté, conformément au règlement sur la marque

de l’Union européenne, d’une marque visée sous a, point i, même si cette dernière marque a fait l’objet d’une renonciation ou s’est éteinte;

c. les demandes de marques visées sous a et b, sous réserve de leur enregistrement; d. les marques qui, à la date de la demande d’enregistrement de la marque, ou, le cas échéant, à la date de la priorité invoquée

à l’appui de la demande d’enregistrement de la marque, sont “notoirement connues” dans le territoire Benelux au sens de l’article 6bis de la Convention de Paris.

3. Par ailleurs, une marque faisant l’objet d’une opposition est également refusée à l’enregistrement ou, si elle est enregistrée, est susceptible d’être déclarée nulle: a. si elle est identique ou similaire à une marque antérieure, indépendamment du fait que les produits ou les services pour

lesquels elle est demandée ou enregistrée sont identiques, similaires ou non similaires à ceux pour lesquels la marque antérieure est enregistrée, lorsque la marque antérieure jouit d’une renommée dans le territoire Benelux ou, dans le cas d’une marque de l’Union européenne, d’une renommée dans l’Union européenne et que l’usage de la marque postérieure sans juste motif tirerait indûment profit du caractère distinctif ou de la renommée de la marque antérieure ou qu’il leur porterait préjudice;

b. lorsque son enregistrement est demandé par l’agent ou le représentant du titulaire de la marque, en son propre nom et sans l’autorisation du titulaire, à moins que cet agent ou ce représentant ne justifie sa démarche;

c. lorsque et dans la mesure où, en application de la législation de l’Union ou du droit interne d’un des pays du Benelux qui prévoient la protection des appellations d’origine et des indications géographiques: i. une demande d’appellation d’origine ou d’indication géographique avait déjà été introduite conformément à la législation

de l’Union ou au droit interne d’un des pays du Benelux avant la date de la demande d’enregistrement de la marque ou avant la date de la priorité invoquée à l’appui de la demande, sous réserve d’un enregistrement ultérieur;

ii. cette appellation d’origine ou cette indication géographique confère à la personne autorisée en vertu du droit applicable à exercer les droits qui en découlent le droit d’interdire l’utilisation d’une marque postérieure.

7 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

4. Une marque ne doit pas nécessairement être refusée à l’enregistrement ou être déclarée nulle lorsque le titulaire de la marque antérieure ou du droit antérieur consent à l’enregistrement de la marque postérieure.

Article 2.2quater Motifs de refus ou de nullité pour une partie seulement des produits ou des services

Si un motif de refus d’enregistrement ou de nullité d’une marque n’existe que pour une partie des produits ou des services pour lesquels cette marque est déposée ou enregistrée, le refus de l’enregistrement ou la nullité ne s’étend qu’aux produits ou aux services concernés.

Chapitre 2. Demande, enregistrement et renouvellement

Article 2.5 Demande

1. La demande de marque Benelux se fait soit auprès des administrations nationales, soit auprès de l’Office, dans les formes fixées par règlement d’exécution et moyennant paiement des taxes dues. Il est vérifié si les pièces produites satisfont aux conditions prescrites pour la fixation de la date du dépôt et la date du dépôt est arrêtée. Le demandeur est informé sans délai et par écrit de la date du dépôt ou, le cas échéant, des motifs de ne pas l’attribuer.

2. S’il n’est pas satisfait aux autres dispositions du règlement d’exécution lors de la demande, le demandeur est informé sans délai et par écrit des conditions auxquelles il n’est pas satisfait et la possibilité lui est donnée d’y répondre.

3. La demande n’a plus d’effet si, dans le délai imparti, il n’est pas satisfait aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution. 4. Lorsque la demande se fait auprès d’une administration nationale, celle-ci transmet la demande à l’Office, soit sans délai après

avoir reçu la demande, soit après avoir constaté que la demande satisfait aux conditions prescrites. 5. L’Office publie la demande, conformément aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution, lorsque les conditions pour la fixation d’une

date de dépôt ont été remplies et que les produits ou services mentionnés ont été classés conformément à l’article 2.5bis.

Article 2.5bis Désignation et classification des produits et des services

1. Les produits et les services pour lesquels l’enregistrement d’une marque est demandé sont classés conformément à la classification visée dans l’Arrangement de Nice (classification de Nice).

2. Les produits et les services pour lesquels la protection est demandée sont désignés par le demandeur avec suffisamment de clarté et de précision pour permettre aux autorités compétentes et aux opérateurs économiques de déterminer, sur cette seule base, l’étendue de la protection demandée.

3. Aux fins de l’alinéa 2, les indications générales figurant dans les intitulés de classe de la classification de Nice ou d’autres termes généraux peuvent être utilisés, sous réserve qu’ils satisfassent aux normes requises en matière de clarté et de précision énoncées au présent article.

8 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

4. L’Office rejette une demande pour des indications ou des termes manquant de clarté ou imprécis lorsque le demandeur ne propose pas de formulation acceptable dans un délai fixé à cet effet par l’Office.

5. L’utilisation de termes généraux, y compris les indications générales figurant dans les intitulés de classe de la classification de Nice, est interprétée comme incluant tous les produits ou les services relevant clairement du sens littéral de l’indication ou du terme. L’utilisation de tels termes ou indications n’est pas interprétée comme incluant une demande pour des produits ou des services ne pouvant être ainsi compris.

6. Lorsque le demandeur sollicite l’enregistrement pour plus d’une classe, il regroupe les produits et les services selon les classes de la classification de Nice, chaque groupe de produits ou de services étant précédé du numéro de la classe dont il relève, et il présente les différents groupes dans l’ordre des classes.

7. Des produits et des services ne sont pas considérés comme similaires au motif qu’ils apparaissent dans la même classe de la classification de Nice. Des produits et des services ne sont pas considérés comme différents au motif qu’ils apparaissent dans des classes différentes de la classification de Nice.

Article 2.6 Revendication de priorité

1. La revendication d’un droit de priorité découlant de la Convention de Paris ou de l’accord ADPIC se fait lors de la demande. 2. Le droit de priorité visé à l’article 4 de la Convention de Paris s’applique également aux marques de service. 3. La revendication d’un droit de priorité peut aussi se faire par déclaration spéciale effectuée auprès de l’Office, dans les formes fixées

par règlement d’exécution et moyennant paiement des taxes dues dans le mois qui suit la demande. 4. L’absence d’une telle revendication entraîne la déchéance du droit de priorité.

Article 2.7 Recherche

1. L’Office peut offrir un service de recherche d’antériorités. 2. Le Directeur général en fixe les modalités.

Article 2.8 Enregistrement

1. Sans préjudice de l’application des articles 2.11, 2.14 et 2.16, la marque demandée est enregistrée, s’il est satisfait aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution, pour les produits ou services mentionnés par le demandeur. L’Office confirme l’enregistrement au titulaire de la marque.

2. Le demandeur peut, s’il est satisfait à toutes les conditions visées à l’article 2.5, demander à l’Office conformément aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution, de procéder sans délai à l’enregistrement de la demande. Les articles 2.11, 2.14 et 2.16 s’appliquent aux marques ainsi enregistrées, étant entendu que l’Office est habilité à décider de radier l’enregistrement.

Article 2.9 Durée et renouvellement de l’enregistrement

1. L’enregistrement d’une marque Benelux a une durée de 10 années prenant cours à la date du dépôt de la demande. 2. Le signe constitutif de la marque ne peut être modifié ni pendant la durée de l’enregistrement, ni à l’occasion de son

renouvellement. 3. L’enregistrement peut être renouvelé pour de nouvelles périodes de 10 années par le titulaire de la marque ou toute personne qui y

est autorisée par la loi ou par contrat.

9 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

4. Le renouvellement s’effectue par le seul paiement de la taxe fixée à cet effet. Si cette taxe n’est acquittée que pour une partie des produits ou des services pour lesquels la marque est enregistrée, l’enregistrement n’est renouvelé que pour les produits ou les services concernés. La taxe doit être payée dans les six mois précédant immédiatement l’expiration de l’enregistrement ou du renouvellement de celui-ci. A défaut, elle peut encore être payée dans les six mois qui suivent immédiatement la date de l’expiration de l’enregistrement ou du renouvellement de celui-ci, sous réserve du paiement simultané d’une surtaxe.

5. L’Office rappelle au titulaire de la marque l’expiration de l’enregistrement au moins six mois avant ladite expiration. 6. L’Office utilise pour ce rappel les dernières coordonnées du titulaire de la marque connues de l’Office. Le défaut d’envoi ou

de réception de ce rappel ne dispense pas des obligations résultant des alinéas 3 et 4. Il ne peut être invoqué ni en justice, ni à l’égard de l’Office.

7. Le renouvellement prend effet le jour suivant la date d’expiration de l’enregistrement. L’Office inscrit le renouvellement au registre.

Article 2.10 Demande internationale

1. Les demandes internationales des marques s’effectuent conformément aux dispositions de l’Arrangement de Madrid et du Protocole de Madrid. La taxe nationale prévue par l’article 8, sous (1) de l’Arrangement de Madrid et du Protocole de Madrid, ainsi que la taxe prévue par l’article 8, sous 7 (a) du Protocole de Madrid sont fixées par règlement d’exécution.

2. Sans préjudice de l’application des articles 2.5bis, 2.13 et 2.18, l’Office enregistre les demandes internationales pour lesquelles l’extension de la protection au territoire Benelux a été demandée.

3. Le demandeur peut demander à l’Office, conformément aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution, de procéder sans délai à l’enregistrement. L’article 2.8, alinéa 2, s’applique aux marques ainsi enregistrées.

Chapitre 3. Examen pour motifs absolus

Article 2.11 Refus pour motifs absolus

1. L’Office refuse d’enregistrer une marque lorsqu’il considère qu’un des motifs absolus visés à l’article 2.2bis, alinéa 1er, est applicable.

2. Le refus d’enregistrer doit concerner le signe constitutif de la marque en son intégralité. 3. L’Office informe le demandeur sans délai et par écrit de son intention de refuser l’enregistrement en tout ou en partie, lui en indique

les motifs et lui donne la faculté d’y répondre dans un délai à fixer par règlement d’exécution. 4. Si les objections de l’Office contre l’enregistrement n’ont pas été levées dans le délai imparti, l’enregistrement de la marque

est refusé en tout ou en partie. L’Office en informe le demandeur sans délai et par écrit en indiquant les motifs du refus et en mentionnant la voie de recours contre cette décision, visée à l’article 1.15bis.

5. Le refus ne devient définitif que lorsque la décision n’est plus susceptible de recours.

Article 2.13 Refus pour motifs absolus des demandes internationales

1. L’article 2.11, alinéas 1er et 2, est applicable aux demandes internationales. 2. L’Office informe le Bureau international sans délai et par écrit de son intention de refuser l’enregistrement, en indique les motifs au

moyen d’un avis de refus provisoire total ou partiel de la protection de la marque et donne au demandeur la faculté d’y répondre conformément aux dispositions établies par règlement d’exécution. L’article 2.11, alinéas 4 et 5, est applicable.

10 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

3. Abrogé 4. Abrogé

Chapitre 4. Opposition

Article 2.14 Introduction de la procédure

1. Dans un délai de deux mois à compter de la publication de la demande, une opposition écrite peut être introduite auprès de l’Office sur base des motifs relatifs prévus à l’article 2.2ter.

2. L’opposition peut être introduite: a. dans les cas visés à l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 1er et alinéa 3, sous a, par les titulaires de marques antérieures, ainsi que par

les licenciés habilités par les titulaires de ces marques; b. dans le cas visé à l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 3, sous b, par les titulaires de marques visées à cette disposition.

Dans ce cas, la cession visée à l’article 2.20ter, alinéa 1er, sous b, peut également être demandée; c. dans le cas visé à l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 3, sous c, par les personnes autorisées, en vertu du droit applicable, à exercer ces droits.

3. L’opposition peut être formée sur la base d’un ou de plusieurs droits antérieurs et sur la base d’une partie ou de la totalité des produits et des services pour lesquels le droit antérieur est protégé ou déposé, et peut porter sur une partie ou la totalité des produits ou des services pour lesquels est demandée la marque contestée.

4. L’opposition n’est réputée avoir été formée qu’après le paiement des taxes dues.

Article 2.16 Déroulement de la procédure

1. L’Office traite l’opposition dans un délai raisonnable conformément aux dispositions fixées au règlement d’exécution et respecte le principe du contradictoire.

2. La procédure d’opposition est suspendue: a. si l’opposition repose sur l’article 2.14, alinéa 2, sous a, lorsque la marque antérieure:

i. n’a pas encore été enregistrée; ii. a été enregistrée sans délai conformément à l’article 2.8, alinéa 2, et est l’objet d’une procédure de refus pour motifs

absolus ou d’une opposition; iii. est l’objet d’une action en nullité ou en déchéance;

b. si l’opposition repose sur l’article 2.14, alinéa 2, sous c, lorsqu’elle est fondée sur une demande d’enregistrement d’une appellation d’origine ou d’une indication géographique, jusqu’à ce qu’une décision définitive ait été rendue dans le cadre de cette procédure;

c. lorsque la marque contestée: i. est l’objet d’une procédure de refus pour motifs absolus; ii. a été enregistrée sans délai conformément à l’article 2.8, alinéa 2, et est l’objet d’une action judiciaire en nullité

ou en déchéance; d. sur demande conjointe des parties; e. lorsque d’autres circonstances justifient une telle suspension.

11 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

3. La procédure d’opposition est clôturée: a. lorsque l’opposant a perdu qualité pour agir; b. lorsque le défendeur ne réagit pas à l’opposition introduite. Dans ce cas, la demande n’a plus d’effet; c. lorsque l’opposition est devenue sans objet, soit parce qu’elle est retirée, soit parce que la demande faisant l’objet

de l’opposition est devenue sans effet; d. lorsque la marque antérieure ou le droit antérieur n’est plus valable; e. si l’opposition repose sur l’article 2.14, alinéa 2, sous a, et que l’opposant n’a pas produit dans le délai imparti les preuves

d’usage de sa marque antérieure comme prévu à l’article 2.16bis. Dans ces cas, une partie des taxes payées est restituée.

4. Après avoir terminé l’examen de l’opposition, l’Office statue dans les meilleurs délais. Lorsque l’opposition est reconnue justifiée, l’Office refuse d’enregistrer la marque en tout ou en partie ou décide d’inscrire dans le registre la cession prévue à l’article 2.20ter, alinéa 1er, sous b. Dans le cas contraire, l’opposition est rejetée. L’Office en informe les parties sans délai et par écrit, en mentionnant la voie de recours contre cette décision, visée à l’article 1.15bis. La décision de l’Office ne devient définitive que lorsqu’elle n’est plus susceptible de recours. L’Office n’est pas partie à un recours contre sa décision.

5. Les dépens sont à charge de la partie succombante. Ils sont fixés conformément aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution. Les dépens ne sont pas dus en cas de succès partiel de l’opposition. La décision de l’Office concernant les dépens forme titre exécutoire. Son exécution forcée est régie par les règles en vigueur dans l’Etat sur le territoire duquel elle a lieu.

Article 2.16bis Non-usage comme moyen de défense dans une procédure d’opposition

1. Dans une procédure d’opposition au titre de l’article 2.14, alinéa 2, sous a, lorsque, à la date de dépôt ou à la date de priorité de la marque postérieure, la période de cinq ans durant laquelle la marque antérieure devait faire l’objet d’un usage sérieux, tel que prévu à l’article 2.23bis, a expiré, l’opposant fournit, sur requête du demandeur, la preuve que la marque antérieure a fait l’objet d’un usage sérieux, tel que prévu à l’article 2.23bis, durant la période de cinq ans ayant précédé la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité de la marque postérieure, ou qu’il existait de justes motifs pour son non-usage.

2. Si la marque antérieure n’a été utilisée que pour une partie des produits ou des services pour lesquels elle est enregistrée, elle n’est réputée enregistrée, aux fins de l’examen de l’opposition prévu à l’alinéa 1er, que pour cette partie des produits ou des services.

3. Les alinéas 1er et 2 du présent article sont également applicables lorsque la marque antérieure est une marque de l’Union européenne. Dans ce cas, l’usage sérieux est établi conformément à l’article 18 du règlement sur la marque de l’Union européenne.

Article 2.18 Opposition aux demandes internationales

1. Pendant un délai de deux mois à compter de la publication par le Bureau international, opposition peut être faite auprès de l’Office à une demande internationale dont l’extension de la protection au territoire Benelux a été demandée. Les articles 2.14 à 2.16bis sont applicables.

2. L’Office informe sans délai et par écrit le Bureau international de l’opposition introduite tout en mentionnant les dispositions des articles 2.14 à 2.16bis ainsi que les dispositions y relatives fixées au règlement d’exécution.

12 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Chapitre 5. Droits du titulaire

Article 2.19 Obligation d’enregistrement

1. A l’exception du titulaire d’une marque notoirement connue au sens de l’article 6bis de la Convention de Paris, nul ne peut, quelle que soit la nature de l’action introduite, revendiquer en justice un signe considéré comme marque, au sens de l’article 2.1, sauf s’il peut faire valoir l’enregistrement de la marque qu’il a demandée.

2. Le cas échéant, l’irrecevabilité est soulevée d’office par le juge. 3. Les dispositions du présent titre n’infirment en rien le droit des usagers d’un signe qui n’est pas considéré comme marque, au sens

de l’article 2.1, d’invoquer le droit commun dans la mesure où il permet de s’opposer à l’emploi illicite de ce signe.

Article 2.20 Droits conférés par la marque

1. L’enregistrement d’une marque visé à l’article 2.2 confère à son titulaire un droit exclusif sur celle-ci. 2. Sans préjudice des droits des titulaires acquis avant la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité de la marque enregistrée et sans

préjudice de l’application éventuelle du droit commun en matière de responsabilité civile, le titulaire de ladite marque enregistrée est habilité à interdire à tout tiers, en l’absence de son consentement, de faire usage d’un signe lorsque: a. le signe est identique à la marque et est utilisé dans la vie des affaires pour des produits ou services identiques à ceux

pour lesquels celle-ci est enregistrée; b. le signe est identique ou similaire à la marque et est utilisé dans la vie des affaires, pour des produits ou des services identiques

ou similaires aux produits ou services pour lesquels la marque est enregistrée, s’il existe, dans l’esprit du public, un risque de confusion; le risque de confusion comprend le risque d’association entre le signe et la marque;

c. le signe est identique ou similaire à la marque, indépendamment du fait qu’il soit utilisé pour des produits ou des services qui sont identiques, similaires ou non similaires à ceux pour lesquels la marque est enregistrée, lorsque celle-ci jouit d’une renommée dans le territoire Benelux et que l’usage du signe dans la vie des affaires sans juste motif tire indûment profit du caractère distinctif ou de la renommée de la marque ou leur porte préjudice;

d. le signe est utilisé à des fins autres que celles de distinguer les produits ou services, lorsque l’usage de ce signe sans juste motif tire indûment profit du caractère distinctif ou de la renommée de la marque ou leur porte préjudice.

3. Si les conditions énoncées à l’alinéa 2, sous a à c, sont remplies, il peut être interdit en particulier: a. d’apposer le signe sur les produits ou sur leur conditionnement; b. d’offrir les produits, de les mettre sur le marché ou de les détenir à ces fins sous le signe, ou d’offrir ou de fournir

des services sous le signe; c. d’importer ou d’exporter les produits sous le signe; d. de faire usage du signe comme nom commercial ou dénomination sociale ou comme partie d’un nom commercial ou

d’une dénomination sociale; e. d’utiliser le signe dans les papiers d’affaires et la publicité; f. de faire usage du signe dans des publicités comparatives d’une manière contraire à la directive 2006/114/CE du

Parlement européen et du Conseil du 12 décembre 2006 en matière de publicité trompeuse et de publicité comparative. 4. Sans préjudice des droits des titulaires acquis avant la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité de la marque enregistrée, le titulaire

de cette marque enregistrée est en outre habilité à empêcher tout tiers d’introduire, dans la vie des affaires, des produits dans le territoire Benelux, sans qu’ils y soient mis en libre pratique, lorsque ces produits, conditionnement inclus, proviennent de pays tiers et portent sans autorisation une marque qui est identique à la marque enregistrée pour ces produits ou qui ne peut être distinguée, dans ses aspects essentiels, de cette marque. Le pouvoir conféré au titulaire de la marque en vertu du premier alinéa s’éteint si, au cours de la procédure visant à déterminer s’il a été porté atteinte à la marque enregistrée, engagée conformément au règlement (UE) no 608/2013 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 12 juin 2013 concernant le contrôle, par les autorités douanières, du respect des droits de propriété intellectuelle et abrogeant le règlement (CE) no 1383/2003 du Conseil, le déclarant ou le détenteur des produits apporte la preuve que le titulaire de la marque enregistrée n’a pas le droit d’interdire la mise sur le marché des produits dans le pays de destination finale.

13 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

5. Lorsqu’il existe un risque qu’il puisse être fait usage, pour des produits ou des services, d’un conditionnement, d’étiquettes, de marquages, de dispositifs de sécurité ou d’authentification ou de tout autre support sur lequel est apposée la marque, et que cet usage porterait atteinte aux droits conférés au titulaire d’une marque par les alinéas 2 et 3, le titulaire de cette marque a le droit d’interdire les actes ci-après lorsqu’ils sont effectués dans la vie des affaires: a. l’apposition d’un signe identique ou similaire à la marque sur le conditionnement, les étiquettes, les marquages, les dispositifs

de sécurité ou d’authentification ou tout autre support sur lequel la marque peut être apposée; b. l’offre, la mise sur le marché ou la détention à ces fins, l’importation ou l’exportation de conditionnements, d’étiquettes,

de marquages, de dispositifs de sécurité ou d’authentification ou tout autre support sur lequel la marque est apposée. 6. Le droit exclusif à une marque rédigée dans l’une des langues nationales ou régionales du territoire Benelux s’étend de plein droit

aux traductions dans une autre de ces langues. L’appréciation de la ressemblance résultant de traductions, lorsqu’il s’agit d’une ou plusieurs langues étrangères au territoire précité, appartient au tribunal.

Article 2.20bis Reproduction de la marque dans des dictionnaires

Si la reproduction d’une marque dans un dictionnaire, une encyclopédie ou un ouvrage de référence similaire, sous forme imprimée ou électronique, donne l’impression qu’elle constitue le terme générique désignant les produits ou les services pour lesquels la marque est enregistrée, l’éditeur veille, sur demande du titulaire de la marque, à ce que la reproduction de la marque soit, sans tarder et, dans le cas d’ouvrages imprimés, au plus tard lors de l’édition suivante de l’ouvrage, accompagnée de l’indication qu’il s’agit d’une marque enregistrée.

Article 2.20ter Interdiction d’utiliser une marque enregistrée au nom d’un agent ou d’un représentant

1. Si une marque a été enregistrée au nom de l’agent ou du représentant de celui qui est titulaire de cette marque, sans l’autorisation du titulaire, celui-ci a le droit d’agir de l’une ou de l’autre des façons suivantes, ou des deux: a. s’opposer à l’utilisation de la marque par son agent ou représentant; b. réclamer la cession de la marque à son profit.

2. L’alinéa 1er ne s’applique pas si l’agent ou le représentant justifie sa démarche.

Article 2.21 Réparation des dommages et autres actions

1. Dans les mêmes conditions qu’à l’article 2.20, alinéa 2, le droit exclusif à la marque permet au titulaire de réclamer réparation de tout dommage qu’il subirait à la suite de l’usage au sens de cette disposition.

