lijjat papad business plan

  • Whats Cooking
  • Relationships
  • Art and Culture
  • Beauty and Care
  • Healthy Living
  • Tips & Tricks
  • Mutual Funds
  • Science And Future
  • #DubaiLikeALocal
  • Ayodhya Ram Mandir
  • Oscars 2024
  • Indiatimes Frontlines
  • India On Plate
  • Sustainability
  • Give Up Plastic
  • The Great Indian Brain Drain

Lijjat Papad's Success Story: How 7 Ordinary Women Built Rs 1600 Crore Empire With Just Rs 80

Lijjat papad, a beloved household staple, isn't just a tasty treat; it's a symbol of resilience and opportunity. let's know the inspiring journey of how seven remarkable women turned a mere rs 80 investment into a thriving rs 1600 crore empire..

IT Worth Desk

Not only in India, but women across the world are shining in different sectors. They are breaking age-old patriarchal doctrines and raiding what was traditionally considered male bastions. In the heart of India's entrepreneurial landscape lies a remarkable story of perseverance, solidarity, and the empowerment of ordinary women that spans generations. 

Lijjat Papad, a beloved household staple, isn't just a tasty treat; it's a symbol of resilience and opportunity. Let's know the inspiring journey of how seven remarkable women turned a mere Rs 80 investment into a thriving Rs 1600 crore empire.

Even today, whenever we see different types of papads placed in the supermarket, those memories become fresh again. Similarly, when we look at Lijjat Papad, we feel a sense of trust and women empowerment in them. There might be hardly anyone in India who is unaware of the delicious Lijjat Papad. The popularity of Lijjat Papad is as great as the story of its success. Started by seven friends and housewives - Jaswantiben Jamnadas Popat, Parvatiben Ramdas Thodani, Ujamben Narandas Kundalia, Bhanuben N. Tanna, Laguben Amritlal Gokani, Jayaben V. Vithalani, and Diwaliben Lukka , Lijjat Papad has now become a successful and inspiring story.

The journey of Lijjat Papad:

Lijjat Papad sucess story

The year was 1959, a time when India grappled with significant developmental challenges. Illiteracy, especially among women, was rampant, and economic opportunities were scarce. It was against this backdrop that seven visionary women from Mumbai, armed with determination and a simple yet revolutionary idea, embarked on a journey to transform their lives.

Also Read: How 8th Pass Businessman Shivratan Agarwal Built Bikaji Foods Into Rs 13,000 Crore Snack Brand

The Vision Takes Shape:

With just Rs 80 and a shared dream, these enterprising women set out to breathe new life into a struggling papad-making business. Their plan was ingenious: to create a product that required minimal investment and could be made within the confines of their homes. Thus, Lijjat Papad was born.

Overcoming Initial Hurdles:

The early days were filled with challenges. With only four packets of papads and a meager Rs 6,000 in sales during the first year, the road to success seemed daunting. However, fueled by unwavering determination and relentless effort, they persevered.

The Rise of Lijjat Papad:

By 1962, the tide began to turn. Adopting the name " Lijjat" through a contest, the brand started gaining traction. Sales surged to nearly Rs 2 lakh, marking the beginning of their ascent to prominence.

Empowering Women through Cooperative Model:

Lijjat Papad operates as the Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad , a women's worker cooperative. This unique model not only provides employment but also empowers women by offering them ownership opportunities and fostering financial independence.

Expanding Horizons:

As word of Lijjat's delicious, high-quality papads spread, demand soared. From a small group of women, the organisation has now grown to include over 45,000 members. Today, Lijjat Papad has a presence in 82 branches across India and has ventured into international markets, exporting to countries like the US and Singapore.

Lijjat Papad received the Business Woman of the Year award from The Economic Times in 2002, the Best Cottage Industry Award in 2003, and the Brand Equity Award from the then President of India, Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, in 2005.

Also Read: From Dhirubhai Ambani To Ratan Tata: Here Are The First Jobs Of Most Successful Indians

Recognition and Honours:

In 2021, Jaswantiben Popat, one of the co-founders, received the prestigious Padma Shri award, highlighting the significant impact of Lijjat Papad on women's empowerment and the manufacturing sector .

