How to Write Your Business Plan Cover Page + Template

Cover of a book with a lightbulb. Represents creating a cover page for your business plan.

6 min. read

Updated March 4, 2024

The cover page is likely the last thing you’ll consider when writing a business plan . 

While it’s not the most vital part of your business plan, a well-formatted cover page can be a nice touch when pitching to investors , banks , or business partners. 

In this article, we’ll cover what to include and how to format your cover page so you can assemble an impressive page in just a few minutes.

  • What is a business plan cover page?

The business plan cover page – or title page – is the introduction to your business plan document. It should be simple and straightforward—only providing logistical information about your business for stakeholders to reference.

Unlike your executive summary , a summarized version of your business plan, the cover page is strictly meant to provide contact information and set the tone for what they are about to read. The quality, formatting, and readability can all impact a stakeholder’s expectations for your plan and business.

Why do you need a cover page for a business plan?

To be clear, the cover page is not a required section of your business plan. 

It’s a largely decorative addition meant to grab the attention of a stakeholder. It should introduce you, your business, and the planning document and make it easy for the reader to find your contact information.

If you’re writing a business plan purely for internal purposes , you probably don’t need to spend time on a cover page.

But if you pitch to investors , apply for a loan , or approach a potential partner—a cover page can be a nice touch that makes you (and your business) look more professional.

What to include in your business plan cover page

It’s best to keep your cover page simple. The page should only include:

  • Company logo
  • Business name
  • Value proposition (optional)
  • Business plan title
  • Completion and/or update date
  • Address and contact information
  • Confidentiality statement

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How to create your business plan cover page

Creating a cover page shouldn’t take too long. Gather all the information listed above, and then fine-tune the formatting. Here’s how we recommend you organize the information:

1. Start with your logo

Including your logo should help your business be more memorable. Just be sure it’s memorable for the right reasons.

That means adding a reasonably sized, high-resolution image at the top of your cover page. Just don’t make it so large that it takes attention away from other information on the page.

2. Add your business name 

You want readers to connect your business name to your logo. So, add some space (2-3 lines) and drop your name front and center. Consider using a large and bold font option to ensure it’s easy to read and immediately noticeable.

3. Include your value proposition (optional)

While optional, including your value proposition can be useful if it effectively describes your business purpose. 

4. Craft a title

Now you need to describe the document’s purpose. Don’t overthink it – start by adding “Business Plan” to the center of the page. Keep the bold font, but apply a slightly smaller font size than with your business name. 

From there, you can apply a title that frames the type of business plan you’re creating: “ One-page ,” “ 5-year ,” “Merger,” “ Growth plan ,” etc. 

Expanding the title is optional and should only be done if you believe it will benefit the reader.

5. Add the completion date

Including the completion date shows how fresh and up-to-date your plan is. Ideally, you’re revisiting your plan regularly (especially the financial projections in your plan). So the date should be relatively recent.

This information alone can show how focused and dedicated you are to running a successful business. 

As far as formatting is concerned, keep it simple. Include the month, day, and year – either numerically (9/15/2023) or spelled out (September 15, 2023).

6. List your contact information

This is the true purpose of your cover page. The last thing you want is for an investor or lender to love your pitch only to have to scrounge around for your email or phone number.

Add a header that states “Contact Information” centered near the bottom of the page. Then, on separate lines, add your name (or other points of contact for your business), email address, phone number, business website, and physical address. 

Tip: If you’re sending your plan digitally, add links to your email address and website so they can reach you quickly.

7. Include a confidentiality statement

The confidentiality statement is meant to help legally protect your information and ensure that no one shares or copies portions of your business plan. 

You can include a simple “Confidential” watermark near the top of the page or write a more thorough statement to sit at the bottom.

Here’s an example:

“This document contains confidential and proprietary information created by [your business]. It is exclusively designed for informational purposes and should not be disclosed, shared, or copied without the consent of [your business].”

Don’t worry too much about emphasizing this information. It can sit as smaller text in the footer of your cover page. 

  • Tips to make your cover page memorable

Adding the information should be quick. Now, spend some time on these best practices to get your business plan title page ready to share.

Apply consistent formatting

Inconsistent formatting looks unprofessional and can make a document more difficult to read. So check that your character and line spacing, font choices, and text alignment are consistent to ensure they are identical. 

You should also print out the document (as a Word Document and PDF) to check if the format changes.

Use your brand color scheme

Adding your brand colors to text, borders, and other design elements can strengthen the presence of your brand identity in your business plan. It also better connects non-visual elements to your logo. 

Just don’t force adding color to your plan. If it takes away from the text or takes too much time to get right, it’s best to avoid it.

Check your cover page from top to bottom for spelling errors and mistakes (you should do this for your entire business plan). If possible, have someone else proofread it to ensure you didn’t miss anything.

Business plan cover page examples

To help you visualize your cover page design, here is an example from our free business plan template :

design a cover page and logo for his business plan

We recommend you avoid creating an overly designed business plan. However, if you believe a more visual cover page will grab your reader’s attention—check out these other examples.

design a cover page and logo for his business plan

Spend more time on the rest of your business plan

We’ve already emphasized that you shouldn’t spend too much time creating a business plan cover page. While it can be a nice addition, it’s often quickly skipped over and only referenced again if the reader needs your contact information. 

And it’s unnecessary altogether if you’re not planning to share your plan with anyone. If that’s the case, focus your time and effort on writing the rest of your business plan. 

Check out our full plan writing guide for step-by-step walkthroughs for every section. 

You can also download a free business plan template (that includes a cover page) to ensure you cover everything about your business.

Content Author: Kody Wirth

Kody Wirth is a content writer and SEO specialist for Palo Alto Software—the creator's of Bplans and LivePlan. He has 3+ years experience covering small business topics and runs a part-time content writing service in his spare time.

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Table of Contents

  • Why do you need a cover page?
  • What to include
  • How to create a cover page
  • Cover page examples
  • Focus on the rest of your business plan

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How to Design a Cover Page for a Business Plan?

Business Plan Cover Pages

Business Plan Cover Pages

  • April 12, 2024

how to design a cover page for a business plan

Many entrepreneurs spend hours preparing and writing their business plans. However, do not pay much attention to the cover page. This is a big mistake.

The business plan cover page can create a strong first impact. It sets the platform for how investors or readers will engage with your document.

In this article, we will understand the importance of a cover page and how you can design one yourself.

What is a Business Plan Cover Page & Why is it Necessary to Design it?

The cover page is an integral part of the business plan. It is the first page of your business plan that highlights the key information of your company like a company logo, company name, address, and other key information.

By looking at the business plan cover page, a banker or investor can get a quick idea about the purpose of the presented document.

Your business plan cover should be neat, clean, attractive, and professional enough to draw your reader’s attention.

Whether you are writing a business plan, marketing plan, or business proposal , the cover page is an essential part of all.

Need a captivating cover page for your business plan?

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What to include in the Business Plan Cover Page?

There is no specific rule about what to include and what not on your cover page. But we have prepared some essential information that you should not miss including in it.

1. Company Logo

Your company logo will be the first and most essential section that will draw your reader’s attention immediately, so you must include your company logo on your cover page.

A neat-clean, high-quality logo should be used to make your business plan cover page look like a professional cover page. It should be placed at the top of your business plan cover page.

Placing the logo on the business plan cover page sets a strong brand association that focuses a reader’s attention throughout the document.

2. Company Name

The second most important section of the cover page after the company logo is your company name. You will always want your reader to remember your company name through the document reading process.

Your company name font should be readably bold and should be the largest font on the page so that it stands out from the rest of the information on the business plan cover page.

3. Business Tagline or Motto

A business tagline is a short catchy marketing slogan that is usually written with a company name or brand and is also sometimes used to indicate key features of your business. Some businesses use a tagline to show what they do and how they are different from the competition.

taglines

If you want your readers to understand your business, then a tagline plays a crucial role. Usually, a memorable tagline can excite an investor or reader that they will take a special interest while reading your business plan.

4. Branding Color

Brand color is most important in establishing trust and confidence in your customers. Your brand color will speak more than you can think about your business. Also, the right use of colors can increase your brand value by creating a strong visual identity in the industry.

Most successful companies have a strong association with their logos and brand colors. Their colors always tend to reflect their branding, even when they don’t include any text on them.

Brand color can help in establishing trust and familiarity by evoking the right emotions in your reader’s brains and sending the right message to them. Also, your brand color should be integrated into your business plan everywhere, like titles, subtitles, features, images, etc to make your business plan template more attractive.

5. Plan Title and Plan Year

The plan title will give a clear idea about what the presented document is about, whether it is a business plan, marketing plan, business expansion plan, recovery plan, or anything else.

The plan title is the notable feature of the cover page and should be in large font size. Immediately, the reader should know the purpose of the presented document.

There is no rule about which should be of the largest font size, “Company Name” or “Plan Title” as both have their benefits. It is the owner’s choice to decide what they want to highlight on the cover page for their document.

Also, readers will want to learn about what is the business plan creation time or what will be the execution time for the presented document. Thus it is important to specify the plan year on your cover page.

It should be written relatively in a smaller size and frequently below the plan title.

6. Prepared By

The “Prepared By” section is used to specify who is presenting the document and it should be the name of the company CEO, President, Owner, or sometimes another key person.

This information will help the reader to know about the key person in the company and whom they should contact in the case for more information.

7. Contact Information

Contact information contains the information reader can use to contact the person specified in the “Prepared By” section. This information includes the company’s physical address, phone number, email address, and company website .

Contact information should always be on the business plan cover page. It lets the reader learn who is presenting the document and how to contact that person.

8. Confidentiality Statement

While it is not required, you may want to include a confidentiality statement on the cover page. Or just state “Confidential” to let the reader know that this document is confidential and not directed to share with others without the owner’s consent.

The confidentiality statement on your cover page will look like this:

Example of Confidentiality Statement

Tips to make a cover page remarkable.

Now, that you know what to include in a cover page of the business plan, let’s see how to make it memorable:

Check the formatting

Before presenting or submitting your business plan to the readers, make sure the formatting (spacing, fonts, size, color) everything is consistent. This will increase the readability and help your audience to understand the things you want to deliver.

Keep it all simple

Keep your cover page for a business plan free from any clutters. The design should be classy and elegant. It should sync with the goals of your business. Ensure consistency by using the same brand color for both your business’ branding and cover page.

Review—Re-review

Double-check the cover page for any typos or grammatical errors. The better option is to have another person review it. This way, he/she will find the mistakes that you might be missing out on.

How to Design a Business Plan Cover Page?

