food label worksheet for elementary

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

  • Basic Nutrition

Printable Materials and Handouts

Find printable handouts and fact sheets that can be used for health fairs, classes, and other food or nutrition-related events.

Cook up something new in your kitchen with these healthy, delicious recipes.

View four tips to help you save money when food shopping and help the environment.

View printable brochures and handouts with healthy eating tips based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025 , including:

  • Build a Healthy Eating Routine
  • Cut Down on Added Sugars

Browse the MyPlate collection of printable tip sheets and resources. These materials are in the public domain.

Want your kids to learn how to build a healthy meal? Use these clever activity sheets to find ideas and tips!

View this fact sheet with nutrition tips for breastfeeding moms. 

View printable materials about food safety, including guides, activity books, and tip sheets.

View lessons, workshops, activities, and curricula for teachers. Topics include food, nutrition, physical activity, and food safety.

Use this checklist to track healthy eating and exercise habits throughout your day!

View tips for building healthy eating habits in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. This fact sheet is available in 13 languages.

FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition developed “Everyday Food Safety” resources to increase food safety awareness among young adults ages 18 – 29. Check out the materials available to use in your classroom, health expo, waiting room, or website.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has updated the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods and beverages with a new design, making it easier to make informed choices towards healthy eating habits. 

This one-page handout highlights the key changes being made to the new Nutrition Facts Label.

Share these tips to reduce food waste, save money, and protect the environment.

Browse handouts and recipes for the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Diet. Topics include getting more potassium, staying on track, and meal tracking for different calorie levels.

Looking for materials about healthy aging for older adults? Download or order these free handouts and booklets on exercise, nutrition, and other health topics.

View science-based fact sheets and handouts for health fairs and community events. 

The Sisters Together program encourages Black women ages 18 and older to reach and maintain a healthy weight. Learn how to bring the program to your community.

Download, print,or order a free copy of this brochure on eating disorders. Also available in Spanish.

Access vitamin and mineral supplement fact sheets for the consumer or health professional. Available in PDF format, and in Spanish.

Find handouts that teach how to build a healthy eating routine, cut down on added sugars, cut down on sodium, and cut down on saturated fat.

Print and share these fact sheets and posters to help people learn key recommendations from the Physical Activity Guidelines. Find materials for adults, older adults, parents and kids, and during and after pregnancy.

Browse by health topic or resource type to find 1-page printable fact sheets written at the 6th- to 8th-grade reading level in English or Spanish.

Challenge yourself to eating fruits and vegetables in new ways by following along to this 30-day calendar.

What are healthy cooking methods, and what equipment do you need for each method? Read this handout to find out.

Use this 31-day calendar to challenge yourself to one choice for a healthy weight each day.

View a table of spices to learn about their flavors and uses.

Use this handout to measure your hunger level on a scale of 1 to 10.

Find handouts to help you manage your weight with healthy eating and physical activity. 

Use this handout to plan weekly meals and create a grocery list.

Learn Bright

Food Labels

Food Labels teaches students how to interpret and understand the meaning of a food label. Students will identify the different parts and demonstrate how these labels are useful to consumers.

The “Options for Lesson” section provides additional ideas that you can incorporate into the lesson plan. One idea is to assign a specific mineral or vitamin to each student. The students will research their assigned vitamins or minerals and present what they find to the class in a report. (You are welcome to allow students to present their findings in other ways.)

Description

Additional information, what our food labels lesson plan includes.

Lesson Objectives and Overview: Food Labels introduces students to the important information they would find on packaged food items. Students will discover how to interpret the meaning of each part of the label and define its parts. They will also be able to demonstrate why food labels are useful to consumers. This lesson is for students in 4th grade, 5th grade, and 6th grade.

Classroom Procedure

Every lesson plan provides you with a classroom procedure page that outlines a step-by-step guide to follow. You do not have to follow the guide exactly. The guide helps you organize the lesson and details when to hand out worksheets. It also lists information in the yellow box that you might find useful. You will find the lesson objectives, state standards, and number of class sessions the lesson should take to complete in this area. In addition, it describes the supplies you will need as well as what and how you need to prepare beforehand. This lesson requires just four different food packages per pair of students for the activity.

Options for Lesson

In the “Options for Lesson” section of the classroom procedure page, you will find a number of suggestions for additional activities to do throughout the lesson. Several involve the activity portion. Students could work alone for the activity. If they do, provide four packages per student. Alternatively, you could require fewer food packages for students to review. You could also ask students to bring empty food packages from home a couple weeks before the start of the lesson. You could give students two “healthy” and two “unhealthy” food packages for the activity. Another option is to assign a mineral or vitamin to each student to research. Students can then present reports on what they found.

Teacher Notes

The paragraph on this page provides a little more information or guidance on what to expect from the lesson. It suggests you use actual food labels of products that your students frequently eat. You can use the blank lines to record any thoughts or ideas you have as you prepare.

FOOD LABELS LESSON PLAN CONTENT PAGES

What is a food label.

The Food Labels lesson plan has two content pages. The lesson begins by describing to students how they read books, texts, and things on the internet. It then asks if they read food labels. Most likely, they do not, and they will discover that many adults don’t read them either. However, reading and understanding a food label is quite important.

A food label provides consumers with information on the nutrients, vitamins, and other minerals that a certain food contains. Another term for food label is nutrition label. These labels contain a lot of things that people need to know about the food they eat. For instance, the labels describe the serving size, number of calories, and the daily values of different nutrients and vitamins. It also shows the ingredients that make up the food.

The lesson provides a graphic of a food label and details the different parts. All labels provide information according to one serving size. They also show the number of calories in that serving. Calories are units of energy that come from the fats, proteins, and carbs in that food. A label may also show the number of calories from just fat.

On a food label, the fats section shows the total fat and then often shows specific types of fat. There may be five grams of total fat but three grams of saturated fat, which is a type of fat typically from animals. Students will also notice the percentages on the right side of the label. These represent the daily value of the given nutrients and vitamins.

Nutritional ingredients include cholesterol, sodium, carbs, sugar, and other things. There is also a vitamins section that provides just the daily value percentages for the vitamins found in that food item. At the bottom of the label, there is often a summary section that shows consumers the specific amount of nutrients they need in a certain diet.

Students will learn that a person’s body is unable to make all the nutrients it needs. The reason we eat certain foods is to get the necessary nutrients each day. There are six groups of nutrients that work together to keep a body healthy: carbs, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water.

Carbs are the main source of energy or calories. Proteins supply energy and amino acids to the body, which help build and repair cells. Fats supply energy and help transport nutrients. They also provide storage and insulation for the body.