The success story of Lijjat Papad is a testament to the power of determination, unity, and women's empowerment. What began as a modest venture by seven ordinary women has blossomed into a Rs 1600 crore empire, providing employment and financial autonomy to thousands. Lijjat Papad not only satisfies taste buds but also embodies hope, opportunity, and the unwavering spirit of women, inspiring us to overcome obstacles and achieve greatness.

Note: Details mentioned here are as per the information available.

For the latest and more interesting financial news, keep reading Indiatimes Worth.  Click here

Visual Stories

breathtaking images of space

10 breathtaking images of space released by NASA you must see

Indiatimes

Pack like a pro: 6 travel hacks you wish you knew sooner

Anant Ambani gifts luxury watches to SRK, Ranveer and other groomsmen

Anant Ambani gifts luxury watches to SRK, Ranveer and other groomsmen

optical illusions

IQ test: Only genius can spot the Leopard that 99% of people missed

baby boy

Unique Gujarati baby boy names starting with 'Y'

5 Korean haircare hacks for faster growth even during monsoon

Accept the updated Privacy & Cookie Policy

Making High Value Business with Low Margins: Lijjat Papad Story

Do you know lijjat papad venture was started with only rs 80 by 7 women and in 2020 it was valued over rs 1600 crore. read the story of persistence and value..

lijjat papad business plan

Lizzat Papad Story & Case Study: Real Women Empowerment

When I was a child, I was convinced that Lijjat is the only kind of papad available on this planet. It wasn't a brand name for me but something synonymous with the delicacy of papad itself. The question wouldn't be, "Ma, did you buy papad?" instead, it would be, "Ma, did you buy Lijjat papad?" And I'm sure that might be the case for many people who grew up in India or have Indian roots.

How did a seemingly ordinary brand become so crucial to the cultural fabric of a country? How did Lijjat papad grow from its extremely humble beginnings to the giant it is today? Let's look at this detailed case study to find out.

Lijjat Papad: History & Idea

In 1959, seven Gujarati women living in the Girgaum locality of Mumbai came together and took over a loss-making papad venture. These seven women were:

  • Jaswantiben Jamnadas Popat,
  • Parvatiben Ramdas Thodani,
  • Ujamben Narandas Kundalia,
  • Banuben. N. Tanna,
  • Laguben Amritlal Gokani,
  • Jayaben V. Vithalani,
  • Diwaliben Lukka.

Lizzat Papad Story

Lijjat Papad: Beginning

They had borrowed Rs 80 (their only seed capital) from renowned social worker Chhaganlal Karamsi Parekh and began production from the roof of their buildings. They started with four packets of papad and started selling them to known merchants in the locality. Through word of mouth, their business expanded and soon, they upgraded to a cooperative system. In the first year, their sales were Rs. 6196.

In 1962, the name Lijjat was chosen for the group, and in July 1966, Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad was registered as a society under the Societies Registration Act of 1860.

Lijjat Papad: Core Values

  • The Concept of Business Their concept of business has been pretty consistent from the beginning. They had pledged to produce quality products and sell them at a reasonable price. They also swore never to accept any kind of donation or charity.
  • The Concept of Family They do not just see themselves as a working body but rather as a large family. Familial affection, mutual concern and respect, is encouraged among the member-sisters and the entire organization in general.
  • The Concept of Devotion The organization takes the concept of faith and devotion very seriously. The members, employees, and well-wishers are expected to not treat the organization as a mere workplace but as a sacred place of worship.

Lijjat Papad: Organization Structure

Lijjat Papad believes in the motto of Sarvodaya or collective ownership. All the members are referred to as "Sisters" are co-owners in the organization. But there is a core governing structure that helps run the organization.