Upmetrics gives you a beautifully designed business plan cover page template with no work on your side. Industry experts recommend our cover pages. Thus, you can trust us for your cover page without any doubts.

You can use a cover page theme that suits the personality of you and your business. Upmetrics comes with professionally designed cover pages that immediately transform the reader’s plain business plan reading experience into an interesting opening.

Upmetrics provides a feature where you can control which information and section you want to highlight on the cover page. Also, you can remove any section that you feel is not necessary for your cover page.

We also allow you to upload your own custom cover page design, so you can personalize your business plan with the cover page of your choice. So, wait no more, and start designing your cover page!

Upmetrics Business Plan Cover Page Examples

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Frequently Asked Questions

Does a business proposal have a cover page.

Yes, a business proposal includes a cover page. The cover page is the first impression of your proposal and should include key information, such as the title, company name, date, and logo.

The cover page can make your business proposal look more professional as it sets the tone for the proposal. 

What three aspects must be included in the cover page?

The three main things to include in a cover page of a business plan are:

  • Clear title: It should be focused on the main topic of the plan & business idea.
  • Contact information: Include the name of your company and the ways to contact you.
  • Date: Readers would want to know the execution time and the timeline of the business plan.

What is the best format for a cover page?

A business plan cover page is the first thing that your potential investors will see. So, the best format for a cover page is to keep it simple & clean so that it draws your audience’s attention to read the whole business plan.

About the Author

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Upmetrics Team

Upmetrics is the #1 business planning software that helps entrepreneurs and business owners create investment-ready business plans using AI. We regularly share business planning insights on our blog. Check out the Upmetrics blog for such interesting reads. Read more

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How to Write a Business Plan Cover Page Complete Guide with Examples

Fill the form to download business plan cover page examples.

A business plan cover page may not come to mind when you think of writing your business plan. Although it’s traditionally one of the last sections of a business plan, it’s one of the most crucial.

Your business plan only has one chance to make a good impression on your reader. The cover page of a book or business plan can easily make a person make a decision.

In this article, we will explain the importance of business plan cover pages and provide a step-by-step guide to help you create your own cover page for your business plan. See our real world business plan examples to see what should be included in the other sections of your business plan.

What is a business plan cover page?

The cover page of a business plan summarizes all the important aspects of the business and serves as an introduction to the full business plan. Bankers and investors can quickly determine the purpose of a business plan by viewing the cover page.

You should include the name of your company, your logo, addresses, and other information that identifies your business. This is the first page of your plan, so it should look professional, visually pleasing, and informative.

What is the purpose of a cover page?

The purpose of the cover page is to communicate what the document enclosed is and to provide information that enables a reader to contact you about your business.

Make sure your business plan’s cover page is visually appealing, free of errors, and concise to set the tone for its content.

A strong business plan cover page should be simple, clean, and powerful. Don’t clutter your cover page with details about how your business will operate. Save those details for the executive summary .

Whether you are writing a business plan , marketing plan, or proposal, the business plan cover page is an essential part of your plan. Read on to find out which elements your business plan cover page should contain and how to design it for maximum impact.

What to include in the business plan cover page

What to Include in the Business Plan Cover Page?

Although there are no specific rules regarding what should be included on your business plan cover page, we have prepared some essential information that you should not overlook.

Company logo

  • Business name
  • Document title
  • Tagline (optional)
  • Contact information and address
  • Completion date
  • Confidentiality statement

Now let’s look at each of these elements in greater detail so you know what you need to include on your business plan cover page.

1. Company Logo

Use a neat, clean, high-quality logo to make your business plan cover page look professional. The logo should be placed at the top of the page.

The image should be large enough to see details, but not so large that it becomes a distraction. Brand identity begins with your logo. The company logo is the first and most significant section that will capture your readers’ attention immediately.

People are 90% more likely to remember your logo if you place it in the top left corner.

2. Business Name

After the company logo, your company name is the second most important section of your cover page as you want your reader to remember your company name as they read the document.

To make your company name stand out from the rest of the information on the business plan cover page, you should use a readable, bold font that is the largest font on the page.

Please keep in mind that if your company logo includes your company name, you can remove either your company logo or name from the cover page.

You can download 50+ Free Business Plan Templates here that include not only pre-built cover pages but also provide step-by-step guidance in the creation of your entire business plan.

3. Document Title

Plan titles tell the reader immediately what the document is about, whether it is a business plan , marketing plan, expansion plan, recovery plan, or anything else.

It is commonly referred to as a “Business Plan,” but you can also customize it by saying “Five-Year Business Plan” or “Merger Business Plan” if you want to outline more specific objectives.

The title of the plan should be large and prominent on the cover page. Readers should know the purpose of the document immediately.

Increase readability by using a clear, bold font, such as Times New Roman, Garamond, or Arial. It may be difficult to read script lettering and doesn’t appear professional.

Please Note: Make sure your name isn’t more prominent than your business plan title cover page.

4. Tagline (optional)

Business owners sometimes use taglines to describe what they do and how they’re different. It’s optional, but you can also include a catchy slogan or motto describing your business.

A tagline becomes an essential part of your cover page if you want your reader to immediately understand what you do.

Generally, your business plan will be more interesting to investors or readers if the tagline is memorable. A business tagline is a short catchy marketing slogan that signifies your brand or company name, as well as other important aspects of your business.

Create a tagline by describing what you do in a few words. Put your tagline under your company logo on your cover page so readers understand what you do immediately.

5. Contact Information and Address

“Prepared By” contains contact information the reader can use to contact the person. It includes information about the company’s mailing address, phone number, e-mail address, and website.

To make investors aware of where to direct their inquiries, include your name as the business owner as well as the names of any partners or executives.

Try to center this information on the page to maintain consistency in formatting. As long as the information is clearly visible and readable, you may use a smaller font size than you used for the company name and title.

6. Completion Date

When was this plan written? The date is important to readers, so include it (month and year are sufficient).

Under the contact information, write the year (or the year and month) in which the business plan was finalized and published. It’s a good idea to update your business plan throughout the year if you’re including the month, so readers don’t think it’s old.

It is important to note that your company name should appear more prominently than your title and date. Depending on your business plan’s writing style, you may spell out the date, like Jan 20, 2023, or write it numerically, like 20/1/23.

Dates should be formatted consistently throughout the document. To maintain consistency, center the text and use the same font size as your address and contact information.

7. Confidentiality Statement

Adding a confidentiality statement to your cover page protects your idea from being disclosed. It is not required, but you may want to include a confidentiality statement on the cover page, or just text “Confidential” to emphasize that this is a confidential document such as the following:

Example of Confidentiality Statement

It is understood that the information provided in this [Company’s Name] Business Plan is totally confidential, and the reader undertakes not to disclose any aspect of it without the express written consent of the business owner.

How to write a business plan cover page that captures investors' attention?

  • Keep it concise and to the point: Investors are busy people, so they don’t want to read a long and rambling cover page. Keep your cover page brief and to the point, highlighting your key business strengths and unique selling points.
  • Use clear and concise language: Avoid using jargon or technical language that your target audience may not understand. Use clear and concise language to communicate your business vision and goals.
  • Highlight your key business strengths and unique selling points: What makes your business unique and different from the competition? What are your key strengths? Highlight these things on your cover page to grab investors’ attention.
  • Make sure your cover page is visually appealing and professional: Your cover page is the first thing that potential investors will see, so it’s important to make a good impression. Use a professional design and layout, and avoid using too many colors or fonts.
  • Proofread carefully for any errors: Typos and grammatical errors on your cover page will make you look unprofessional. Proofread your cover page carefully before submitting it to any potential investors.

What are some creative business plan cover page design ideas?

  • Use high-quality images or graphics that are relevant to your business: Images and graphics can be a great way to add visual interest to your cover page and make it more engaging for potential investors. Choose high-quality images or graphics that are relevant to your business and that will help to communicate your brand message.
  • Use a unique and eye-catching font scheme: Your cover page should stand out from the crowd, so use a unique and eye-catching font scheme. Avoid using overused or generic fonts.
  • Use your company colors and branding to create a cohesive look: Your cover page should be consistent with your overall branding. Use your company colors and fonts to create a cohesive look and feel.
  • Keep your design simple and elegant: A simple and elegant design is often the most effective. Avoid cluttering your cover page with too much text or too many images and graphics.

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What makes a great cover page for a business plan

Formatting should be consistent.

Messy or unprofessional cover pages can create negative perceptions in your readers’ minds before they even open your business plan.

The cover page of your business plan is the first impression of your company, so your logo, fonts, and brand colors should all work together to capture the reader’s attention.

Follow these best practices to create a cover page that stands out:

Keeping your cover page neat and consistent will allow your reader to perceive your organization and professionalism. Use consistent formatting through

  • Maintaining equal spacing between characters and lines
  • Choosing fonts that are similar or identical
  • Make sure each line of your cover page is centered

When it comes to fonts, it’s best practice to stick to one type of typeface, such as serif or sans serif. It’s also important to choose fonts that are simple, easy to read, and represent your brand.

It is important to ensure your business plan’s cover page is free of spelling and grammatical errors. Make sure you proofread your document several times before publishing the final version, and ask others to review it as well.

The less the better

In your business plan executive summary , you will summarize its contents. The cover page should not do the same. It is also unwise to create a business plan cover that is graphically complicated because the information will be difficult to discern. A strong business plan cover page should be simple, clean, and powerful.

Make use of the color scheme of your company

Color plays a crucial role in establishing your brand’s credibility and trustworthiness. Choosing the right brand color will reveal more about your business than you could ever imagine.

In addition, using the right colors can enhance your brand value by creating a strong visual identity. To make your business plan more appealing, your brand color should be incorporated everywhere, such as titles, subtitles, features, images, etc.

Ensure the colors don’t distract from the important information and consider coordinating them with your company’s brand or logo.

Colors represent 90% of your brand’s personality and elicit the right emotions from your customers, so choose colors that represent your brand’s personality and evoke the right emotions.

When it comes to choosing a logo, simplicity is key. Try to create something that represents your brand and speaks to your audience without being too busy (in other words: white space is your friend).

It’s also important to remember to be practical: your logo should look good in any medium, size, color, and even time period. Beyond your business plan cover page, you’ll need it for your social media, marketing material, or labels.

Download Pack of 6 Business Plan Cover Page Examples

We will show you some real-world business plan cover page examples so you may know how to design your own.