Vitamins help our bodies use up the energy we get from food. They all have specific jobs and control chemical reactions. Minerals are similar to vitamins. They help promote reactions and form body structures. Finally, water is a part of every cell and tissue. It carries nutrients, removes waste, and helps the body regulate its temperature.

Ingredients on a Food Label

All food labels list the ingredients of that particular food. Many ingredients are long words that can be hard to pronounce. Some might be additives that give a food its color, allow the food to last longer, or add flavor. The lesson shows a label for peanut butter that contains 20 ingredients. Many experts believe it is best to eat food with more natural ingredients. And foods with the least amount of ingredients are usually the healthier choices.

Processed foods are those we find packaged in bags, boxes, or cans. They usually have the most ingredients and contain large amounts of sodium, fats, and sugar. Not all processed foods are bad for you, but understanding the numbers on their labels will best help us make healthy choices.

On this page are two labels that students can compare to determine which one is healthier. As with all foods, the healthy choice depends on what kinds of nutrients, vitamins, or minerals we want. Label 1 shows 80 calories and fewer nutritional values. Label 2 shows 250 calories and more fat, protein, calcium, sodium, and carbs. That means that label 2 might actually be the healthier choice overall.

FOOD LABELS LESSON PLAN WORKSHEETS

The Food Labels lesson plan includes three worksheets: an activity worksheet, a practice worksheet, and a homework assignment. Each one will help students solidify their grasp of the material they learned throughout the lesson. You can refer to the classroom procedure guidelines to know when to hand out each worksheet.

HEALTHY OR UNHEALTHY ACTIVITY WORKSHEET

Students will need four food packages each and either internet access or a dictionary. For the activity, students will examine the labels on each package they receive. They will choose five of the ingredients on one package and list and define each ingredient. They must also write which item they chose.

Next, they will write the food for each package in the table at the bottom of the worksheet page and fill out the information using the nutrition labels. Finally, they will consider what they learned from each food package and describe why each would be healthy or unhealthy for someone to eat. There are four separate sections for them to write in. After all the students finish, they can share what they learned with the class.

MATCHING AND T/F PRACTICE WORKSHEET

The practice worksheet splits into two sections. On the first section, students will match information to the correct term. There is a word bank on the right of 15 terms to match up. The second section requires students to write whether each of 10 statements is true (T) or false (F).

FOOD LABELS HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT

For the homework assignment, students will respond to a series of 10 prompts using the information in a bread food label on the page. Then they will use a bread food label from home to fill out the nutritional information of that bread. If they don’t have bread at the time, they can use a different food item. When they finish filling out the nutrition information, they will answer the prompt at the bottom of the page that asks which bread they would eat and why.

Worksheet Answer Keys

The lesson provides answer keys for the practice and homework worksheets. All the correct answers are in red to make it easier to compare them to students’ responses. Given the nature of the second half of the homework assignment, students’ answers will vary. If you choose to administer the lesson pages to your students via PDF, you will need to save a new file that omits these pages. Otherwise, you can simply print out the applicable pages and keep these as reference for yourself when grading assignments.

subject

Science

grade-level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Thank you for submitting a review!

Your input is very much appreciated. Share it with your friends so they can enjoy it too!

It is an interesting lesson plan! Thank you so much!

Well worth it

This informative and practice a resource is ready to go. It's a big help for busy teachers and home educators.

Great product

This product was very helpful in thinking through a nutrition lesson I am developing. No chance to use it in action yet, but I am sure it will be useful and effective.

Food Label Lesson

I have to edit the item before use because it shows the old Nutrition Facts Label not the new Label. Several changes have been made that are important for students to know when reading labels. It is useful to compare the old and the new labels since there are still products in their homes that may have the old label.

Great Resource

This will help my students to understand the idea of what types of calories we eat and what to look for on the food labels.

Related products

This is the title page for the Sports: Ultimate lesson plan. The main image is of a person throwing a flying disc in a field. The orange Learn Bright logo is at the top of the page.

Sports: Ultimate

This is the title page for the Hamsters lesson plan. The main image is of a cream colored hamster gnawing on the stem of a red tomato. The orange Learn Bright logo is at the top of the page.

Sports: Professional Wrestling

This is the title page for the Frogs lesson plan. The main image is of five frogs holding on to a think twig branch. One frog's legs are dangling. The orange Learn Bright logo is at the top of the page.

Make Your Life Easier With Our Lesson Plans

Stay up-to-date with new lessons.

food label worksheet for elementary

  • Lesson Plans
  • For Teachers

© 2024 Learn Bright. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions. Privacy Policy.