2. Le tribunal qui fixe les dommages-intérêts: a. prend en considération tous les aspects appropriés tels que les conséquences économiques négatives, notamment le manque

à gagner, subies par la partie lésée, les bénéfices injustement réalisés par le contrevenant et, dans des cas appropriés, des éléments autres que des facteurs économiques, comme le préjudice moral causé au titulaire de la marque du fait de l’atteinte; ou

b. à titre d’alternative pour la disposition sous a, peut décider, dans des cas appropriés, de fixer un montant forfaitaire de dommages-intérêts, sur la base d’éléments tels que, au moins, le montant des redevances ou droits qui auraient été dus si le contrevenant avait demandé l’autorisation d’utiliser la marque.

3. En outre, le tribunal peut, à la demande du titulaire de la marque, ordonner à titre de dommages-intérêts la délivrance au titulaire de la marque des biens qui portent atteinte à un droit de marque, ainsi que, dans des cas appropriés, des matériaux et instruments ayant principalement servi à la fabrication de ces biens; le tribunal peut ordonner que la délivrance ne sera faite que contre paiement par le demandeur d’une indemnité qu’il fixe.

4. Outre l’action en réparation ou au lieu de celle-ci, le titulaire de la marque peut intenter une action en cession du bénéfice réalisé à la suite de l’usage visé à l’article 2.20, alinéa 2, ainsi qu’en reddition de compte à cet égard. Le tribunal rejettera la demande s’il estime que cet usage n’est pas de mauvaise foi ou que les circonstances de la cause ne donnent pas lieu à pareille condamnation.

14 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

5. Le titulaire de la marque peut intenter l’action en réparation ou en cession du bénéfice au nom du licencié, sans préjudice du droit accordé à ce dernier à l’article 2.32, alinéas 5 et 6.

6. Le titulaire de la marque peut exiger une indemnité raisonnable de celui qui, pendant la période située entre la date de publication de la demande et la date d’enregistrement de la marque, a effectué des actes tels que visés à l’article 2.20, alinéa 2, dans la mesure où le titulaire de la marque a acquis des droits exclusifs à ce titre.

Article 2.22 Demandes additionnelles

1. Sans préjudice des éventuels dommages-intérêts dus au titulaire de la marque à raison de l’atteinte et sans dédommagement d’aucune sorte, le tribunal peut ordonner à la demande du titulaire de la marque le rappel des circuits commerciaux, la mise à l’écart définitive des circuits commerciaux ou la destruction des biens qui portent atteinte à un droit de marque, ainsi que, dans les cas appropriés, des matériaux et instruments ayant principalement servi à la fabrication de ces biens. Ces mesures sont mises en œuvre aux frais du contrevenant, à moins que des raisons particulières ne s’y opposent. Lors de l’appréciation d’une demande telle que visée dans le présent alinéa, il sera tenu compte de la proportionnalité entre la gravité de l’atteinte et les mesures correctives ordonnées, ainsi que des intérêts des tiers.

2. Les dispositions du droit national relatives aux mesures conservatoires et à l’exécution forcée des jugements et actes authentiques sont applicables.

3. Dans la mesure où le droit national ne le prévoit pas et à la demande du titulaire de la marque, le tribunal peut, en vertu de la présente disposition, rendre à l’encontre du contrevenant supposé ou à l’encontre d’un intermédiaire dont les services sont utilisés par un tiers pour porter atteinte à un droit de marque, une ordonnance de référé: a. visant à prévenir toute atteinte imminente à un droit de marque, ou b. visant à interdire, à titre provisoire et sous réserve, le cas échéant, du paiement d’une astreinte, que les atteintes présumées

à un droit de marque se poursuivent, ou c. visant à subordonner la poursuite des atteintes présumées à la constitution de garanties destinées à assurer l’indemnisation

du titulaire de la marque. 4. A la demande du titulaire de la marque dans une action relative à une atteinte, le tribunal peut ordonner à l’auteur de l’atteinte à

son droit de fournir au titulaire toutes les informations dont il dispose concernant la provenance et les réseaux de distribution des biens et services qui ont porté atteinte à la marque et de lui communiquer toutes les données s’y rapportant, pour autant que cette mesure apparaisse justifiée et proportionnée.

5. L’injonction visée à l’alinéa 4 peut être faite également à la personne qui est en possession des marchandises contrefaisantes à l’échelle commerciale, qui a utilisé des services contrefaisants à l’échelle commerciale ou qui a fourni, à l’échelle commerciale, des services utilisés dans des activités contrefaisantes.

6. Le tribunal peut, à la demande du titulaire de la marque, rendre une injonction de cessation de services à l’encontre des intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés par un tiers pour porter atteinte à son droit de marque.

7. Le tribunal peut ordonner, à la demande du requérant et aux frais du contrevenant, que des mesures de publication appropriées soient prises pour la diffusion de l’information concernant la décision.

Article 2.23 Restriction au droit exclusif

1. Une marque ne permet pas à son titulaire d’interdire à un tiers l’usage, dans la vie des affaires: a. de son nom ou de son adresse, lorsque ce tiers est une personne physique; b. de signes ou d’indications qui sont dépourvus de caractère distinctif ou qui se rapportent à l’espèce, à la qualité, à la quantité,

à la destination, à la valeur, à la provenance géographique, à l’époque de la production du produit ou de la prestation du service ou à d’autres caractéristiques de ceux-ci;

c. de la marque pour désigner ou mentionner des produits ou des services comme étant ceux du titulaire de cette marque, en particulier lorsque cet usage de la marque est nécessaire pour indiquer la destination d’un produit ou service, notamment en tant qu’accessoire ou pièce détachée;

pour autant que l’usage par le tiers soit fait conformément aux usages honnêtes en matière industrielle ou commerciale.

15 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

2. Une marque ne permet pas à son titulaire d’interdire à un tiers l’usage, dans la vie des affaires, d’un droit antérieur de portée locale, si ce droit est reconnu en vertu des dispositions légales de l’un des pays du Benelux et si l’usage de ce droit a lieu dans les limites du territoire où il est reconnu.

3. Une marque ne permet pas à son titulaire d’interdire l’usage de celle-ci pour des produits qui ont été mis sur le marché dans l’Espace économique européen sous cette marque par le titulaire ou avec son consentement, à moins que des motifs légitimes ne justifient que le titulaire s’oppose à la commercialisation ultérieure des produits, notamment lorsque l’état des produits est modifié ou altéré après leur mise sur le marché.

Article 2.23bis Usage sérieux de la marque

1. Si, dans une période de cinq ans suivant la date à laquelle la procédure d’enregistrement est terminée, la marque n’a pas fait l’objet d’un usage sérieux par le titulaire dans le territoire Benelux pour les produits ou les services pour lesquels elle est enregistrée, ou si un tel usage a été suspendu pendant une période ininterrompue de cinq ans, la marque est soumise aux limites et sanctions prévues aux articles 2.16bis, alinéas 1er et 2, 2.23ter, 2.27, alinéa 2, et 2.30quinquies, alinéas 3 et 4, sauf juste motif pour le non-usage.

2. Dans le cas visé à l’article 2.8, alinéa 2, la période de cinq ans visée à l’alinéa 1er est calculée à partir de la date à laquelle la marque ne peut plus faire l’objet d’un refus pour motifs absolus ou d’une opposition ou, si un refus a été prononcé ou une opposition a été formée, à partir de la date à laquelle une décision levant les objections pour motifs absolus de l’Office ou clôturant l’opposition est devenue définitive ou l’opposition a été retirée.

3. En ce qui concerne les marques qui ont fait l’objet d’un enregistrement international ayant effet dans le territoire Benelux, la période de cinq ans visée à l’alinéa 1er est calculée à partir de la date à laquelle la marque ne peut plus faire l’objet d’un refus ou d’une opposition. Si une opposition a été formée ou si un refus fondé sur des motifs absolus a été notifié, la période est calculée à partir de la date à laquelle une décision clôturant la procédure d’opposition ou une décision concernant les motifs absolus de refus est devenue définitive ou à laquelle l’opposition a été retirée.

4. La date du début de la période de cinq ans visée aux alinéas 1er et 2 est inscrite dans le registre. 5. Sont également considérés comme usage au sens de l’alinéa 1er:

a. l’usage de la marque sous une forme qui diffère par des éléments n’altérant pas son caractère distinctif dans la forme sous laquelle celle-ci a été enregistrée, que la marque soit ou non enregistrée aussi au nom du titulaire sous la forme utilisée;

b. l’apposition de la marque sur les produits ou sur leur conditionnement dans le territoire Benelux dans le seul but de l’exportation.

6. L’usage de la marque avec le consentement du titulaire est considéré comme fait par le titulaire.

Article 2.23ter Non-usage comme moyen de défense dans une procédure en contrefaçon

Le titulaire d’une marque ne peut interdire l’usage d’un signe que dans la mesure où il n’est pas susceptible d’être déchu de ses droits conformément à l’article 2.27, alinéas 2 à 5, au moment où l’action en contrefaçon est intentée. À la demande du défendeur, le titulaire de la marque fournit la preuve que, durant la période de cinq ans ayant précédé la date d’introduction de l’action, la marque a fait l’objet d’un usage sérieux, tel que prévu à l’article 2.23bis, pour les produits ou les services pour lesquels elle est enregistrée et que le titulaire invoque à l’appui de son action, ou qu’il existe de justes motifs pour son non-usage, sous réserve que la procédure d’enregistrement de la marque ait été, à la date d’introduction de l’action, terminée depuis au moins cinq ans.

Article 2.23quater Droit d’intervention du titulaire d’une marque enregistrée postérieurement comme moyen de défense dans une procédure en contrefaçon

1. Lors d’une procédure en contrefaçon, le titulaire d’une marque ne peut interdire l’usage d’une marque enregistrée postérieurement lorsque cette marque postérieure n’aurait pas été déclarée nulle en vertu de l’article 2.30quinquies, alinéa 3, de l’article 2.30sexies ou de l’article 2.30septies, alinéa 1er.

16 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

2. Lors d’une procédure en contrefaçon, le titulaire d’une marque ne peut interdire l’usage d’une marque de l’Union européenne enregistrée postérieurement lorsque cette marque postérieure n’aurait pas été déclarée nulle en vertu de l’article 60, paragraphe 1, 3 ou 4, de l’article 61, paragraphe 1 ou 2, ou de l’article 64, paragraphe 2, du règlement sur la marque de l’Union européenne.

3. Lorsque le titulaire d’une marque ne peut interdire, en vertu des alinéas 1er ou 2, l’usage d’une marque enregistrée postérieurement, le titulaire de cette marque enregistrée postérieurement ne peut pas interdire l’usage de la marque antérieure dans une action en contrefaçon, bien que le droit antérieur ne puisse plus être invoqué contre la marque postérieure.

Chapitre 6. Fin du droit

Article 2.25 Radiation sur requête

1. Le titulaire d’une marque Benelux peut en tout temps requérir la radiation de son enregistrement. 2. Toutefois, si une licence a été enregistrée, la radiation de l’enregistrement de la marque ne peut s’effectuer que sur requête

conjointe du titulaire de la marque et du licencié. La disposition de la phrase précédente s’applique en cas d’enregistrement d’un droit réel ou d’une exécution forcée.

3. La radiation a effet pour l’ensemble du territoire Benelux. 4. La renonciation à la protection qui résulte d’une demande internationale, limitée à une partie du territoire Benelux, a effet pour

l’ensemble de ce territoire, nonobstant toute déclaration contraire du titulaire. 5. La radiation volontaire peut être limitée à un ou plusieurs des produits ou services pour lesquels la marque est enregistrée.

Article 2.26 Extinction du droit

Le droit à la marque s’éteint: a. par la radiation volontaire ou l’expiration de l’enregistrement de la marque; b. par la radiation ou l’expiration de l’enregistrement international, ou par la renonciation à la protection pour le territoire Benelux ou,

conformément aux dispositions de l’article 6 de l’Arrangement et du Protocole de Madrid, par suite du fait que la marque ne jouit plus de la protection légale dans le pays d’origine.

2. Abrogé 3. Abrogé

Article 2.27 Déchéance du droit

1. Le titulaire d’une marque peut être déchu de ses droits lorsque, après la date de son enregistrement, la marque: a. est devenue, par le fait de l’activité ou de l’inactivité de son titulaire, la désignation usuelle dans le commerce d’un produit

ou d’un service pour lequel elle est enregistrée; b. risque, par suite de l’usage qui en est fait par le titulaire ou avec son consentement pour les produits ou les services

pour lesquels elle est enregistrée, d’induire le public en erreur notamment sur la nature, la qualité ou la provenance géographique de ces produits ou de ces services.

2. Le titulaire d’une marque peut également être déchu de ses droits lorsqu’il n’y a pas eu d’usage sérieux de celle-ci en vertu de l’article 2.23bis.

17 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

3. La déchéance du droit à la marque en vertu de l’alinéa 2 ne peut plus être invoquée si, entre l’expiration de la période de cinq années visée à l’article 2.23bis et la présentation de la demande en déchéance, la marque a fait l’objet d’un commencement ou d’une reprise d’usage sérieux. Cependant, le commencement ou la reprise d’usage qui a lieu dans un délai de trois mois avant la présentation de la demande de déchéance n’est pas pris en considération lorsque les préparatifs pour le commencement ou la reprise de l’usage interviennent seulement après que le titulaire a appris qu’une demande en déchéance pourrait être présentée.

4. Le titulaire du droit à la marque dont la déchéance ne peut plus être invoquée en vertu de l’alinéa 3 ne peut s’opposer, en vertu de l’article 2.20, alinéa 1er, sous a, b et c, à l’usage d’une marque dont la demande a été effectuée pendant la période durant laquelle le droit antérieur à la marque pouvait être déclaré déchu en vertu de l’alinéa 2.

5. Le titulaire du droit à la marque dont la déchéance ne peut plus être invoquée en vertu de l’alinéa 3 ne peut, conformément à la disposition de l’article 2.28, alinéa 2, invoquer la nullité de l’enregistrement d’une marque dont la demande a été effectuée pendant la période durant laquelle le droit antérieur à la marque pouvait être déclaré déchu en vertu de l’alinéa 2.

Chapitre 6bis. Procédure de nullité ou de déchéance devant les tribunaux

Article 2.28 Invocation de la nullité ou de la déchéance devant les tribunaux

1. La nullité pour motifs absolus peut être invoquée par tout intéressé, y compris le Ministère public. 2. La nullité pour motifs relatifs peut être invoquée par tout intéressé, pour autant que le titulaire de la marque antérieure visé

à l’article 2.2ter, alinéas 1er et 3, sous a ou b, ou la personne autorisée en vertu du droit applicable à exercer les droits visés à l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 3, sous c, prenne part à l’action.

3. Lorsque l’action en nullité est introduite conformément à l’alinéa 1er par le Ministère public, seuls les tribunaux de Bruxelles, La Haye et Luxembourg sont compétents. L’action introduite par le Ministère public suspend toute autre action intentée sur la même base.

4. Tout intéressé peut invoquer la déchéance du droit de marque.

18 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Chapitre 6ter. Procédure de nullité ou de déchéance auprès de l’Office

Article 2.30bis Introduction de la demande

1. Une demande en nullité ou en déchéance de l’enregistrement d’une marque peut être présentée auprès de l’Office: a. sur la base des motifs de nullité absolus visés à l’article 2.2bis et des motifs de déchéance visés à l’article 2.27 par toute

personne physique ou morale ainsi que tout groupement ou organe constitué pour la représentation des intérêts de fabricants, de producteurs, de prestataires de services, de commerçants ou de consommateurs et qui, aux termes du droit qui leur est applicable, ont la capacité, en leur propre nom, d’ester en justice;

b. sur la base des motifs de nullité relatifs visés à l’article 2.2ter: i. dans les cas visés à l’article 2.2ter, alinéas 1er et 3, sous a, par les titulaires de marques antérieures et les licenciés

autorisés par ces titulaires; ii. dans le cas visé à l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 3, sous b, par les titulaires de marques visés dans cette disposition; dans ce cas,

la cession visée à l’article 2.20ter, alinéa 1er, sous b, peut également être demandée; iii. dans le cas visé à l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 3, sous c, par les personnes autorisées en vertu du droit applicable à exercer

les droits visés dans cette disposition. 2. La demande en nullité ou en déchéance n’est réputée avoir été formée qu’après le paiement des taxes dues.

Article 2.30ter Déroulement de la procédure

1. L’Office traite la demande en nullité ou en déchéance dans un délai raisonnable conformément aux dispositions fixées au règlement d’exécution et respecte le principe du contradictoire.

2. La procédure est suspendue: a. si la demande est basée sur l’article 2.30bis, alinéa 1er, sous b, point i, lorsque la marque antérieure:

b. si la demande est basée sur l’article 2.30bis, alinéa 1er, sous b, point iii, lorsqu’elle est fondée sur une demande d’appellation d’origine ou d’indication géographique, jusqu’à ce qu’une décision définitive ait été prise sur cette demande;

c. lorsque la marque contestée: i. n’a pas encore été enregistrée; ii. a été enregistrée sans délai conformément à l’article 2.8, alinéa 2, et est l’objet d’une procédure de refus pour motifs

absolus ou d’une opposition; iii. est l’objet d’une action judiciaire en nullité ou en déchéance;

d. sur demande conjointe des parties; e. lorsque d’autres circonstances justifient une telle suspension.

3. La procédure est clôturée: a. lorsque le demandeur a perdu qualité pour agir; b. lorsque le défendeur ne réagit pas à la demande introduite; dans ce cas, l’enregistrement est radié; c. lorsque la demande est devenue sans objet, soit parce qu’elle est retirée, soit parce que l’enregistrement faisant l’objet

de la demande est devenu sans effet; d. lorsque la demande est fondée sur l’article 2.30bis, alinéa 1er, sous b, et que la marque antérieure ou le droit antérieur

n’est plus valable; e. lorsque la demande est basée sur l’article 2.30bis, alinéa 1er, sous b, point i, et que le demandeur n’a fourni dans le délai

imparti aucune preuve d’usage de sa marque antérieure comme prévu à l’article 2.30quinquies. Dans ces cas, une partie des taxes payées est restituée.

19 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

4. Après avoir terminé l’examen de la demande en nullité ou en déchéance, l’Office statue dans les meilleurs délais. Lorsque la demande est reconnue justifiée, l’Office radie l’enregistrement en tout ou en partie ou décide d’inscrire dans le registre la cession prévue à l’article 2.20ter, alinéa 1er, sous b. Dans le cas contraire, la demande est rejetée. L’Office en informe les parties sans délai et par écrit, en mentionnant la voie de recours contre cette décision, visée à l’article 1.15bis. La décision de l’Office ne devient définitive que lorsqu’elle n’est plus susceptible de recours. L’Office n’est pas partie à un recours contre sa décision.

5. Les dépens sont à charge de la partie succombante. Ils sont fixés conformément aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution. Les dépens ne sont pas dus en cas de succès partiel de la demande. La décision de l’Office concernant les dépens forme titre exécutoire. Son exécution forcée est régie par les règles en vigueur dans l’Etat sur le territoire duquel elle a lieu.

Article 2.30quater Demande en nullité ou en déchéance de demandes internationales

1. Une demande en nullité ou en déchéance peut être formée auprès de l’Office contre une demande internationale dont l’extension de la protection au territoire Benelux a été demandée. Les articles 2.30bis et 2.30ter sont applicables.

2. L’Office informe sans délai et par écrit le Bureau international de la demande introduite, tout en mentionnant les dispositions des articles 2.30bis et 2.30ter, ainsi que les dispositions y relatives du règlement d’exécution.

Chapitre 6quater. Moyens de défense et portée de la nullité et de la déchéance

Article 2.30quinquies Non-usage comme moyen de défense dans une procédure de nullité

1. Dans une procédure de nullité fondée sur l’existence d’une marque enregistrée dont la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité est antérieure, le titulaire de cette marque antérieure fournit, sur requête du titulaire de la marque postérieure, la preuve que, durant la période de cinq ans ayant précédé la date de sa demande en nullité, la marque antérieure a fait l’objet d’un usage sérieux, tel que prévu à l’article 2.23bis, pour les produits ou les services pour lesquels elle est enregistrée et qui sont invoqués à l’appui de la demande, ou qu’il existait de justes motifs pour son non-usage, sous réserve que la procédure d’enregistrement de la marque antérieure soit, à la date de la demande en nullité, terminée depuis au moins cinq ans.

2. Lorsque, à la date de dépôt ou à la date de priorité de la marque postérieure, la période de cinq ans durant laquelle la marque antérieure a dû faire l’objet d’un usage sérieux, tel que prévu à l’article 2.23bis, a expiré, le titulaire de la marque antérieure fournit, outre la preuve requise au titre de l’alinéa 1er du présent article, la preuve que la marque a fait l’objet d’un usage sérieux durant la période de cinq ans ayant précédé la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité de la marque, ou qu’il existait de justes motifs pour son non-usage.

3. En l’absence des preuves visées aux alinéas 1er et 2, la demande en nullité fondée sur l’existence d’une marque antérieure est rejetée.

4. Si la marque antérieure n’a fait l’objet d’un usage conforme à l’article 2.23bis que pour une partie des produits ou des services pour lesquels elle est enregistrée, elle n’est réputée enregistrée, aux fins de l’examen de la demande en nullité, que pour cette partie des produits ou des services.

5. Les alinéas 1er à 4 sont également applicables lorsque la marque antérieure est une marque de l’Union européenne. Dans ce cas, l’usage sérieux est établi conformément à l’article 18 du règlement sur la marque de l’Union européenne.

20 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 2.30sexies Absence de caractère distinctif ou de renommée d’une marque antérieure empêchant de déclarer nulle une marque enregistrée

L’auteur d’une demande en nullité fondée sur une marque antérieure n’obtient pas gain de cause à la date de la demande en nullité lorsqu’il n’aurait pas obtenu gain de cause à la date de dépôt ou à la date de priorité de la marque postérieure pour l’un des motifs suivants: a. la marque antérieure, susceptible d’être déclarée nulle en vertu de l’article 2.2bis, alinéa 1er, sous b, c ou d, n’avait pas encore acquis

un caractère distinctif au sens de l’article 2.2bis, alinéa 3; b. la demande en nullité est fondée sur l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 1er, sous b, et la marque antérieure n’avait pas encore acquis un caractère

suffisamment distinctif pour justifier la constatation d’un risque de confusion au sens de cette disposition; c. la demande en nullité est fondée sur l’article 2.2ter, alinéa 3, sous a, et la marque antérieure n’avait pas encore acquis

de renommée au sens de cette disposition.

Article 2.30septies Forclusion du demandeur en nullité pour tolérance

1. Le titulaire d’une marque antérieure telle que visée à l’article 2.2ter, alinéas 2 et 3, sous a, qui a toléré l’usage d’une marque postérieure enregistrée pendant une période de cinq années consécutives en connaissance de cet usage ne peut plus demander la nullité, sur la base de cette marque antérieure, pour les produits ou les services pour lesquels la marque postérieure a été utilisée, à moins que l’enregistrement de la marque postérieure n’ait été demandé de mauvaise foi.

2. Dans le cas visé à l’alinéa 1er, le titulaire d’une marque postérieure enregistrée ne peut pas s’opposer à l’usage du droit antérieur bien que ce droit ne puisse plus être invoqué contre la marque postérieure.