Lizzat Papad Story

Lijjat Papad: Payment System in Shri Mahila Griha Udyog

Being a cooperative society, the organization does not have an owner neither does it open itself up for corporate investments. Every payment is done on a daily basis, and profits and losses are shared equally among the member of the branches. Every 'Sister' member has access to the financial records, and full transparency is maintained regarding money flow. Let's take a look:

Lizzat Papad Story

Lijjat Papad: Current Office Bearers

  • President - Smt. Swati R. Paradkar
  • Vice-President - Smt. Pratibha E. Sawant
  • Secretary - Smt. Sharda D. Kubal
  • Secretary - Smt. Priyanka G. Redkar
  • Treasurer - Smt. Namita N. Sakpal
  • Treasurer - Smt. Sakshi S. Palav

Lijjat Papad: Expanded Ventures

  • A flour processing division at Vashi, Mumbai
  • A Masala processing division in Cottongreen, Mumbai.
  • A Quality Control Laboratory in Cottongreen, Mumbai.
  • Printing division in the same location as above
  • An Advertising unit at Bandra, Mumbai.
  • Chapati making division in Bandra, Wadala, Mulund, and Kandivali.
  • A Detergent Powder and Cakes (SASA Detergent) manufacturing unit at Pune.

Lijjat Patrika: In-House Magazine

Lijjat Patrika is the in-house magazine that is published and distributed among member-sisters or interested associates. The magazine is published in many languages— Hindi, English, Marathi, and Gujarati.

Lijjat Papad & Role in Women Empowerment

Lijjat has been one of the cornerstones of female empowerment in the industrial landscape of our country. Hence, they can rightfully claim that "The Institution, over the years, has paved the way for women to become self-reliant and self-confident. Lijjat has provided them with the right platform to improve their status in society." Some initiatives in the field:

  • On 18 June 1999, a literacy campaign through classes began in Girgaum. Later it was decided that these classes will be conducted in all branches.
  • In 1980, Lijjat started Chhaganbapa Smruti Scholarships for the daughters of the member-sisters of the organization.
  • In their Valod centre, they opened up an education and hobby centre for women. Courses such as typing, cooking, sewing, knitting and toy-making etc., were taught here.
  • In 1979, Lijjat teamed up with UNICEF to organize a "Child Care and Mother Welfare" seminar in Mumbai.
  • Following Mother Teresa's guidance, some organization members volunteered for Asha Dhan, an institute that cares for needy women.

Lijjat Papad: Awards and Achievements

  • For the period of 1998-1999 to 2000-2001: Khadi & Village Industries Commission's "Best Village Industry."
  • 2002: Economic Times Award of "Businesswomen of the Year 2001-02 for Corporate Excellence."
  • 2003: 'Best Village Industries' from the former Prime Minister Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee at New Delhi.
  • 2005: 'Brand Equity Award' by the former President of India, Dr A.P.J. Abdul Kalam at Vigyan Bhavan, New Delhi.
  • 2012: 'Outstanding Service Organization Award-2012' was awarded to Smt. Swati R. Paradkart, President of Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad by the National Institution for Quality and Reliability (NIQR), Chennai
  • 2014: 'Lijjat' was honored with the National Award as 'Best Village Industries Institution for 2012-13.'
  • Today Lizzat Papad employs more than 45,000 women.
  • 2021: The Government of India graced co-founder Jaswantiben Jamnadas Popat with India's fourth-highest civilian award, Padma Shri, in Trade and Industry category.

Lijjat Papad had a consistent journey from its inception to its present-day position. They have remained consistent in their core values and their operational methods. They have also been meticulous in their quality control and have a brilliant result to show for it. After everything, it can be said that Lijjat Papad's success is owed to consistency, hard work, and philosophy.

Anindita Paul

I’m an avid reader and a wobbly but driven writer, who hopes to make her mark in the world of writing one article at a time. I am passionate about creative writing and storytelling, for me this is where my love for art meets my love for language. I am pursuing my masters in English literature, a course that has equipped me to question, comment and analyse the world from diverse points of views, and writing is how I plan to not let these skills go to waste. In my free time I can be found neck deep in meme culture foraging for my next pop-culture obsession.

View More Posts

lijjat papad business plan

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

enter How much is

Latest Updates from around the world

GoKwik: Revolutionizing Digital Payments – A Startup Saga of Innovation and Growth

Simranjeet kaur.