  • Sign Up for Free
  • Free Signup!
  • My Plate Balanced Meals
  • Chef Solus Game
  • Food Group Games
  • Gardening With Kids
  • Healthy Message Games
  • Nutrition Word Games
  • New Printables
  • Kids Cooking Program Materials
  • Kids Gardening Program Materials
  • National Nutrition Month® Materials
  • Nutrition Games - Clinical Setting
  • Educators Membership Sign Up
  • Parent Handout List
  • Nutrition Education Research
  • Website Links
  • log in or sign up ." data-content="You must be a member to access this feature." href="#">Top Picks
  • Five Food Groups
  • Telling The Time - Mealtime
  • Puerto Rico - My Plate
  • Food Pyramid
  • Rainbow Foods
  • Dairy Group Fun
  • Fruit Group Fun
  • Grains Group Fun
  • Protein Group Fun
  • Other Foods
  • Parents Handouts
  • Chef Solus Game Materials
  • Broccoli Brad
  • Pediatrician Visit Sheet
  • Nutrition Alphabets
  • Nutrition Words
  • Nutrition Definitions
  • Portions and Serving Size
  • Food labels
  • Food Distribution Channels
  • Farming Fun
  • Farm Animals
  • Farmers Market
  • Grocery Shopping
  • Cooking Fun
  • Measuring and Amounts
  • Recipe Books
  • Cooking Vocabulary
  • Kids Garden Activities
  • Food Safety In The Kitchen
  • Hand Washing
  • Meal Plans-2-3 yrs
  • Meal Plans-4-8 yrs
  • Meal Plans-9 yrs or older
  • Healthy Foods Calendar
  • Holiday-Themed Calendars
  • Make Your Own Calendar
  • Healthy Goals Pledge Sheets
  • Healthy Goals Tracking Sheets
  • Healthy Heart
  • Food Allergies
  • Bingo Food Groups Game
  • Nutrition Conversation Cards
  • Nutrition Flash Cards
  • Food Groups Matching Game
  • Lunch Box Messages
  • Crossword Puzzles
  • Jigsaw Puzzles
  • Unscramble Word Puzzles
  • Word Search
  • Summer Printables
  • Valentine's Day Cards
  • Mother's Day Cards
  • Father's Day Cards
  • Christmas Day Cards
  • Dietitian's Day
  • Nurse's Day
  • Teacher's Day
  • Valentine’s Day
  • St Patrick’s Day
  • Easter Activities
  • Mother’s Day
  • Father's Day
  • Healthy Halloween Activities
  • Thanksgiving Activities
  • Healthy Christmas Activities
  • New Years Day
  • President's Day
  • National Nutrition Month
  • Cinco de Mayo Holiday Printables for Kids
  • 4th of July
  • Certificates
  • Healthy Tip Categories
  • Healthy Tip Lists
  • Psychology To Healthier Eating
  • Lunch Ideas
  • Family Mealtime
  • Cooking At Home
  • Eating Out Tips
  • Back To School For Kids
  • Fruit Group
  • Vegetables Group
  • Grains Group
  • Dairy Group
  • Protein Group
  • Healthy Oils
  • Portion Control-Healthy Servings
  • Vegetarian-Vegan Child
  • Hydration, Drinks and Kids
  • Organics, Farmers' Markets, GMOs
  • Food Labels
  • Healthy Holiday
  • Summer Foods
  • Kids and TV
  • Food Safety Guidelines
  • Food Allergies Resources
  • Food Marketing and Kids
  • Healthy Child
  • Panda Express Menu
  • Subway Menu
  • Taco Bell Menu
  • Dominoes Menu
  • Pizza Hut Menu
  • Fitness and Wellness Resources
  • Mom Blog Sites
  • Meal Planner
  • Smart Snack Calculator
  • Food Label Tool
  • Interactive Food Pyramid
  • Nutrient Tool
  • Nutrition Dictionary
  • BMI Calculator
  • After School Snack Recipes
  • Back To School Lunches
  • Half Time Game Snacks
  • Dairy Recipes
  • Valentine Party Snack Recipes
  • St. Patrick's Day Recipes
  • Easter Snack Recipes
  • Cinco De Mayo
  • Mother's Day Breakfast Recipes
  • Father's Day Lunch
  • Patriotic Snacks
  • Halloween Snacks
  • Thanksgiving Meal
  • Christmas Party Recipes
  • Kids Fruits Recipes
  • Kids Grains Recipes
  • Kids Protein Recipes
  • Kids Vegetable Recipes
  • Potato Recipes
  • How Games Teach Nutrition
  • Game Features
  • Healthy Harvest Maze Game Information
  • Pyramid Game Learning Objectives
  • Food Label Game Information
  • Vocabulary Games
  • Top Picks Organizer
  • Your Avatar
  • Apple Rating and Comments Feature
  • Educators Role
  • Parents Role

Your TOP PICK - Content Organizer Tool

Nutrition Lesson Plan - Reading Food Labels

  • Subject: Health/Nutrition/ Computer skills
  • Duration: 20-30 minutes
  • Grades: 2-5
  • Reading Levels: Intermediate
  • Prerequisite Knowledge and Skills: Basic computer & mouse skills, Hand-eye coordination

Food Labels Lesson Plan

Topic/task Objective Domain and Level
 the health Affective – Receiving
Cognitive - Comprehension
 the different Cognitive – Knowledge
 nutrients between Cognitive – Evaluation
 the amount of Cognitive – Evaluation
 the food label that  Cognitive – Knowledge
Cognitive – Analysis

Ride the Food Label Game:

  • Round 1: Quiz requires the student to select a specific part on the food label to ensure they understand the different parts of the food label.
  • Round 2: Quiz requires the student to compare the food label to answer question about the nutrients found on the food label.
  • Round 3: Final quiz simulates real life use with a virtual grocery scene where the student must select up to three food items and click and drag the food item into their grocery cart. Food labels must be compared to answer questions.

Teaching Tips:

  • Have students list packaged foods they like to eat.
  • Have students list the reasons they choose one food instead of another.
  • Discuss how they can make food choices that are healthy for their bodies by reading food labels.
  • Guide the students to Ride the Food Label Game where they will learn to understand the food and nutrient information on the different sections of food labels and how to compare food label facts.

Assessment:

Back to page for lesson plan for balanced meal games, back to main page for nutrition lesson plan page.

  • Our Website
  • Free Sign Up
  • New Features
  • About Our Games
  • Play Demo Game
  • Advertising Policy
  • Visitors Comments
  • Kids Fun Nutrition Section
  • Food Label Game
  • Healthy Kids Story Time
  • Fun Farm Games
  • Healthy Active Kids Games
  • Healthy Meal Games
  • Fun Preschool Games
  • Fun Arts and Crafts
  • Promoting Fun Exercise
  • Parents' Healthy Eating Section
  • Family Nutrition Blog
  • Printable Family Nutrition Tips
  • Daily Health Tip Calendar
  • Family Goals & Tracking Sheets
  • Nutrition Tools
  • Healthy Family Nutrition Articles
  • Family Resources
  • Healthy Recipes
  • Health Educators' Section
  • Nutrition Lesson Plans
  • Nutrition and Health Worksheets
  • Food Groups
  • Cooking with Kids
  • Fun Healthy Handouts
  • Print A Flyer
  • Teaching Nutrition - Games and Tools
  • Childhood Obesity Resources
  • Clinical Studies
  • Press - News
  • Meet Our Partners
  • Showcase Links to Us
  • Advisory Board
  • Sponsorship - Advertising
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms and Conditions

Nourish Interactive is a free interactive website available in English and Spanish. Visit www.NourishInteractive.com for free nutrition education materials.

  • Professional
  • Accessibility
  • Search website Search Site
  • Food Safety
  • Handwashing the Rufus way
  • Nutrition standards for Early Learning and Care Services
  • Serving size guide
  • Menu plans and recipes
  • Healthy snacks & food swaps
  • Fussy eating
  • Special occasions
  • Preparation, Cooking & Serving
  • Personal Hygiene
  • Food Delivery & Storage
  • Food Contamination
  • Allergies and Intolerances
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Bin your litter campaign
  • Acknowledgements
  • Watch the TV ads
  • Healthy lunchboxes
  • Meeting the animals
  • Food for life
  • Food for life quiz
  • Healthy choices
  • Healthy lunchbox game
  • What's on a label?
  • Fuel your body
  • safefood for life exam
  • Early school leavers
  • Healthy school initiatives

What's on a label?

food label worksheet for elementary

How to read food labels, for Junior Cycle and Transition Year Home Economics

This resource is aimed at Junior Cycle and Transition Year Home Economics. It also supports the Social Personal Health Education curriculum. It allows you and your students to keep up to date on food labelling, is packed with practical examples and is designed to be help students learn in an engaging and interactive way.

Junior cycle

Topic 1 - food labelling requirements.