Article 2.30octies Invocation de la nullité ou de la déchéance d’une marque qui sert de base pour l’ancienneté d’une marque de l’Union européenne

Lorsque l’ancienneté d’une marque enregistrée en vertu de la présente convention, qui a fait l’objet d’une renonciation ou qui s’est éteinte, est invoquée pour une marque de l’Union européenne, la nullité de la marque qui est à la base de la revendication d’ancienneté ou la déchéance des droits du titulaire de celle-ci peut être constatée a posteriori, à condition que la nullité ou la déchéance des droits ait pu être déclarée au moment où la marque a fait l’objet d’une renonciation ou s’est éteinte.

Article 2.30nonies Portée de la nullité et de la déchéance

1. La nullité ou la déchéance portent sur le signe constitutif de la marque en son intégralité. 2. Une demande en nullité ou en déchéance peut porter sur une partie ou la totalité des produits ou des services pour lesquels la

marque contestée est enregistrée et peut se fonder sur un ou plusieurs droits antérieurs, sous réserve qu’ils appartiennent tous au même titulaire.

3. Si un motif de nullité ou de déchéance d’une marque n’existe que pour une partie des produits ou des services pour lesquels cette marque est enregistrée, la déclaration de nullité ou de déchéance ne s’étend qu’aux produits ou aux services concernés.

4. Une marque enregistrée est réputée n’avoir pas eu, à compter de la date de la demande en déchéance, les effets prévus dans la présente convention, dans la mesure où le titulaire est déclaré déchu de ses droits. Une date antérieure, à laquelle est survenu un motif de déchéance, peut être fixée dans la décision sur la demande en déchéance, sur requête d’une partie.

5. Une marque enregistrée est réputée n’avoir pas eu, dès l’origine, les effets prévus dans la présente convention, dans la mesure où elle a été déclarée nulle.

21 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Chapitre 7. La marque en tant qu’objet de propriété

Article 2.31 Transfert

1. Une marque peut, indépendamment du transfert de l’entreprise, être transférée pour tout ou partie des produits ou services pour lesquels elle a été enregistrée.

2. Sont nulles: a. les cessions entre vifs qui ne sont pas constatées par écrit; b. les cessions ou autres transmissions qui ne sont pas faites pour l’ensemble du territoire Benelux.

3. Le transfert de l’entreprise dans sa totalité implique le transfert de la marque, sauf s’il existe une convention contraire ou si cela ressort clairement des circonstances. Cette disposition s’applique à l’obligation contractuelle de transférer l’entreprise.

1. La marque peut faire l’objet de licences pour tout ou partie des produits ou services pour lesquelles elle est enregistrée et pour tout ou partie du territoire Benelux. Une licence peut être exclusive ou non exclusive.

2. Le titulaire de la marque peut invoquer les droits conférés par cette marque à l’encontre d’un licencié qui enfreint l’une des clauses du contrat de licence en ce qui concerne: a. sa durée; b. la forme couverte par l’enregistrement sous laquelle la marque peut être utilisée; c. la nature des produits ou des services pour lesquels la licence est octroyée; d. le territoire sur lequel la marque peut être apposée; ou e. la qualité des produits fabriqués ou des services fournis par le licencié.

3. La radiation de l’enregistrement de la licence dans le registre ne peut s’effectuer que sur requête conjointe du titulaire de la marque et du licencié.

4. Sans préjudice des stipulations du contrat de licence, le licencié ne peut engager une procédure en contrefaçon d’une marque qu’avec le consentement du titulaire de celle-ci. Toutefois, le titulaire d’une licence exclusive peut engager une telle procédure si, après mise en demeure, le titulaire de la marque n’agit pas lui-même en contrefaçon dans un délai approprié.

5. Afin d’obtenir la réparation du préjudice qu’il a directement subi ou de se faire attribuer une part proportionnelle du bénéfice réalisé par le défendeur, le licencié a le droit d’intervenir dans une action visée à l’article 2.21, alinéas 1er à 4, intentée par le titulaire de la marque.

6. Le licencié ne peut intenter une action autonome au sens de l’alinéa précédent qu’à condition d’avoir obtenu l’autorisation du titulaire à cette fin.

7. Le licencié est habilité à exercer les facultés visées à l’article 2.22, alinéa 1er, pour autant que celles-ci tendent à protéger les droits dont l’exercice lui a été concédé et à condition d’avoir obtenu l’autorisation du titulaire de la marque à cet effet.

Article 2.32bis Droits réels et exécution forcée

1. Une marque peut, indépendamment de l’entreprise, être donnée en gage ou faire l’objet de droits réels. 2. Une marque peut faire l’objet de mesures d’exécution forcée.

22 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 2.33 Opposabilité aux tiers

La cession ou autre transmission ou la licence n’est opposable aux tiers qu’après l’enregistrement du dépôt, dans les formes fixées par règlement d’exécution et moyennant paiement des taxes dues, d’un extrait de l’acte qui la constate ou d’une déclaration y relative signée par les parties intéressées. La disposition de la phrase précédente s’applique aux droits réels et à l’exécution forcée visés à l’article 2.32bis.

Article 2.33bis Demandes de marque comme objet de propriété

Les articles 2.31 à 2.33 sont applicables aux demandes de marque.

Chapitre 8. Des marques collectives

Article 2.34bis Marques collectives

1. Une marque collective est une marque ainsi désignée lors du dépôt de la demande et propre à distinguer les produits ou les services des membres de l’association qui en est le titulaire de ceux d’autres entreprises. Peuvent déposer une marque collective les associations de fabricants, de producteurs, de prestataires de services ou de commerçants qui, aux termes de la législation qui leur est applicable, ont la capacité, en leur propre nom, d’être titulaires de droits et d’obligations, de passer des contrats ou d’accomplir d’autres actes juridiques et d’ester en justice, de même que les personnes morales de droit public.

2. Par dérogation à l’article 2.2bis, alinéa 1er, sous c, les signes ou indications susceptibles de servir, dans le commerce, à désigner la provenance géographique des produits ou des services peuvent constituer des marques collectives. Une telle marque collective n’autorise pas le titulaire à interdire à un tiers d’utiliser, dans la vie des affaires, ces signes ou indications, pour autant que ce tiers en fasse un usage conforme aux usages honnêtes en matière industrielle ou commerciale. En particulier, une telle marque ne peut être opposée à un tiers habilité à utiliser une dénomination géographique.

3. Les marques collectives sont soumises à toutes les dispositions de la présente convention qui portent sur les marques, sauf disposition contraire dans le présent chapitre.

Article 2.34ter Règlement d’usage de la marque collective

1. Le demandeur d’une marque collective présente à l’Office, lors de la demande, son règlement d’usage. 2. Toutefois, lorsqu’il s’agit d’une demande internationale, le demandeur dispose pour déposer ce règlement d’un délai

de six mois à compter de la notification de l’enregistrement international prévue par l’article 3, sous (4) de l’Arrangement et du Protocole de Madrid.

3. Le règlement d’usage indique au minimum les personnes autorisées à utiliser la marque, les conditions d’affiliation à l’association ainsi que les conditions d’usage de la marque, y compris les sanctions. Le règlement d’usage d’une marque visée à l’article 2.34bis, alinéa 2, autorise toute personne dont les produits ou les services proviennent de la zone géographique concernée à devenir membre de l’association qui est titulaire de la marque, sous réserve que cette personne remplisse toutes les autres conditions prévues dans le règlement.

23 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 2.34quater Refus d’une demande

1. Outre les motifs de refus d’une demande de marque prévus à l’article 2.2bis, à l’exception de l’article 2.2bis, alinéa 1er, sous c, relatif aux signes ou indications pouvant servir, dans le commerce, à désigner la provenance géographique des produits ou des services, une demande de marque collective est refusée lorsque les dispositions de l’article 2.34bis ou de l’article 2.34ter ne sont pas respectées, ou que le règlement d’usage de cette marque collective est contraire à l’ordre public ou aux bonnes mœurs.

2. Une demande de marque collective est également refusée lorsque le public risque d’être induit en erreur sur le caractère ou la signification de la marque, notamment lorsque celle-ci est susceptible d’apparaître comme étant autre chose qu’une marque collective.

3. Une demande n’est pas refusée si le demandeur, par une modification du règlement d’usage de la marque collective, répond aux exigences visées aux alinéas 1er et 2.

Article 2.34quinquies Usage de la marque collective

Il est satisfait aux exigences de l’article 2.23bis lorsqu’une personne habilitée à utiliser la marque collective en fait un usage sérieux conformément audit article.

Article 2.34sexies Modifications du règlement d’usage de la marque collective

1. Le titulaire de la marque collective soumet à l’Office tout règlement d’usage modifié. 2. Les modifications du règlement d’usage sont mentionnées au registre, à moins que le règlement d’usage modifié ne satisfasse pas

aux prescriptions de l’article 2.34ter ou comporte un motif de refus visé à l’article 2.34quater. 3. Aux fins de la présente convention, les modifications du règlement d’usage ne prennent effet qu’à la date d’inscription au registre

de la mention de ces modifications.

Article 2.34septies Personnes habilitées à exercer une action en contrefaçon

1. L’article 2.32, alinéas 4 et 5, s’applique à toute personne habilitée à utiliser une marque collective. 2. Le titulaire d’une marque collective peut réclamer, au nom des personnes habilitées à utiliser la marque, réparation du dommage

subi par celles-ci du fait de l’usage non autorisé de la marque.

Article 2.34octies Motifs de déchéance supplémentaires

Outre les motifs de déchéance prévus à l’article 2.27, le titulaire de la marque collective est déclaré déchu de ses droits pour les motifs suivants: a. le titulaire ne prend pas de mesures raisonnables en vue de prévenir un usage de la marque qui ne serait pas compatible avec

les conditions d’usage prévues par le règlement d’usage, y compris toute modification de celui-ci mentionnée au registre; b. la manière dont les personnes habilitées ont utilisé la marque a eu pour conséquence de la rendre susceptible d’induire le public

en erreur au sens de l’article 2.34quater, alinéa 2; c. une modification du règlement d’usage a été mentionnée au registre en infraction à l’article 2.34sexies, alinéa 2, sauf si le titulaire

de la marque satisfait, par une nouvelle modification du règlement d’usage, aux exigences fixées par cet article.

24 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 2.34nonies Motifs de nullité supplémentaires

Outre les motifs de nullité prévus à l’article 2.2bis, à l’exception de l’article 2.2bis, alinéa 1er, sous c, relatif aux signes ou indications pouvant servir, dans le commerce, à désigner la provenance géographique des produits ou des services, et à l’article 2.2ter, la marque collective est déclarée nulle lorsqu’elle a été enregistrée en infraction à l’article 2.34quater sauf si le titulaire de la marque satisfait, par une modification du règlement d’usage, aux exigences fixées par l’article 2.34quater.

Chapitre 8bis. Des marques de certification

Article 2.35bis Marques de certification

1. Une marque de certification est une marque ainsi désignée lors du dépôt de la demande et propre à distinguer les produits ou services pour lesquels la matière, le mode de fabrication des produits ou de prestation des services, la qualité, la précision ou d’autres caractéristiques, à l’exception de la provenance géographique, sont certifiés par le titulaire de la marque par rapport aux produits ou services qui ne bénéficient pas d’une telle certification.

2. Toute personne physique ou morale, y compris les institutions, autorités et organismes de droit public, peut déposer une marque de certification pourvu que cette personne n’exerce pas une activité ayant trait à la fourniture de produits ou de services du type certifié.

3. Les marques de certification sont soumises à toutes les dispositions de la présente convention qui portent sur les marques, sauf disposition contraire dans le présent chapitre.

Article 2.35ter Règlement d’usage de la marque de certification

1. Le demandeur d’une marque de certification présente à l’Office, lors de la demande, son règlement d’usage. 2. Toutefois, lorsqu’il s’agit d’une demande internationale, le demandeur dispose pour déposer ce règlement d’un délai

3. Le règlement d’usage indique les personnes autorisées à utiliser la marque, les caractéristiques que certifie la marque, la manière dont l’organisme de certification vérifie ces caractéristiques et surveille l’usage de la marque. Ce règlement d’usage indique également les conditions d’usage de la marque, y compris les sanctions.

Article 2.35quater Refus de la demande

1. Outre les motifs de refus prévus à l’article 2.2bis, une demande de marque de certification est refusée lorsque les conditions énoncées aux articles 2.35bis et 2.35ter ne sont pas satisfaites ou que le règlement d’usage est contraire à l’ordre public ou aux bonnes mœurs.

2. Une demande de marque de certification est également refusée lorsque le public risque d’être induit en erreur sur le caractère ou la signification de la marque, notamment lorsque celle-ci est susceptible d’apparaître comme étant autre chose qu’une marque de certification.

3. Une demande n’est pas refusée si le demandeur, à la suite d’une modification du règlement d’usage, répond aux exigences énoncées aux alinéas 1er et 2.

25 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 2.35quinquies Usage de la marque de certification

Il est satisfait aux exigences de l’article 2.23bis lorsqu’une personne qui y est habilitée en vertu du règlement d’usage visé à l’article 2.35ter fait un usage sérieux de la marque de certification conformément audit article.

Article 2.35sexies Modification du règlement d’usage de la marque

1. Le titulaire de la marque de certification soumet à l’Office tout règlement d’usage modifié. 2. Les modifications du règlement d’usage sont mentionnées au registre, à moins que le règlement d’usage modifié ne satisfasse pas

aux prescriptions de l’article 2.35ter ou comporte un motif de refus visé à l’article 2.35quater. 3. Aux fins de la présente convention, les modifications du règlement d’usage ne prennent effet qu’à compter de la date d’inscription

au registre de la mention de la modification.

Article 2.35septies Transfert

Par dérogation à l’article 2.31, alinéa 1er, une marque de certification ne peut être transférée qu’à une personne répondant aux exigences de l’article 2.35bis, alinéa 2.

Article 2.35octies Personnes autorisées à exercer une action en contrefaçon

1. Une action en contrefaçon ne peut être exercée que par le titulaire de la marque de certification ou par une personne que celui-ci a expressément autorisée à cet effet.

2. Le titulaire d’une marque de certification a le droit de réclamer, au nom des personnes habilitées à utiliser la marque, réparation du dommage subi par celles-ci du fait de l’usage non autorisé de la marque.

Article 2.35nonies Motifs de déchéance supplémentaires

Outre les motifs de déchéance prévus à l’article 2.27, le titulaire de la marque de certification est déclaré déchu de ses droits pour les motifs suivants: a. le titulaire ne satisfait plus aux exigences énoncées à l’article 2.35bis, alinéa 2; b. le titulaire ne prend pas de mesures raisonnables en vue de prévenir un usage de la marque qui ne serait pas compatible avec les

conditions d’usage prévues par le règlement d’usage, y compris toute modification de celui-ci mentionnée au registre; c. la manière dont la marque a été utilisée par le titulaire a eu pour conséquence de la rendre susceptible d’induire le public en erreur

au sens de l’article 2.35quater, alinéa 2; d. une modification du règlement d’usage a été mentionnée au registre en infraction à l’article 2.35sexies, alinéa 2, sauf si le titulaire

Article 2.35decies Motifs de nullité supplémentaires

Outre les motifs de nullité prévus aux articles 2.2bis et 2.2ter, une marque de certification qui a été enregistrée en violation de l’article 2.35quater est déclarée nulle, sauf si le titulaire de la marque satisfait, par une modification du règlement d’usage, aux exigences fixées par l’article 2.35quater.

26 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Chapitre 9. (Abrogé)

27 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

TITRE III: DES DESSINS OU MODELES

Chapitre 1. Des dessins ou modèles

Article 3.1 Des dessins ou modèles

1. Un dessin ou modèle n’est protégé que dans la mesure où le dessin ou modèle est nouveau et présente un caractère individuel. 2. Est considéré comme dessin ou modèle l’aspect d’un produit ou d’une partie de produit. 3. L’aspect d’un produit lui est conféré, en particulier, par les caractéristiques des lignes, des contours, des couleurs, de la forme,

de la texture ou des matériaux du produit lui-même ou de son ornementation. 4. On entend par produit tout article industriel ou artisanal, y compris, entre autres, les pièces conçues pour être assemblées en

un produit complexe, emballage, présentation, symbole graphique et caractère typographique. Les programmes d’ordinateur ne sont pas considérés comme un produit.

Article 3.2 Exceptions

1. Sont exclues de la protection prévue par le présent titre: a. les caractéristiques de l’aspect d’un produit qui sont exclusivement imposées par sa fonction technique; b. les caractéristiques de l’aspect d’un produit qui doivent nécessairement être reproduites dans leur forme et leurs dimensions

exactes pour que le produit dans lequel est incorporé ou auquel est appliqué le dessin ou modèle puisse mécaniquement être raccordé à un autre produit, être placé à l’intérieur ou autour d’un autre produit, ou être mis en contact avec un autre produit, de manière que chaque produit puisse remplir sa fonction.

2. Par dérogation à l’alinéa 1, sous b, les caractéristiques de l’aspect d’un produit qui ont pour objet de permettre l’assemblage ou la connexion multiples de produits interchangeables à l’intérieur d’un système modulaire sont protégées par des droits sur un dessin ou modèle répondant aux conditions fixées à l’article 3.1, alinéa 1.

Article 3.3 Nouveauté et caractère individuel

1. Un dessin ou modèle est considéré comme nouveau si, à la date de dépôt ou à la date de priorité, aucun dessin ou modèle identique n’a été divulgué au public. Des dessins ou modèles sont considérés comme identiques lorsque leurs caractéristiques ne diffèrent que par des détails insignifiants.

2. Un dessin ou modèle est considéré comme présentant un caractère individuel si l’impression globale que ce dessin ou modèle produit sur l’utilisateur averti diffère de celle que produit sur un tel utilisateur tout dessin ou modèle qui a été divulgué au public avant la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité. Pour apprécier le caractère individuel, il est tenu compte du degré de liberté du créateur dans l’élaboration du dessin ou modèle.

3. Pour l’appréciation de la nouveauté et du caractère individuel un dessin ou modèle est réputé avoir été divulgué au public si ce dessin ou ce modèle a été publié après enregistrement ou autrement, ou exposé, utilisé dans le commerce ou rendu public de toute autre manière, sauf si ces faits, dans la pratique normale des affaires, ne pouvaient raisonnablement être connus des milieux spécialisés du secteur concerné, opérant dans la Communauté européenne ou l’Espace économique européen, avant la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité. Toutefois, le dessin ou modèle n’est pas réputé avoir été divulgué au public uniquement parce qu’il a été divulgué à un tiers à des conditions explicites ou implicites de secret.

28 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

4. Aux fins de l’appréciation de la nouveauté et du caractère individuel, il n’est pas tenu compte de la divulgation au public d’un dessin ou modèle, pour lequel la protection est revendiquée au titre d’un enregistrement, si, dans les douze mois précédant la date de dépôt ou la date de priorité: a. la divulgation a été opérée par le créateur ou son ayant droit ou par un tiers sur la base d’informations fournies ou d’actes

accomplis par le créateur ou son ayant droit, ou b. la divulgation a été effectuée à la suite d’une conduite abusive à l’égard du créateur ou de son ayant droit.

5. On entend par droit de priorité le droit prévu à l’article 4 de la Convention de Paris. Ce droit peut être revendiqué par celui qui a introduit régulièrement une demande de dessin ou modèle ou un modèle d’utilité dans un des pays parties à ladite convention ou à l’accord ADPIC.

Article 3.4 Pièces de produits complexes

1. Un dessin ou modèle appliqué à un produit ou incorporé dans un produit qui constitue une pièce d’un produit complexe n’est considéré comme nouveau et présentant un caractère individuel que dans la mesure où: a. la pièce, une fois incorporée dans le produit complexe, reste visible lors d’une utilisation normale de ce produit, et b. les caractéristiques visibles de la pièce remplissent en tant que telles les conditions de nouveauté et de caractère individuel.

2. Aux fins du présent titre, on entend par produit complexe un produit se composant de pièces multiples qui peuvent être remplacées de manière à permettre le démontage et le remontage du produit.

3. Par utilisation normale au sens de l’alinéa 1, on entend l’utilisation par l’utilisateur final à l’exception de l’entretien, du service ou de la réparation.

Article 3.5 Acquisition du droit

1. Sans préjudice du droit de priorité, le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle s’acquiert par l’enregistrement du dépôt, effectué en territoire Benelux auprès de l’Office (dépôt Benelux), ou effectué auprès du Bureau international (dépôt international).

2. En cas de concours de dépôts, si le premier dépôt n’est pas suivi de la publication prévue à l’article 3.11, alinéa 2, de la présente convention ou à l’article 6, sous 3 de l’Arrangement de La Haye, le dépôt subséquent obtient le rang de premier dépôt.

Dans les limites des articles 3.23 et 3.24, alinéa 2, l’enregistrement n’est pas attributif du droit à un dessin ou modèle lorsque: a. le dessin ou modèle est en conflit avec un dessin ou modèle antérieur qui a fait l’objet d’une divulgation au public après la date

de dépôt ou la date de priorité et qui est protégé, depuis une date antérieure, par un droit exclusif dérivant d’un dessin ou modèle communautaire, de l’enregistrement d’un dépôt Benelux, ou d’un dépôt international;

b. il est fait usage, dans le dessin ou modèle, d’une marque antérieure sans le consentement du titulaire de cette marque; c. il est fait usage, dans le dessin ou modèle, d’une œuvre protégée par le droit d’auteur sans le consentement du titulaire du droit

d’auteur; d. le dessin ou modèle constitue un usage abusif de l’un des éléments qui sont énumérés à l’article 6ter de la Convention de Paris; e. le dessin ou modèle est contraire aux bonnes mœurs ou à l’ordre public d’un des pays du Benelux; f. le dépôt ne révèle pas suffisamment les caractéristiques du dessin ou modèle.

29 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 3.7 Revendication du dépôt

1. Dans un délai de cinq années à compter de la publication de l’enregistrement du dépôt, le créateur du dessin ou modèle, ou la personne qui, d’après l’article 3.8, est considérée comme créateur, peut revendiquer le droit au dépôt Benelux ou les droits dérivant, pour le territoire Benelux, du dépôt international de ce dessin ou modèle, si le dépôt a été effectué par un tiers, sans son consentement; il peut pour le même motif invoquer la nullité de l’enregistrement de ce dépôt ou de ces droits sans limitation dans le temps. L’action en revendication sera enregistrée auprès de l’Office à la demande du requérant dans les formes fixées par règlement d’exécution et moyennant paiement des taxes dues.

2. Si le déposant visé à l’alinéa 1 a requis la radiation totale ou partielle de l’enregistrement du dépôt Benelux ou a renoncé aux droits dérivant, pour le territoire Benelux, du dépôt international, cette radiation ou renonciation n’aura, sous réserve de l’alinéa 3, aucun effet à l’égard du créateur ou de la personne qui, d’après l’article 3.8, est considérée comme créateur, à condition que le dépôt ait été revendiqué avant qu’une année ne soit écoulée depuis la date de la publication de la radiation ou renonciation et ceci avant l’expiration du délai de cinq années cité à l’alinéa 1.

3. Si dans l’intervalle de la radiation ou renonciation visées à l’alinéa 2, et de l’enregistrement de l’action en revendication, un tiers de bonne foi a exploité un produit ayant un aspect identique ou ne produisant pas sur l’utilisateur averti une impression globale différente, ce produit sera considéré comme mis licitement sur le marché.

Article 3.8 Droits des employeurs et donneurs d’ordre

1. Si un dessin ou modèle a été créé par un ouvrier ou un employé dans l’exercice de son emploi, l’employeur sera, sauf stipulation contraire, considéré comme créateur.