GoKwik: Revolutionizing Digital Payments – A Startup Saga of Innovation and Growth

Skyroot Aerospace: Pioneering the Indian Space Odyssey – From Ideation to Orbit Dominance

Skyroot Aerospace: Pioneering the Indian Space Odyssey – From Ideation to Orbit Dominance

Pocket FM: Unveiling the Sonic Revolution – A Startup Odyssey from Idea to Auditory Triumph

Saurabh mishra.

Pocket FM: Unveiling the Sonic Revolution – A Startup Odyssey from Idea to Auditory Triumph

Ditto Insurance: Redefining Coverage in the Digital Age – A Startup Journey from Concept to Triumph

Ditto Insurance: Redefining Coverage in the Digital Age – A Startup Journey from Concept to Triumph

BluSmart: Electrifying Urban Mobility – A Sustainable Startup Success Story

BluSmart: Electrifying Urban Mobility – A Sustainable Startup Success Story

Udaan : Connecting India's Businesses to Success

Udaan : Connecting India's Businesses to Success

DealShare : Revolutionizing Indian E-Commerce Through Innovation and Community Building

DealShare : Revolutionizing Indian E-Commerce Through Innovation and Community Building

काइबर फ्रॉड: डिजिटल दुनिया में भारत में हो रहे धोखाधड़ी के प्रकार - ऐसे करें बचाव

lijjat papad business plan

Top Healthcare Management Courses for Working Professionals

Top Healthcare Management Courses for Working Professionals

Honoring the Ink of Change: Dr. Sunil Kumar Verma Awarded Prestigious Doctorate

Honoring the Ink of Change: Dr. Sunil Kumar Verma Awarded Prestigious Doctorate

Most read stories, topics, and videos

Learn to be Grateful after Difficulties: Muniba Mazari Story

Learn to be Grateful after Difficulties: Muniba Mazari Story

Preeti Chhipa Life Story: Woman Entrepreneur & Philanthropist

Kunal tulsani.

Preeti Chhipa Life Story: Woman Entrepreneur & Philanthropist

Success Story of Coca-Cola Company : Complete Case Study

Srishti mudgal.

Success Story of Coca-Cola Company : Complete Case Study

Foodpanda Case Study: How the Billion Dollar Startup Model Failed?

Foodpanda Case Study: How the Billion Dollar Startup Model Failed?

Mountaineer Arunima Sinha – A True Tale of Will Power & Positive Attitude

Mountaineer Arunima Sinha – A True Tale of Will Power & Positive Attitude

Kishore Biyani’s Big Bazaar and the Story of its Rise, Fall, and Controversial Journey

Swati chandra.

Kishore Biyani’s Big Bazaar and the Story of its Rise, Fall, and Controversial Journey

BoAt : Lifestyle Brand's Full Analysis & Useful Information

BoAt : Lifestyle Brand's Full Analysis & Useful Information

Sugar Cosmetics Success Story – The Cruelty-Free Beauty Brand

Sugar Cosmetics Success Story – The Cruelty-Free Beauty Brand

Ralegan Sidhi Story: Inspirational Water Model for India

Ralegan Sidhi Story: Inspirational Water Model for India

How this Simple CricBuzz Cricket News App Generated $7.8 Million in Revenue?

How this Simple CricBuzz Cricket News App Generated $7.8 Million in Revenue?

BankSathi, under the leadership of founders, creates ripples of growth in the FinTech world

BankSathi, under the leadership of founders, creates ripples of growth in the FinTech world

Login With DigitalYug

By signing up for yourstory you agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy of the platform.

For any help

Whatsapp us at: +91 9651081944.

lijjat papad business plan

Utilities ˅

The story of lijjat papad: seven women who made a business worth over 1600 cr from just 80 rs..

In March 1959, in a small chawl colony of Mumbai, homemakers saw a dream. Later that became true with a remarkable name and fame. The dream was to make and sell papad today it is known to every house. Yes, we are talking about the famous “Lijjat Papad”, Lijjat Papad is the result of seven visionary Gujarati women.

It was started by Jaswantiben Popat and her six friends Parvatiben Thodani, Ujamben Kundalia, Banuben Tanna, Laguben Gokani, Jayaben Vithalani, and Diwaliben Lukka. They all embarked on a mission to create a sustainable livelihood for housewives. They were determined to overcome the financial challenges faced by women like them.