Download Business Plan Cover Page Templates

Here are a few business plan cover examples to illustrate the structure and format. Download and customize it according to your needs.

business plan

Business Plan Cover Page Example 1

business-plan-cover-page2

Business Plan Cover Page Example 2

business-plan-cover-page

Business Plan Cover Page Example 3

business-plan-cover-page

Business Plan Cover Page Example 4

business-plan-cover-page5

Business Plan Cover Page Example 5

business-plan-cover-page-6

Business Plan Cover Page Example 6

If you’re not confident in your ability to create a business plan on your own, or if you simply don’t have the time to do so, Wise Business Plans can help.

Our expert business plan writers have years of experience crafting comprehensive plans for businesses of all sizes and industries. We’ll work with you to understand your unique vision and goals, and we’ll create a customized plan that outlines your marketing strategy, target market, financial projections, and more.

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How to Design a Cover Page for Your Business Plan

  • 26th Nov, 2023

If you're starting a new business or growing an existing one, it's critical to have a successful business plan to guide your decisions.

How to Design a Cover Page for Your Business Plan

Starting a Business

Why? A good plan helps you understand your business expenses and cash flow, and it can lay out your goals and track milestones along the way. It's also important if you're applying for a loan or approaching potential investors who may be interested in your future business.

That means when you're writing your business plan, you have one chance to make a good first impression and catch your reader's attention. It takes a lot of research and planning, but after you've finished the hard work of compiling the contents of your plan, you're still not done. Your business plan's cover page may seem like an afterthought, but it shouldn't be. As they say, never judge a book by its cover, but that's precisely what happens when it comes to business plan cover pages.

A glimpse at the cover page can be enough for someone to decide if they want to pay attention to your business or ignore it. So, before you distribute your business plan, design a cover that stands out and entices interested parties to find out more about your company.

Helpful resource: How to Write Your First Business Plan

What is a business plan cover page?

Think of the cover page (also called a title page) as a welcome mat that leads to your full business plan. It's meant to be simple and highlight the legal information of your business like a company logo, company name, address, contact details, and other key information.

The quality and appearance of the cover page may influence the perception of the material that follows in your plan—and the credibility of your business. If you want to spark the interest of prospective investors or lenders, you need to make sure that it's professional, informative, and easy to read.

What is the purpose of a business plan cover page?

The main purpose of any business plan cover page is to inform and enhance your report. Your cover page should communicate a little about the business plan itself and provide the necessary information for a reader to contact you about the business you're spotlighting.

Keep the cover page concise and focus only on the introductory basics. There's no need to get into the weeds here. Instead, save those details about how your business will operate for the executive summary, which underlines the most crucial pieces of your plan, such as your short-term and long-term goals.

What should you include on a business plan cover page?

There are no hard-and-fast rules about what to show on your business plan cover page. But there are a few standard elements you should consider adding. Once you know what information you want to use, you just have to arrange it.

1. Document title

Often, the title of these documents is merely "Business Plan." But you can also customize it with "Five-Year Business Plan" or "Business Acquisition Plan" if you want to outline more explicit goals of your business plan.

Use a clear, bold font to increase readability, like Times New Roman, Garamond, or Arial. Avoid script lettering as it doesn't come across as professional and may be challenging to read.

2. Business name

Add your company name below the title of the document. Use the same font of the title, but increase the font size slightly, so it stands out. Your company name is a significant part of the cover page, so use sharp, bold text that's big enough to read clearly. Also, center your company name a few spaces below the title to continue a clean and consistent appearance.

3. Contact information

Below your company name, include a physical address, phone number, email, website, and other details about your business. You can also add a section titled "prepared by" to list your name and credentials, as well as the names of partners or collaborators, so readers know where to direct their inquiries.

To keep consistent formatting, center this information on the page. You can use a smaller font size than you used for your company name and title, as long as the information is clearly visible and legible.

4. Date of completion

Under your company's contact information, include the month and year you completed your business plan. Use the same font size as your address and contact information, and center the text for consistency.

5. Company logo

Your logo is the foundation of your brand identity. It can draw interest and pique the curiosity of your audience. If you have a high-resolution thumbnail of your company's logo, add and center it at the top of the page. The logo should be large enough that readers can easily see details, but not so big that it's a distraction from the rest of the content.

6. Business tagline

Some businesses use a tagline to show what they do and how they're different from the competition. Think Nike's "Just Do It" or Dollar Shave Club's "Shave Time. Shave Money."

If you have a tagline, add it to your cover page under your company logo so readers understand straight away what you do or how you do it. A memorable tagline can excite an investor so that they'll take a special interest while evaluating your business plan.

7. Confidentiality statement

At the bottom of your cover page, add a brief confidentiality statement to protect your business's intellectual property or sensitive information. This may prevent others from disclosing your business plan without your permission.

For this section, use a slightly smaller font size, but try to make sure the text is still visible. Here's an example of a typical confidentiality statement:

"This document contains confidential, proprietary information created by (your company's name). It is issued exclusively for informational purposes and should not be reproduced without the consent of (your company's name)."

Business plan cover page templates

Looking to create a standout cover page? There are dozens of professionally-designed business plan templates, including cover pages, available online. You can download and customize these in a matter of minutes.

If you need help getting started, try one of these:

  • Microsoft Word
  • Business in a Box
  • MS Office Templates

You might even be able to adapt one of Canva's proposal templates to suit your needs.

How to make your business plan cover page stand out

A cover page that's messy or unprofessional in any way can create negative preconceptions in your reader's minds before they even look at your business plan.

Set yourself up for success with a cover page that stands out by following these best practices:

Use consistent formatting

Inconsistent formatting can turn a stable document into chaos. Try to stay consistent when using styles and line spacing. Make sure your fonts are complementary, and don't select too many—that could be overwhelming.

Proofread it

Because your cover is the first page of a business plan, it's important to ensure there are zero spelling typos or mistakes within your content. Carefully proofread your document before distributing the final draft and ask someone else to read your work. Having a second set of eyes can smooth out any rough spots and save you potential embarrassment.

Show your brand's personality

The design elements (color scheme, font type, images) you use can create a memorable, bold statement for your cover page that'll make a positive impression on your audience. Still, do keep it professional. Coordinate the colors with your company's logo or brand, and be sure the elements don't distract from the important details on the cover page.

How Accracy can help

While we can't design a beautiful business plan cover page for you, we can help you out with the contents of that plan. Bench is America's largest professional bookkeeping service for small businesses. We can handle your bookkeeping and tax filing for you while you focus on starting and running your business. Even if you're pre-revenue , you need a solid bookkeeping setup—plus, reliable bookkeeping can give you the numbers you need to prove to investors that you're a good bet.

Even if you aren't using your business plan to seek funding, including your financial projections offers major benefits. By looking into the future of your business, you can make plans for growth and set realistic goals to reach along the way. Get started with our guide to financial forecasting .

Make a great first impression

Although your business plan cover page has a big job to do, it's meant to be simple and straightforward. With just a few business details, like your company name, logo, and contact information, the cover page is your first opportunity to stand out and persuade readers that you're worth the investment.

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How to Design a Cover Page for Your Business Plan

Paula Kehoe

Reviewed by

December 22, 2021

This article is Tax Professional approved

If you're starting a new business or growing an existing one, it’s critical to have a successful business plan to guide your decisions.

I am the text that will be copied.

Why? A good plan helps you understand your business expenses and cash flow, and it can lay out your goals and track milestones along the way. It’s also important if you’re applying for a loan or approaching potential investors who may be interested in your future business.

That means when you’re writing your business plan, you have one chance to make a good first impression and catch your reader’s attention. It takes a lot of research and planning, but after you’ve finished the hard work of compiling the contents of your plan, you’re still not done. Your business plan’s cover page may seem like an afterthought, but it shouldn’t be. As they say, never judge a book by its cover, but that’s precisely what happens when it comes to business plan cover pages.

A glimpse at the cover page can be enough for someone to decide if they want to pay attention to your business or ignore it. So, before you distribute your business plan, design a cover that stands out and entices interested parties to find out more about your company.

Helpful resource: How to Write Your First Business Plan

What is a business plan cover page?

Think of the cover page (also called a title page) as a welcome mat that leads to your full business plan. It’s meant to be simple and highlight the legal information of your business like a company logo, company name, address, contact details, and other key information.

The quality and appearance of the cover page may influence the perception of the material that follows in your plan—and the credibility of your business. If you want to spark the interest of prospective investors or lenders, you need to make sure that it’s professional, informative, and easy to read.

What is the purpose of a business plan cover page?

The main purpose of any business plan cover page is to inform and enhance your report. Your cover page should communicate a little about the business plan itself and provide the necessary information for a reader to contact you about the business you’re spotlighting.

Keep the cover page concise and focus only on the introductory basics. There’s no need to get into the weeds here. Instead, save those details about how your business will operate for the executive summary, which underlines the most crucial pieces of your plan, such as your short-term and long-term goals.

What should you include on a business plan cover page?

There are no hard-and-fast rules about what to show on your business plan cover page. But there are a few standard elements you should consider adding. Once you know what information you want to use, you just have to arrange it.

1. Document title

Often, the title of these documents is merely “Business Plan.” But you can also customize it with “Five-Year Business Plan” or “Business Acquisition Plan” if you want to outline more explicit goals of your business plan.

Use a clear, bold font to increase readability, like Times New Roman, Garamond, or Arial. Avoid script lettering as it doesn’t come across as professional and may be challenging to read.

2. Business name

Add your company name below the title of the document. Use the same font of the title, but increase the font size slightly, so it stands out. Your company name is a significant part of the cover page, so use sharp, bold text that’s big enough to read clearly. Also, center your company name a few spaces below the title to continue a clean and consistent appearance.

3. Contact information

Below your company name, include a physical address, phone number, email, website, and other details about your business. You can also add a section titled “prepared by” to list your name and credentials, as well as the names of partners or collaborators, so readers know where to direct their inquiries.

To keep consistent formatting, center this information on the page. You can use a smaller font size than you used for your company name and title, as long as the information is clearly visible and legible.

4. Date of completion

Under your company’s contact information, include the month and year you completed your business plan. Use the same font size as your address and contact information, and center the text for consistency.

5. Company logo

Your logo is the foundation of your brand identity. It can draw interest and pique the curiosity of your audience. If you have a high-resolution thumbnail of your company’s logo, add and center it at the top of the page. The logo should be large enough that readers can easily see details, but not so big that it’s a distraction from the rest of the content.

6. Business tagline

Some businesses use a tagline to show what they do and how they’re different from the competition. Think Nike’s “Just Do It” or Dollar Shave Club’s “Shave Time. Shave Money.”

If you have a tagline, add it to your cover page under your company logo so readers understand straight away what you do or how you do it. A memorable tagline can excite an investor so that they’ll take a special interest while evaluating your business plan.