  • Activity Sheets: Find the 11 pieces of mandatory information on a food pack (Interactive PDF)
  • Classroom Slides (PDF, 2MB)
  • T eacher's Notes (PDF, 2MB)

Topic 2 - Voluntary labelling and claims

  • Activity Sheets: Identify foods that make different nutrition claims (Interactive PDF, 100KB)
  • Classroom Slides (PDF, 800KB)
  • Teacher's Notes (PDF, 600KB)

Topic 3 - Healthy eating information and reducing food waste

  • Activity Sheets: The food groups and reference daily intakes (PDF, 300KB)
  • Information Sheet (PDF, 1.5KB)
  • Teacher's Notes (PDF, 2MB)

Transition year

Topic 1 - food labelling and healthy eating.

  • Activity Sheets: Identify the foods from the ingredients (PDF, 200KB)
  • Classroom Slides (PDF, 1.2MB)
  • Teacher's Notes (PDF, 900KB)
  • Activity Sheets: Nutrition and health claims (PDF, 100KB)
  • Classroom Slides (PDF, 1MB)
  • Information Sheet (PDF, 200KB)
  • Teacher's Notes (PDF, 800KB)

Topic 3 - Food labelling and food safety

  • Activity Sheets: Match the foods with the allergen (PDF, 500KB)
  • Teacher's Notes (PDF, 1MB)
  • Cad atá ar an Lipéad? (ZIP, 25MB)

safe food wishes to acknowledge input from the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, The Irish Nutrition and Dietetics Institute and teacher Siobhan Foster in the development of the resource.

Related pages

education news logo

Sign up for updates on education resources and news.

  • Mobile search Search Site

The site content is redirecting to the NI version.

  • Resource Library
  • AFHK RESOURCE LIBRARY

How to Read Nutrition Facts Labels

food label worksheet for elementary

Take Action

Nutrition Facts labels have a lot of information on them and can be overwhelming. Make it simple by focusing on:  

  • Serving size: A serving is what is typically consumed, not a recommendation. How many servings are in the container? How does this compare to how much you’re eating?   
  • Total calories: Calories are energy! When we use energy throughout the day, it is important that we refuel with calories in food. Total calories will tell you how many calories there are in one serving.  
  • Choosing foods that have smaller percentage Daily Value for saturated fat, added sugars and sodium. A small percentage or low amount of a specific nutrient is considered 5% DV or less.   
  • Choosing foods that have higher percentage Daily Value for vitamins, minerals and fiber. A higher percentage of a specific nutrient is considered 20% DV or more.  

Get your kids comfortable with reading the label. Practice on the cereal box at home and on products at the grocery store, for example. Ask questions like “How many calories are in a serving? “Does this food have fiber in it?” to familiarize them with the label and nutrition lingo.  

At school:  

  • Teach kids how to read Nutrition Facts labels as part of health education, or a science, math or literacy lesson.  
  • Incorporate practical skills into the lesson by practicing how to decipher real Nutrition Facts labels and how to choose the healthier option by reading the label.  
  • Extend it to home—Nutrition Facts labels are all around us! Teach parents how to read labels so kids and their families can make healthy decisions together.  

When choosing your serving consider what a balanced plate might look like. How many vegetables can you fit on half your plate? How does this compare to the serving? Were you still hungry after consuming the serving, were you satisfied, or too full? Encourage children to take their time and reflect on their state of hunger and satiety.  

Check out the vitamins and minerals content. A food is considered a “good source” of that vitamin or mineral if it has 10% or more of it.  

The first ingredient on the ingredient list has the largest amount. Pay attention to the kind of ingredients, too. If you don’t recognize an ingredient look it up! What benefits might this ingredient provide for product safety or health?   

Recruit a registered dietitian to teach a lesson on how to read the label.

Avoid labeling nutrition labels as “good” or “bad”, “healthy” or “unhealthy” in order to foster healthy relationships with all food. All foods provide energy. Focus on things like fast acting and slow acting carbs, and how this affects energy levels or immune boosting vitamins in certain fruits and vegetables. Children will be able to learn and practice responsible decision making when it comes to food choice by choosing what they need and when to fuel their bodies!  

Nutrition Education

Nutrition education is especially important for kids, as they establish food patterns that carry into adulthood. Teaching students about MyPlate and the benefits of each food group can help promote healthy eating from a young age.

Offer Healthy Snacks

In addition to nourishing bodies, snacks provide an opportunity to practice healthy eating habits.

Nutrition Education & Activities for Staff

Providing nutrition education for staff is key to a successful school wellness program.

Healthy Cooking Club

Cooking with kids is a great way to educate them about good nutrition, what's in season, planning and preparing meals, and reading food labels.

Categories: Nutrition & Healthy Eating , At Home , At School , Digital Resource

food label worksheet for elementary

  • International
  • Education Jobs
  • Schools directory
  • Resources Education Jobs Schools directory News Search

Understanding food labels: Lesson plan

Understanding food labels: Lesson plan

Subject: Cross-curricular topics

Age range: 7-11

Resource type: Lesson (complete)

GrainChain

Last updated

30 September 2016

  • Share through email
  • Share through twitter
  • Share through linkedin
  • Share through facebook
  • Share through pinterest

food label worksheet for elementary

Creative Commons "Sharealike"

Your rating is required to reflect your happiness.

It's good to leave some feedback.

Something went wrong, please try again later.

Very helpful

Empty reply does not make any sense for the end user

Kermitthefrog2

Thanks for sharing

Ronaldomcm15

Suzannehamilton.

Report this resource to let us know if it violates our terms and conditions. Our customer service team will review your report and will be in touch.

Not quite what you were looking for? Search by keyword to find the right resource:

Caution: you have javascript disabled. Your site experience may be affected.

  • Teacher Center
  • Student Center
  • Get Involved

Login to MyBinder

Forgot password

Don't have an account? Create one now!

View a MyBinder tutorial

Agricultural Literacy Curriculum Matrix

Lesson plan, grade levels, type of companion resource, content area standards, agricultural literacy outcomes, common core, introducing the nutrition facts label, grade level.

Explore the features of the Nutrition Facts label with a focus on protein, analyze serving size, and make a Nutrition Facts label for a smoothie. Grades 6-8

Estimated Time

Three student-directed 40-minute activities

Materials Needed

Activity 1: Dissecting the Nutrition Facts Label

  • Food Product Cards with Nutrition Facts Labels , 1 copy per group
  • Dissecting the Nutrition Facts Label worksheet, 1 copy per student
  • Internet access
  • Dissecting the Nutrition Facts Label Student Instructions , 1 copy per group
  • Nutrition Facts Label Mini-Book , 1 copy per student

Activity 2: Analyzing Serving Size

  • Three different kinds of cereal in 1-gallon plastic bags
  • Cereal boxes from the three different kinds of cereal
  • Cereal bowls large enough to hold a student-sized serving
  • Scales or measuring cups
  • Get the Facts on Serving Size – FDA Fact Sheet
  • Analyzing Serving Size worksheet, 1 copy per student

Activity 3: Creating a Nutrition Facts Label

  • Creating a Nutrition Facts Label worksheet, 1 copy per student
  • Creating a Nutrition Facts Label Student Instructions , 1 copy per student or group
  • Internet Access 

Note: All worksheets can be downloaded as a fillable PDF .

calorie: the "energy" supplied from all food sources (fat, carbohydrate, protein, and alcohol)

nutrient: a substance that provides nourishment essential for growth and the maintenance of life

serving size: the amount of a particular food listed on that food's Nutrition Facts label along with the calorie and nutrient content

Did You Know?