Finding multibagger stocks is important for building wealth. Discover potential multi-baggers at  Sovrenn Discovery.

The idea of making papad

One day Jasvanti Jamnadas Popat and her friends were discussing things with each other after completing their household work. Jasvanti belonged to a humble family and wanted to help her family financially. She shared her idea of making papads with her friends to earn some money. They all liked the idea and decided to utilise their culinary skills to produce papad and earn money. But just like others in the 60s, their condition was also not good.

They had no money to start a business. But all were determined for it, they borrowed Rs. 80 from Chhaganlal Karamsi Parekh, a social worker and member of the Servants of India Society, to purchase ingredients. They all gathered on their building's terrace, the women produced four packets of papads. Their first customer was a merchant in the Bhuleshwar market of Mumbai. He liked the quality and taste of the Papad and asked them for more orders. 

Initially, they faced numerous challenges, but they adhered to a strict policy of self-reliance refused monetary aid and relied solely on their efforts. Chhaganlal also played a crucial role in the journey of Lijjat sisters. He suggested them making standardise Papad and he also taught them marketing and banking.

The business soon became recognised by women living near be areas. Within three months, around 25 women joined the papad-making venture. By the end of their first year, their annual sales reached Rs. 6,196. Even the broken papads were not wasted and were distributed among neighbours. Their product quickly gained popularity, prompting local shops to buy wholesale, leading to further expansion.

Banner Image

Expansion of Lijjat Papad

In 1962, the cooperative business adopted the product name "Lijjat," chosen through a cash prize contest by the Lijjat sisters. The business expanded rapidly and the sales reached Rs. 1,82,000 by the end of the year. The organization began to purchase the necessary equipment and infrastructure to support its growing operations. The cooperation was also renamed “Shri Mahila Grahu Udyog”

Investing has built huge wealth for several HNI investors. Learn investing FREE OF CHARGE at  Sovrenn Education

In 1966, Lijjat registered as a society under the Societies Registration Act, of 1860. It was also recognized under the Khadi and Village Industries Act as a unit for the processing of cereals and pulses. This recognition brought financial support and tax exemptions, further solidifying Lijjat's foundation.

Lijjat began to diversify its product range and introduced khakhra in 1974, masala in 1976, and bakery products in 1979. They also established flour mills, a printing division, and a polypropylene packing division. 

Around 1978-79, Lijjat's marketing team collaborated with Ramdas Padhye, a ventriloquist, puppeteer, and puppet maker, to create an advertisement. Padhye introduced a pink-coloured bunny as the mascot for Lijjat Papad, along with the catchy jingle "Karram Kurram Kurram Karram." Despite initial reservations, the mascot and jingle became hugely popular and made Lijjat Papad a household name.

During the 1980s and 1990s, Lijjat expanded its reach across India and began exporting to countries like the United States, the United Kingdom, the Middle East, Singapore, the Netherlands, and Thailand. By 2001, annual exports exceeded US $2.4 million, and the business recorded a turnover of INR 300 crores.

Lizzat papad

Equality and unity among Lijjat sisters

The motto of Lijjat Papad is "Sarvodhya," meaning upliftment for all. The cooperative model also ensures collective ownership, with every member considered an equal partner. Profits are distributed equally among members and foster a sense of unity and equality. Lijjat also initiated literacy campaigns and scholarship programs for the daughters of its members, as well as recreational and infrastructural development projects in rural areas.

Also Read: Chinu Kala, who left her home at 15 and made a jewellery brand Ruban

In 2002, Lijjat generated over $300 billion in revenue and exported Rs 10 billion. It employed over 42,000 people in 62 division branches all around the country. 

The brand has also won many awards. In 2003, Lijjat won the "Best Village Industry Institution" Award. In 2011, it was chosen as a "Power Brand" by Indian consumers. The cooperative expanded to 82 branches in 17 states and began exporting to over 25 countries.