2. Si un dessin ou modèle a été créé sur commande, celui qui a passé la commande sera considéré, sauf stipulation contraire, comme créateur, pourvu que la commande ait été passée en vue d’une utilisation commerciale ou industrielle du produit dans lequel le dessin ou modèle est incorporé.

Chapitre 2. Dépôt, enregistrement et renouvellement

Article 3.9 Dépôt

1. Le dépôt Benelux des dessins ou modèles se fait soit auprès des administrations nationales, soit auprès de l’Office, dans les formes fixées par règlement d’exécution et moyennant paiement des taxes dues. Le dépôt Benelux peut comprendre soit un seul dessin ou modèle (dépôt simple) soit plusieurs (dépôt multiple). Il est vérifié si les pièces produites satisfont aux conditions prescrites pour la fixation de la date de dépôt et la date du dépôt est arrêtée. Le déposant est informé sans délai et par écrit de la date du dépôt ou, le cas échéant, des motifs de ne pas l’attribuer.

2. S’il n’est pas satisfait aux autres dispositions du règlement d’exécution lors du dépôt, le déposant est informé sans délai et par écrit des conditions auxquelles il n’est pas satisfait et la possibilité lui est donnée d’y répondre.

3. Le dépôt n’a plus d’effet si, dans le délai imparti, il n’est pas satisfait aux dispositions du règlement d’exécution. 4. Lorsque le dépôt se fait auprès d’une administration nationale, celle-ci transmet le dépôt Benelux à l’Office, soit sans délai après

avoir reçu le dépôt, soit après avoir constaté que le dépôt satisfait aux conditions prescrites par les alinéas 1 à 3. 5. Sans préjudice, en ce qui concerne les dépôts Benelux, de l’application de l’article 3.13, le dépôt d’un dessin ou modèle ne peut

donner lieu, quant au fond, à aucun examen dont les conclusions pourraient être opposées au déposant par l’Office.

30 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 3.10 Revendication de priorité

1. La revendication du droit de priorité se fait lors du dépôt ou par déclaration spéciale effectuée auprès de l’Office dans le mois qui suit le dépôt, dans les formes fixées par règlement d’exécution et moyennant paiement des taxes dues.

2. L’absence d’une telle revendication entraîne la déchéance du droit de priorité.

Article 3.11 Enregistrement

1. L’Office enregistre sans délai les dépôts Benelux, ainsi que les dépôts internationaux qui ont fait l’objet d’une publication dans le «Bulletin International des dessins ou modèles – International Design Gazette» et pour lesquels les déposants ont demandé qu’ils produisent leurs effets dans le territoire Benelux.

2. Sans préjudice des dispositions des articles 3.12 et 3.13, l’Office publie dans le plus bref délai possible les enregistrements des dépôts Benelux conformément au règlement d’exécution.

3. Si la publication ne révèle pas suffisamment les caractéristiques du dessin ou modèle, le déposant peut demander à l’Office, dans le délai fixé à cet effet, de faire sans frais une nouvelle publication.

4. A partir de la publication du dessin ou modèle, le public peut prendre connaissance de l’enregistrement ainsi que des pièces produites lors du dépôt.

Article 3.12 Ajournement de la publication sur demande

1. Le déposant peut demander, lors du dépôt Benelux, que la publication de l’enregistrement soit ajournée pendant une période qui ne pourra excéder une durée de douze mois prenant cours à la date du dépôt ou à la date qui fait naître le droit de priorité.

2. Si le déposant fait usage de la faculté prévue à l’alinéa 1, l’Office ajourne la publication conformément à la demande.

Article 3.13 Contrariété à l’ordre public et aux bonnes mœurs

1. L’Office ajourne la publication s’il estime que le dessin ou modèle tombe sous l’application de l’article 3.6, sous e. 2. L’Office en avertit le déposant et l’invite à retirer son dépôt dans un délai de deux mois. 3. Lorsque, à l’expiration de ce délai, l’intéressé n’a pas retiré son dépôt, l’Office refuse la publication. L’Office informe le déposant

sans délai et par écrit en indiquant les motifs du refus de publication et en mentionnant la voie de recours contre cette décision, visée à l’article 1.15bis.

4. Le refus de publication ne devient définitif que lorsque la décision de l’Office n’est plus susceptible de recours. Ceci entraîne la nullité du dépôt.

Article 3.14 Durée et renouvellement de l’enregistrement

1. L’enregistrement d’un dépôt Benelux a une durée de cinq années prenant cours à la date du dépôt. Sans préjudice des dispositions de l’article 3.24, alinéa 2, le dessin ou modèle objet du dépôt ne peut être modifié ni pendant la durée de l’enregistrement ni à l’occasion de son renouvellement.

2. Il peut être renouvelé pour quatre périodes successives de cinq années jusqu’à un maximum de 25 ans. 3. Le renouvellement s’effectue par le seul paiement de la taxe fixée à cet effet. Cette taxe doit être payée dans les douze mois

précédant l’expiration de l’enregistrement; elle peut encore être payée dans les six mois qui suivent la date de l’expiration de l’enregistrement, sous réserve du paiement simultané d’une surtaxe. Le renouvellement a effet à partir de l’expiration de l’enregistrement.

4. Le renouvellement peut être limité à une partie seulement des dessins ou modèles compris dans un dépôt multiple.

31 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

5. Six mois avant l’expiration de la première à la quatrième période d’enregistrement, l’Office rappelle la date de cette expiration par un avis adressé au titulaire du dessin ou modèle et aux tiers dont les droits sur le dessin ou modèle ont été inscrits dans le registre.

6. Les rappels de l’Office sont envoyés à la dernière adresse qu’il connaît des intéressés. Le défaut d’envoi ou de réception de ces avis ne dispense pas des obligations résultant de l’alinéa 3. Il ne peut être invoqué ni en justice, ni à l’égard de l’Office.

7. L’Office enregistre les renouvellements et les publie conformément au règlement d’exécution.

Article 3.15 Dépôts internationaux

Les dépôts internationaux s’effectuent conformément aux dispositions de l’Arrangement de La Haye.

Chapitre 3. Droits du titulaire

Article 3.16 Etendue de la protection

1. Sans préjudice de l’application éventuelle du droit commun en matière de responsabilité civile, le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle permet au titulaire de s’opposer à l’utilisation d’un produit dans lequel le dessin ou modèle est incorporé ou auquel celui-ci est appliqué et ayant un aspect identique au dessin ou modèle tel qu’il a été déposé, ou qui ne produit pas sur l’utilisateur averti une impression globale différente, compte tenu du degré de liberté du créateur dans l’élaboration du dessin ou modèle.

2. Par utilisation, on entend en particulier la fabrication, l’offre, la mise sur le marché, la vente, la livraison, la location, l’importation, l’exportation, l’exposition, l’usage, ou la détention à l’une de ces fins.

Article 3.17 Réparation des dommages et autres actions

1. Le droit exclusif ne permet au titulaire de réclamer réparation pour les actes énumérés à l’article 3.16, que si ces actes ont eu lieu après la publication visée à l’article 3.11, révélant suffisamment les caractéristiques du dessin ou modèle.

à gagner, subies par la partie lésée, les bénéfices injustement réalisés par le contrevenant et, dans des cas appropriés, des éléments autres que des facteurs économiques, comme le préjudice moral causé au titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle du fait de l’atteinte; ou

b. à titre d’alternative pour la disposition sous a, peut décider, dans des cas appropriés, de fixer un montant forfaitaire de dommages-intérêts, sur la base d’éléments tels que, au moins, le montant des redevances ou droits qui auraient été dus si le contrevenant avait demandé l’autorisation d’utiliser le dessin ou modèle.

3. En outre, le tribunal peut, à la demande du titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle, ordonner à titre de dommages-intérêts la délivrance au titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle des biens qui portent atteinte à un droit de dessin ou modèle, ainsi que, dans des cas appropriés, des matériaux et instruments ayant principalement servi à la fabrication de ces biens; le tribunal peut ordonner que la délivrance ne sera faite que contre paiement par le demandeur d’une indemnité qu’il fixe.

4. Outre l’action en réparation ou au lieu de celle-ci, le titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle peut intenter une action en cession du bénéfice réalisé à la suite de l’usage visé à l’article 3.16, ainsi qu’en reddition de compte à cet égard. Le tribunal rejettera la demande s’il estime que cet usage n’est pas de mauvaise foi ou que les circonstances de la cause ne donnent pas lieu à pareille condamnation.

5. Le titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle peut intenter l’action en réparation ou en cession du bénéfice au nom du licencié, sans préjudice du droit accordé à ce dernier à l’article 3.26, alinéa 4.

6. A compter de la date de dépôt, une indemnité raisonnable peut être exigée de celui qui, en connaissance du dépôt, a effectué des actes tels que visés à l’article 3.16, dans la mesure où le titulaire a acquis des droits exclusifs à ce titre.

32 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 3.18 Demandes additionnelles

1. Sans préjudice des éventuels dommages-intérêts dus au titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle à raison de l’atteinte et sans dédommagement d’aucune sorte, le tribunal peut ordonner à la demande du titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle le rappel des circuits commerciaux, la mise à l’écart définitive des circuits commerciaux ou la destruction des biens qui portent atteinte à un droit de dessin ou modèle, ainsi que, dans les cas appropriés, des matériaux et instruments ayant principalement servi à la fabrication de ces biens. Ces mesures sont mises en œuvre aux frais du contrevenant, à moins que des raisons particulières ne s’y opposent. Lors de l’appréciation d’une demande telle que visée dans le présent alinéa, il sera tenu compte de la proportionnalité entre la gravité de l’atteinte et les mesures correctives ordonnées, ainsi que des intérêts des tiers.

3. Dans la mesure où le droit national ne le prévoit pas et à la demande du titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle, le tribunal peut, en vertu de la présente disposition, rendre à l’encontre du contrevenant supposé ou à l’encontre d’un intermédiaire dont les services sont utilisés par un tiers pour porter atteinte à un droit de dessin ou modèle, une ordonnance de référé: a. visant à prévenir toute atteinte imminente à un droit de dessin ou modèle, ou b. visant à interdire, à titre provisoire et sous réserve, le cas échéant, du paiement d’une astreinte, que les atteintes présumées à

un droit de dessin ou modèle se poursuivent, ou c. visant à subordonner la poursuite des atteintes présumées à la constitution de garanties destinées à assurer l’indemnisation

du titulaire du dessin ou modèle. 4. A la demande du titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle dans une action relative à une atteinte, le tribunal peut ordonner

à l’auteur de l’atteinte à son droit de fournir au titulaire toutes les informations dont il dispose concernant la provenance et les réseaux de distribution des biens et services qui ont porté atteinte au dessin ou modèle et de lui communiquer toutes les données s’y rapportant, pour autant que cette mesure apparaisse justifiée et proportionnée.

6. Le tribunal peut, à la demande du titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle, rendre une injonction de cessation de services à l’encontre des intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés par un tiers pour porter atteinte à son droit de dessin ou modèle.

Article 3.19 Restriction au droit exclusif

1. Le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle n’implique pas le droit de s’opposer: a. à des actes accomplis à titre privé et à des fins non commerciales; b. à des actes accomplis à des fins expérimentales; c. à des actes de reproduction à des fins d’illustration ou d’enseignement, pour autant que ces actes soient compatibles avec

les pratiques commerciales loyales, ne portent pas indûment préjudice à l’exploitation normale du dessin ou modèle et que la source en soit indiquée.

2. En outre, le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle n’implique pas le droit de s’opposer: a. à des équipements à bord de navires ou d’aéronefs immatriculés dans un autre pays lorsqu’ils pénètrent temporairement sur

le territoire Benelux; b. à l’importation, sur le territoire Benelux, de pièces détachées et d’accessoires aux fins de la réparation de ces véhicules; c. à l’exécution de réparations sur ces véhicules.

3. Le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle qui constitue une pièce d’un produit complexe n’implique pas le droit de s’opposer à l’utilisation du dessin ou modèle à des fins de réparation de ce produit complexe en vue de lui rendre son aspect initial.

4. Le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle n’implique pas le droit de s’opposer à des actes visés à l’article 3.16, portant sur des produits qui ont été mis en circulation dans un des Etats membres de la Communauté européenne ou de l’Espace économique européen, soit par le titulaire ou avec son consentement, ou à des actes visés à l’article 3.20.

33 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

5. Les actions ne peuvent pas porter sur les produits qui ont été mis en circulation dans le territoire Benelux avant le dépôt.

Article 3.20 Droit de possession personnelle

1. Un droit de possession personnelle est reconnu au tiers qui, avant la date du dépôt d’un dessin ou modèle ou avant la date de priorité, a fabriqué sur le territoire Benelux des produits ayant un aspect identique au dessin ou modèle déposé ou ne produisant pas sur l’utilisateur averti une impression globale différente.

2. Le même droit est reconnu à celui qui, dans les mêmes conditions, a donné un commencement d’exécution à son intention de fabriquer.

3. Toutefois, ce droit ne sera pas reconnu au tiers qui a copié, sans le consentement du créateur, le dessin ou modèle en cause. 4. Le droit de possession personnelle permet à son titulaire de continuer ou, dans le cas visé à l’alinéa 2 du présent article,

d’entreprendre la fabrication de ces produits et d’accomplir, nonobstant le droit dérivant de l’enregistrement, tous les autres actes visés à l’article 3.16, à l’exclusion de l’importation.

5. Le droit de possession personnelle ne peut être transmis qu’avec l’établissement dans lequel ont eu lieu les actes qui lui ont donné naissance.

Chapitre 4. Radiation, extinction du droit et nullité

Article 3.21 Radiation sur requête

1. Le titulaire de l’enregistrement d’un dépôt Benelux peut en tout temps requérir la radiation de cet enregistrement, sauf s’il existe des droits de tiers contractuels en justice et notifiés à l’Office.

2. En cas de dépôt multiple, la radiation peut porter sur une partie seulement des dessins ou modèles compris dans ce dépôt. 3. Si une licence a été enregistrée, la radiation de l’enregistrement du dessin ou modèle ne peut s’effectuer que sur requête conjointe

du titulaire du dessin ou modèle et du licencié. La disposition de la phrase précédente s’applique en cas d’enregistrement d’un droit de gage ou d’une saisie.

4. La radiation a effet pour l’ensemble du territoire Benelux, nonobstant toute déclaration contraire. 5. Les règles énoncées par le présent article sont également applicables à la renonciation à la protection qui résulte pour le territoire

Benelux d’un dépôt international.

Article 3.22 Extinction du droit

Sous réserve des dispositions de l’article 3.7, alinéa 2, le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle s’éteint: a. par la radiation volontaire ou l’expiration de l’enregistrement du dépôt Benelux; b. par l’expiration de l’enregistrement du dépôt international ou par la renonciation aux droits dérivant, pour le territoire Benelux,

du dépôt international ou par la radiation d’office du dépôt international visée à l’article 6, 4e alinéa, sous c, de l’Arrangement de La Haye.

34 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 3.23 Invocation de la nullité

1. Tout intéressé, y compris le Ministère public, peut invoquer la nullité de l’enregistrement d’un dessin ou modèle si: a. le dessin ou modèle ne répond pas à la définition visée à l’article 3.1, alinéas 2 et 3; b. le dessin ou le modèle ne remplit pas les conditions fixées à l’article 3.1, alinéa 1, et aux articles 3.3 et 3.4; c. le dessin ou modèle tombe sous l’application de l’article 3.2; d. si cet enregistrement n’est pas attributif du droit au dessin ou modèle en application de l’article 3.6, sous e ou f.

2. Seul le déposant ou le titulaire d’un droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle dérivant de l’enregistrement d’un dessin ou modèle communautaire, d’un enregistrement Benelux ou d’un dépôt international peut invoquer la nullité de l’enregistrement du dépôt postérieur d’un dessin ou modèle qui est en conflit avec son droit, si l’enregistrement du dépôt n’est pas attributif du droit au dessin ou modèle en application de l’article 3.6, sous a.

3. Seul le titulaire d’un droit de marque antérieur ou le titulaire d’un droit d’auteur antérieur peut invoquer la nullité de l’enregistrement du dépôt Benelux ou des droits dérivant pour le territoire Benelux d’un dépôt international de ce dessin ou modèle, si aucun droit à un dessin ou modèle n’est acquis en application de l’article 3.6, sous b, respectivement sous c.

4. Seul l’intéressé peut invoquer la nullité de l’enregistrement du dessin ou modèle, si aucun droit au dessin ou modèle n’est acquis en application de l’article 3.6, sous d.

5. Seul le créateur d’un dessin ou modèle tel que visé à l’article 3.7, alinéa 1, peut, aux conditions visées dans cet article, invoquer la nullité de l’enregistrement du dépôt d’un dessin ou modèle effectué par un tiers sans son consentement.

6. La nullité de l’enregistrement du dépôt d’un dessin ou modèle peut être prononcée même après extinction du droit ou renonciation à ce droit.

7. Lorsque l’action en nullité est introduite par le Ministère public, seuls les tribunaux de Bruxelles, La Haye et Luxembourg sont compétents. L’action introduite par le Ministère public suspend toute autre action intentée sur la même base.

Article 3.24 Portée de l’annulation, de la déclaration d’extinction et de la radiation volontaire

1. Sous réserve des dispositions de l’alinéa 2, l’annulation, la radiation volontaire et la renonciation doivent porter sur le dessin ou modèle en son entier.

2. Si l’enregistrement du dépôt d’un dessin ou modèle peut être annulé en vertu de l’article 3.6, sous b, c, d ou e, et de l’article 3.23, alinéa 1, sous b et c, le dépôt peut être maintenu sous une forme modifiée, si sous ladite forme, le dessin ou modèle répond aux critères d’octroi de la protection et que l’identité du dessin ou modèle est conservée.

3. Par le maintien visé à l’alinéa 2, on peut entendre l’enregistrement assorti d’une renonciation partielle de la part du titulaire du droit ou l’inscription d’une décision judiciaire qui n’est plus susceptible ni d’opposition, ni d’appel, ni de pourvoi en cassation prononçant la nullité partielle de l’enregistrement du dépôt.

Chapitre 5. Transmission, licence et autres droits

Article 3.25 Transmission

1. Le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle peut être transmis. 2. Sont nulles:

a. les cessions entre vifs qui ne sont pas constatées par écrit; b. les cessions ou autres transmissions qui ne sont pas faites pour l’ensemble du territoire Benelux.

35 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

1. Le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle peut être l’objet d’une licence. 2. Le titulaire du dessin ou modèle peut invoquer le droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle à l’encontre d’un licencié qui enfreint les

clauses du contrat de licence, en ce qui concerne sa durée, la forme couverte par l’enregistrement sous laquelle le dessin ou modèle peut être utilisé, les produits pour lesquels la licence a été octroyée et la qualité des produits mis dans le commerce par le licencié.

3. La radiation de l’enregistrement de la licence dans le registre ne peut s’effectuer que sur requête conjointe du titulaire du dessin ou modèle et du licencié.

4. Afin d’obtenir la réparation du préjudice qu’il a directement subi ou de se faire attribuer une part proportionnelle du bénéfice réalisé par le défendeur, le licencié a le droit d’intervenir dans une action visée à l’article 3.17, alinéas 1 à 4, intentée par le titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle. Le licencié ne peut intenter une action autonome au sens de l’article 3.17, alinéas 1 à 4, qu’à condition d’avoir obtenu l’autorisation du titulaire du droit exclusif à cette fin.

5. Le licencié est habilité à exercer les facultés visées à l’article 3.18, alinéa 1, pour autant que celles-ci tendent à protéger les droits dont l’exercice lui a été concédé et à condition d’avoir obtenu à cet effet l’autorisation du titulaire du droit exclusif à un dessin ou modèle.

Article 3.27 Opposabilité aux tiers

La cession ou autre transmission ou la licence n’est opposable aux tiers qu’après l’enregistrement du dépôt, dans les formes fixées par règlement d’exécution et moyennant paiement des taxes dues, d’un extrait de l’acte qui l’a constaté ou d’une déclaration y relative signée par les parties intéressées. La disposition de la phrase précédente s’applique aux droits de gage et aux saisies.

Chapitre 6. Cumul avec le droit d’auteur

Article 3.28 Cumul

1. L’autorisation donnée par le créateur d’une œuvre protégée par le droit d’auteur à un tiers, d’effectuer un dépôt de dessin ou modèle dans lequel cette oeuvre d’art est incorporée, implique la cession du droit d’auteur relatif à cette oeuvre, en tant qu’elle est incorporée dans ce dessin ou modèle.

2. Le déposant d’un dessin ou modèle est présumé être également le titulaire du droit d’auteur y afférent; cette présomption ne joue cependant pas à l’égard du véritable créateur ou son ayant droit.

3. La cession du droit d’auteur relatif à un dessin ou modèle, entraîne la cession du droit de dessin ou modèle et inversement, sans préjudice de l’application de l’article 3.25.

Article 3.29 Droit d’auteur des employeurs et donneurs d’ordre

Lorsqu’un dessin ou modèle est créé dans les conditions visées à l’article 3.8, le droit d’auteur relatif à ce dessin ou modèle appartient à celui qui est considéré comme créateur, conformément aux dispositions de cet article.

36 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

TITRE IV: DISPOSITIONS DIVERSES

Chapitre 1. (Abrogé)

Chapitre 2. Autres attributions de l’Office

Article 4.4 Attributions

En plus des attributions qui lui sont conférées par les titres qui précèdent, l’Office est chargé: a. d’apporter aux dépôts et enregistrements les modifications qui sont requises par le titulaire, ou qui résultent des notifications

du Bureau international ou des décisions judiciaires et d’en informer, le cas échéant, le Bureau international; b. de publier les enregistrements des dépôts Benelux de marques et de dessins ou modèles, ainsi que toutes les autres mentions

requises par le règlement d’exécution; c. de délivrer à la requête de tout intéressé, copie des enregistrements.

1. L’Office peut fournir sous le nom “i-DEPOT” la preuve de l’existence de pièces à la date de leur réception. 2. Les pièces sont conservées par l’Office pendant une durée déterminée. La conservation a lieu sous le sceau du secret, sauf

renonciation expresse du déposant. 3. Les modalités de ce service sont fixées par le règlement d’exécution.

37 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Chapitre 3. Compétence juridictionnelle

Article 4.5 Règlement des litiges

1. Sans préjudice des dispositions des articles 2.14 et 2.30bis, les tribunaux sont seuls compétents pour statuer sur les actions ayant leur base dans la présente convention.

2. L’irrecevabilité qui découle du défaut d’enregistrement du dépôt de la marque ou du dessin ou modèle est couverte par l’enregistrement ou le renouvellement de la marque ou du dessin ou modèle, effectué en cours d’instance.

3. Le juge prononce d’office la radiation des enregistrements annulés ou éteints.

Article 4.6 Compétence territoriale

1. Sauf attribution contractuelle expresse de compétence judiciaire territoriale, celle-ci se détermine, en matière de marques ou de dessins ou modèles, par le domicile du défendeur ou par le lieu où l’obligation litigieuse est née, a été ou doit être exécutée. Le lieu du dépôt ou de l’enregistrement d’une marque ou d’un dessin ou modèle ne peut en aucun cas servir à lui seul de base pour déterminer la compétence.

2. Lorsque les critères énoncés ci-dessus sont insuffisants pour déterminer la compétence territoriale, le demandeur peut porter la cause devant le tribunal de son domicile ou de sa résidence, ou, s’il n’a pas de domicile ou de résidence sur le territoire Benelux, devant le tribunal de son choix, soit à Bruxelles, soit à La Haye, soit à Luxembourg.