7. Confidentiality statement

At the bottom of your cover page, add a brief confidentiality statement to protect your business’s intellectual property or sensitive information. This may prevent others from disclosing your business plan without your permission.

For this section, use a slightly smaller font size, but try to make sure the text is still visible. Here’s an example of a typical confidentiality statement:

“This document contains confidential, proprietary information created by (your company’s name). It is issued exclusively for informational purposes and should not be reproduced without the consent of (your company’s name).”

Business plan cover page templates

Looking to create a standout cover page? There are dozens of professionally-designed business plan templates, including cover pages, available online. You can download and customize these in a matter of minutes.

If you need help getting started, try one of these:

  • Microsoft Word
  • Business in a Box
  • MS Office Templates

You might even be able to adapt one of Canva’s proposal templates to suit your needs.

How to make your business plan cover page stand out

A cover page that’s messy or unprofessional in any way can create negative preconceptions in your reader’s minds before they even look at your business plan.

Set yourself up for success with a cover page that stands out by following these best practices:

Use consistent formatting

Inconsistent formatting can turn a stable document into chaos. Try to stay consistent when using styles and line spacing. Make sure your fonts are complementary, and don’t select too many—that could be overwhelming.

Proofread it

Because your cover is the first page of a business plan, it’s important to ensure there are zero spelling typos or mistakes within your content. Carefully proofread your document before distributing the final draft and ask someone else to read your work. Having a second set of eyes can smooth out any rough spots and save you potential embarrassment.

Show your brand’s personality

The design elements (color scheme, font type, images) you use can create a memorable, bold statement for your cover page that’ll make a positive impression on your audience. Still, do keep it professional. Coordinate the colors with your company’s logo or brand, and be sure the elements don’t distract from the important details on the cover page.

How Bench can help

While we can’t design a beautiful business plan cover page for you, we can help you out with the contents of that plan. Bench is America’s largest professional bookkeeping service for small businesses. We can handle your bookkeeping and tax filing for you while you focus on starting and running your business. Even if you’re pre-revenue , you need a solid bookkeeping setup—plus, reliable bookkeeping can give you the numbers you need to prove to investors that you’re a good bet.

Even if you aren’t using your business plan to seek funding, including your financial projections offers major benefits. By looking into the future of your business, you can make plans for growth and set realistic goals to reach along the way. Get started with our guide to financial forecasting .

Make a great first impression

Although your business plan cover page has a big job to do, it’s meant to be simple and straightforward. With just a few business details, like your company name, logo, and contact information, the cover page is your first opportunity to stand out and persuade readers that you’re worth the investment.

Join over 140,000 fellow entrepreneurs who receive expert advice for their small business finances

Get a regular dose of educational guides and resources curated from the experts at Bench to help you confidently make the right decisions to grow your business. No spam. Unsubscribe at any time.

design a cover page and logo for his business plan

Business Plan Cover Page

A business plan is a crucial document for entrepreneurs, startups, and businesses seeking to outline their future strategy and secure funding. The cover page, also known as the business plan title page, serves as the first impression of this important document. An effective cover page not only makes the business plan look professional but also organizes and highlights essential information to grab the attention of potential investors, partners, and stakeholders.

How to Make a Cover Page for a Business Plan

How to Make a Cover Page for a Business Plan

What is a cover page for a business plan.

The cover page acts as the face of your business plan. It presents the business name, plan title, and contact information at a glance, setting the stage for what is detailed in the following pages. It's the entry point that either invites readers to dive deeper into the document or dissuades them based on its aesthetics and professionalism.

The purpose of a business plan cover page is twofold:

  • To Introduce the Business : It provides a snapshot of the business identity and what it stands for.
  • To Engage the Reader : The cover page should spark interest and encourage the reader to engage with the content that follows.

Creating a compelling and professional cover page is straightforward but requires attention to detail. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

1. Include Essential Information

A standard business plan cover page should include:

  • Business Name and Logo : Place these prominently to emphasize your brand.
  • Plan Title : Clearly state the nature of the business plan. For instance, “2023 Business Expansion Plan”.
  • Date : Include the date of the business plan submission.
  • Contact Information : Provide contact details of the business owner or the main point of contact, such as an email address, phone number, and mailing address.

2. Design for Clarity and Professionalism

  • Professional Layout : Use clean, uncluttered layouts that align with your business branding.
  • Font and Size : Choose professional fonts like Arial, Times New Roman, or Calibri. Keep the font size readable; typically, main titles are around 16-18 points.
  • Use of Color : Incorporate brand colors, but ensure they do not overshadow the text’s readability.

3. Add a Tagline or Mission Statement (Optional)

A brief tagline or the mission statement below the business name can add context to what the business plan will discuss, providing a concise preview of the business’s goals.

4. Consider Including an Image (Optional)

Depending on the type of business and the audience, including a high-quality image that reflects your services or products can make the cover page more attractive and engaging.

5. Maintain Consistency with Overall Business Plan

Ensure that the design and thematic elements on the cover page are consistent with the rest of the business plan. This includes color schemes, fonts, and logos, ensuring a cohesive look throughout the document.

6. Proofread

Before finalizing your business plan cover page, proofread it to correct any typographical errors and ensure all information is accurate and up-to-date. Errors on the cover page can create an unfavorable impression.

7. Use High-Quality Printing Materials

If you're presenting a printed version of the business plan, use high-quality paper to enhance the overall presentation. This reflects the seriousness and professionalism of your endeavor.

Business Plan Cover Page

The business plan cover page is more than just a protective shield for your document; it’s a marketing tool that introduces and sells your business concept at first sight. By following these guidelines, you can create a professional and appealing title page that sets the tone for the investors' or readers' journey through your business plan . Remember, a well-designed cover page not only reflects your business’s professionalism but also enhances the readability and appeal of your business plan as a whole.

BizPlanner AI's Update: Advanced Financial Planning Capabilities

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Crafting an Impressive Cover Page for Your Business Plan: A Comprehensive Guide

The cover page of your business plan is the very first thing investors lenders, and partners will see when reviewing your plan. While it’s not the most critical component, a well-designed cover page makes a strong first impression and introduces your business in a polished professional manner.

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll explore what makes an effective cover page, key information to include, formatting best practices, common mistakes to avoid, and tips to create a memorable introduction to your business plan

What is the Purpose of a Business Plan Cover Page?

A cover page sometimes called a title page serves as the introduction to your full business plan document. It should provide high-level details to identify your company and summarize the purpose of the plan.

The key goals of an effective cover page are:

  • Introduce your business to the reader
  • Make your company name and brand recognizable
  • Offer essential contact information upfront
  • Set expectations for the rest of the document

Unlike the executive summary which summarizes your entire plan, the cover page simply sets the stage. It’s meant to be glanced at briefly before the reader dives into the details of your plan.

Key Pieces of Information to Include

When creating your cover page, simplicity and clarity are key. Only include the most essential details:

Company Logo: Adds brand recognition. Use high resolution.

Business Name: Centered prominently in bold, large font.

Tagline or Value Proposition: Optional. 1-2 sentences describing your purpose.

Document Title: Such as “Business Plan” or “3-Year Growth Plan”

Date: The month and year the plan was created or updated.

Contact Info: Name, phone, email, website, address.

Confidentiality Statement: Note that the plan is private.

Avoid cluttering the page with anything else nonessential. Keep it clean, organized and easy to scan.

Formatting Tips for Visually Appealing Cover Pages

Take the time to get the formatting and design right. A few small tweaks can elevate the quality:

Consistent formatting: Use the same font, sizing, colors and alignment throughout.

Brand colors: Incorporate your brand color scheme through text and borders.

Readable font: Stick to simple, professional fonts like Arial or Times New Roman.

Balanced layout: Equally distribute elements with plenty of white space.

Accessible contact info: Add clickable website and email links if sharing digitally.

Double check accuracy: Proofread closely and have others review.

Common Mistakes to Avoid on Cover Pages

While creating a cover page is fairly straightforward, it’s easy to make small mistakes that detract from the professionalism you want to convey:

Using low-quality logos that appear blurry or pixelated

Cramming in too much unnecessary information

Having inconsistent formatting that looks sloppy

Not proofreading leading to spelling/grammar errors

Including overly salesy claims or fluffy language

Neglecting to add contact information

Using hard-to-read fonts or color schemes

With attention to detail, you can avoid these missteps and make your cover page error-free.

Cover Page Design Tips and Tricks

Beyond the basics, consider these tips to take your cover page from good to great:

Highlight your value proposition: Summarize what makes your business unique.

Use an engaging image: A relevant, high-quality photo can draw interest.

Add color: Colored borders or backgrounds can make your page pop.

Include social media links: Add icons linking to your profiles.

Personalize the tone: Use warm, conversational language.

Craft a catchy subtitle: Expand on the purpose of your plan.

Showcase awards/certifications: Feature badges earned by your company.

Add testimonials: A positive quote about your business makes an impression.

Cover Page Templates and Examples

If you need inspiration, look at cover page examples from others. Here are a few nicely designed samples:

Minimalist Cover Page

design a cover page and logo for his business plan

There are also many free, downloadable cover page templates available online you can customize to your brand.

An eye-catching cover page makes a strong first impression and introduces your business in a memorable way to investors, lenders and partners reviewing your plan. Keep the design clean and uncluttered. Only include key details like your logo, name, contact information and document title. Take the time to get the formatting, fonts, colors and layout right. With an engaging cover page that looks polished and professional, you can set yourself up for success before the reader gets to your executive summary and the details within your full business plan.

cover page for business plan

Cover page design

Now it’s time for the finishing touches: the actual design of your cover page. Your business plan’s cover page gives the first impression of your business, so your company logo, fonts, and brand colors should all work together to make people want to read more.

90% of a customer’s impression of your business comes from the brand colors you choose, so it’s important to choose colors that represent your business’s personality and elicit the right emotions from your readers.

Don’t know where to start? Grab a pen and paperand write down three emotions you want your customers to feel when they think of your brand. Now you can brainstorm some colors that represent those emotions. For example, you might choose blue if your product is associated with reliability, or yellow if your product is supposed to make your clients feel happy. It’s safer to only choose 2-3 colors , including black, for your color scheme.

You can also analyze the competition and choose colors that help you stand out. Canva has more detailed instructions on how to create your brand color palette .

When it comes to fonts, it’s best practice to stick to one type of typeface, such as serif or sans serif . It’s also important to choose fonts that are simple, easy to read, and represent your brand.