By 2019, Lijjat Papad had grown into a formidable enterprise with 45,000 women, known as "Lijjat Sisters," working for the cooperative. The same year, Lijjat received the "Business Women of the Year" award from the Economic Times. In 2021, Jaswantiben Jamnadas Popat, one of the founding members, was honoured with the prestigious Padma Shri award by President Ram Nath Kovind, recognizing her immense contribution to women's empowerment and the manufacturing sector.

In 2022, the company's net worth was over Rs 1,600 crore. Lijjat sisters have sold over 5.5 billion papads.   

Lijjat Papad stands as a symbol of empowerment, resilience, and the indomitable spirit of women. It has transformed the lives of thousands of women, providing them with financial independence and a sense of purpose. Lijjat Papad is not just a beloved snack but a testament to the power of collective effort and the strength of unity.

Also Read: Nirmal Jain: A Visionary Leader and Ordinary Person of Extraordinary qualities

Written by Manvi

Related Posts

Ecom Learner Logo

Lijjat Papad: A Success Story of Empowering Women and Building a Sustainable Business | Business Model & Case Study

Table of Contents

Introduction to Lijjat Papad and its history

Lijjat Papad is a well-known Indian brand of papad, which is a type of thin, crisp, and circular-shaped Indian bread. The company was established in 1959 by a group of seven women in Mumbai, with the goal of providing employment opportunities for women while producing high-quality papad. Today, Lijjat Papad is one of the most successful and respected brands of papad in India, known for its consistent quality and taste.

History of Lijjat Papad: The story of Lijjat Papad began in the late 1950s, when a group of seven women from a low-income community in Mumbai came together to form a small-scale papad-making enterprise. They were motivated by the need to earn a livelihood and support their families, as well as the desire to empower women by providing them with employment opportunities. Despite facing numerous challenges, such as limited resources and lack of market knowledge, the women were able to establish a successful business and grow it over time.

The company was officially registered as the Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad in 1959, and it has grown significantly since then. Today, Lijjat Papad is a cooperative society owned and run by more than 43,000 women, with an annual turnover of more than US$200 million and a presence in more than 60 countries.

The company’s success is attributed to its unique business model, which emphasizes the empowerment of women, quality control, and sustainable growth. Lijjat Papad is known for its commitment to using high-quality ingredients and maintaining strict quality standards, as well as for its socially responsible practices, such as providing employment opportunities for women and supporting local communities.

Description of the business model and operations

Lijjat Papad’s business model is based on a cooperative structure, where the company is owned and run by its members, who are mostly women. The company operates on a decentralized model, with the production units located in different parts of the country, and each unit is managed by a group of women who are responsible for the day-to-day operations.

In terms of operations, Lijjat Papad follows a traditional method of making papad, which involves mixing the ingredients, such as flour, spices, and oil, and then rolling out the dough into thin circles before sun-drying them. The company uses high-quality ingredients, such as wheat flour, lentils, and spices, which are sourced from local farmers.

One of the unique features of Lijjat Papad is its emphasis on quality control. The company has a strict quality assurance system in place, which includes regular testing of ingredients and finished products to ensure that they meet the company’s high standards.

Lijjat Papad also operates on a just-in-time production system, which allows them to produce fresh papad quickly and efficiently. This system ensures that the products are delivered to the customers on time and are fresh.

The company also have a strong distribution network, which includes a network of wholesalers, retailers and their own company’s outlet. They also have a strong online presence, which allows customers to purchase products directly from the company’s website.

Overall, Lijjat Papad’s business model and operations are characterized by a strong emphasis on quality, efficiency, and social responsibility, which has helped the company to become one of the most successful and respected brands of papad in India.

Analysis of the company’s financial performance and growth

Lijjat Papad has been a financially successful company since its inception. The company has been able to achieve steady growth over the years and has a strong financial performance.

In terms of revenue, Lijjat Papad has seen a steady increase in sales over the years, with an annual turnover of more than US$200 million. The company’s revenue growth can be attributed to a combination of factors, such as increasing demand for its products, expansion into new markets, and the introduction of new product lines.