3. Les tribunaux appliqueront d’office les règles définies aux alinéas 1 et 2 et constateront expressément leur compétence. 4. Le tribunal devant lequel la demande principale est pendante, connaît des demandes en garantie, des demandes en intervention et

des demandes incidentes, ainsi que des demandes reconventionnelles, à moins qu’il ne soit incompétent en raison de la matière. 5. Les tribunaux de l’un des trois pays renvoient, si l’une des parties le demande, devant les tribunaux de l’un des deux autres pays

les contestations dont ils sont saisis, quand ces contestations y sont déjà pendantes ou quand elles sont connexes à d’autres contestations soumises à ces tribunaux. Le renvoi ne peut être demandé que lorsque les causes sont pendantes au premier degré de juridiction. Il s’effectue au profit du tribunal premier saisi par un acte introductif d’instance, à moins qu’un autre tribunal n’ait rendu sur l’affaire une décision autre qu’une disposition d’ordre intérieur, auquel cas le renvoi s’effectue devant cet autre tribunal.

Chapitre 4. Autres dispositions

Article 4.7 Effet direct

Les ressortissants des pays du Benelux ainsi que les ressortissants des pays ne faisant pas partie de l’Union constituée par la Convention de Paris qui sont domiciliés ou ont des établissements industriels ou commerciaux effectifs et sérieux sur le territoire Benelux, peuvent, dans le cadre de la présente convention, revendiquer l’application à leur profit, sur l’ensemble dudit territoire, des dispositions de ladite convention, de l’Arrangement et du Protocole de Madrid, de l’Arrangement de La Haye et de l’accord ADPIC.

Article 4.8 Autres droits applicables

Les dispositions de la présente convention ne portent pas atteinte à l’application de la Convention de Paris, de l’accord ADPIC, de l’Arrangement et du Protocole de Madrid, de l’Arrangement de La Haye et des dispositions du droit belge, luxembourgeois ou néerlandais dont résulteraient des interdictions d’usage d’une marque.

38 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Article 4.8bis Droit applicable aux marques et dessins ou modèles en tant qu’objet de propriété

1. La marque ou le dessin ou modèle en tant qu’objet de propriété sont régis en leur totalité et pour l’ensemble du territoire Benelux par le droit national du pays du Benelux dans lequel, selon le registre: a. le titulaire a son siège ou son domicile à la date de la demande d’enregistrement; b. si le point a. n’est pas applicable, le titulaire a un établissement à la date de la demande d’enregistrement.

2. Dans les cas non prévus à l’alinéa 1er, le droit applicable est le droit du Royaume des Pays-Bas. 3. Si plusieurs personnes sont inscrites au registre en tant que cotitulaires, l’alinéa 1er est applicable au premier inscrit; à défaut, il

s’applique dans l’ordre de leur inscription aux cotitulaires suivants. Lorsque l’alinéa 1er ne s’applique à aucun des cotitulaires, l’alinéa 2 est applicable.

Article 4.9 Taxes et délais

1. Toutes les taxes dues pour les opérations effectuées auprès de l’Office ou par l’Office sont fixées par règlement d’exécution. 2. Tous les délais applicables aux opérations effectuées auprès de l’Office ou par l’Office qui ne sont pas fixés dans la convention

sont fixés par règlement d’exécution.

39 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

TITRE V: DISPOSITIONS TRANSITOIRES

Article 5.1 L’Organisation ayant cause des Bureaux Benelux

1. L’Organisation est l’ayant cause du Bureau Benelux des Marques, institué en vertu de l’article 1er de la Convention Benelux en matière de marques de produits du 19 mars 1962, et du Bureau Benelux des Dessins ou Modèles, institué en vertu de l’article 1er de la Convention Benelux en matière de Dessins ou Modèles du 25 octobre 1966. L’Organisation succède à tous les droits et à toutes les obligations du Bureau Benelux des Marques et du Bureau Benelux des Dessins ou Modèles à compter de la date d’entrée en vigueur de la présente convention.

2. Le Protocole concernant la personnalité juridique du Bureau Benelux des Marques et du Bureau Benelux des dessins ou modèles du 6 novembre 1981 est abrogé à compter de la date d’entrée en vigueur de la présente convention.

Article 5.2 Abrogation des conventions Benelux en matière de marques et de dessins ou modèles

La Convention Benelux en matière de marques de produits du 19 mars 1962 et la Convention Benelux en matière de dessins ou modèles du 25 octobre 1966 sont abrogées à compter de la date d’entrée en vigueur de la présente convention.

Article 5.3 Maintien des droits existants

Les droits qui existaient respectivement en vertu de la loi uniforme Benelux sur les marques et de la loi uniforme Benelux en matière de dessins ou modèles sont maintenus.

Article 5.4 Ouverture par classe de la procédure d’opposition

L’article III du protocole du 11 décembre 2001 portant modification de la loi uniforme Benelux sur les marques reste d’application.

Article 5.5 Premier règlement d’exécution

Par dérogation à l’article 1.9, alinéa 2, le Conseil d’Administration du Bureau Benelux des Marques et le Conseil d’Administration du Bureau Benelux des Dessins ou Modèles sont habilités à établir conjointement le premier règlement d’exécution.

40 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

TITRE VI: DISPOSITIONS FINALES

La présente convention sera ratifiée. Les instruments de ratification seront déposés auprès du Gouvernement du Royaume de Belgique.

Article 6.2 Entrée en vigueur

1. Sous réserve des alinéas 2 et 3, la présente convention entrera en vigueur le premier jour du troisième mois qui suivra le dépôt du troisième instrument de ratification.

2. Abrogé 3. L’article 5.5 s’applique à titre provisoire.

Article 6.3 Durée de la convention

1. La présente convention est conclue pour une durée indéterminée. 2. La présente convention peut être dénoncée par chacune des Hautes Parties Contractantes. 3. La dénonciation prend effet au plus tard le premier jour de la cinquième année suivant l’année de la réception de sa notification par

les deux autres Hautes Parties Contractantes, ou à une autre date fixée de commun accord par les Hautes Parties Contractantes.

Article 6.4 Protocole sur les privilèges et immunités

Le protocole sur les privilèges et immunités fait partie intégrante de la présente convention.

Article 6.5 Règlement d’exécution

1. L’exécution de la présente convention est assurée par un règlement d’exécution. Le Directeur général en assure la publication sur le site Internet de l’Office.

2. En cas de divergence entre le texte de la présente convention et le texte du règlement d’exécution, le texte de la convention fait foi. 3. Les modifications au règlement d’exécution entrent en vigueur au plus tôt après la publication visée à l’alinéa 1er. 4. Les Hautes Parties Contractantes publient également ces modifications dans leurs journaux officiels.

41 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

En foi de quoi, les Plénipotentiaires ont signé la présente convention et l’ont revêtue de leur sceau.

Fait à La Haye, le 25 février 2005, en trois exemplaires, en langues française et néerlandaise, les deux textes faisant également foi.

Pour le Royaume de Belgique:

K. de Gucht

Pour le Royaume des Pays-Bas:

Pour le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg:

J. Asselborn

42 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

du Comité de Ministres de l’Union économique Benelux portant modification de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), signée à La Haye le 25 février 2005

Le Comité de Ministres de l’Union économique Benelux visé à l’article 1.2, alinéa 2, sous a, de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles) (ci-après: CBPI),

Vu les dispositions de l’article 1.7, alinéa 1er, de la CBPI,

Animé du désir d’apporter à la CBPI les modifications qui s’imposent pour assurer la conformité avec la directive 2004/48/CE du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 29 avril 2004 relative au respect des droits de propriété intellectuelle (JOCE L 157 du 30.4.2004 et JOCE L 195 du 02/06/2004),

A pris la présente décision:

Les modifications visées à cet article sont incorporées aux articles de la convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles).

Conformément à l’article 1.7, alinéa 1, de la CBPI, les modifications susmentionnées sont publiées au journal officiel de chacune des Hautes Parties Contractantes. Elles entrent en vigueur le premier jour du mois suivant la dernière publication.

FAIT à La Haye, le 1er décembre 2006.

Le Président du Comité de Ministres,

43 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

PROTOCOLE portant modification de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles)

Animés du désir de modifier la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles) sur quelques points,

Sont convenus des dispositions suivantes:

La Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles) est modifiée comme suit:

En exécution de l’article 1er, alinéa 2, du Traité relatif à l’institution et au statut d’une Cour de Justice Benelux, les dispositions du présent protocole sont désignées comme règles juridiques communes pour l’application des chapitres III et IV dudit traité.

Article III

Conformément à l’article 1.7, alinéa 2, Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), les modifications reprises à l’article I seront présentées pour assentiment ou approbation aux Hautes Parties Contractantes. Le présent protocole sera ratifié et les instruments de ratification seront déposés auprès du Gouvernement du Royaume de Belgique. Le présent protocole entre en vigueur le premier jour du troisième mois suivant le dépôt du troisième instrument de ratification.

EN FOI DE QUOI, les soussignés, dûment autorisés à cet effet, ont signé le présent Protocole.

FAIT à Bruxelles, le 22 juillet 2010, en trois exemplaires, en langues française et néerlandaise, les deux textes faisant également foi.

Pour le Royaume de Belgique: S. VANACKERE

Pour le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg: J. ASSELBORN

Pour le Royaume des Pays-Bas: M..J.M. VERHAGEN

44 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Se référant à la Décision M(2011)9 du Comité de Ministres de l’Union économique Benelux du 8 décembre 2011 établissant un Protocole modifiant le Traité du 31 mars 1965 relatif à l’institution et au statut d’une Cour de Justice Benelux;

Se référant au point 4 de la Recommandation 733/2 du Conseil Interparlementaire Consultatif de Benelux du 18 juin 2005 relative à la révision du Traité du 31 mars 1965 relatif à l’institution et au statut d’une Cour de Justice Benelux, qui propose d’attribuer à la Cour de Justice Benelux la compétence d’agir comme juge en appel et en cassation pour les décisions de l’Office Benelux de la Propriété intellectuelle;

Se référant à la réponse à cette Recommandation du Comité de Ministres de l’Union économique Benelux du 20 novembre 2008, qui exprime son soutien au point 4 de la Recommandation;

Considérant qu’il est utile de modifier la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles) du 25 février 2005 sur quelques points en sorte que les recours contre les décisions de l’Office Benelux de la Propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles) soient désormais traités par la Cour de Justice Benelux;

Après avoir recueilli l’avis de la Cour de Justice Benelux;

Conviennent à cet effet de conclure un Protocole, qui est libellé comme suit:

En exécution du Traité relatif à l’institution et au statut d’une Cour de Justice Benelux, les dispositions du présent Protocole sont désignées comme règles juridiques communes pour l’application dudit Traité.

Conformément à l’article 1.7, alinéa 2, de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), les modifications reprises à l’article I seront présentées pour assentiment ou approbation aux Hautes Parties Contractantes. Le présent Protocole sera ratifié et les instruments de ratification seront déposés auprès du Gouvernement du Royaume de Belgique.

45 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

Le présent Protocole entre en vigueur le premier jour du troisième mois suivant le dépôt du troisième instrument de ratification, et au plus tôt à la date à laquelle le Protocole modifiant le Traité du 31 mars 1965 relatif à l’institution et au statut d’une Cour de Justice Benelux, établi par la Décision M(2011)9 du Comité de Ministres de l’Union économique Benelux du 8 décembre 2011, entre en vigueur.

Les procédures judiciaires dirigées contre une décision de l’Office prise avant l’entrée en vigueur du présent Protocole, restent régies par les dispositions de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles) qui étaient applicables au moment où ladite décision a été prise.

FAIT À Bruxelles, le 21 mai 2014, en trois exemplaires, en langues française et néerlandaise, les deux textes faisant également foi.

Pour le Royaume de Belgique: D. ACHTEN

Pour le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg: J.-J. WELFRING

Pour le Royaume des Pays-Bas: H. SCHUWER

46 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

PROTOCOLE portant modification de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), en ce qui concerne l’opposition et l’instauration d’une procédure administrative de nullité ou de déchéance des marques

Vu l’article 1.7, alinéa 2, de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles),

Vu le Protocole portant modification de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), signé à Bruxelles le 21 mai 2014,

1. Le Gouvernement du Royaume de Belgique est le dépositaire du présent Protocole, dont il fournit une copie certifiée conforme à chaque Haute Partie Contractante.

2. Le présent Protocole est ratifié, accepté ou approuvé par les Hautes Parties Contractantes. 3. Les Hautes Parties Contractantes déposent leur instrument de ratification, d’acceptation ou d’approbation auprès du dépositaire. 4. Le dépositaire informe les Hautes Parties Contractantes du dépôt des instruments de ratification, d’acceptation ou d’approbation. 5. Le présent Protocole entre en vigueur le premier jour du troisième mois qui suit la date du dépôt du troisième instrument de

ratification, d’acceptation ou d’approbation et au plus tôt à la date de l’entrée en vigueur du Protocole portant modification de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), signé à Bruxelles le 21 mai 2014.

6. Le dépositaire informe les Hautes Parties Contractantes de la date d’entrée en vigueur du présent Protocole.

47 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

L’article 2.14, alinéa 1er, sous a, tel que libellé avant l’entrée en vigueur du présent Protocole reste applicable aux oppositions introduites avant cette entrée en vigueur.

FAIT À Bruxelles, le 16 décembre 2014, en un exemplaire, en langues française et néerlandaise, les deux textes faisant également foi.

Pour le Royaume de Belgique: D. REYNDERS

Pour le Royaume des Pays-Bas: B. KOENDERS

48 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

PROTOCOLE portant modification de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), en ce qui concerne la mise œuvre de la Directive (UE) 2015/2436

Animés du désir d’apporter un nombre de modifications à la convention susmentionnée, notamment pour en assurer la conformité avec la Directive (UE) 2015/2436 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 16 décembre 2015 rapprochant les législations des États membres sur les marques,

Sont convenus des dispositions suivantes :

En exécution du Traité relatif à l’institution et au statut d’une Cour de Justice Benelux, les dispositions du présent Protocole sont désignées comme règles juridiques communes pour l’application dudit traité.

Les dispositions du chapitre 8 du titre II de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), telles qu’elles étaient libellées avant l’entrée en vigueur du présent Protocole, restent applicables aux marques collectives déjà enregistrées, jusqu’à ce que leurs titulaires aient déclaré s’il s’agit d’une marque collective ou d’une marque de certification en vertu des dispositions modifiées. Le titulaire doit faire cette déclaration au plus tard lors du renouvellement de l’enregistrement, étant entendu qu’il dispose à cet effet d’un délai d’au moins trois mois à partir de l’entrée en vigueur du présent Protocole. L’Office n’exerce aucun contrôle sur le contenu de la déclaration du titulaire.

49 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

1. Le gouvernement du Royaume de Belgique est le dépositaire du présent Protocole, dont il fournit une copie certifiée conforme à chaque Haute Partie Contractante.

ratification, d’acceptation ou d’approbation et au plus tôt à la date de l’entrée en vigueur du Protocole portant modification de la Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle (marques et dessins ou modèles), signé à Bruxelles le 16 décembre 2014, en ce qui concerne l’opposition et l’instauration d’une procédure administrative de nullité ou de déchéance des marques.

En fait de quoi, les soussignés, dûment autorisés à cet effet, ont signé le présent Protocole.

Fait à Bruxelles, le 11 décembre 2017, en un seul exemplaire, en langues française et néerlandaise, les deux textes faisant également foi.

Pour le Royaume de Belgique : D. ACHTEN

Pour le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg : G. STRONCK

Pour le Royaume des Pays-Bas : J. BRANDT

50 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

51 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

52 Convention Benelux en matière de propriété intellectuelle

  • Regulation (EU) 2017/1001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 June 2017 on the European Union trade mark  (EU232)
  • Council Regulation (EC) No. 6/2002 of 12 December 2001 on Community designs  (EU118)
  • Act of 10 May 2006 approving the Benelux Treaty on Intellectual Property (trademarks and drawings or models), concluded in The Hague on 25 February 2005, with Protocol (Trb. 2005, 96)  (NL109)
  • Paris Convention   (March 20, 1883)
  • Madrid Agreement (Marks)   (April 14, 1891)
  • Hague Agreement   (November 6, 1925)
  • Nice Agreement   (June 15, 1957)
  • Madrid Protocol   (June 27, 1989)
  • Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization (WTO)   (April 15, 1994)
  • Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement)   (April 15, 1994)
  • Uniform Benelux Law on Trademarks of March 19, 1962 (as amended up to Protocol of December 2, 1992)  (NL014)
  • Protocol of March 28, 1995, on Amendments to the Benelux Designs Law  (NL018)
  • Protocol of December 2, 1992, on Amendments to the Uniform Benelux Law on Trademarks  (NL011)
  • Uniform Benelux Law on Trademarks of March 19, 1962 (as amended by Protocol of November 10, 1983)  (NL010)
  • Protocol of 10 November, 1983, on Amendments to the Uniform Benelux Law on Trademarks  (NL013)
  • Uniform Benelux Designs Law of October 25, 1966  (NL012)
  • Benelux Designs Convention of October 25, 1966  (NL106)
  • Benelux Convention Concerning Trademarks of March 19, 1962  (NL108)
Required field. Incorrect Username or Password.
You have {0} attempts left.

  • News & Events
  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy Policy

benelux trademark assignment

See more information about:

  • BOIP General information

Trademark registration in Benelux countries: The Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg

  • Industrial Design registration in Benelux countries: The Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg

International Country Code:

Number of Classes
Value 1 - 45 Please enter a value.

Trademark registration in Benelux means trademark protection in three member states of Benelux Union – Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg. 

  • Trademark fees

Fees associated with filing trademark applications in Benelux, as well as other trademark fees, are available in the fee calculator .

  • Multiple-class applications

Multiple-class trademark applications are possible in Benelux.

  • Filing requirements in Benelux

The official languages of trademark applications in Benelux are Dutch and French, however, it is possible to file an application in English. To obtain the filing date, a trademark application in Benelux must contain: - representation of the trademark; - applicant(s)name and address; - list of goods and services; - trademark type; - priority details (country, number, date). To confirm the priority right, a copy of the Priority Document (non-legalised) must be provided simultaneously with filing trademark applications in Benelux. English translation thereof is sufficient. The POA form is usually not required for registration of a trademark in Benelux. However, legal representative’s details should be entered in the application form.

  • Examination, publication and opposition of a trademark application in the Benelux countries

Benelux trademark applications are subject to formal and substantive examination that includes examination of distinctiveness. The application will be published following the successful examination of formal requirements. Opposition against a trademark application in Benelux may be filed within a period of 2 months after the date of publication of a trademark.

  • Grant, validity term and trademark renewal

The grant fee is included in the filing fee. A Benelux trademark is valid in the territory of Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg for ten years from the date of filing. It may be renewed for successive ten-year periods within six months before the expiry date. A six-month grace period may be granted upon condition of a surcharge payment.

  • Duration of registration procedure

The processing time from first filing to registration is approximately 4 months in the case of a smooth registration procedure.

  • Use requirement

The validity of a trademark in Benelux may be subject to cancellation if it has not been used within five years from registration.

  • Representation by a trademark attorney

If an applicant resides outside the Benelux countries, it is recommended to perform a trademark prosecution through an agent, a registered trademark attorney having a place of residence or registered office within the European Union or the European Economic Area.

1. Online Search Databases: Benelux Trademarks , International Trademarks . 2. Trademark protection in Benelux countries may also be obtained via registration of a European Union Trademark or by designation of the Benelux in an international application. 3. The time limit for filing of a response to a provisional refusal of an international registration is up to six months from the date the BOIP issues the refusal. Requests for extension of time can be submitted to the Office. The language of the response is Dutch, French or English. It is recommended to appoint a local representative, a Benelux trademark attorney for performing this action before the Office. Appeals can be filed with the Benelux Court of Justice and not with the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property. An appeal can be launched within 2 months from the final decision of the BOIP.

The above information was verified by NEOVIAQ IP/ ICT Solutions sàrl on 23.01.2024 Please contact us if the above information is not in conformity with Benelux IP Laws

* Incorrect login information. Please try again. You have {0} attepmts left.

Cookies and privacy policy

Our website utilizes cookies to enhance site performance, user experience, and functionality. By continuing to browse this site, you consent to our use of cookies. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy page.

Essential cookies are automatically enabled, while you have the option to select analytical and marketing cookies according to your preferences.

Email notifications on new messages

ManagingIP_logo_h50px.png

  • Show more sharing options
  • Copy Link URL Copied!

Benelux trade mark procedure explained

Jeroen cornelis and louise e scheffer of nederlandsch octrooibureau provide tips on filing benelux trade mark applications and using the new opposition procedure, unlock this content..

The content you are trying to view is exclusive to our subscribers.

To unlock this content:

managing-ip.png

More from across our site

Legal Concept: Themis is Goddess of Justice and law on the background of books

As a premium subscriber, you can gift this article for free

You have reached the limit for gifting for this month

There was an error processing the request. Please try again later.

I am looking for:

Background with BOIP icons

Searching in the Trademarks Register

Do you want to search in the BOIP Trademarks Register but you don’t know how exactly? We are pleased to set out some information here to help you with your search! 

  • How do I search properly?

You can search for trademarks in the Trademarks Register in different ways. This allows you to identify which trademarks might be the source of an objection filed against your trademark application. This way you can decide whether to continue with your application, search for professional advice or come up with another trademark.  

Read more about searching properly

I see a trademark that looks like mine 

Is there a risk of confusion if your trademark looks like someone else’s? If so, that can be reason for someone to file an objection against your trademark application. What should you look out for and when should you seek advice?

Read about: what to do if a trademark in the Trademarks Register looks like yours

  • An identical trademark to mine is showing in the Trademarks Register

Identical trademarks can actually exist alongside each other as long as they are not registered for the same products and services. Does your name already exist in the Trademarks Register? 

Read about: what to do if your trademark is already showing in the Trademarks Register

How do I understand the search results? 

What do EUR, BX and INT mean? How do I view the ‘goods and services’ that have been specified? What is the difference between a word mark and a figurative mark with word elements?  

Read more about understanding the search results

Go directly to:

  • My trademark is not in the Trademarks Register (yet)
  • I see a trademark that looks like mine
  • How do I understand the search results?

Search directly in the Trademarks Register

My trademark is not in the Trademarks Register (yet) 

If your name or logo is not showing in the Trademarks Register yet, you might be able to register it then. Did you really search properly though? Do any trade names exist, for instance, that are similar to your trademark? 

Read about: what to do if your trademark does not show in the Trademarks Register

Note : a search result is of indicative value only

Help with your search in the Trademarks register

Would you like a comprehensive investigation into whether your trademark is available and specific advice on how best to apply for your trademark? Please contact an IP professional .

Want to know more about intellectual property? Subscribe to the newsletter for entrepreneurs (4x per year).

Follow us on LinkedIn

Tips and inspiration for entrepreneurs.

Problems with iDEAL payments

This website uses cookies so that we can provide you with the best user experience possible. Our Cookie Notice is part of our Privacy Policy and explains in detail how and why we use cookies. To take full advantage of our website, we recommend that you click on “Accept All”. You can change these settings at any time via the button “Update Cookie Preferences” in our Cookie Notice .

Technical cookies are required for the site to function properly, to be legally compliant and secure. Session cookies only last for the duration of your visit and are deleted from your device when you close your internet browser. Persistent cookies, however, remain and continue functioning on repeat visits.

CMS does not use any cookie based Analytics or tracking on our websites; see details here .