  • All foods are required to have a Nutrition Facts Label except raw fruits and vegetables, dietary supplements, and foods without a significant amount of nutrients (like tea, coffee, and some spices).
  • Fast food portions are two to five times larger today than they were in the 1980s.
  • The format of the Nutrition Facts Label was updated in 2020. Some of the changes were intended to better communicate health information such as serving size and added sugar.

Background Agricultural Connections

What is a Nutrient? 

  • A nutrient is a substance in food that contributes to growth and health. Nutrients have many functions, such as serving as a source of energy, providing structure to cells, and regulating the body’s metabolism. 
  • Nutrients include proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and water. Examples of nutrients that are important for growing bodies are protein and calcium. 

What are Calories? 

  • Calories give your body energy to survive and thrive. Calories refer to the “energy” supplied by major food components: fat, carbohydrate, and protein. 
  • General nutrition advice for children 9 to 13 years of age is that females require about 1,400 to 2,200 calories per day and males require about 1,600 to 2,600 calories per day. However, calorie needs vary. In fact, your calorie needs may be higher or lower and depend on your age, gender, height, weight, and physical activity level. 
  • Calories derived from foods or beverages containing few or no benefcial nutrients (such as regular soda) are sometimes referred to as “empty calories.” Most empty calories come from added saturated fats, added sugars, and refined starches. 

Nutrient-Dense Foods 

To get the nutrients you need while meeting your calorie requirements, it’s best to choose “nutrient-dense” foods. Unlike foods with “empty calories,” nutrient-dense foods provide vitamins, minerals, and other health-promoting components and have no or little added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium. 

A healthy dietary pattern consists of nutrient-dense forms of foods and beverages across all food groups, in recommended amounts, and within calorie limits. Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, eggs, beans, peas, and lentils, unsalted nuts and seeds, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, fortifed soy products, and lean meats and poultry— when prepared with no or little added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium—are nutrient-dense foods. 

Nutrition Primer: What’s on the Label? 

food label worksheet for elementary

Serving Size is based on the amount of food that is customarily eaten at one time. The Nutrition Facts label on a food’s package includes nutrition information based on one serving of that food; however, some labels might also list the “per package” nutrition information. For example, a label might have two columns: one with calorie and nutrient information for one serving and the other with the information for the entire package . 

The serving size is shown as a common household measure that is appropriate to the food (such as cup, tablespoon, piece, slice, or jar) followed by the metric amount in grams (g) or milliliters (mL). 

When you compare calories and nutrients between different foods, don’t forget to check the serving size to make an accurate comparison. 

Servings Per Container 

The “servings per container” on the label shows the total number of servings in the entire food package or container. Often, a package of food, such as a cereal box, contains more than one serving! 

The information listed on the Nutrition Facts label is usually based on one serving; if a package contains four servings and you eat the entire package, you have consumed four times the amount of calories and nutrients that are listed on the label. 

Calories refers to the total number of calories or “energy” supplied from all sources (fat, carbohydrate, and protein) in one serving of the food.

Nutrients 

Nutrients play a big role in your health. Knowing the nutrient content in one serving of food enables you to compare foods to make healthy choices. 

Percent Daily Value (%DV) 

The Percent Daily Value (%DV) on a food’s Nutrition Facts label tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to your daily diet. The %DVs are references for the amount of nutrients to consume (for benefcial nutrients) or not exceed (for nutrients to get less of) each day. The actual amount of a nutrient in a serving of food that corresponds to the %DV is listed in grams [g], milligrams [mg], or micrograms [mcg]. 

You can use the %DV to compare food products and to choose products that are higher in nutrients you want to get more of (like dietary fber and calcium) and lower in nutrients you want to get less of (like saturated fat and sodium). The %DV column doesn’t add up vertically to 100%; instead, the %DV is the percentage of the Daily Value for each nutrient in one serving of the food. 

As a general rule: 

  • 5% DV or less of a nutrient per serving is considered low. 
  • 20% DV or more of a nutrient per serving is considered high. 

Ingredient List 

food label worksheet for elementary

Recipe Analyzers and Label-Making Tools

Everyday cooks and food companies of all sizes can use several online tools to help calculate the nutrients in their recipes and products. Some of these tools also help calculate %DVs and create a Nutrition Facts label for a specifc recipe or product. Some older online recipe analyzers do not calculate Added Sugars separate from the amount of Total Sugars, since declaring Added Sugars on the Nutrition Facts label was not required until 2020. In addition, Nutrition Facts label tools that meet FDA labeling guidelines must use specifc “rounding rules” for nutrient quantities and %DVs. 

What are the Food Label Rounding Rules? 

food label worksheet for elementary

Explore and Explain

Advance Preparation:

  • Divide the class into small groups of 2 or 3.
  • Make a set of the Food Product Cards for each group. To make the cards, cut out the individual food cards and associated Nutrition Facts label. Fold the label behind the food card and glue in place.
  • Make copies of the Dissecting the Nutrition Facts Label worksheet for each group.
  • Make a copy of the Nutrition Facts Label Mini-Book  for each student. (See written instructions to make the Mini-Book.)
  • Provide scissors for each group.
  • Healthful eating is a balancing act, and it takes practice to get it right. Health experts agree that what and how much you eat can affect your health now and in the future. It is important to understand the link between diet and health and to develop the ability to consistently make informed food choices. There are many tools that can help people make informed choices about what they eat. Among them are: the Nutrition Facts label; the Dietary Guidelines for Americans; and MyPlate. The activities in this module will teach students about the Nutrition Facts label. 
  • Give each group one copy of the Dissecting the Nutrition Facts Label Student Instructions along with the supplies listed in the Advance Preparation section.
  • Instruct students to follow the instructions to complete the activity.