Serif fonts give off the impression that your brand is trustworthy and dependable, and work great for more traditional businesses, like law practices. “Serif fonts have been widely used in books, newspapers, and magazines, which is why they remind us of more classical, formal and sophisticated themes—think of Old English and Roman scripture,” Robyn Young, founder of branding agency robyn young & co, told Canva .

But if you’re going for a more contemporary and youthful feel, then sans serif is the way to go. “Brands that want a modern aesthetic that scales well at different sizes and is easy to read on screens are going to choose sans serif for their main branding elements,” said Young .

When it comes to choosing a logo, simplicity is key. Try to create something that represents your brand and speaks to your audience without being too busy (in other words: white space is your friend).

It’s also important to remember to be practical: your logo should look good in any medium, size, color, and even time period. Beyond your business plan cover page, you’ll need it for your social media, marketing material, or labels.

Date of completion

Below the contact information, write the year (or year and month) in which this business plan was finalized and issued. If you’re including the month, it’s a good idea to update it throughout the year as you send out your business plan so readers don’t assume it’s outdated.

At the bottom of the page, include a sentence to the effect of:

“This document contains confidential and proprietary information created by [business name]. This document is issued exclusively for informational purposes and should not be reproduced without the consent of [business name].”

Adding this confidentiality statement offers a protective measure against the disclosure of your business idea, according to this cover page guide.starterPlan

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Send invoices, estimates, and other docs automatically, via Wavewhen you add-on online paymentswhen you add-on online payments

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How to Design a Cover Page for a Business Plan? | Upmetrics

How to design a business plan cover page?

Design your business plan cover page using free templates by Canva. Add your brand logos, switch the layout colors, and try out different fonts. A cover sheet is the first thing that people will see when they receive your business plan. With it, you can let your audience know what you’re trying to accomplish, and why they should care about it.

How do I create a business cover page?

We’ll break down the 5 steps to creating a successful cover page and some essential tips that will help you along the way. Here’s What We’ll Cover: 1. Use a Business Cover Page Template 2. Use Your Business Logo 3. The Document Title 4. Company Information and Date 5. Write a Confidentiality Statement Key Takeaways 1.

What is a business plan cover sheet?

A cover sheet is the first thing that people will see when they receive your business plan. With it, you can let your audience know what you’re trying to accomplish, and why they should care about it. It’s a great opportunity to make a strong impression, so make it count with these business plan cover page templates by Canva.

What should be on a business plan cover?

The most prominent feature on your business plan cover is the name of your company. Instantly, the reader should notice the name of your business. In fact, if readers take away nothing else from the cover page, they should remember your company’s name.

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Everything you need to know about business plan cover pages

You have only one chance to make a good first impression with the readers of your business plan.

People do judge books—and business plans—by their covers. A quick glance at the cover can easily be enough to make up one’s mind.

So set yourself up for success with a powerful cover page that stands out and entices the reader to find out more about your business.

Here’s everything you need to know:

Definition: What is a Business Plan Cover Page?

Cover page (also known as title page or cover sheet) is the first page of a business plan that communicates what the enclosed document is about and highlights the key company information like name, logo and contact details, making a good impression with professional and attractive appearance.

Purpose: Why is Business Plan Cover Page Important?

Many businesses spend hours preparing their business plans but then do not pay enough attention to the title page. This is a huge mistake .

5 ways a strong cover page can help you make a positive first impression:

  • Clearly indicate what the presented document is about
  • Provide the necessary information for a reader to contact you
  • Create a powerful first impact that sets the stage for how readers will engage with your document
  • Avoid falling victim to negative preconceived notions as a result or unprofessional or unattractive cover
  • Maximize the chance of the plan being read by making the document stand out from the crowd and immediately drawing your reader’s attention

Keep reading to find out which elements you need to include in the cover page, how to structure it to maximize the impact of your business plan, and to take a look at some successful examples .

Contents: What Should You Include in a Business Plan Cover Page?

Surprisingly, there are no strict rules about what to show on your business plan cover sheet, but there certainly are best practices that you should follow.

Here are 9 elements that are typically included on business plan covers, 3 of which are essential and you should not miss to include them. The remaining 6 are optional for your consideration.

Business Plan Cover Page Contents
Must-haves Nice-to-haves
Company Logo
Tagline
Document Title Date
Version Control
Disclaimer
Contact Info Visuals

1. Must-haves: 3 mandatory cover page elements

1.1. Business name: The name of the company that is the subject of the plan.

1.2. Document title: The words “ Business Plan ” in a prominent spot so that it is clear what kind of document this is.

1.3. Contact information: Name, title and contact details (e.g., phone, email, social media, website, address) of the primary contact persons presenting the plan (e.g., CEO, Founder, Owner, President) so that any interested parties know exactly to whom to direct their inquiries and can reach them quickly and easily.

2. Nice-to-haves: 6 optional cover page elements:

2.1. Company logo: The logo of the company if available and desired.

2.2. Tagline: Short, memorable summary of the business described in the plan.

2.3. Date: In order to make sure your plan does not look outdated, include only the year of the business plan completion date. If you are including both the month also, it is advisable to create a new cover sheet each time you send out the plan.

2.4. Version control: Numbering each copy of the plan enables you to more easily keep track of who you sent what version of the document to.

2.5. Disclaimer: Disclaimer can help protect you and your company from confidentiality and other legal issues resulting from the distribution of the business plan by indicating that the plan is for information only, not an offering of stock in the company, and not to be shared with third parties without your prior consent.

2.6. Visuals: Graphic elements or images to enhance the professional look and visual appeal of the document.

Structure of business plan cover page with all attributes, essentials and typical

Let’s have a more detailed look at these cover page elements so you know what exactly to include into each of them:

Business Name

The most prominent feature on your business plan cover is the name of your company.

Instantly, the reader should notice the name of your business. In fact, if readers take away nothing else from the cover page, they should remember your company’s name.

As this is the most noticeable feature on the page, use a large font that stands out, but is easy to read, looks professional and corresponds to the typeface that you used for the rest of the document.

Company Logo

Placing a high-quality company logo on the cover page helps to make the business plan look more professional and establish a brand identity by allowing readers to connect visually to the business right from the beginning.

If your logo includes the full name of the company, you do not have to display both the company name and logo on the cover page, it is sufficient to choose one of the two.

Document Title

The readers need to know what the presented document is about – immediately and clearly.

The cover page should clearly state whether it is a Business Plan, Executive Summary, Financial Forecast, Marketing Plan, Recovery Plan, or any other kind of plan.

For example, write the words “ Business Plan ” in a prominent spot on the cover sheet to make it crystal clear what type of document this is. You may include any additional words that are part of the title, such as “Three/Five-Year Business Plan” if needed or relevant.

As a focal point on the cover page, the document title should be in a large font size .

There is no rule though about whether the Document Title or Company Name and Logo should be of the largest font size, as all are of key importance. So it is entirely your decision what feature you prefer to highlight on the cover page of the document.

Contact Information

Contact details should always be on the business plan cover page, letting the reader know who is presenting the document and how to contact them if they need more information.

It is helpful to indicate the names and titles of the company’s primary contact persons for investors and other business plan readers, such as:

  • External distribution: company founder, owner, president, partner, CEO
  • In-house corporate plans: head of division, departmental manager, executive officer

Next, provide the contact details that will allow the interested parties to reach these primary contact persons quickly and easily, including:

  • Name and title of primary contact(s)
  • Phone number
  • Email address
  • Social media handles
  • Website address
  • Postal address

The contact information is typically displayed in the smallest font on the cover page.

Company tagline, or a motto , is a catchy memorable marketing slogan that captures the essence of a business in a few short and simple words: >> What you do >> How you do it >> Why are you different from the competition

For example, you will undoubtedly recognize the following company mottos:

Company Motto: Examples
Company Tagline
"Just Do It."
Apple "Think Different."
McDonald's "I'm Lovin' It"
De Beers "A Diamond Is Forever"
L'Oreal “Because you’re worth it”
Dollar Shave Club "Shave Time. Shave Money."

As such, the tagline is a useful part of the cover page as it helps the business plan readers better understand what you do straight away, and even excite them to read the business plan and study it with more interest.

When was this business plan finalized and issued ? The readers will be interested to know. Hence, it is advisable to state the document completion date on the cover page.

Strictly speaking, you do not need to denote anything more specific that the year in which you completed the business plan. (“Business Plan: 2021”) This will ensure that the plan does not appear outdated for an entire year.

Imagine that you are a potential investor who in December 2021 receives a business plan dated January 2021. It would be natural to assume that the document has been rejected many times by other investors over the last 12 months.

Alternatively, you can include both the current month and year on the cover sheet. (“Business Plan: January 2021”) Each time you update the document and send it out or present it, you will need to check if this date of completion needs updating .

The date is featured on the cover sheet less prominently and in a smaller font size than the document title and company name, and is often displayed below the plan title.

Version Control

As your business develops, you may revise your business plan any number of times and send it to multiple recipients . To keep track of the different versions of the plan that you produce and which version you sent to whom, you may decide to use a version control system.

However, it does not make the best impression when someone receives a “Version 25” of your plan.

Instead, consider devising a simple coding system . For example: “Copy D.5” would indicate it is the fifth copy of a fourth version of the document or “Version 4.5” could mean a fifth copy of a document version completed in April.

Numbering each copy of your business plan before distribution, and keeping a list of which individual has received which copy, would enable you to keep track of how many copies are in circulation, and, if needed, ask to have a copy returned, or trace the responsible party in case a copy is circulated without your permission.

Confidentiality Statement & Disclaimer

Why should your plan include a disclaimer.

Legal issues may arise as a result of circulating your business plan. 

For example, anyone who is in the possession of the document could potentially divulge the confidential information. 

Also, in some countries, offering ownership in your company in return for an investment is considered as selling of stock, which is a regulated activity. The best way to protect yourself is to consult a lawyer.

Nevertheless, including a disclaimer in the business plan helps to protect your company by indicating the plan itself is not an offering of stock for sale but rather a document for information purposes only.

The same disclaimer can also be used to help protect the confidentiality of the information disclosed in your business plan by informing the reader that the plan is confidential and not to be shared with other parties without the owner’s consent, especially when you are not adding a non-disclosure agreement.

What Should the Disclaimer Say?

These are the two most common ways how to show the disclaimer in the business plan:

1. Display a brief disclaimer , just one or two sentences, directly on the front cover , probably at the bottom of the page. Consult a lawyer for the most appropriate wording, but a standard disclaimer might look something to the effect this:

2. Write “ Confidential ” on the cover sheet and include a longer disclaimer and confidentiality statement in the main body of the business plan, perhaps on the first page after the cover sheet.