Personalisation cookies collect information about your website browsing habits and offer you a personalised user experience based on past visits, your location or browser settings. They also allow you to log in to personalised areas and to access third party tools that may be embedded in our website. Some functionality will not work if you don’t accept these cookies.

Social Media cookies collect information about you sharing information from our website via social media tools, or analytics to understand your browsing between social media tools or our Social Media campaigns and our own websites. We do this to optimise the mix of channels to provide you with our content. Details concerning the tools in use are in our privacy policy .

International

  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Czech Republic
  • Netherlands
  • North Macedonia
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
  • South Africa
  • United States of America

Asia-Pacific

  • Timor-Leste

Middle East

  • Saudi Arabia
  • United Arab Emirates
  • War in Ukraine

Publications

  • Social media

Transfer of IP rights in Belgium

1. how may a patent be assigned (by law and/or transaction) and is it required to record the assignment in the national patent register to become effective , 2. which formalities must be met to record a patent assignment which supporting documents are required, 3. what are the legal consequences of not recording the patent assignment does the record in the patent register have declarative or constitutive effect, 4. are there specific formalities in case the patent is held by more than one proprietor , 5. is there a need to appoint a domestic professional representative, 6. which official fees (if any) arise from recording a patent assignment, 7. which forms of licensing patents exist and which ones must be recorded in the patent register to become effective (if any) , 8. which formalities must be met to record a patent licence which supporting documents are required, 9. what are the legal consequences of not recording the patent licence does the record in the patent register have declarative or constitutive effect, 10. is there a need to appoint a domestic professional representative, 11. it is possible to pledge a patent if yes, is it required to record such pledge in the patent register, 1. how may a trademark be assigned (by law and/or transaction) and is it required to record the assignment in the national trademark register to become effective , 2. which formalities must be met to record a trademark assignment which supporting documents are required, 3. what are the legal consequences of not recording the trademark assignment does the record in the trademark register have declarative or constitutive effect, 4. are there specific formalities in case the trademark is held by more than one proprietor , 5. are there specific formalities in case a trademark is only partially assigned , 6. is there a need to appoint a domestic professional representative, 7. which official fees (if any) arise from recording a trademark assignment, 8. which forms of licensing trademarks exist and which ones must be recorded in the trademark register to become effective (if any) , 9. which formalities must be met to record a trademark licence which supporting documents are required, 10. what are the legal consequences of not recording the trademark licence does the record in the trademark register have declarative or constitutive effect , 11. are there specific formalities in case a trademark is only partially licenced, 12. is there a need to appoint a domestic professional representative, 13. which official fees (if any) arise from recording a trademark license, 14. it is possible to pledge a trademark if yes, is it required to record such pledge in the trademark register.

  • EPO European Patents
  • EPO Unified Patents
  • European Union

Patents: Assignment

A patent may be assigned to third parties. Such a transfer must be executed in writing and communicated to the Belgian Intellectual Property Office (Art. XI.50 of the Belgian Code of Economic Law).

The transfer of rights becomes opposable to third parties only upon its registration in the patent register.

The communication of the assignment to the Intellectual Property Office must be accompanied by a copy of the deed of transfer, by an extract of that deed, or by a transfer certificate signed by the parties.

2.1 Are original supporting documents essential or are copies sufficient?

An original supporting document is not required, a copy is sufficient.

2.2 Are there any legalization and/or notarization and/or translation requirements?

The documents are to be submitted in French, Dutch or German. The supplementary documents (for example deeds and powers of attorney) may be submitted in English, provided they are accompanied by a translation into one of the three official Belgian languages.

2.3 Is there a must to use a specific form?

The communication of the transfer must be executed by means of the form published on the website of the Intellectual Property Office.

The transfer of rights is only opposable to third parties when it is recorded in the patent register. The record in the patent register has a declarative effect.

Assignments require the consent of all proprietors.

When a co-owner expresses intent to transfer its share, the remaining co-owners are vested with a preemption right for three months as from the notification of the intended transfer (Art. XI.49 of the Belgian Code of Economic Law).

The appointment of a domestic professional representative is not required.

There are no fees for a patent assignment.

Patents: Licensing

In general, there are exclusive and non-exclusive licences as well as compulsory licences.

Exclusive and non-exclusive licences must be executed in writing to be valid. They become opposable to third parties only upon their registration in the patent register (Art. XI.37 of the Code of Economic Law).

The Minister of the Economy is vested with the authority to grant compulsory licences, enabling the licensee to utilise the patent without obtaining the consent of the patentee (Art. XI.37 of the Code of Economic Law).

Compulsory licences may be granted, for instance, if the patent holder fails to exploit the patent or in specific circumstances related to public health.

The licence must be communicated to the Intellectual Property Office through a jointly signed certificate in the form imposed by the Office.

8.1 Are original supporting documents essential or are copies sufficient?

It must be accompanied by a copy of the licence agreement, an extract of the licence agreement or a licence certificate signed by the parties.

8.2 Are there any legalization and/or notarization and/or translation requirements?

The documents must be submitted in French, Dutch or German. The supplementary documents (for example deeds and powers of attorney) may be submitted in English, provided they are accompanied by a translation into one of the three official Belgian languages.

8.3 Is there a must to use a specific form?

The communication of the licence must be executed by means of the form published on the website of the Intellectual Property Office.

A licence is only opposable to third parties when it is recorded in the patent register. The record in the patent register has a declarative effect.

Patents: Pledge

Yes, the patent holder can grant a pledge on the patent (Art. XI.52 of the Code of Economic Law).

To be opposable to third parties, the pledge must be recorded in the patent register, using the form provided by the Intellectual Property Office.

Trademarks: Assignment

Note: The Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg have uniform rules for the protection of trademarks, which automatically offer protection in the three Benelux countries. The Benelux trademarks are governed by the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property (“ BCIP ”). The Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (“ BOIP ”) is the official body for trademarks and designs registrations in the Benelux.

According to article 2.31 BCIP a trademark may be transferred, separately from any transfer of the undertaking, in respect of some or all the goods or services for which it is registered.

The assignment of the trademark must be in writing.

The assignment shall become opposable to third parties only after recordal of an extract of the assignment document or of a declaration signed by the parties, in the manner specified by the implementing regulations and following payment of the fees due (Art. 2.33 BCIP).

To record a trademark assignment, the following supporting documents are required: an extract of the deed showing the assignment (a purchase contract, an asset deal, a judgement) or a statement confirming the transfer signed by both parties.

2.1 Are original supporting documents essential or are copies sufficient? 

A copy of the deed evidencing the assignment will suffice (Rule 3.1(4) of the Implementing Regulations).

2.2 Are there any legalization and/or notarization and/or translation requirements?

If the Office has any reason to question the accuracy of the assignment, the Office may request further information, including the submission of original documents or certified copies thereof (Rule 3.1(4) of the Implementing Regulations).(a)   Translation requirements: all documents submitted to the Office should be drawn up in one of the Office’s working languages, being Dutch, French and English (Rule 3.3 of the Implementing Regulations). Documents evidencing the assignment of a Benelux trademark will also be accepted if they have been drawn up in German.

2.3 Is there a must to use a specific form?

Documentary evidence may be submitted to Benelux Office using electronic means or other means accepted by the Director General (Rule 3.4 of the Implementing Regulations). The Director General has issued a document on the submission of supporting documents and means of evidence. As of 1 January 2021, the following conditions apply:

  • all documents must be included in one bundle;
  • the bundle of documents must have a table of contents containing at least: (i) the number of exhibits; (ii) a brief description of each exhibit; and (iii) a description of the facts evidenced by the exhibit;
  • documents must refer to the exhibits in the bundle of documents and relevant passages in the exhibits should be highlighted or otherwise precisely marked. 

Not recording the trademark assignment means that the assignee cannot oppose the assignment to third parties (Art. 2.33 BCIP).

The record in the trademark register has a declarative effect.

The Benelux Convention does state that a trademark may be held by more than one proprietor. But in practice, a trademark can be held by more than one proprietor and the register will in that case mention the different names of the co-owners. 

The Benelux Convention allows a trademark to be assigned for only part of the goods or services for which it is registered (Art. 2.31). There are no particular formalities for a partial assignment.

The assignment of a Benelux trademark must always concern the entire Benelux territory. 

There is no need to appoint a domestic professional representative.

The fees for the assignment of a Benelux trademark are:

  • transfer of the first right: EUR 56;
  • transfer of the second to fifth right: EUR 28;
  • transfer of every additional right: free. 

Trademark: Licensing

A Benelux trademark may be licensed for some or all the goods of services for which it is registered and for the whole or part of the Benelux territory (Art. 2.32 BCIP).

A licence may be exclusive or non-exclusive.

The holder of a non-exclusive licence may not bring proceedings for infringement of a trademark without the consent of the proprietor of the trademark unless otherwise stipulated in the licence agreement.

The holder of an exclusive licence may bring such proceedings even without the consent of the proprietor of the trademark, if the proprietor of the trademark, after having been given notice, does not initiate infringement proceedings within a reasonable term.

According to article 2.33 BCIP a licence must be registered in the manner specified by the Implementing Regulations and a fee will be due.

9.1 Are original supporting documents essential or are copies sufficient? 

A copy of the deed evidencing the licence will suffice (Rule 3.1(4) of the Implementing Regulations).

9.2 Are there any legalization and/or notarization and/or translation requirements?

If the Office has any reason to question the accuracy of the assignment, the Office may request further information, including the submission of original documents or certified copies thereof (Rule 3.1(4) of the Implementing Regulations). Translation requirements: all documents submitted to the Office should be drawn up in one of the Office’s working languages, being Dutch, French and English (Rule 3.3 of the Implementing Regulations). Documents evidencing the licnese of a Benelux trademark will also be accepted if they have been drawn up in German.

9.3 Is there a must to use a specific form?

Documentary evidence may be submitted to Benelux Office using electronic means or other means accepted by the Director General (Rule 3.4 of the Implementing Regulations). The Director General has issued a document on the submission of supporting documents and means of evidence (cf. above). 

Not recording the trademark licence means that the licensee cannot oppose the licence to third parties (Art. 2.33 BCIP).

The record in the trademark licence has a declarative effect.

The Court of Justice of the EU, however, ruled that a licensee of a European Union trademark can take enforcement action even if its licence has not been registered, so long as the licensee has the trademark owner’s consent to assert such rights (judgment of 4 February 2016, case C- 163/15, Hassan). The Benelux Court of Justice had already ruled in the same way in its decision of 28 February 2003. 

A trademark may be the subject of a licence for all or some of the goods or services in respect of which it is registered (Art. 2.32(1) BCIP).

The trademark can be licensed for all or part of the Benelux. 

The fees for recording a trademark licence in the Benelux are:

  • the first right: EUR 56;
  • the second to fifth right: EUR 28;
  • every additional right: free. 

Trademark: Pledge

Yes, it is possible to pledge a trademark. According to Article 2.32bis (1) BCIP a trademark may, independently of the undertaking, be given as a security or be the subject of rights in rem.

The registration of the deed of pledge is not necessary for the validity of the pledge.

The pledge shall become opposable to third parties only after recordal of an extract of the pledge document or of a declaration signed by the parties, in the manner specified by the implementing regulations and following payment of the fees due (Art. 2.33 BCIP).

This also applies to the rights in rem.

The fees for recording a pledge in the Benelux are:

  • every additional right: free.

Portrait ofTom Heremans

How can we help your business?

Write us a message and we will get in contact.

Your message was sent.

Thank you for contacting us. We will get back to you soon.

By including your personal data on this form you agree to it being used in accordance with our Privacy Policy

Latest update

Key contacts, explore more, expert guides.

benelux trademark assignment

Logo of the Belgian Federal Authorities

What rights does the Benelux trademark provide (scope of protection)?

Table of contents, characteristics of the trademark rights, an exclusive right.

A registered trademark gives its holder the exclusive right to use it. This means that he alone has the right to use, or not use, the protected sign or to authorise a third party to use it. Please note that if within five years of registration the trademark holder does not use it for the goods or services for which it is registered, he runs the risk of losing the protection conferred by the trademark (see end of the trademark ).

In addition, the holder of the trademark may transfer it (e.g., sell it) or licence it (grant a third party the right to use the trademark). He also has the right to bring proceedings against third parties who infringe the trademark, and to invoke the invalidity of subsequent registrations of trademarks regarding the same or a similar sign. If third parties wish to register identical or similar signs as trademarks for identical or similar products, the owner of an earlier trademark may bring opposition proceedings before the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (Benelux trademark) or the European Union Intellectual Property Office (European Union trademark) and request that more recent applications for registration be rejected.

Application of the principle of territoriality and speciality

The exclusive right of the trademark holder is, however, not absolute.

First, the trademark is only protected in the territory for which registration was obtained (principle of territoriality). In other words, a Benelux trademark gives the holder an exclusive right to the sign only in the three Benelux countries, but not in France, Sweden or Japan, for example, unless a registration has also been obtained in these countries. (See also European Union trademark or international trademark ). Through the priority right , it is possible to prevent other parties from registering the sign in other countries, within six months after the first filing.

Secondly, the registered trademark only confers exclusive rights when the sign is used in relation to the goods or services for which it has been registered. The trademark is, therefore, never protected in absolute terms. This rule - known as the principle of speciality - implies that several companies may have trademark rights to the same sign within the same territory, but for different goods or services (for example, the trademark "Lotus" is registered as a trademark for biscuits, cars and toilet paper by different companies).

There is an exception to this rule for trademark holders who have acquired a certain reputation. The latter may act beyond their commercial domain and oppose the use or subsequent filing of their sign for goods or services that are not similar (see hypothesis 3 below ).

Scope of protection

The holder of the trademark has the exclusive right to use the trademark for the goods or services for which he obtained a registration. The essential characteristic of this exclusive right is its prohibition function. Other parties may not use the same or a similar sign without the consent of the trademark holder. Third parties may not, for example, apply this sign to their products or packaging or use it in their advertising.

The exact scope of the exclusive right - and the right of prohibition - depends on a number of factors. The use which the trademark holder may take action against must in principle be in the course of trade. This concept of "course of trade" is rather broad and includes any use in a commercial or professional activity for which an economic advantage is pursued. It does not include purely private use or use for purely scientific purposes.

In the event of use in the course of trade, a distinction must be made between four situations in which the holder of a Benelux or European Union trademark may take action:

  • the use of an identical sign for identical goods or services;  
  • the use of an identical or similar sign for identical or similar goods or services: In this situation, the trademark holder must also prove that there is a risk of confusion for the consumer as to the origin of the goods or services in question. The risk of confusion also applies where the confusion results from the association of the sign with the earlier trademark.  
  • the use of an identical or similar sign for identical, similar or dissimilar goods or services, where the trademark has a reputation in the territory concerned. The holder of a reputable trademark must also prove that, by using the sign without just cause, the third party has an unjustified advantage because of the distinctiveness or reputation of the trademark (dilution or parasitism).  For example, the use of Klarein for cleaning products was considered as an infringement of the famous Clareyn genever trademark because of the negative impact on the genever trademark. There was a risk that the consumer was less likely to be attracted to genever that reminds him of a detergent. The third party may defend itself by claiming that it has a justified reason to use the reputed trademark, but this defence is not easily accepted.  
  • For the Benelux trademark, in addition to these three cases of use of the trademark in the course of trade, there is a fourth situation in which the trademark holder may take action, even if the trademark is not used in the course of trade. This is the case for: the use of an identical or similar sign in any way other than "as a trademark". This situation refers to the use of the sign by third parties not to distinguish their goods or services, but for other reasons. For example, third parties use the trademark as decoration (e.g., a striped pattern), in a film or other media, in a trade name or in advertising. Or, third parties use the trademark on the Internet. This could concern a domain name registration by a "cybersquatter" , or the mention of a trademark in the metatags of a web page. As in hypothesis 3 above, the trademark holder will have to prove that the use of the sign takes unfair advantage of the distinctiveness or reputation of his trademark or that such use is detrimental to him and that the third party in question cannot invoke any valid reason to justify such use.

However, there are several exceptions   where the use of another party's trademark does not constitute an infringement of the trademark.

Transfer and licence

The trademark holder may decide at any time to transfer his trademark - e.g. by selling it. Companies will regularly consider this option when analysing their trademarks portfolio. For a transfer 'inter vivos' to be valid, it must be made in writing and cover the entire Benelux territory. In order for the transfer to be enforceable against third parties, an extract from the deed recording it must also be registered in the Benelux Trademarks register. 

The trademark holder can also benefit from the economic value of his trademark by granting a right of use - a licence - to third parties. This licence is laid down in a contract setting out in detail the conditions of use (exclusive or non-exclusive use, for all or part of the products or services concerned, duration, territorial scope, etc.). However, a written document is not required for the validity of the licence. Nonetheless, the registration of an extract from the document recording the licence in the Benelux register is necessary to make the licence enforceable against third parties.

The specific content of contracts governing transfer and licence is generally freely negotiable. However, the rules of competition law must be respected.

Taking action against trademark infringements

If a third party infringes the trademark, i.e. if they perform one of the acts described under the heading "Scope of Protection", without any exception or limitation being applicable, the trademark holder may bring proceedings against this third party for counterfeiting. The latter will primarily request that the infringing act be halted, but a court may also order other measures. More information on the enforcement of rights .

Taking action against subsequent trademark registrations

The holder of a trademark has the right to prevent subsequent registration of signs that fall within the scope of protection of his trademark. This can first be done during the registration procedure by filing an opposition against the registration of a trademark which came later than its own. If the later (more recent) trademark has nevertheless been registered, the holder may initiate proceedings to have the trademark declared invalid. The first filing therefore rendered the sign unavailable .

Related with this topic

Publications.

  • The Intellectual Property Office (OPRI)
  • Regulation (EU) 2017/1001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 June 2017 on the European Union trade mark
  • Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property

Useful links

  • Regulation No. 2017/1001 on the European Union trade mark
  • The Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP)
  • European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO)

Most recent news related with this theme

""

The FPS Economy Welcomes the New Unified Patent Court in Brussels

""

Conference 17/11/2022: The Unitary Patent system – a game-changer for innovation in Europe

""

Victor Dewulf and Peter Hedly, a Belgian-British Inventor Duo, Win the Young Inventors Prize 2022

  • Registration Fees
  • Free TM Search
  • Country Details

Benelux Trademark Registration & Search

Trademark search in benelux.

Basic Availability Report & Our Offer to your email in 24 hours.

Trademark Registration in Benelux

Work with a local trademark attorney to file your trademark for registration. Take advantage of our easy, fast & efficient process. No hidden fees.

  • Experienced attorneys in every country
  • Competitive prices with zero hidden fees
  • 5000+ happy clients & many positive reviews
  • Free consultations with no obligations
  • Personal account manager dedicated to your success

Trademark application form for Benelux

Submit an online form in order to request your trademark registration in Benelux. You can pay later or have your personal consultant check your form first.

  • Current Contacts info
  • Trademark info
  • Additional services
  • Review and Submit

Check if your trademark is available for registration.

The results will resolve any doubts regarding your mark and give you confidence in the outcome of the registration process.

Our AI search will constantly monitor Trademark Registers for any similar marks.

We'll manually check the results and regularly deliver reports of any conflicting marks allowing you to enforce your rights.

Request a cost-effective trademark renewal in 150+ countries, don’t let your trademark expire.

Contact us for our online renewal process.

Benelux includes 🇧🇪 Belgium, the 🇳🇱 Netherlands and 🇱🇺 Luxembourg. A mark in Benelux will cover all 3 countries .

Benelux Trademark Registration

💡 The best idea for your first mark is a wordmark , which means a simple word without any design, like "Apple", "BMW". It gives the broadest scope of protection. Additionally, wordmarks are rarely changed, unlike logos. Usually a wordmark is a foundation of your Intellectual Property, most businesses start from it.

A logo as the first mark is rarely recommended as it has limited uses. You can't use it when speaking and it can be only seen when displayed or printed. This is an important limitation of its use.

A combined mark is a solid choice in Benelux as in Benelux it is registered as a combination of the logo and wordmark.

Read more about how to renew a mark in Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg; What can be registered; Classes and how to manage your mark after registration:

1. What can be registered in Benelux?

Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg are treated as one common area - common area - BE-NE-LUX - with a uniform trademark law and one trademark office. Benelux trademarks are therefore valid in the three Benelux countries (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg). There are no national trademark laws in any of the Benelux countries, therefore, the national trademarks are not registered in these countries . There are currently two ways to obtain trademark registration covering these 3 countries: to apply for registration at the Trademark Office of the European Union - this will cover all 28 countries of the EU - or to apply for the trademark at the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP).

The main difference is the price - the fee for registering a mark in Benelux is considerably lower than the fee in the European Union. 

1.1 Trademark Classification in Benelux

A trademark must be filed or registered in association with products on which it is going to be used (for example, Coca-Cola is for beverages), the same applies to services. All products/services are divided into 45 classes. The names of the products and services are standard but in some countries, you can add custom terms. 

The terms are created by the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP), the EUIPO and by the WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization).

The main list of acceptable descriptions of goods and services is the Nice classification , but each country will have an additional set of terms and might use slightly different items.

1.2 Registrable and unregistrable marks

If you want to choose the best items to cover all your products and services you can have us help you. Choosing the right services is crucial as if the list is too short, your mark will have no room to develop, and if it is too vague it might be objected by the Trademark Office. An ideal list includes around 10 items, a combination of general and precise terms.

Did you know that there are marks that can NEVER be registered? Those are generic or descriptive marks, for example, you can't register CAR for cars, FAST CAR for cars. The same applies to misleading marks or marks that are offensive. Also, a country might have its own rules, for example, in the UK you can't register images of crowns similar to the Royal Crown and in China disparaging marks are not allowed. If any word has even a very slight offensive meaning, most likely it will be refused in China.

1.3 Weak and Strong Trademarks

There are strong marks and weak marks. A weak mark in the course of  an extensive use might become strong, think of Booking.com as an example. But strong marks are easier to defend and register. Marks that are descriptive to some degree are considered weak, while strong marks have no meaning, for instance, Google.

The strongest marks are fanciful or made-up words, but from the marketing point of view, a suggestive mark might be preferable. A suggestive mark is a mark that SUGGEST a quality of the product. Microsoft is a suggestive mark, you understand that it has something to do with software and this makes it easier for a regular customer to remember the mark. 

1.4 Similarity in Benelux

Confusingly similar marks in Benelux can potentially block your mark and prevent it from getting registered. Confusingly similar marks can sound similar, mean similar things or look similar. The general conception of similarity is that the new mark might mislead consumers into believing that there is an association between the prior mark and the new mark. 

There is no 100% algorithm to determine similar marks, each case is different and we rely on the experience of our attorneys.

1.5 Trademark Study in Benelux

A study is a very detailed trademark search, when we check all the valid trademarks to find out if your mark can be registered. You get a report with the list of all similar marks and our recommendations if you should file your trademark as is or if you should change something about your mark, for example, if you should add a logo to the mark.

Getting a study makes the process more predictable. It's like getting a map before going into a forest. You know what to expect and you can get prepared for what lies ahead.

2. Free Trademark Search in Benelux

We offer an online free trademark search in Benelux, you can request it on this page. It's free and we'll check the register within a day. Our search is carried out by professional trademark consultants and this will increase its value.

We may spot that your mark is descriptive or generic and inform you beforehand. Some marks can't be registered in Benelux and we will notify you if this is the case. 

We send search results within a day and we might contact you even earlier to ask about your business niche and your products. You will get a list of identical marks and can request additional details. That's free as well. Sometimes we can get additional details of a trademark only from a special paid database. In this case, we will inform you beforehand. 