Advance Preparation

  • Make copies of the Analyzing Serving Size worksheet for each group.
  • Assemble the materials listed in the Materials section.
  • In the first activity, students learned about the components of the Nutrition Facts label. In this activity, they will learn more about just one part of that label – Serving Size. Students will pour approximately the same amount of cereal that they regularly eat for breakfast into a bowl and compare that amount with the serving size listed on the label. Next, students will calculate the number of calories, carbohydrates, sugars, and added sugars in the cereal they poured into their bowl and then calculate its nutrients if they add one cup of 2% milk to the bowl. Finally, they will compare their serving size with the one listed on the Nutrition Facts label.
  • Give each student group one copy of the Analyzing Serving Size Student Instructions along with the supplies.
  • Watch the video, The Difference Between Portion Sizes and Serving Sizes . 

  • Make copies of Creating a Nutrition Facts Label worksheet and the student instructions .
  • The previous activities used Nutrition Facts labels that are available for most food products. In this activity, students will use two online website tools to create their own Nutrition Facts label for a Fruit Smoothie. They will input a recipe’s ingredients into a Recipe Nutrition Calculator and then insert that information into a labelmaking tool to create a Nutrition Facts label that shows the nutritional qualities for one 8-oz cup Smoothie. Then they will use Rounding Rules to fnalize their Nutrition Facts label.
  • Give each student one copy of the  Creating a Nutrition Facts Label worksheet and the  student instructions . (This activity can be completed individually or in small groups.)
  • Explore FDA's Read the Label Youth Outreach materials for kids, parents, and educators.
  • Use the Interactive Nutrition Facts Label .
  • Ask students to draw/illustrate the difference between serving size and portion size.
  • The Nutrition Facts Label is a tool to determine if foods meet specific nutritional needs.
  • Serving sizes and portion sizes are different.
  • Nutrition Facts Labels are created using nutrition information and math skills to represent the food.

Acknowledgements

The  Science and Our Food Supply: Using the Nutrition Facts Label to Make Healthy Food Choices  (2022 Edition)  was brought to you by the Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

Recommended Companion Resources

  • Food Models
  • How to Read Nutrition Facts - Food Labels Made Easy video
  • Labels Unwrapped
  • Nutrition Ag Mag

FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

Organization

We welcome your feedback! If you have a question about this lesson or would like to report a broken link, please . If you have used this lesson and are willing to , we will provide you with a coupon code for 10% off your next purchase at .

Food, Health, and Lifestyle

  • Evaluate serving size related to nutritional needs (T3.6-8.c)
  • Evaluate food labels to determine food sources that meet nutritional needs (T3.6-8.b)

Education Content Standards

Career & technical education (career).

FCSE (Grades 6-8): Nutrition and Wellness 14.0

  • 14.2.4    Analyze sources of food and nutrition information, including food labels, related to health and wellness.
  • 14.3.1    Apply current dietary guidelines in planning to meet nutrition and wellness needs.

Health/Nutrition (HEALTH)

Health Standard 3: Demonstrate health literacy by accessing valid and reliable health information, products, and services to enhance health.

  • 3.5.3    Discuss which trusted adults and resource people in the community (e.g., doctor, dentist, nurse, police officer, firefighter, faith-based leader, elders) can help a person obtain credible health information and trustworthy services.

Common Core Connections

Anchor standards: language.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.

Anchor Standards: Speaking and Listening

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

How can we help?

Send us a message with your question or comment.

  • About Food - a fact of life
  • My dashboard

Food - a fact of life

  • 3 - 5 Years
  • 5 - 7 Years
  • 7 - 11 Years
  • 11 - 14 Years
  • 14 - 16 Years
  • Pupils with additional needs
  • Whole school
  • Professional development
  • Healthy eating (11-14 Years)

Nutrition labels (11-14 Years)

This area covers: food labelling and using food labels to help make healthier choices.

Nutrition labels

Nutrition and allergy information on food labels help us to make informed food and drink choices.

Nutrition labels, including both mandatory and voluntary labelling, are in place to help us to make informed food and drink choices. It is important for pupils to be able to recall the key aspects of labelling information and apply to make an informed choice.

This area covers:

  • food labelling ;
  • using food labels to help make healthier choices .

Food labelling

  • As a starter activity, ask the pupils to state a piece of information that they have seen on a food label. Is it legally required or for consumer information only? Use the Food labelling information sheet to support this activity.
  • To outline the information that should appear on food labels, show the Food labels presentation. Task the pupils to complete the Food labels worksheet . Check pupil’s knowledge with the Food labelling Kahoot quiz and Food labelling Kahoot quiz answers .
  • 14 allergens must be identified on food labels, task the pupils to complete the Allergen labelling activity to recognise and highlight the allergens present in three recipes.
  • Using a bean bag or small soft ball, play ‘pass the question’ using the questions on the Pass the question - food labelling questions . Arrange the pupils in a circle, gently throw the bean bag or ball to the first pupil who should answer a question. If they answer correctly, they should stay in the circle. If not, they should throw the bean bag or ball to another pupil and then sit down out of the circle. The game would then continue. There is more than one possible answer for some of the questions. Therefore, some questions are repeated enabling there to be enough questions for 20 pupils.
  • Task the pupils to find out further information from the back of pack nutrition labels on a variety of foods. The Investigating information - back of pack nutrition labels and Investigating information - back of pack nutrition worksheet uses bread, yogurt and canned tuna as examples but, can be edited using labels from online supermarket websites.
  • Challenge the pupils to find a piece of food packaging (that can be easily cleaned) and attach it (opened flat) to a large piece of paper. Using two different colours, task the pupils to identify the information that is required by law and the information that is for consumer/supermarket use only. In a third colour, they should explain the purpose of the information.
  • Conduct the Food labelling class activity with the whole class. This activity uses wheat and non-wheat based foods to investigate the information found on labels and focuses on energy, carbohydrates and fibre, but can be edited. The pupils should use the Comparing food labels worksheet to record their results.

Further information about the use of food labels to ensure food is safe to eat can be found in the Hygiene and safety area.

Food labeling information sheet

An information sheet about food labeling.

Food labels presentation

A presentation looking at food labeling.

Food labels worksheet

A worksheet looking at food labeling.

Food labeling quiz

A quiz about food labeling.

Comparing food labels worksheet

A worksheet about comparing food labels.

Pass the question - food labeling questions

A quiz to play as a class looking at food labeling.

Investigating information - back of pack labeling

A worksheet exploring the information on the back of pack.

Food labeling class activity

A class activity investigating food labels.

Allergen labeling activity

An activity that explores allergens present in recipes.

Using food labels to make healthier choices

  • Task the pupils to complete the Front of pack nutrition labels worksheet and Front of pack nutrition labels to understand how to use food labels to make healthier choices.
  • Comparing the label worksheet  - uses nutritional analysis to understand and compare nutrition labels;
  • High, medium or low – applying traffic light labelling to recipes;
  • Nutrition labels worksheet   - analyse a recipe a complete the back of pack nutrition information.
  • Provide the pupils with the clean packaging from a range of standard and healthy option foods. Task the pupils to read and compare the food labels and discuss the findings. What is the first ingredient listed in each product? How does the amount of energy, fat, sugar and salt compare in each product? A simple example would be to compare a full fat yogurt with a low or fat free yogurt. If using yogurt, discuss with the pupils the reason why there may be more sugars in the low or fat free version - when fat is removed, sugars are often added to provide texture and mouthfeel.