In addition, you can also include the text “Confidential” into the header or footer of the document.

Design: How Should You Format a Business Plan Cover Page?

The cover page is the first thing the readers will see when they open your business plan. Thus, your business plan cover should be neat , clean , attractive , and professional enough to draw your readers’ attention , make a good first impression and set the tone for your business plan’s content.

Cover page that is messy, dated, unattractive or in any way unprofessional can create negative preconceptions in the recipients’ minds before they even start reading the business plan.

Your design should be clean and professional, which can be accomplished by observing the following best practices:

Visual Identity

Most successful businesses have a strong association with their brand identity , including a company logo, typeface and color scheme. Visual identity helps to establish recognition, familiarity, trust and confidence in customers by evoking the right emotions and sending the right message.

As a result, companies take care to develop a brand identity and keep consistent across all marketing collateral and business materials.

Likewise, your brand identity should be integrated into all parts of your business plan, including the cover page. The best practice is to make the plan consistent with the logo, font type and color scheme as they appear across your other company’s documents.

If you do not have a brand identity created yet, keep the color scheme of the plan cover simple.

The easiest is to have a logo designed, which is inexpensive and easy to do nowadays, and then use your logo colors across the business plan. Alternatively, consider using an online color scheme generator to select colors that go well together.

To stay on the safe side, use maximum of two to three colors, one of which should be black. You can use different shades of the same color (e.g., light blue and dark blue).

First and foremost, the fonts you use in the business plan, including its cover, need to be readable .

The most important information should be displayed in a way that it stands out from the rest of the elements on the business plan cover page, for example, differentiated by font size , weight or color .

Ideally, the typefaces and their color(s) should be consistent with the brand identity used in all of the other company’s marketing materials.

Do not combine more than two typefaces. It is ok to combine a sans-serif (e.g., Times New Roman) with a sans-serif (e.g., Arial) typeface.

Again, less is definitely more here. Refrain from cluttering the business plan cover sheet with photos and graphics.

If you do use a visual element, make sure to leave enough white space around it so the page does not look too busy.

The resolution of any images, including the company logo, should be of high enough quality to not look pixelated.

There is no need for a fancy over-designed cover page, unless you are a large corporation or perhaps a design agency. Equally, beware of any templates with outdated designs that will make your cover look like it was created back in 1999.

Professional designers often combine different alignments (left / right / center) of elements on a page (text, images) to achieve a desired design effect. However, a design novice should play it safe and keep the alignment simple and consistent , especially when it comes to professional documents, such as a business plan.

You should be able to comfortably fit all of the recommended elements on the cover sheet (e.g., company name and logo, document title, contact details, date, disclaimer), and still leave enough white space on the page.

Making a great first impression does not equal to creating a cover that is graphically busy and cluttered with unimportant details. Instead, set yourself up for success by keeping the business plan cover sheet neat , clean , simple and concise .

Proofreading

Carefully proofread the cover page to avoid, at all costs, any mistakes and typos , which would do you a great disservice in the eyes of the reader. Even better, have someone else to look it over.

Finally, make sure that the cover page looks good in every format you will be distributing the business plan in, probably including a PDF electronic file and a printed hard copy.

Some common issues include:

  • Photos look pixelated due to low image resolution
  • Colors do not print well (e.g., dark font color on a dark background)
  • White space left at the edges of a printout because and image does not stretch (i.e., “bleed” in designer terms) enough into the edges of the page

Most importantly, the cover page should look professional and stand out from the crowd so that your business plan has a better chance of being read.

Finally, remember that these aren’t rigid rules. The overall goal for a cover page is to look neat and professional so that it stands out from the crowd and your business plan has a better chance of being read. In the end, that’s the most important outcome.

The cover sheet is the first thing the readers of your business plan will see. Make a good first impression.

Examples: Sample Images

Here are some examples to further illustrate the structure and format of a business plan cover page:

Examples of Business Plan Cover Pages

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design a cover page and logo for his business plan

How to write your business plan cover page

design a cover page and logo for his business plan

When you think of putting together your business plan , the business plan cover page may not be the first thing that comes to mind. While it’s traditionally one of the last sections you create in a business plan, it’s one of the most important.

Definition: What is a business plan cover page?

The cover page of a business plan is used to give an overview of all the key information of your business. This includes your company name, logo, address, and any other information that may define your business. It's the first page of your plan, so it should look professional, visually pleasing, and informative.

When potential investors or banks read a business plan, their first impression is the cover page—but don’t overthink it. A business plan cover page is meant to be simple and straightforward, with some important contact information and, more importantly, your logo.

Use this breakdown to find out what the purpose of your cover page is, which elements you need to include, and how to structure it to maximize your impact:

What is the purpose of a cover page?

Your cover page exists to communicate what the enclosed document is and to provide the necessary information for a reader to contact you about your business.

The appearance and quality of a business plan cover page will set the tone for your business plan’s content, so make sure it’s visually appealing, free of errors, and concise.“ Simple, clean and powerful are the three goals of a strong business plan cover,” suggest the experts at Growthink . Don’t clutter your cover page with details about how your business will operate—save those important details for the executive summary .

What should you include on a business plan cover page?

To keep it simple, your business plan cover page should include:

Company logo

  • Document title
  • Business name
  • Business address and contact information
  • Business plan completion date
  • Confidentiality statement

How should you format a business plan cover page?

Once you know what information belongs in this section, all that remains now is to organize it. If you need some further guidance, these downloadable templates can streamline the process of drafting a cover page—and the rest of your business plan, too.

A business plan cover page for Meow Bots Inc. The slogan is “the future of pets.” The cover page example also includes information on the President, address, email, and phone number. There is a confidentiality statement at the bottom.

1. Company logo

Add a high-resolution thumbnail of your logo at the top of the cover page. This will help establish a brand identity and allow readers to connect visually to the business right from the start.

Hot tip: people are 89% more likely to remember your logo if you put it in the top left corner.

Give the logo some space and then include the words “Business Plan” in a large, bold font. You can also frame the title as “Three–” or “Five–Year Business Plan,” if you intend to make those kinds of financial projections in the document.

3. Business name

Beneath the title, write your company name in a bold font. This should be the most noticeable and prominent feature on the page, so choose a large typeface.

4. Tagline (optional)

This part is optional, but you can also include a catchy slogan or motto that describes your company and what you do.

5. Address and contact information

Under the company name, include your business’s physical address and website if you have one. Provide the details necessary for interested parties to contact you, such as a phone number and email address.

It’s also helpful to include your name as the business owner and the names of any partners or executive officers so that potential investors know where to direct their inquiries.

6. Date of completion

Below the contact information, write the year (or year and month) in which this business plan was finalized and issued. If you’re including the month, it’s a good idea to update it throughout the year as you send out your business plan so readers don’t assume it’s outdated.

7. Confidentiality Statement

At the bottom of the page, include a sentence to the effect of:

“This document contains confidential and proprietary information created by [business name]. This document is issued exclusively for informational purposes and should not be reproduced without the consent of [business name].”

Adding this confidentiality statement offers a protective measure against the disclosure of your business idea , according to this cover page guide .

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Cover page design

Now it’s time for the finishing touches: the actual design of your cover page. Your business plan’s cover page gives the first impression of your business, so your company logo, fonts, and brand colors should all work together to make people want to read more.

Brand colors

90% of a customer’s impression of your business comes from the brand colors you choose, so it’s important to choose colors that represent your business’s personality and elicit the right emotions from your readers.

Don’t know where to start? Grab a pen and paperand write down three emotions you want your customers to feel when they think of your brand. Now you can brainstorm some colors that represent those emotions. For example, you might choose blue if your product is associated with reliability, or yellow if your product is supposed to make your clients feel happy. It’s safer to only choose 2-3 colors , including black, for your color scheme.

You can also analyze the competition and choose colors that help you stand out. Canva has more detailed instructions on how to create your brand color palette .

When it comes to fonts, it’s best practice to stick to one type of typeface, such as serif or sans serif . It’s also important to choose fonts that are simple, easy to read, and represent your brand.

Serif fonts give off the impression that your brand is trustworthy and dependable, and work great for more traditional businesses, like law practices. “Serif fonts have been widely used in books, newspapers, and magazines, which is why they remind us of more classical, formal and sophisticated themes—think of Old English and Roman scripture,” Robyn Young, founder of branding agency robyn young & co, told Canva .

But if you’re going for a more contemporary and youthful feel, then sans serif is the way to go. “Brands that want a modern aesthetic that scales well at different sizes and is easy to read on screens are going to choose sans serif for their main branding elements,” said Young .

When it comes to choosing a logo, simplicity is key. Try to create something that represents your brand and speaks to your audience without being too busy (in other words: white space is your friend).

It’s also important to remember to be practical: your logo should look good in any medium, size, color, and even time period. Beyond your business plan cover page, you’ll need it for your social media, marketing material, or labels.

Business plan cover page examples

To further illustrate the structure and format of a business plan cover page, we’ve compiled a few cover page template examples. The first example from officetemplatesonline is simple but attractive and effectively emphasizes pertinent information. The next cover page example is from a fictional clothing store . They usea pop of color to instantly tell you about their brand personality.

Keep your business plan cover page simple

As you prepare to write your business plan , remember to keep your cover page simple and concise. With your logo, business name, and contact information, you’ll introduce the reader into your business plan quickly and easily—and set yourself up for success as a result.

Just don’t forget to proofread and keep an eye out for typos!

Business plan cover page FAQs

How can businesses make sure their business plan cover pages stand out to investors or lenders.

You can spice up your business plan cover page by including elements that’ll grab the attention of investors or lenders. Beyond basic contact information and a logo, you could include compelling visuals, like graphics or images that represent your business or industry. You could also highlight key achievements or milestones to showcase your potential for success

Are there any specific rules or tips for designing a business plan cover page that make sure it matches a business’s brand?

When designing a business plan cover page, it's key to align it with your business's brand identity. This means choosing colors, fonts, and imagery that reflect your brand's personality and values. Following industry standards for design and layout can help ensure professionalism while still allowing for creativity that helps your business stand out.

How can a business use their cover page to show their business strategy?

Your cover page can serve as an opportunity to convey important aspects of your business strategy or unique value proposition. Beyond listing basic details, you could include a brief mission statement or tagline that summarizes your business’s purpose or competitive advantage. Additionally, incorporating visual elements or a brief narrative about your business's story can help show off its identity and vision.