3. Trademark Registration in Benelux

3.1 your registration plan.

Step 1. Start with a Free TM Search. We will check if there are any obvious conflicts. You will know if it's worth moving forward with the mark.

Step 2. Learning more about your brand. To file a trademark, we will need to know the owner address and name, the trademark and if it has a logo and what services/products it covers. 

Optional Step 3. Attorney's opinion (a.k.a. Study) In some cases we may recommend asking our attorney to review the case and prepare a detailed registration report. That's an optional non-obligatory service.

Step 4. Request registration and submit your payment. The process is completely online and we'll request your mark within 3-5 days and you will get a filing confirmation."

3.2 Recommendations for applicants in Benelux

There is only examination on absolute grounds ; the official search has been abandoned .  This means that even if there is an identical trademark. the examiner will not issue an objection due to likelihood of confusion with such a trademark but merely informs the trademark owner that there is a potential conflict, allowing him to file an opposition. After the examination on formalities and absolute grounds, the application is published in the online Benelux Bulletin for opposition purposes.

The entire straightforward process takes around 4 months.  Also, an expedited registration procedure might be requested, the expedited process takes only a month.

3.3 Brand Registration Process in Benelux

  • Applying for your mark (we pay all the government fees and submit the application) 
  • Formal examination (if the list of goods/services is correct, if other details are correct) 
  • Substantial examination (if the mark is unique and registrable) 
  •  Publication (allowing the public and other business to object against the mark registration) 
  • Registration 

Trademark Process in Benelux

4. Benelux Trademark Registration: Required documents

4.1 documents required for filing a mark.

In Benelux we will require no additional documents to file a mark. The process can be completed online, you can just provide us with the documents required.

5. Other process details

5.1 benelux first to use or first to file.

This is a first to file country, which means that whoever filed a trademark first will own it, even if someone else used it before.

5.2 How long does the process take in Benelux?

The entire process in Benelux takes 3-4 months provided that there are no problems during the examination and publication stages. That's the average time required to register your mark. 

6. What are the benefits of owning a trademark?

6.1 what means to own a mark.

When you register your trademark in Benelux, you’ll be able to:

1. Take legal action against anyone who uses your brand without your permission, including counterfeiters

2. Put the ® symbol next to your brand - to show that it’s yours and warn others against using it

3. Sell and license your brand

4. Register it on Amazon

6.2 What can you do with a registered mark?

You have an ownership confirmation and the mark becomes a point of value collection, meaning that whatever you invest into your brand or into its reputation will not disappear, but will ""stick"" to your trademark. Getting a registration will seal your ownership over this value. 

That's similar to buying a land lot to build a house. Would you like to build a house on a land lot that's not even yours? Of course not. Ownership matters.

7. Why Bonamark?

Bonamark takes care of more parts of the process than any other company out there. We are not here to just file anything without thinking. 

We are here to check everything, prepare the documents required in a way to avoid the most common objections, enhance your product list for the optimal scope of protection and make sure that you don't have to pay extra and spend more time than you have to.

8. After TM registration

8.1 trademark certificate.

A trademark is registered for 10 years and a digital copy certificate is issued. An example is attached below

Benelux Trademark Registration Certificate

8.3 Trademark Validity in Benelux

 A trademark registration is valid for 10 years starting from the filing date. The trademark can be renewed for periods of 10 years

You must use the mark in Benelux as you registered it. If you don't use your mark for 5 consecutive years, the mark will become vulnerable to cancellations and others will be able to cancel it if they decide to start this legal procedure. 

In most countries, you will not lose a mark automatically if you don't use it. Notable exclusions are the USA, Mexico, the Philippines where you must submit a Declaration of Use every 3-5 years.

8.4 Competitors and similar marks

The Trademark Office might refuse any similar mark for similar products, but we recommend getting a Trademark Watch in order to track any similar marks independently. This way you will be able to spot any similar marks and submit an opposition during their publication stage in order to prevent those marks from registering. 

8.5 How to maintain your mark after registration?

1.You have an obligation to use the mark in commerce. If you stop using the mark for 5 consecutive years your mark might be cancelled by anyone who starts the cancellation process 

2. You must keep your details up to date, if the name of your company was changed you should submit the change at the Trademark Office, the same applies to the address. Otherwise, there might be difficulties when you have to enforce your mark and if you decide to sell it.

3. We offer Change of Address and Change of Name services and will help you to keep your details up to date.

4. Keep your trademark certificate safe. You don’t want to lose it.

Official Trademark Office in Benelux

  • Name of Office: Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP)
  • Address: Bordewijklaan 15, 2591 XR Den Haag, Netherlands
  • Phone number: (31 70) 349 11 11

Our local intellectual property IP attorneys will prepare and file your trademark for registration in the country, via the Benelux trademark office. Trademarks are filed at the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP), Benelux uses the "first-to-file" policy. No evidence of use is required upon filing of a trademark application. However, the Benelux trademark law protects unregistered trademarks if the mark is recognised as a well-known mark in Benelux.

Benelux has been a member of WIPO since 1975. 

Registering the brand in Benelux is highly advisable if you plan to sell in this market within the next 3-5 years. 

The Benelux is a politico-economic union of three neighbouring states in western Europe: Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. The countries formed a trademark treaty and created one mutual Trademark Office in 2005, they concluded a treaty establishing a Benelux Organization for Intellectual Property which replaced their trademark offices upon its entry into force on 1 September 2006. This Organization is the official body for the registration of trademarks and designs in the Benelux.

🆕 Trademark Renewals in Benelux

A  trademark is renewable  for a period of 10 years and valid from the filing date.

  • A  mark can be renewed  within  6 months before the expiration of the current trademark registration .
  • In Benelux we will require no additional documents. The process can be completed online, you can just provide us with the documents required.
  • The process takes approximately 1-2 weeks, and a Renewal Certificate is issued.

Trademark renewal in Benelux price

The price is 479$ for one class. The government fee is included in the price. 

Trademark renewal process

Please contact us using the following form in order to request a  trademark renewal in Beneulxl . The process is rather simple, our attorney will become your representative and will pay the renewal fee. 

What if the deadline is missed?

After the expiration date a  grace period of 6 months  is provided to the registrant to renew the trademark paying an  extra fee  (135 EUR). 

After the end of the  grace period  the mark expires without any ways of restoration, a new mark must be filed. 

📆 Renewal deadline in Benelux calculation (example):

  • Filing date: 01.09.2019
  • Registration date: 01.09.2021
  • Expiration date: 01.09.2029
  • The earliest date for filing a renewal: 01.03.2029
  • Grace period starts and ends: 01.09.2029-01.03.2030

Please be informed that the dates are determined to the best of our knowledge and we take no responsibility if the calculations are incorrect. We recommend that you contact us with an actual case in order to determine the renewal date with the highest accuracy possible.

Benelux Trademark Services

We offer the following services in Benelux:

  • Trademark Search
  • Trademark Registration
  • Trademark renewal
  • Trademark opposition
  • Defenses in case of oppositions or objections/office actions in Benelux
  • Trademark assignment
  • Change of name/Change of Address

If you are interested in any of these services, please do not hesitate to  contact us .

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer.

Some cookies on this site are essential, and the site won't work as expected without them. These cookies are set when you submit a form, login or interact with the site by doing something that goes beyond clicking on simple links.

We also use some non-essential cookies to anonymously track visitors or enhance your experience of the site. If you're not happy with this, we won't set these cookies but some nice features of the site may be unavailable.

By using our site you accept the terms of our Privacy Policy .

ClickCease

U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government Here’s how you know keyboard_arrow_down

An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official. Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

The site is secure. The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Jump to main content

United States Patent and Trademark Office - An Agency of the Department of Commerce

Trademark assignments: Transferring ownership or changing your name

Assignment Center

Trademark owners may need to transfer ownership or change the name on their application or registration. This could happen while your trademark application is pending or after your trademark has registered. Use Assignment Center to transfer ownership or to request a change in name. See our how-to guide for trademarks on using Assignment Center.

Here are examples of common reasons:

  • I’ve sold my business and need to transfer ownership of the trademark. This is a transfer of ownership called an assignment.
  • I got married just after I filed my application and my last name changed.  This is a name change of the owner. 

There are fees associated with recording assignments, name changes, and other ownership-type changes with the USPTO. See the Trademark Services Fee Code “8521” on the current fee schedule to find the specific fee amount.

See the correcting the owner name page to learn if you can correct an error in the owner's name that does not require an assignment.

Limitations based on filing basis

Intent-to-use section 1(b) applications.

If you’re transferring ownership to a business successor for the goods or services listed in your identification, you can file your assignment at any time. In all other cases, you must wait until after you file an  Amendment to Allege Use or a Statement of Use before you file your assignment. For more information, see the Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure (TMEP)  section 501.01(a) . 

Madrid Protocol section 66(a) U.S. applications and registrations

All ownership changes involving international registrations must be filed with the International Bureau of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Follow the guidance on the WIPO website about changing ownership or changing an owner’s or holder’s name. See the  TMEP section 502.02(b) for more information.

How to update ownership information

Submit a request to transfer ownership or change the name.

Use Assignment Center to submit your request to transfer ownership or change the owner name for your U.S. application or registration. You will need to fill out a cover sheet with certain information and may also need to upload supporting documents, depending on the type of change. Also, be prepared to pay the Trademark Services Fee Code “8521” on the current fee schedule .

You'll receive a notice of recordation or non-recordation

In about seven days, look for your notice. If you don’t receive one, contact the Assignment Recordation Branch . The Notice of Non-Recordation will explain the reason your request to record was denied. Here are four common reasons: 

  • A critical piece of information was omitted from the cover sheet. 
  • The document is illegible or not scannable. 
  • The information on the cover sheet and the supporting document do not match. 
  • The assignment was not transferred with the good will of the business. 

USPTO trademark database will be automatically updated after recordation

Once recorded, the trademark database should reflect the new owner information or name change. Check the Trademark Status and Document Retrieval (TSDR) system to see if the owner information has been updated. See below for information about what to do if the database isn’t updated.

What to do if the USPTO trademark database isn’t updated

In some cases, the USPTO will not automatically update the trademark database to show the change in ownership or name. This could happen when the execution date conflicts with a previously recorded document or multiple assignments have the same execution date on the same date. For more information, see TMEP section 504.01 . 

If the trademark database wasn’t updated and your trademark has not published in the Trademark Official Gazette yet, and you need to respond to an outstanding USPTO letter or office action, use the appropriate Response form to request the update of the owner information. If you don’t have a response due, use the Voluntary Amendment form . To do this,

  • Answer “yes” to the question at the beginning of the form that asks if you need to change the owner’s name or entity information.
  • Enter the new name in the “Owner” field in the “Owner Information” section of the form.

Your request to update the owner information will be reviewed by a USPTO employee and entered, if appropriate. To request the owner information be updated manually when your trademark has already published or registered, use the appropriate form listed in the “Checking the USPTO trademark database for assignment/name change” section below.

If you made an error in your Assignment Center cover sheet 

Immediately call the Assignment Recordation Branch to request possible suspension of the recordation. The recordation may be suspended for two days. You’ll be instructed to email the specialist you speak with requesting the cancellation and that a refund be issued. However, if the assignment has already been recorded, your request will be denied. You must then follow the procedures outlined in the TMEP section 503.06 to make any corrections to the assignment.

We strongly recommend filing these changes online using Assignment Center , which will record your changes in less than a week. It is possible to request these changes by paper using the Recordation Form Cover Sheet and mailing the cover sheet, any supporting documentation, and fee to: 

Mail Stop Assignment Recordation Branch Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office PO Box 1450 Alexandria, VA 22313-1450

If you file by paper, we will record your changes within 20 days of filing. 

Checking the USPTO trademark database for assignment /name change

After you receive a Notice of Recordation, wait one week before checking to see if the owner information has been updated in your application or registration in the trademark database. Follow these instructions:

  • Go to TSDR .
  • Enter the application serial number or registration number.
  • Select the “Status” button.
  • Scroll down to the “Current Owner(s) Information” section. 
  • Check to see that your owner information was updated correctly.

If the owner information hasn’t yet been updated, go to the “Prosecution History” section in TSDR to see the status of the assignment or name change. It can take up to seven days to see an entry in the Prosecution History regarding the assignment. If an entry shows "Ownership records not automatically updated," you will need to submit a TEAS form making the owner or name change manually.

The form you need depends on where your application is in the process.

  • If your trademark has not published in the Trademark Official Gazette yet, use the TEAS Response to Examining Attorney Office Action form or the TEAS Voluntary Amendment form . If you are responding to an outstanding USPTO Office action regarding your application or registration, use the TEAS response form.
  • If your trademark has published but hasn't registered, use the TEAS Post-Publication Amendment form . 
  • If your trademark is registered , use the TEAS Section 7 Request form . A fee is required.

Updating your correspondence information

If your ownership information is automatically updated in TSDR , you must ensure your correspondence information, including any attorney information, is also updated. To update your correspondence or attorney information, use the TEAS Change of Address or Representation (CAR) form . This form cannot be used to change the owner name.

For further information, see TMEP Chapter 500 and look at the frequently asked questions .

Additional information about this page

  • More Blog Popular
  • Who's Who Legal
  • Instruct Counsel
  • My newsfeed
  • Save & file
  • View original
  • Follow Please login to follow content.

add to folder:

  • My saved (default)

Register now for your free, tailored, daily legal newsfeed service.

Find out more about Lexology or get in touch by visiting our About page.

Benelux: Trademark procedures and strategies

World Trademark Review logo

Legal framework

No separate trademark laws exist in the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. Benelux trademark law is governed by the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property, the current version of which entered into force on 1 March 2019. The first version of the Convention replaced the Benelux Trademark Law 1971, which was the first law providing uniform trademark protection in multiple EU member states. The Convention is in line with the EU Trademarks Directive (2015/2436, 16 December 2015), and thus is similar in material aspects and provides similar rights.

The Benelux is a member to all major international trademark treaties and agreements, including the Paris Convention, the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, the Madrid Agreement and Protocol, the Nice Agreement and the Locarno Agreement.

The EU IP Enforcement Directive (2004/48), which provides specific remedies for IP rights infringement, has been implemented in the national laws of the Benelux countries.

Unregistered marks

The Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property does not provide for protection of unregistered trademarks, the only exception being the protection of well-known marks as prescribed by the Paris Convention. When no registration exists, no trademark rights can be invoked. Timely registration is therefore of the essence.

Registered marks

Who can apply?

As a rule, anyone can apply for trademark protection in the Benelux. However, special requirements exist with respect to ownership of collective marks and certification marks. The representative’s place of residence or registered office should be in the European Economic Area.

Formal requirements

No power or attorney is required for filing for trademark protection in the Benelux (or the European Union). The filing of a power of attorney, however, is required in the case of a request for withdrawal or limitation of a trademark. A priority claim must be substantiated but can be done by means of a scan or photocopy of the priority document.

What can and cannot be protected?

The legal definition of a trademark in Benelux is quite broad. The requirement of graphical representation has also been abolished. Benelux legislation and practice regarding the admissibility of trademarks are largely in line with European practice. Despite changes in the law effective as of 1 June 2018 and 1 March 2019, non-traditional trademarks, especially three-dimensional trademarks, are generally difficult to obtain.

The Benelux has a fee-per-class system. As at January 2022, the official fees were:

  • €244 for an application in one class;
  • €27 for the second class; and
  • €81 for each additional class.

There are no official publication or registration fees. Renewals are calculated in a similar manner:

  • €263 for the first class;
  • €29 for the second class; and
  • €87 for the third and subsequent classes.

Additional fees are due for expedited applications (registration being obtained in 48 hours) as well as collective and certification trademark applications.

Examination procedure

The Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP) maintains the Benelux Trademarks Register. The registration procedure is almost entirely done electronically and is fairly efficient.

An application is checked on formal grounds and subsequently on absolute grounds. No check on relative grounds is conducted. After publication, the two-months’ opposition period commences. This term is not extendible.

In the absence of objections, the application will proceed to registration in approximately four months. If an office action or refusal is issued, the applicant is granted an initial term of one month to overcome such objections, which may be extended to a maximum of six months. If an expedited registration is requested (under payment of the above-mentioned additional fee), an accelerated check on formalities is conducted. If no objections arise, the mark is registered within two working days. With this type of application, the check on absolute grounds and publication takes place after registration, which implies that the registration may be cancelled eventually.

An opposition can be lodged on the basis of a prior identical or similar trademark application or registration for identical or similar goods. Opposition may also be filed on the basis of a mark with a reputation against a mark applied for dissimilar goods, provided that the younger mark takes unfair advantage of, or is detrimental to, the distinctive character or reputation of the earlier mark.

Also, and in line with Article 6 bis of the Paris Convention, an opposition may be filed based on a non-registered well-known mark. A more recent development is that the grounds for opposition have been extended to unauthorised filings by agents and protected designations of origin and geographical indications.

The opposition grounds do not need to be substantiated within the opposition form, thus it is possible merely to file a formal opposition. An opposition must be filed prior to the end of the two-month publication period (or the next working day if the term ends on a day that is not a working day).

Opposition fees are €1,045 – a relatively high amount, the effects of which are, however, mitigated by the rule that only 40% thereof needs to be paid at the time of filing the opposition. Only when a case is not settled within the reglementary cooling-off period is the remaining 60% of the fee payable.

The opposition procedure is similar to the opposition proceedings before the EUIPO. When the opposition is deemed admissible, the statutory two-month cooling-off period starts – the term of which can be extended with the consent of both parties for four month-long terms until an amicable settlement has been reached. When no extension is applied for, the opponent must file its arguments and further evidence within two months. Subsequently, the defendant or applicant is granted a two-month period to file counterarguments and request proof of use (where applicable). When both parties have filed arguments (and, where applicable, have exchanged proof of use and comments), the BOIP will issue a decision.

The language of the opposition proceedings is the language in which the application was filed (ie, Dutch, French or English). This standard language can be changed, but only with the consent of the trademark applicant. If the application was filed in English, however, the language of the proceedings may be chosen by the opponent.

If the opposition is awarded or rejected in full, the opposition fees of €1,045 must be borne by the losing party. The cost decision constitutes an enforceable judgment.

Appeals against decisions issued by the BOIP must be brought before the second chamber of the Benelux Court of Justice. The appeal deadline ends two months after the notification of the final BOIP decision.

Registration

Registrations are valid for 10 years from the application date. The use requirement commences five years from the date of registration.

Removal from the register

Any interested party, including the public prosecutor, may invoke the nullity of the registration and the registration may consequently be invalidated by the courts if the mark:

  • is a sign that is not distinctive;
  • is misleading; or
  • has become the usual denomination for the goods or services involved.

In addition, nullity may be requested if the mark involved:

  • was filed in bad faith;
  • is contrary to public order or morals;
  • conflicts with Article 6 ter of the Paris Convention;
  • conflicts with a geographical indication or constitutes a so-called agent mark;
  • is similar or identical to a prior trademark registered for similar or identical goods or services; or
  • is similar to a trademark with a reputation in the Benelux for dissimilar goods or services or is similar to a well-known trademark (in the sense of Article 6 bis of the Paris Convention).

Finally, revocation may be requested if the mark has not been put to genuine use within five years of registration. Use by a licensee (and indeed any genuine use with prior authorisation from the mark owner) is sufficient to maintain rights in a Benelux mark.

Any interested person can apply for cancellation (on the basis of non-use) or invalidity (on the basis of a prior right) with the BOIP. The proceedings with the BOIP are generally swifter and less expensive compared to court proceedings. Moreover, the proceedings generally follow the same structure as Benelux opposition proceedings, and EU cancellation and nullity proceedings.

Search option

The BOIP does not carry out an examination on relative grounds during the registration procedure. The BOIP does provide a useful and comprehensive search tool (also available in English), which can be accessed at www.boip.int/en/trademarks-register . When this search tool does not suffice, the TMview trademark search engine is also useful ( www.tmdn.org/tmview/welcome ).

Enforcement

The enforcement of registered trademark rights in the Benelux is efficient. While there is no single specialised court for general trademark disputes, most district courts and courts of appeal have judges who focus on IP matters. Due to its exclusive jurisdiction for European trademark and design matters, the Hague District Court has highly specialised judges.

Most infringement actions will relate to the use of an identical or similar sign for identical or similar products or services. In addition, an action can be brought based on infringement of a well-known trademark.

Remedies sought can first consist of an injunction, after which a recall of infringing products can be demanded, as well as surrender or destruction of the infringing products. In addition, the infringer may be summoned to provide all relevant information enabling the plaintiff to calculate the damages caused by the infringement. This information may include the number of infringing products bought, sold and still in stock, along with the profits made. In addition, the infringer can be ordered to provide the contact details of the supplier of the infringing goods. In both summary and main proceedings, a claim may be brought for compensation of the legal costs incurred in ending the infringement. This works both ways; if the defendant prevails, they may also request compensation of their legal costs. It is not possible to claim punitive damages in the Benelux.

In the case of trademark infringement, a rights holder may bring a claim for the surrender of profits made by the infringer from the sale of the infringing products. A claim for compensation of damages can, however, be brought only in proceedings on the merits.

Interim relief is available. Under certain circumstances (particularly a threat of irreparable damage to the trademark owner), ex parte injunctions are also available. An application for an ex parte injunction is granted only if the plaintiff can make a prima facie case of infringement. Additional claims, such as a request for compensation of damages, cannot be granted in ex parte cases. As a rule, interim relief can be obtained provided that the infringement persists.

The trademark owner must proceed with initiating proceedings on the merit to prevent an interim relief decision from losing its effect.

The time limit for action against a registration filed in good faith is five years, as an effect of the rule of acquiescence. The holder of a prior trademark that has acquiesced for a period of five successive years in the use of a registered later trademark, while being aware of such use, will no longer be entitled to prohibit the use of the later trademark (Article 2.30 of the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property). This rule does not apply when the younger mark was filed in bad faith.

The timeframe for the resolution of an enforcement action for registered and unregistered rights will depend on the type of remedy sought. Ex parte injunctions and interim relief can be obtained almost immediately, if the case is sufficiently urgent. As a rule, interim relief cases will be decided within approximately 14 days. Cases on the merits are commonly decided in six to 12 months.

Finally, although trademark infringement is mentioned in the Dutch Penal Code, public prosecutors do not show a great interest in pursuing common IP cases in the Netherlands. An exception may be IP infringement cases that are interconnected with large criminal cases.

Ownership changes and rights transfers

Assignment is possible without the goodwill of the business but must be in writing. Recordal of assignments, licences and liens with the BOIP is efficient and straightforward. A scan or photocopy of the underlying document will usually suffice. For recordation of a licence, lien or limitation, an executed power of attorney of all parties concerned is required. Again, a scan or photocopy of the document will usually suffice. No notarisation or legalisation is required.

In the case of service marks that also constitute the company name, it is likely that trade name rights apply. These rights are governed by the Dutch, Belgian and Luxembourg trade name laws.

Device marks, or combined word or device marks, may under circumstances also be protected under the copyright laws of the Benelux countries, as the scope of protection under such laws is not limited to artistic works and the threshold for copyright protection in the Benelux is considered to be fairly low. However, copyrights are dealt with on a national level.

Design rights are governed by the design chapters in the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property, as well as European legislation. When it comes to unfair competition, various national laws against unfair competition come into play. In the Netherlands, for example, slavish imitation may be considered a form of tort. However, as a rule, a claim of unfair competition will require additional circumstances, and slavish imitation is, therefore, commonly claimed only in conjunction with a claim of infringement of other IP rights.