The company also has a strong profit margin, which is a result of its efficient operations and cost-effective production methods. Lijjat Papad’s business model, which is based on a cooperative structure and decentralized production units, allows the company to keep its overhead costs low, which in turn results in higher profit margins.

In terms of growth, Lijjat Papad has expanded both domestically and internationally, with a presence in more than 60 countries. The company has also diversified its product portfolio, which includes a range of papad flavors and other snack items, such as namakpare and mathri.

Overall, Lijjat Papad’s financial performance and growth can be described as steady and strong. The company’s unique business model and strong emphasis on quality and efficiency have allowed it to achieve financial success and growth over the years.

Discussion of the unique features of Lijjat Papad, such as its cooperative structure and emphasis on women’s empowerment

One of the unique features of Lijjat Papad is its cooperative structure, where the company is owned and run by its members, who are mostly women. This structure is designed to empower women by providing them with employment opportunities and a sense of ownership and control over the business.

The company’s emphasis on women’s empowerment can be seen in various aspects of its operations, such as its recruitment and training programs, which are designed to provide women with the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in the business.

Another unique feature of Lijjat Papad is the emphasis on quality and efficiency. The company has strict quality control procedures in place, which ensures that the products meet the company’s high standards. The company also operates on a just-in-time production system, which allows them to produce fresh papad quickly and efficiently.

Lijjat Papad is also known for its socially responsible practices, such as providing employment opportunities for women and supporting local communities. The company’s mission is not only to produce high-quality products but also to empower women and promote sustainable growth.

In summary, the cooperative structure and emphasis on women’s empowerment are the unique features of Lijjat Papad, which sets it apart from other companies in the industry. The company’s commitment to quality, efficiency, and social responsibility has helped it to become one of the most successful and respected brands of papad in India.

Examination of the challenges faced by the company, such as competition and changing consumer preferences

One of the main challenges faced by the company is competition from other papad brands and snack food companies. As the market for papad and snack foods is becoming increasingly crowded, Lijjat Papad needs to constantly innovate and differentiate itself to remain competitive.

Another challenge for the company is changing consumer preferences, as people are becoming more health-conscious and are looking for more nutritious options. This has led to an increase in demand for low-fat and organic products, which Lijjat Papad needs to keep up with.

The company also faces challenges in terms of distribution and logistics, as they have to manage a large number of production units and suppliers spread across the country. This can be a challenge in terms of coordinating production schedules and ensuring timely delivery of products.

Lijjat Papad also faces challenges in terms of managing the cooperative structure, as they have to balance the interests of the members and ensure that the company’s mission and values are upheld.

Overall, Lijjat Papad faces a number of challenges in its efforts to remain competitive and continue to grow. However, the company has been able to successfully overcome these challenges by innovating and adapting to changing market conditions, and by staying true to its mission and values.

Evaluation of Lijjat Papad’s marketing and branding strategies

Lijjat Papad has a strong marketing and branding strategy that has helped it to become one of the most successful and respected brands of papad in India.

One of the key elements of Lijjat Papad’s marketing strategy is its emphasis on quality and consistency. The company has a strict quality assurance system in place, which helps to ensure that the products meet the company’s high standards. This has helped to build trust and loyalty among customers, as they know they can rely on the consistent quality and taste of Lijjat Papad’s products.

Another important aspect of Lijjat Papad’s marketing strategy is its focus on women’s empowerment and social responsibility. The company is known for its commitment to providing employment opportunities for women and supporting local communities, which has helped to build a strong emotional connection with customers.

Lijjat Papad also has a strong presence in traditional and digital media, which helps to raise brand awareness and reach new customers. The company has a strong online presence, including a website and social media accounts, which allows customers to purchase products directly from the company and stay updated on the latest products and promotions.

In terms of branding, Lijjat Papad has a strong and recognizable brand that is associated with quality, consistency, and social responsibility. The company’s logo and packaging are easily recognizable, and the company’s slogan, “Empowering Women, Enriching Lives,” reflects the company’s mission and values.

Overall, Lijjat Papad’s marketing and branding strategies have been successful in building a strong and recognizable brand that is associated with quality, consistency, and social responsibility. The company’s strong emphasis on women’s empowerment and social responsibility has helped to build a strong emotional connection with customers, which has been key to the company’s success.