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The information and tips shared on this blog are meant to be used as learning and personal development tools as you launch, run and grow your business. While a good place to start, these articles should not take the place of personalized advice from professionals. As our lawyers would say: “All content on Wave’s blog is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be considered legal or financial advice.” Additionally, Wave is the legal copyright holder of all materials on the blog, and others cannot re-use or publish it without our written consent.

design a cover page and logo for his business plan

How to Make a Business Plan Cover Page

by Sampson Quain

Published on 25 Jul 2019

An effective business plan details how your company will achieve its goals by describing your products or services, your organizational structure, marketing ideas and how your company will distinguish itself from competitors.

Business plans are most often used to attract potential investors, but some companies also use these plans to communicate their culture to employees or to provide compelling reasons for a merger. Although it may seem minor, the business plan cover page can create a powerful first impression that sets the stage for how readers will engage with the document.

Use Your Company Logo

Your business plan cover page should include your company’s logo centered at the top of the page. The best practice is to create a high-resolution image of the logo and make it consistent with the font type and color scheme of the logo, as it appears in all your company’s documents. The logo should be the first thing that catches your readers' eyes and helps them associate that logo with your company name. Placing the logo at the top of the page establishes a strong brand association that focuses a reader's attention throughout the document.

Write the Title and Company Name

Skip several lines after the company logo and write the words “Business Plan”. Center this title on the cover page and make sure that it is in bold. Include any additional words that are part of the title. For example, you could write, “Five-Year Business Plan,” or “Three-Year Business Plan.” The title should have the second largest font after your company name.

Skip two lines. Then, under the title of your business plan, write and center the name of your business. Your business name should be in bold and set off in the largest font on the page so that it stands out. If readers take away nothing else from the cover page, they should know and remember the name of your company.

Write the Company Address and Date

Under the company name and logo, write and center your business address. This is the address where investors or other interested parties should send all their inquiries. If you already have a website that is up and running, you can include the web address after the physical address. Include your business phone number and business fax number. Directly below the contact information, write and center the month and year in which you completed the business plan.

Write a Confidentiality Statement

Centered at the bottom of the page, include a confidentiality statement. For example, you could write, “This document contains confidential and proprietary information created by [your company name]. This document is issued exclusively for informational purposes, and may not be reproduced without the consent of [your company name].”

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Business Plan Cover Page: The First Impression Matters!

Business Plan Cover Page: The First Impression Matters! - Peak Plans

So, you have written or trying to write your business plan. At some point, usually such a question arises: “how to design the cover page of my business plan?” The first impression in both social and business life is important. It is a magical moment that draws the attention. It sets the tone and mood for the rest of the conversations with that person. Similarly, the cover page is the very first touchpoint with investors, partners, and stakeholders. If it expresses professionalism and clarity you’re one step ahead of the struggle.

Click here to Access free resources for your business plan.

Here are the reasons why a cover page makes difference:

Eye-Catching:

A well-designed cover page, with the right colors, typography, and layout, is visually appealing and eye-catching.

Demonstrates Professionalism:

It gives the impression that you are serious about your business, and you’ve invested time and thought into presenting it.

Conveys Key Details:

At a glance, it provides vital information about your business and sets the tone for what’s to come.

Essential Elements of a Good Cover Page

Business name:.

Write your business name, it’s the most important asset on a cover page.

If you have a logo, do insert it! Or, you better have a logo too.

A brief and catchy phrase that gives an idea to the audience about the essence of your business.

Contact Information:

Give the details like your phone number, email address, and physical address.

It helps in tracking versions and shows that your plan is up-to-date.

While the above elements are essential, to truly make a difference and convert those curious glances into meaningful conversations, demonstrate your cover page with.

Personality:

Let your brand’s character shine. Whether you’re playful, earnest, innovative, or traditional – let it show.

Quality Imagery:

A relevant, high-quality image can evoke emotions and draw readers into the narrative of your plan.

Engaging Design:

A harmonious blend of colors, fonts, and spacing makes all the difference.

Here are some resources that you can use to craft your cover page:

Why Use Canva:

  • Canva is a user-friendly platform that offers a lot of templates, including business plan cover pages.
  • Its drag-and-drop interface makes it super easy for beginners.
  • Canva provides a vast library of stock images, fonts, icons, and other design elements.

How to Use Canva:

  • Go to  Canva .
  • Sign up for a free account.
  • In the search bar, type “business plan cover page” or simply “cover page” to get related templates.
  • Select a template that fits your vision and edit it as per your needs.

Adobe Spark

Why use adobe spark:.

  • Adobe Spark is another intuitive platform for creating visual content.
  • It offers design templates, customizable themes, and the capability to add animations.

How to Use Adobe Spark:

  • Visit  Adobe Spark .
  • Choose the “Page” option for web pages or “Post” for images.
  • Search for cover page templates or create one from scratch.

Microsoft Word &Google Docs

Why use them:.

  • Both are familiar tools for most people, offering basic design elements for a cover page.
  • Suitable for those who want a straightforward design without much flair.

How to Use Them:

  • Open a blank document.
  • Navigate to “Insert” to add images, shapes, text boxes, etc.
  • Format and arrange elements to design your cover page.

Why Use Crello:

  • Similar to Canva, Crello offers customizable templates and a vast design element library.
  • It provides animated designs which can add a unique touch to your digital documents.

How to Use Crello:

  • Go to  Crello .
  • Create a free account.
  • Search for relevant templates or start with a blank canvas to design your cover page.

Why Use Fotor:

  • Fotor is both a photo editor and design tool, ideal for those who want to blend original photography with design elements.
  • It offers a simple interface and design templates.

How to Use Fotor:

  • Visit  Fotor .
  • Navigate to the “Design” section.
  • Choose your canvas size or template, and then customize it to fit your needs.

Visit us at:  www.peakplans.co   and Schedule a free consultation for a fast and expert delivery of your business plan.

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  • Write Your Business Plan | Part 1 Overview Video
  • The Basics of Writing a Business Plan
  • How to Use Your Business Plan Most Effectively
  • 12 Reasons You Need a Business Plan
  • The Main Objectives of a Business Plan
  • What to Include and Not Include in a Successful Business Plan
  • The Top 4 Types of Business Plans
  • A Step-by-Step Guide to Presenting Your Business Plan in 10 Slides
  • 6 Tips for Making a Winning Business Presentation
  • 3 Key Things You Need to Know About Financing Your Business
  • 12 Ways to Set Realistic Business Goals and Objectives
  • How to Perfectly Pitch Your Business Plan in 10 Minutes
  • Write Your Business Plan | Part 2 Overview Video
  • How to Fund Your Business Through Friends and Family Loans and Crowdsourcing
  • How to Fund Your Business Using Banks and Credit Unions
  • How to Fund Your Business With an SBA Loan
  • How to Fund Your Business With Bonds and Indirect Funding Sources
  • How to Fund Your Business With Venture Capital
  • How to Fund Your Business With Angel Investors
  • How to Use Your Business Plan to Track Performance
  • How to Make Your Business Plan Attractive to Prospective Partners
  • Is This Idea Going to Work? How to Assess the Potential of Your Business.
  • When to Update Your Business Plan
  • Write Your Business Plan | Part 3 Overview Video
  • How to Write the Management Team Section to Your Business Plan
  • How to Create a Strategic Hiring Plan
  • How to Write a Business Plan Executive Summary That Sells Your Idea
  • How to Build a Team of Outside Experts for Your Business
  • Use This Worksheet to Write a Product Description That Sells
  • What Is Your Unique Selling Proposition? Use This Worksheet to Find Your Greatest Strength.
  • How to Raise Money With Your Business Plan
  • Customers and Investors Don't Want Products. They Want Solutions.
  • Write Your Business Plan | Part 4 Overview Video
  • 5 Essential Elements of Your Industry Trends Plan
  • How to Identify and Research Your Competition
  • Who Is Your Ideal Customer? 4 Questions to Ask Yourself.
  • How to Identify Market Trends in Your Business Plan
  • How to Define Your Product and Set Your Prices
  • How to Determine the Barriers to Entry for Your Business
  • How to Get Customers in Your Store and Drive Traffic to Your Website
  • How to Effectively Promote Your Business to Customers and Investors
  • Write Your Business Plan | Part 5 Overview Video
  • What Equipment and Facilities to Include in Your Business Plan
  • How to Write an Income Statement for Your Business Plan
  • How to Make a Balance Sheet
  • How to Make a Cash Flow Statement
  • How to Use Financial Ratios to Understand the Health of Your Business
  • How to Write an Operations Plan for Retail and Sales Businesses
  • How to Make Realistic Financial Forecasts
  • How to Write an Operations Plan for Manufacturers
  • What Technology Needs to Include In Your Business Plan
  • How to List Personnel and Materials in Your Business Plan
  • The Role of Franchising
  • The Best Ways to Follow Up on a Buisiness Plan
  • The Best Books, Sites, Trade Associations and Resources to Get Your Business Funded and Running
  • How to Hire the Right Business Plan Consultant
  • Business Plan Lingo and Resources All Entrepreneurs Should Know
  • How to Write a Letter of Introduction
  • What To Put on the Cover Page of a Business Plan
  • How to Format Your Business Plan
  • 6 Steps to Getting Your Business Plan In Front of Investors

What To Put on the Cover Page of a Business Plan Use this checklist to ensure you've included all the essential elements in your cover page.

By Eric Butow Oct 27, 2023

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

This is part 6 / 8 of Write Your Business Plan: Section 6: Getting Your Business Plan to Investors series.

You've sent a letter of introduction and the recipients have indicated that they'd like to see your business plan, the next step is to send a cover letter, which is a brief correspondence stating that you are including the business plan that the recipient has acknowledged and asked you to send it over.

The cover letter goes in the email that includes the plan or on top of a hard copy and thanks the recipient for agreeing to look at the plan. Think of it as a brief note to accompany the plan and express gratitude to the recipients for taking a look.

Why is this important? The first thing anyone looking at your business plan will see is the cover page. After that, they may never look at it again.

Related: How to Write a Letter of Introduction

What to Include on a Cover Page

A few cover page components are essential, whether you are using an email or sending a hard copy. You should have your company name, address, phone number, email address, Twitter handle, and other contact information. Other good items to include are the date as a notice that this is a business plan.

  • Format this information in a large, black, easily readable font. Above all else, you want a plan reader to know which business this plan is for and how to contact you.
  • If you have a striking, well-designed corporate logo, it's also a good idea to include that on the cover page. A corporate slogan, as long as it's not too long, is also a good identifying mark that does something to communicate your strategy as well.