Online issues

On the basis of registered trademark rights, among other things, the trademark owner can object to unauthorised use in domain names, websites, hyperlinks, online ads and metatags. Benelux legislation provides no specific provisions regarding online IP matters.

The courts have exclusive jurisdiction over these proceedings (apart from dispute resolution policy options).

The ‘.nl’ Dispute Regulation Policy (2008, amended in 2013) provides the legal framework for taking action against a conflicting ‘.nl’ domain name. The WIPO Arbitration and Mediation Centre is the administrative body in this respect.

The centre may order the transfer of the domain name when the domain name is identical or confusingly similar to:

  • a trademark or trade name protected under Dutch law in which the complainant has rights;
  • a personal name registered in the General Municipal Register in the Netherlands, or the name of a Dutch public legal entity, association or foundation registered in the Netherlands under which the complainant undertakes public activities on a permanent basis;
  • the registrant has no rights to or legitimate interests in the domain name; and
  • the domain name has been registered or is being used in bad faith.

The WIPO arbitration system works very efficiently, and Dutch arbiters are considered to be experts in their field, so that UDRP proceedings will generally form a cost-effective solution for ‘.nl’ domain name conflicts. In Belgium, the legal situation is very comparable. Next to court proceedings, it is possible to initiate ADR proceedings at the Belgian Center for Arbitatration and Mediation (CEPANI). In the event of a dispute regarding a .lu domain name, legal proceedings would be necessary. The .lu registry’s range of action is limited to enforcing court decisions.

Examination/registration
Representative requires a power of attorney when filing? Legalised/notarised? Examination for relative grounds for refusal based on earlier rights? Registrable unconventional marks
No No Yes: all regular unconventional marks are eligible for registration.
Unregistered rights Opposition
Protection for unregistered rights? Specific/increased protection for well-known marks? Opposition procedure available? Term from publication?
No Yes Yes: two-month term from publication date.
Removal from register
Can a registration be removed for non-use? Term and start date? Are proceedings available to remove a mark that has become generic? Are proceedings available to remove a mark that was incorrectly registered?
Yes: five-year term from registration date. Yes Yes
Enforcement
Specialist IP/trademark court? Punitive damages available? Interim injunctions available? Time limit?
Yes: however, preliminary measures are possible through all courts Yes Yes: no specific term.
Ownership changes Online issues
Is registration mandatory for assignment/licensing documents? National anti-cybersquatting provisions?

Peter van der Wees and Marloes Smilde

Subscribe here  for related content, breaking news and market analysis.

WTR is the world’s leading trademark intelligence platform, universally acknowledged for unrivalled coverage of breaking developments and international issues, and its role in supporting strategic decision making.

Filed under

  • European Union
  • Netherlands
  • Internet & Social Media
  • World Trademark Review
  • Power of attorney

Organisations

Popular articles from this firm, wtr 1000: world trademark review’s analysis of the leading firms in benelux: belgium *, louis vuitton takedown spree, poundland relaunches twin peaks bar, and a proposal for next round of ‘.brand’ tlds: news round-up *.

If you would like to learn how Lexology can drive your content marketing strategy forward, please email [email protected] .

Powered by Lexology

Related practical resources PRO

  • How-to guide How-to guide: Liability for fake reviews (USA) Recently updated
  • How-to guide How-to guide: The Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act – what is it and why does it matter (USA)
  • Checklist Checklist: Business licensing and compliance requirements (USA)

Related research hubs

benelux trademark assignment

  • News & Analysis
  • Legal Updates
  • Anti-counterfeiting
  • Brand management
  • Enforcement and litigation
  • In-house operations
  • IP offices and government
  • Law firm management
  • Trademark law
  • Consumer goods
  • Fashion and luxury
  • Food and beverage
  • Internet and Online
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Africa & Middle East
  • Asia-Pacific
  • Latin America & Caribbean
  • North America
  • Special Reports
  • Panel Reports
  • Report Centre
  • Survey Research
  • WTR 1000 Analytics
  • Data Analysis
  • Primary Sources
  • Introduction
  • All individuals
  • Individual rankings
  • Law firm leaders
  • EUIPO Filing Elite
  • The Global IP Awards
  • WTR Global Leaders
  • WTR Analytics
  • Market Insight
  • Login | Register
  • Subscribe Now

11 December 2017

Benelux

Legal framework

Benelux design law is governed by the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property, the current version of which entered into force on October 1 2013. The convention replaced the Benelux Design Law 1975, which was the first law providing uniform design protection in multiple EU member states and was heralded as such in the preamble of the EU Community Design Regulation.

The Community Design Regulation (December 12 2001, as amended by EU Regulation 1891/2006) is the second important piece of legislation for design law in the Benelux countries.

As both the convention and the Community Design Regulation are necessarily in line with the EU Design Directive (98/71 EC), they are similar in their material aspects and provide similar rights. Since the introduction of the registered Community design, many applicants have therefore elected to file for a Community design as opposed to a Benelux design registration covering only Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

Finally, the EU IP Enforcement Directive (2004/48/EC), which provides specific remedies for IP rights infringement, has been implemented in the national laws of the Benelux countries.

Unregistered designs

The Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property does not provide for protection of unregistered designs. However, the EU Design Regulation does, which means that all operators in Benelux can benefit from three years of unregistered design protection. In order to qualify for such protection, the relevant design must have become known to the EU public. Any prior publication outside the European Union may destroy the design’s novelty, provided that such publication could reasonably have become known to the relevant circles within the European Union. For foreign applicants, this is generally a motivating factor in filing for registered design protection, the costs of which are fairly low.

Copyright law, unfair competition and even trademark protection may also come into play when it comes to the protection of the appearance of products and their parts.

Registered designs

Material requirements.

The legal definition of a ‘design’ in Benelux is quite broad. A design can consist of the appearance of a product or part of a product, defined by its lines, contours, colours, shape, texture or materials, or of its ornamentation.

In order to be protectable, the design must be novel and have individual character. Novelty is relatively easy to assess: a design is regarded as novel if, on the filing or priority date, no identical design has been disclosed to the public. Designs are regarded as identical when their characteristics differ only in insignificant details. There is a 12-month grace period, meaning that novelty is not destroyed if the design was disclosed by its creator in the 12 months preceding the application. Nevertheless, it is strongly recommended to file for design protection before publication, especially if the applicant is also contemplating applying for design protection abroad.

A design is regarded as having individual character if the overall impression which it produces on the informed user differs from that produced by existing designs. In assessing this, the creator’s degree of freedom must be taken into account. If the designer has little freedom (eg, because the design is strongly dictated by technical requirements), the scope of protection will be limited.

Design law has also introduced the concept of the ‘informed user’. The informed user is defined as particularly observant and having some awareness of the state of the prior art in the design field. The informed user is commonly seen as being more observant than the average consumer (as known in trademark law), but less observant than the person skilled in the art (as known in patent law).

There are two important exceptions to what can be protected as a design. The following are ineligible for design registration:

  • characteristics of a product that are dictated exclusively by its technical function; and
  • characteristics of a product which must be reproduced in an exact form and specific dimensions in order to permit the product into which the design is incorporated or to which it is applied to be mechanically connected to or placed in, around or against another product so that either product may perform its function (the ‘must-fit’ exception).

Spare parts

The convention stipulates that a design applied to a product or a design incorporated into a product which constitutes part of a complex product (ie, a spare part) is regarded as novel and having individual character only insofar as that part – once incorporated into the complex product – remains visible during normal use of the product. In other words, products or parts that are found under the bonnet of a car or inside a machine are not usually visible during normal operation of the machine and thus ineligible for design protection.

With regard to printer cartridges, in 2016 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd successfully argued that these should not be considered as spare parts. The court in The Hague ruled that even though a printer is indeed to be regarded as a complex product, even without a cartridge it would still be seen as a complete product, meaning that the visibility of the cartridge during normal use is not required. This led to the conclusion that a cartridge should not be considered a spare part and therefore should not be excluded from design protection. On this basis, the court also ruled that the defendant Maxperian cs had infringed Samsung’s design rights to the cartridge and Maxperian was accordingly ordered to cease use.

As mentioned above, products that must be reproduced in an exact form and connected to another product so that either product may perform its function are also ineligible for design protection

Who can apply?

As a rule, anyone can apply for Benelux (and EU) design protection. Representation by a representative established in the European Union is required when an office action is issued.

The official fees for a single Benelux design application, including application and publication fees, amount to €150. The official fees for a single Community design (again including both application and publication fees) are €350. Both types of application are usually filed electronically.

In Benelux as well as the European Union, multiple design applications are possible. For registered Community designs, multiple applications must belong to the same (sub)class. This restriction does not apply to Benelux designs and any combination of products can be filed in one multiple design application.

The Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP) maintains the Benelux Design Register. The BOIP provides a useful search tool, which can be accessed at https://register.boip.int/designsOnlineWeb/?l=en. The BOIP does not carry out an examination on relative grounds. Objections can be made only if a design is considered to be contrary to public order or morality, which (the Netherlands being quite liberal) is rarely the case.

The same applies to the procedure for registered Community design applications handled by the EU Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO). If the formalities are in order, a Community design registration can be obtained in as little as 48 hours. However, if so desired, publication of the Community design can be deferred until 30 months after the application date or earlier priority date. This is considered to be a useful feature of the EU design system by companies that are active in, for example, the furniture and automotive industries.

For Benelux designs, publication can be deferred for up to 12 months.

Electronic filing is available in Benelux as well as with the EUIPO, and is strongly promoted.

Neither the BOIP nor the EUIPO provides for opposition against design applications. For registered Community designs, a cancellation action can be brought before the EUIPO or, alternatively, a case can be brought before one of the designated Community design courts.

Cancellation of a Benelux design registration can be obtained only through the courts.

Designs created during employment

Unless specifically agreed otherwise, if a design has been created by an employee in the course of his or her employment, the employer will be regarded as the creator. Similarly, if a design has been created on commission, the commissioning party will be regarded as the creator, provided that the commission was given with a view to commercial or industrial use of the product into which the design is incorporated.

Enforcement

The rights holder can take legal action against the sale or manufacture of any design that infringes its design, in the sense that it creates a similar overall impression on the informed user.

Legal action must be taken through the court, as the BOIP has no authority over infringement of design rights.

Aside from an injunction, the most important available remedies are penalties and damages claims. The Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property also provides for the possibility to request a transfer of the profits made as a result of the infringement. In addition, the rights holder can request the recall or destruction of the infringing goods and the equipment used to produce them.

Generally speaking, three different courses of action are available to the rights holder:

  • A request can be filed with the court for an ex parte order with a view to precautionary seizure of goods that are suspected of infringing the rights holder’s design. The ex parte order is usually granted almost immediately. In practice, the court may contact the claimant in order to obtain more information and indicate whether the ex parte order will likely be granted.
  • Preliminary relief proceedings are available, through which an injunction can be obtained. Compensation for damages cannot be requested in these proceedings. While the courts can handle such cases on very short notice, a decision is normally rendered within two weeks.
  • In non-urgent matters and cases where compensation for damages is sought, proceedings on the merits can be initiated. Such proceedings usually take between one and two years.

Case law highlights

The Netherlands is a popular litigation venue because of its overall lower costs, highly knowledgeable and internationally orientated courts and typically swift proceedings.

The past year has seen several interesting design law cases. One of these was a follow-up to a case that made headlines in Summer 2016. In that case, Fatboy, which owned the LAMZAC inflatable lounge chair, successfully acted against Massive Air and its similar KAISR chair. At first instance and on appeal, the court ruled that Fatboy’s design rights were valid and that the KAISR chair had infringed these rights.

In 2017 Fatboy continued to score courtroom victories, maintaining its monopoly on the inflatable lounge chair in actions against various parties in the Netherlands and Belgium. In summary proceedings between Fatboy and Dutch retailer Makro (part of the Metro Group) relating to its LOUNG’AIR XL inflatable lounge chair, a Brussels court ruled that the EU registered design rights of Fatboy, despite being under attack, were valid. In its judgment, the court referred to the 2016 cases in the Netherlands and Germany regarding the validity of the same design, in which the novelty, individual character and technical features were discussed in depth. The Brussels court ruled that the EU design rights of Fatboy appeared to be valid and the Makro product infringed these rights. Makro was accordingly ordered to cease use throughout the European Union.

In the same week, Fatboy also successfully stopped the use of a similar product in the Netherlands. Dutch retail organisation Blokker and one of its subsidiaries sold a similar inflatable product. The court in The Hague ruled in ex parte proceedings (again) that the design rights appeared to be valid and the Blokker product infringed these rights. Blokker and its related companies were ordered to remove the product from their websites and online leaflets within four hours.

Another interesting case this year dealt with toys. Canadian toy manufacturer Spin Master Inc had developed a product called ‘Bunchems’: small plastic balls that easily stick together to create various shapes. Spin Master registered the product as a Community design. It successfully acted against copycats in the Netherlands, Germany, Poland and China (among other places). In the Netherlands and Germany, it took action against Dutch company High5, which sold a similar product called ‘Linkeez’. In summary proceedings the court in Amsterdam ruled that Spin Master’s registered Community design was valid, did not lack novelty or individual character and was not solely dictated by a technical function. Moreover, given the same overall impression and degree of freedom of the creator, the Linkeez product infringed the Bunchems toys and High5 was ordered to cease use of the product and accessories. The parties reached a global settlement shortly thereafter.

Ownership changes and rights transfers

Recordation of ownership changes, licences and liens with the BOIP is efficient and straightforward. A copy of the deed of assignment will usually suffice. For recordation of a licence, lien or limitation, the executed power of attorney of all parties concerned is required. Again, a copy of the document will usually suffice.

Interestingly, Article 3.28 of the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property stipulates that authorisation given by the creator of a work protected by copyright to a third party to file a design for that work of art will imply the assignment of the copyright attached to that work. Assignment of the copyright relating to a design will result in the assignment of the rights to the design and vice versa. This is a little-known clause in Benelux design law and must be considered during the process of assignment of IP portfolios.

Related rights

Historically, the Dutch and Belgian copyright laws have provided useful added protection for designs and the scope of protection under both laws is by no means limited to artistic works. The Dutch Copyright Act in particular is considered to have a very low threshold of protection.

Another layer of protection is added by the various national laws against unfair competition. In the Netherlands, for example, slavish imitation may be considered a form of tort. However, as a rule, a claim of unfair competition will require additional circumstances and slavish imitation is therefore commonly claimed only in conjunction with a claim of infringement of other IP rights.

benelux trademark assignment

Figure 1: LAMZAC/Fatboy inflatable lounge chair

benelux trademark assignment

Figure 2: Loung’Air/Makro product

benelux trademark assignment

Figure 3: Inflatable lounger of Blokker

benelux trademark assignment

Figure 4: Registered Community Design 002614669-0002 of Spin Master

benelux trademark assignment

Figure 5: Products of Spin Master (left) and High5 (right)

benelux trademark assignment

Bavinckhouse

Prof JH Bavincklaan 2

Amstelveen 1183 AT

Netherlands

Tel +31 20 223 88 04

Fax +31 20 223 87 81

Web www.signifyip.com

[email protected]

Merel Kamp is one of Signify’s founding partners. She is a certified Benelux and European trademark and design attorney and was a member of the board of the Benelux Association of Trademark and Design Law (BMM) from 2007 to 2015. She has been president of the professional accreditation committee of the BMM since 2015. She is also a tutor on the professional training programme for Benelux trademark and design attorneys.

benelux trademark assignment

Michiel Haegens

Michiel Haegens joined Signify as a partner in 2016 after heading an international IP firm’s trademarks and designs department for years. He is a certified European and Benelux trademark and design attorney and immediate past president of the BMM, of which he is an acting board member. He is also active in a number of national and international (legislative) IP committees for the BMM, the International Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property and the International Trademark Association.

benelux trademark assignment

Peter van der Wees

Peter van der Wees is a founding partner of Signify. He studied law at Leiden University and trained at one of the Netherlands’ largest patent and trademark firms. Having qualified as a Benelux and subsequently a European trademark and design attorney, he became a partner at an Amsterdam-based trademark firm. He is a guest lecturer at the University of Amsterdam. His further teaching experience includes tutorships at the Dutch Bar Association education programme and the professional training programme for Benelux trademark and design attorneys.

Related Topics

Copyright © Law Business Research Company Number: 03281866 VAT: GB 160 7529 10

Unlock unlimited access to all WTR content

IMAGES

  1. Fillable Online Benelux application of a trademark Fax Email Print

    benelux trademark assignment

  2. Trademark registration benelux explained

    benelux trademark assignment

  3. Benelux Trademark Registration & Search

    benelux trademark assignment

  4. Searching in the Trademarks Register

    benelux trademark assignment

  5. Trademark Benelux for management and registration of your Intellectual

    benelux trademark assignment

  6. Trademark Benelux for management and registration of your Intellectual

    benelux trademark assignment

VIDEO

  1. Big scale Benelux #benelux #mapping #minecraft #pixelart

  2. Benelux and Nancy Dee

  3. Process of Trademark ™️ Transfer| Trademark Assignment |Trademark Transmission| 8076906274 Law Firm

  4. Assignment of trademark #shorts40 By CS NKJ Sir #drafting #cs #csnkjcsclass #csprofessionalsyllabus

  5. Trademarks by Fred Otswong'o

  6. Benelux in Different Scales #shorts #netherlands #belgium #luxembourg #benelux #europe

COMMENTS

  1. All about trademarks

    Trademark = intellectual property. A trademark is an intellectual property right. Intellectual property (often abbreviated to IP) is the collective term for rights relating to concrete ideas and creative concepts. These are, for example, trademark right for names and logos, design right for designs or patent right for technical innovations.

  2. FAQ

    That registration can be a Benelux trademark or design (with BOIP), but it can also be a European Union trademark or a registered Community design (EU), a trademark or design registration with one of the EU Member States or a trademark or design registration with WIPO. ... An assignment is recorded in the register. The corresponding deed of ...

  3. Trademark procedures and strategies: Benelux

    The Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP) maintains the Benelux Trademarks Register. The registration procedure is largely electronic and fairly efficient. ... Assignment is possible without the goodwill of the business but must be in writing. Recordal of assignments, licences and liens with the BOIP is efficient and straightforward ...

  4. Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property (trademarks and ...

    Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs)1 ... the assignment referred to in Article 2.20ter (1) (b), may also be requested; c. in the case referred to in Article 2.2ter (3) (c), by persons authorised, under the applicable law, to exercise these rights. 3. Opposition may be filed on the basis of one or more earlier ...

  5. Register a Benelux trademark

    Register a trademark outside of Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg ? Check your options here. Step 1 Check whether your trademark already exists. Step 2 Choose a distinctive trademark. Step 3 Choose your products and/or services. Step 4 Apply to register your trademark. Go to step 2.

  6. Trademarks in Benelux

    In such case, a mere extract of the assignment contract or a declaration signed by the parties must be submitted to the Benelux Organisation for Intellectual Property (BOIP). The assignment covers ...

  7. IP Guide

    Trademark protection in Benelux countries may also be obtained via registration of a European Union Trademark or by designation of the Benelux in an international application. 3. The time limit for filing of a response to a provisional refusal of an international registration is up to six months from the date the BOIP issues the refusal.

  8. Transfer of IP rights in Luxembourg

    The Benelux Convention allows a trademark to be assigned for only part of the goods or services for which it is registered (Art. 2.31). There are no particular formalities for a partial assignment. The assignment of a Benelux trademark must always concern the entire Benelux territory.

  9. Benelux trade mark procedure explained

    The authors thank the Benelux Trademark Office for the information supplied, especially for the details regarding the opposition procedure. Profile: Jeroen Cornelis. Jeroen Cornelis is a European and Benelux trade mark and design attorney with Nederlandsch Octrooibureau based in the firm's Hague office. He practises mainly in the trade mark ...

  10. Searching in the Trademarks Register

    How do I search properly? You can search for trademarks in the Trademarks Register in different ways. This allows you to identify which trademarks might be the source of an objection filed against your trademark application. This way you can decide whether to continue with your application, search for professional advice or come up with another ...

  11. Transfer of IP rights in Belgium| CMS Expert Guides

    The Benelux Convention allows a trademark to be assigned for only part of the goods or services for which it is registered (Art. 2.31). There are no particular formalities for a partial assignment. The assignment of a Benelux trademark must always concern the entire Benelux territory.

  12. What rights does the Benelux trademark provide (scope of protection

    Scope of protection. The holder of the trademark has the exclusive right to use the trademark for the goods or services for which he obtained a registration. The essential characteristic of this exclusive right is its prohibition function. Other parties may not use the same or a similar sign without the consent of the trademark holder.

  13. Specialist Chapter: Benelux Sees Surge in Post-Pandemic Trademark

    The Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property does not provide for the protection of unregistered trademarks. The only exceptions to this are well-known marks as prescribed by the Paris Convention. When no registration exists, no trademark rights can be invoked. ... Assignment is possible without the goodwill of the business. However, it must ...

  14. Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs

    c. the Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (trademarks and designs), hereinafter referred to as "the. ... The assignment or other transfer or the licence shall become opposable against third parties only after filing of an extract from the document establishing this or a corresponding declaration signed by the parties involved has been ...

  15. Trademark Assignment: What You Need to Know Before ...

    Trademark assignment is the process of transferring ownership of a trademark. It is a significant legal process that requires careful consideration and adherence to relevant laws and regulations.

  16. Benelux: Trademark procedures and strategies

    The Benelux Office for Intellectual Property (BOIP) maintains the Benelux Trademarks Register. The registration procedure is almost entirely done electronically and is fairly efficient. ... Assignment is possible without the goodwill of the business but must be in writing. Recordal of assignments, licences and liens with the BOIP is efficient ...

  17. Trademark procedures and strategies: Benelux

    Benelux trademark law is governed by the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property, the current version of which entered into force on 1 March 2019. ... Assignment is possible without the ...

  18. PDF Trademark Assignment Agreement Checklist

    Where are the to-be-assigned trademark assets located (i.e., in what country, countries or multi-country registration systems like Benelux, CTM, OAPI, etc.)? Determine the requirements of each applicable jurisdiction for each of the Checklist items below. 2. Recording Requirements. a.___ Is recordal of trademark assignment mandatory or optional ...

  19. Benelux

    Benelux (comprising Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) has unified law, meaning that it is possible to acquire design rights only for the three countries together. Three types of design application are available in Benelux: a Benelux application, based on the Benelux Treaty for Intellectual Property and its Implementing Regulation (both ...

  20. Benelux Trademark Registration & Search

    Trademark Registration in Benelux. Work with a local trademark attorney to file your trademark for registration. Take advantage of our easy, fast & efficient process. No hidden fees. Experienced attorneys in every country. Competitive prices with zero hidden fees. 5000+ happy clients & many positive reviews. Free consultations with no obligations.

  21. Trademark assignments: Transferring ownership or changing your name

    Answer "yes" to the question at the beginning of the form that asks if you need to change the owner's name or entity information. Enter the new name in the "Owner" field in the "Owner Information" section of the form. Your request to update the owner information will be reviewed by a USPTO employee and entered, if appropriate.

  22. Benelux: Trademark procedures and strategies

    Costs. The Benelux has a fee-per-class system. As at January 2022, the official fees were: €244 for an application in one class; €27 for the second class; and. €81 for each additional class ...

  23. Benelux

    Benelux design law is governed by the Benelux Convention on Intellectual Property, the current version of which entered into force on October 1 2013. The convention replaced the Benelux Design Law 1975, which was the first law providing uniform design protection in multiple EU member states and was heralded as such in the preamble of the EU ...