Further information and resources to support teaching and learning about nutritional analysis and food labelling can be found in the Explore food area.

Reviewed November 2023

Front of pack nutrition labels worksheet

A worksheet looking at front of pack nutrition labeling.

Front of pack nutrition label cards

Cards accompanying the front of pack nutrition labeling worksheet.

Comparing the label

A worksheet exploring food labelling.

High, medium or low?

A worksheet exploring traffic light labelling on food products.

A worksheet exploring and creating nutrition labels.

Is there something wrong with the page? Do you have a suggestion or would like to see something on this page?

  • Healthy Eating
  • Where Food Comes From
  • Food Commodities
  • Activity Packs
  • Nutritional analysis
  • Schemes of work
  • Healthy eating
  • Food science
  • Consumer awareness
  • Where food comes from
  • Food commodities
  • Activity packs
  • Whole School
  • Whole school approach
  • Parental engagement
  • BNF Healthy Eating Week
  • Food Life Skills
  • FFL training
  • PPDprogramme
  • PPD toolkit
  • Teaching and learning
  • Search resources
  • English ESL Worksheets
  • General Topics

Food labels

KarolinaTea

Notification Bell

Food labels

Profile picture for user KATHRYNFALLERA

KATHRYNFALLERA

IDENTIFYING FOOD LABELS

Loading ad...

  • Google Classroom
  • Microsoft Teams
  • Download PDF

Food labels

  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to FDA Search
  • Skip to in this section menu
  • Skip to footer links

U.S. flag

The .gov means it’s official. Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you're on a federal government site.

The site is secure. The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

  •   Search
  •   Menu
  • Food Labeling & Nutrition

Nutrition Education Resources & Materials

Resources on the importance of good nutrition.

Nutrition Education Resources Header

The Nutrition Facts Label

The Nutrition Facts Label: What's in it for you?

The Nutrition Facts label reflects current scientific information, including the link between diet and chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease. The label makes it easier for you and your audience to make more informed food choices.

Learn about What’s on the Nutrition Facts Label , including details on: Calories, Serving Sizes, Added Sugars, and Percent Daily Value.

Industry members, read more about the changes to the Nutrition Facts label requirements .

More on the Nutrition Facts Label

How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label Learn how to use this information more effectively and easily.  

How to Understand the Nutrition Facts Label

Interactive Nutrition Facts Label An interactive way to learn about the Nutrition Facts label and discover the wealth of information it contains.

Nutrition Facts Interactive Label

For Educators

Health Educator’s Nutrition Toolkit Teach your audience how to use the Nutrition Facts label and to make informed choices.  

Health Educator's Nutrition Toolkit

"Behind the Label” with FDA Information for Educators View this video for health educators that explains the changes to the Nutrition Facts label.

Behind the Label

For Youth & Youth Educators

Read the Label Use these hands-on materials to challenge kids and families to look for and use the Nutrition Facts label.  

Read the Label

Science and Our Food Supply | Curriculum for Middle/High School Teachers Introduce students to the fundamentals of informed food choices with this nutrition-based curriculum.  

Science and Our Food Supply

Whyville Snack Shack Games Kids can play two fun games that test their knowledge about using the Nutrition Facts label to make healthy snack choices.

Snack Shack Game

For Older Adults

A How-To Guide for Older Adults Good nutrition can help older adults feel their best and stay strong. It can also help lower the risk of developing some health conditions that are common among older adults.

Nutrition Guide for Older Adults

For Physicians & Healthcare Professionals

Physicians' Continuing Medical Education Program Resources for talking to patients about using the Nutrition Facts label to make healthy food choices.

Continuing Medical Education

Pediatricians' Continuing Medical Education Program Resources for talking to parents and patients about using the Nutrition Facts label to make healthy food choices.

Continuing Medical Education Program for Pediatricians

More on Labeling

Gluten-Free Labeling Learn how gluten-free labeling can help your audience manage health and dietary intake — especially those with celiac disease.

Reading Gluten Free Labeling

Calories on the Menu | Menu Labeling Information Find out how calorie labeling on menus can help your community make informed and healthful decisions about meals and snacks.

Look for Calorie and Nutrition Information on Menu Boards

Sodium | Look at the Label Learn the basics on sodium’s health effects, how-to’s for using the Nutrition Facts label to reduce sodium intake, and more.

Sodium: Look at the Label

Using the Nutrition Facts Label to Choose Milk and Plant-Based Beverages Use the Nutrition Facts Label to compare the nutrient content of different products to help you make the best choices for you and your family when choosing milk and plant-based beverages.

Using the Nutrition Facts Label to Choose Milk and Plant-Based Beverages Thumbnail

CFSAN Education Resource Library

FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) has a wealth of nutrition education materials.

Consumers, educators, teachers, dietitians, and health professionals are invited to explore CFSAN’s Education Resource Library – a catalog of downloadable and printable materials and videos on nutrition (including labeling and dietary supplements), food safety, and cosmetics.

CFSAN Education Resource Library

Education Newsletter

Get regular FDA email updates delivered on this topic to your inbox.

IMAGES

  1. Food label Worksheets

    food label worksheet for elementary

  2. Food Label Worksheet by Mrs Lile Health Resources

    food label worksheet for elementary

  3. Free Printable Food Label Worksheets

    food label worksheet for elementary

  4. Food Label Worksheet

    food label worksheet for elementary

  5. Reading a Food Label Worksheet by Science Health and PE Materials

    food label worksheet for elementary

  6. Reading Food Labels Worksheet by Miss DoubleU

    food label worksheet for elementary

VIDEO

  1. Traditional Food: Worksheet

  2. VMS Health Nutrition Label Worksheet 20-21

  3. Worksheet _Section 1|| My favorite food from this area

  4. Haunted House for Sale: Creative Writing Worksheet #shorts #halloweenactivities #creativewriting

  5. How to Read Food Labels

  6. Nutrition label

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Grades 3 to 5 • Personal Health Series Food Labels

    1. True or false: If something is listed as one of the first three ingredients on a Nutrition Facts food label, it means the food probably contains a lot of it. 2. On a food label, most nutrients are written in grams (g) or milligrams (mg). There are 1,000 milligrams in 1 gram. 3.

  2. Printable Materials and Handouts

    USDA, HHS. View printable brochures and handouts with healthy eating tips based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025, including: Build a Healthy Eating Routine. Cut Down on Added Sugars. MyPlate Print Materials. USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.