While it's tempting to put all kinds of stuff on the cover page, you should probably resist the urge. Your business concept, the amount you're trying to raise, and other details can go on the inside. The cover page must identify the company. More than that is likely to be too much.

Related: Why You Shouldn't Send Your Business Plan to Investors

More in Write Your Business Plan

Section 1: the foundation of a business plan, section 2: putting your business plan to work, section 3: selling your product and team, section 4: marketing your business plan, section 5: organizing operations and finances, section 6: getting your business plan to investors.

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design a cover page and logo for his business plan

How to Write a Business Plan Outline in 9 Steps (Example Included!)

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Starting a business often begins with writing a business plan , especially if you need funding . It acts as a roadmap, guiding you through each stage of launching and managing your company, and it presents a clear, compelling case to potential investors and partners. But here's the thing: not everyone finds this step intuitive. That's where a business plan outline can be incredibly helpful.

Creating a detailed business plan outline helps you organize your thoughts and ensure you cover all the key aspects of your business strategy. Plus, it might be just what you need to overcome that blank page and start typing.

Below, you'll find an easy-to-follow guide on how to craft your business plan outline, and an example to show you what it should look like.

​​ Build your dream business with the help of a high-paying job—browse open jobs on The Muse »

What is an outline of a business plan?

Think of a business plan outline as the skeleton of your entire business plan. It gives a high-level overview of the main sections you'll need to flesh out later. It's not the final document but a crucial step in getting you there.

Simply put, it's like creating a detailed table of contents for your business plan, showing you exactly what information to include and how everything fits together. A well-structured business plan outline also helps you plan things ahead, saving time and effort.

Writing a business plan outline in 9 steps

Follow these steps to build your business plan outline and learn exactly what each section should include.

(Bear in mind that every business plan is unique, tailored to the specific needs and goals of the business. While the structure below is common, the order of sections may vary—only the executive summary will always come first.)

1. Executive summary

Imagine you have just 60 seconds to convince someone to invest in your business. That's the essence of a strong executive summary. Although it appears first on your business plan, this section is often written last because it sums up the entire plan. Think of it as your elevator pitch . This section gives a quick overview of your entire business plan, highlighting key points that grab the reader's attention.

Keep it clear and concise. Start with a brief overview of your business, including its name and what it offers. Summarize your mission statement and objectives, and don’t forget to mention crucial aspects like financial projections and competitive advantages.

2. Company description

Here's where you provide detailed information about your company. Begin with the business name and location. Describe the legal structure (e.g., sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation) and ownership. If your business already exists, share a brief history.

For new ventures, explain the business's nature and the problems you aim to solve. Go into more detail about your vision and mission statements, outlining your goals and the principles guiding your business. This section helps potential investors and stakeholders grasp your company’s identity and purpose.

3. Market research and analysis

This section shares insights into your company’s industry. Start with a landscape analysis to give an overview of the market, including its size, growth rate, and key players.

Next, define your target market and customer demographics—age, location, income, and interests—detailing who your ideal customers are. Identify market needs and trends your business will address, and highlight customer pain points your product or service aims to solve.

Consider conducting a SWOT analysis to evaluate your business's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, and gain a strategic view of where your business stands in the competitive landscape.

4. Organization and management

Describe how your business is structured and who runs it. Outline the organizational structure, and if helps, include a chart. Introduce the leadership team and key personnel, highlighting their qualifications and roles. If you have a board of directors, mention them and briefly explain their involvement.

Then, outline your production processes, detailing how your product or service is (or will be) created—from sourcing materials to delivery—to give a comprehensive view of your operational capabilities.

5. Products and services

This section of your business plan outline is crucial for showing potential investors what makes your products and services unique and valuable.

Clearly describe what your business offers, emphasizing your unique selling propositions (USPs) and the benefits and features that set you apart from the competition. Talk about the product life cycle, including any plans for future updates.

If your business holds any intellectual property or proprietary technologies, detail them here to underscore your competitive advantages.

6. Marketing strategy

Having a fantastic product or service is just half the battle. The marketing plan section should outline how you'll reach your target market and convert them into customers.

Begin with market positioning and branding, explaining how you want your brand perceived. Detail your marketing and promotional strategies, including specific tactics to reach your target audience.

Discuss your sales strategy, focusing on how you'll convert leads into customers. Lastly, include your pricing strategy and provide a sales forecast, projecting your expected revenue over a certain period.

7. Operations plan

Here, the goal is to give a detailed overview of the physical and logistical aspects of your company. Start with the business location and facilities, describing where it operates and any significant physical assets. Detail the technology and equipment needed for daily operations.

Briefly describe your supply chain and logistics processes to illustrate how you manage inventory, procurement, and distribution. Finish it by outlining your production process and quality control measures to ensure your products or services consistently meet high standards.

8. Financial plan

Use this section of the business plan to show how your company will succeed financially. Include financial projections like income statements and cash flow statements. Specify how much capital you need and how you plan to use it, discussing funding sources.

Conduct a break-even analysis to estimate when your business will become profitable. Be transparent and address any financial risks and assumptions, outlining how you plan to mitigate them.

9. Appendices and exhibits

In this section, include any additional information that supports your business plan. This might be resumes of key personnel to highlight your team's expertise and experience, or even legal documents and agreements.

Include market research data and surveys to back up your market analysis. Add financial statements for a detailed look at your financial plan. Also, provide detailed product specifications to give a clear understanding of your products and services.

Here's a business plan outline example

Not quite there yet? Take a look at this business plan outline example—it will make everything clear for you.

3.1 Executive Summary

  • Overview of the business
  • Key points of the business plan

3.2 Company Description

  • Business name and location
  • History and nature of the business
  • Legal structure and ownership
  • Vision and mission statement

3.3 Market Research and Analysis

  • Industry analysis
  • Target market and customer demographics
  • Market needs, trends
  • Customer pain points
  • SWOT analysis

3.4 Organization and Management

  • Organizational structure
  • Leadership team and key personnel
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Board of directors (if applicable)
  • Production processes

3.5 Products and Services

  • Description of products or services offered
  • Unique selling propositions, benefits, features
  • Product lifecycle and development plans
  • Intellectual property and proprietary technologies

3.6 Marketing Strategy

  • Market positioning and branding
  • Marketing and promotional strategies
  • Sales strategy and tactics
  • Pricing strategy and sales forecast

3.7 Operations Plan

  • Business location and facilities
  • Technology and equipment
  • Supply chain and logistics
  • Production process and quality control

3.8 Financial Plan

  • Financial projections (income statements, balance sheets, cash flow statements)
  • Funding requirements and sources
  • Break-even analysis
  • Financial risks and assumptions

3.9 Appendices and Exhibits (if applicable)

  • Supporting documents and additional information
  • Resumes of key personnel
  • Legal documents and agreements
  • Market research data and surveys
  • Financial Statements
  • Detailed Product Specifications

Bonus tips on how to write a winning business plan

Once you've done your business plan outline, it's time to fill in the gaps and craft a winning business plan. Here are some bonus tips to keep in mind:

  • Tailor it to fit your business : Customize sections to meet industry-specific needs and highlight what makes your business unique.
  • Keep it clear and concise : Use straightforward language and support your points with data to ensure easy understanding and avoid any confusion.
  • Set actionable and realistic goals : Define measurable objectives with clear timelines and milestones to track your progress.
  • Update regularly : Keep your plan dynamic by making regular updates to reflect changes in goals, market conditions, and strategies.
  • Seek feedback : Gain insights from mentors and advisors to refine your plan.

Read this next: How to Start a Business in 8 Steps: A Comprehensive Guide from Concept to Launch

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Cover Page Designs & Formats for Business Plan in MS Word [Free and Editable]

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Why is a cover page needed in a business plan?

What does it contain.

  • Company’s name
  • Company’s address and contact information (email, fax, or postal address)
  • Company’s logo, design color, and catchphrase or slogan
  • Year and date of when the plan has been formulated for
  • Serial number
  • Name and contact details of the person to be contacted when needed
  • Name of the person or key member who prepared it
  • A confidentiality statement
  • A disclaimer

Why is it vital for a business plan?

  • It is the first introduction
  • It tells what the document contains from the inside
  • It gives information to the reader to get in touch with you
  • It professionally conveys the information that the readers are interested in getting
  • A carefully planned front page will get you the edge you need and help you stand out among the rest of the companies

Things to avoid

  • Inappropriate font size, either too large or too small
  • Bad-quality image/company logo
  • Unattractive color scheme
  • Bad printing quality
  • Overcrowded graphic outlook
  •  A wrong sequence of information
  • Informal representation
  • Informal font
  • Confused or inconsistent alignment of text and image
  • Typos or grammatical errors

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  2. How to Write a Business Plan Cover Page + Template

    A business plan cover page needs to be simple and clearly include necessary business information for stakeholders to reference later. Here's how to create one.

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    Learn how to design a business plan cover page like a pro and impress everyone. Also, explore the modern cover pages.

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    Printable business plan cover pages by Canva A cover sheet is the first thing that people will see when they receive your business plan. With it, you can let your audience know what you're trying to accomplish, and why they should care about it. It's a great opportunity to make a strong impression, so make it count with these business plan cover page templates by Canva.

  5. How to Write a Business Plan Cover Page + Examples

    In this article, we will explain the importance of business plan cover pages and provide a step-by-step guide to help you create your own cover page.

  6. How to Design a Cover Page for Your Business Plan

    What is a business plan cover page? Think of the cover page (also called a title page) as a welcome mat that leads to your full business plan. It's meant to be simple and highlight the legal information of your business like a company logo, company name, address, contact details, and other key information.

  7. How to design your business plan cover page?

    There are four key design and editorial tips to keep in mind whilst drafting your business plan title page: Choosing the right font and typography. Utilizing colors strategically to make the business plan cover page visually appealing. Layout and alignment.

  8. How to Design a Cover Page for Your Business Plan

    What is a business plan cover page? Think of the cover page (also called a title page) as a welcome mat that leads to your full business plan. It's meant to be simple and highlight the legal information of your business like a company logo, company name, address, contact details, and other key information.

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    Company logo and name. Think of your company logo as the superhero cape for your business plan. It instantly identifies your brand and adds a professional touch to your cover page. Make sure your ...

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  14. How to write your business plan cover page

    Definition: What is a business plan cover page? The cover page of a business plan is used to give an overview of all the key information of your business. This includes your company name, logo, address, and any other information that may define your business.

  15. How to Make a Business Plan Cover Page

    A business plan cover page provides readers with a vital first impression and can set the table for investors that are looking for a professional, well-executed document. A standard title page should include your company logo, company name, date and a brief confidentiality statement at the bottom.

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