  3. Food Labels Nutrition Printables- Food Label Worksheets, Printout

    Each sheet has two food labels. To find the sample food labels quickly just select Activities for Kids in the "Printable Type" pull down menu below. See all our nutrition education printables for preschool and elementary school children! Free Food Labels Printables Worksheets

  4. PDF LESSON PLAN A HOW TO READ THE (NEW) FOOD LABELS

    3, the daily allowance for oils is 5 teaspoons. A number of foods are naturally high in healthy oils, like nuts, peanut and oth. r nut butters, olives, some fish, and avocados. In addition to essential fa. ty acids, oils are a major source of vitamin E.Other foods that are mainly oil include mayonnaise, certain salad.

  5. Read the Label Youth Outreach Materials

    Read the Label Youth Outreach materials challenge kids (ages 9 to 13) to look for and use the Nutrition Facts label on food and beverage packages. The materials include fun, easy tips and targeted ...

  6. PDF Nutrition label worksheet

    All packaged foods are required to display a standardized nutrition label. This nutrition label contains information about the caloric content, amount of fat, protein, carbohydrates, and other required nutrients. Examine the following nutrition labels and answer the questions. 1. How many calories would you take in if you ate the whole

  7. Food Labels, Free PDF Download

    FOOD LABELS LESSON PLAN WORKSHEETS. The Food Labels lesson plan includes three worksheets: an activity worksheet, a practice worksheet, and a homework assignment. Each one will help students solidify their grasp of the material they learned throughout the lesson. You can refer to the classroom procedure guidelines to know when to hand out each ...

  8. Nutrition Lesson Plan

    Kids' Reading Food Labels Tutorial and Fun Understanding Food Labeling Classroom Activity. Food Label Nutrition Lesson Plan for Teachers- Use our free lesson plans for teaching children to read and understand food labels, food labeling information and nutrition facts. K-5- Elementary school aged kids learn to read food labels with our fun online food label reader tutorial game, quizzes and ...

  9. PDF Food Labels

    2. A food is considered to be an excellent source of a nutrient if the percent daily value of that nutrient is: a. 0%. b. less than 5%. c. between 10% and 19%. d. 20% or more , 3. True or false: Because food labels are written according to the calorie needs of adults, they are not useful for kids and teens. 4.

  10. PDF Grades 9-12 • Personal Health Series Food Labels

    Grades 9-12 • Personal Health Series. Food Labels. Activities for Students. Note: The following activities are written in language appropriate for sharing with your students. The People vs. Sugar. Objectives: Students will: • Examine the amounts of added sugar in their favorite foods and beverages.

  11. How to read food labels

    It allows you and your students to keep up to date on food labelling, is packed with practical examples and is designed to be help students learn in an engaging and interactive way. Junior cycle. Topic 1 - Food labelling requirements. Activity Sheets: Find the 11 pieces of mandatory information on a food pack (Interactive PDF)

  12. PDF Lesson 10 Decoding Food Labels Social Studies [Lesson Duration: 50 minutes]

    Lesson Overview. Food products are labeled with words like "natural" and "humane," and some are certified as USDA Organic or gluten free. Students will learn how to read and critically interpret common food labels, review who regulates and verifies the accuracy of these labels, and create their own food labels. Learning Objectives.

  13. Food Labels Nutrition Activity Worksheet

    This food labels nutrition activity is easy to download and use with your class. It also comes with an answer key to make assessing the worksheet easier. This nutrition activity can be used for a class or homework activity. The answer key can also help your students assess themselves. For more teaching materials about food and health, you can ...

  14. Food Labels Nutrition Activity Worksheet

    Give this Nutrition Labels worksheet to pupils to teach them about the purpose and importance of food labelling. The sheet provides pupils with an example of a nutrition label and poses questions to assess how well they can interpret the information provided. This is a great resource to use to introduce pupils to food and nutrition labels.For more teaching materials about food and health, you ...

  15. How to Read Nutrition Facts Labels

    Choosing foods that have higher percentage Daily Value for vitamins, minerals and fiber. A higher percentage of a specific nutrient is considered 20% DV or more. At home: Get your kids comfortable with reading the label. Practice on the cereal box at home and on products at the grocery store, for example. Ask questions like "How many calories ...

  16. Nutrition Worksheets

    The worksheets will help students understand the differences between autotrophic and heterotrophic forms of nutrition and the advantages and disadvantages of each type. We will inspect food labels and the advantages to a well-balanced diet. We spend a good bit of time here focused on Fungi. Let's face it fungi and decomposer nutrition, in ...

  17. Understanding food labels: Lesson plan

    Subject: Cross-curricular topics. Age range: 7-11. Resource type: Lesson (complete) File previews. pdf, 514.88 KB. pdf, 392.91 KB. pdf, 514.68 KB. Develop your students' understanding of nutrition and healthy eating with this lesson plan designed to help them read and understand the information given on food labels. Creative Commons "Sharealike".

  18. Introducing the Nutrition Facts Label

    Activity 1: Dissecting the Nutrition Facts Label. Advance Preparation: Divide the class into small groups of 2 or 3. Make a set of the Food Product Cards for each group. To make the cards, cut out the individual food cards and associated Nutrition Facts label. Fold the label behind the food card and glue in place.

  19. Nutrition labels (11-14 Years)

    Nutrition labels, including both mandatory and voluntary labelling, are in place to help us to make informed food and drink choices. It is important for pupils to be able to recall the key aspects of labelling information and apply to make an informed choice. This area covers: food labelling; using food labels to help make healthier choices.

  20. Food labels: English ESL worksheets pdf & doc

    Food labels. KarolinaTea. 1142. 9. 2. 0. 1/1. Understanding food labels and simple instructions For CLB 2 This worksheet is a skill using worksheet that prepares the students for the assessment of the….

  21. PDF Label it! Worksheet for food label activity

    ngredients used and the cooking techniques. Many of the labels here have been taken from the website Eat. Bowl of wholewheat bisks and semi-skimmed milk. Each portion contains. Energy Fat Saturates Sugars Salts. 888kJ 3.5g 1.9g 8.9g 0.25g 211kcal MED MED MED MED. 11% 5% 10% 10% 4%.

  22. Food labels interactive worksheet

    10/10/2021. Country code: SA. Country: Saudi Arabia. School subject: HEALTH (1138016) Main content: Food labels (1567675) From worksheet author: IDENTIFYING FOOD LABELS. Other contents: PARTS OF FOOD LABELS.

  23. Nutrition Education Resources & Materials

    The label makes it easier for you and your audience to make more informed food choices. Learn about What's on the Nutrition Facts Label , including details on: Calories, Serving Sizes, Added ...