Lessons learned from the case study

There are several key lessons that can be learned from the case study of Lijjat Papad:

  • The importance of a strong business model: Lijjat Papad’s success can be attributed to its unique business model, which emphasizes the empowerment of women, quality control, and sustainable growth. This model has allowed the company to achieve financial success and growth over the years.
  • The benefits of a cooperative structure: The cooperative structure of Lijjat Papad has helped to empower women by providing them with employment opportunities and a sense of ownership and control over the business. This structure has also helped the company to keep its overhead costs low and resulted in higher profit margins.
  • The importance of quality and consistency: Lijjat Papad’s emphasis on quality control has helped to build trust and loyalty among customers, as they know they can rely on the consistent quality and taste of the company’s products.
  • The importance of innovation and adaptation: Lijjat Papad has been able to overcome challenges such as competition and changing consumer preferences by innovating and adapting to changing market conditions. This has helped the company to remain competitive and continue to grow.
  • The power of social responsibility: Lijjat Papad’s commitment to providing employment opportunities for women and supporting local communities has helped to build a strong emotional connection with customers and has been key to the company’s success.
  • Empowerment of women through entrepreneurship: The story of Lijjat Papad illustrates the potential for women’s empowerment through entrepreneurship and the benefits of the cooperative structure in business. This serves as an inspiration for other small businesses and entrepreneurs who are looking to make a positive impact in their communities and the world.

Suggestions for future growth and expansion of the business.

  • Diversification of product portfolio: Lijjat Papad could consider diversifying its product portfolio by introducing new flavors and types of papad, as well as other snack items. This would help the company to tap into new markets and attract new customers.
  • Expansion into new markets: Lijjat Papad could consider expanding its operations into new domestic and international markets. This could be done by establishing new production units, opening new retail outlets, and building partnerships with local distributors.
  • Emphasis on e-commerce: Lijjat Papad could focus on expanding its e-commerce presence to tap into the growing market of online shoppers. This could be done by building a strong online presence, including a website and social media accounts, and investing in digital marketing to reach new customers.
  • Implementation of sustainable practices: Lijjat Papad could consider implementing sustainable practices throughout its operations. This could include using eco-friendly materials, reducing energy consumption, and supporting local farmers.
  • Emphasis on research and development: Lijjat Papad could consider investing in research and development to come up with new and innovative products, new recipes and flavors, to stay ahead of the competition.
  • Focus on branding and marketing: Lijjat Papad could focus on building a strong brand identity and promoting its mission and values through various marketing channels. This would help to build a strong emotional connection with customers and differentiate the company from its competitors.
  • Emphasis on training and development: Lijjat Papad could consider investing in the training and development of its members, to ensure that they have the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in the business.

Overall, these suggestions aim to increase the company’s reach and revenue, by expanding its product line, exploring new markets, and increasing its visibility through digital marketing. It also aims to keep the company sustainable and socially responsible, by implementing eco-friendly practices, investing in research and development, and promoting the company’s mission and values.

In conclusion, Lijjat Papad is a well-known and respected brand of papad in India, known for its consistent quality and taste. The company was established in 1959 by a group of seven women in Mumbai, with the goal of providing employment opportunities for women while producing high-quality papad. Today, Lijjat Papad is a cooperative society owned and run by more than 43,000 women, with an annual turnover of more than US$200 million and a presence in more than 60 countries.

One of the unique features of Lijjat Papad is its cooperative structure, which empowers women by providing them with employment opportunities and a sense of ownership and control over the business. The company’s business model is also characterized by a strong emphasis on quality, efficiency, and social responsibility, which has helped it to become one of the most successful and respected brands of papad in India.

Despite facing challenges such as competition and changing consumer preferences, Lijjat Papad has been able to overcome these challenges by innovating and adapting to changing market conditions, and by staying true to its mission and values. The company’s marketing and branding strategies have also been successful in building a strong and recognizable brand that is associated with quality, consistency, and social responsibility.

In summary, the case study of Lijjat Papad illustrates the importance of a strong business model, efficient operations, and a commitment to quality and social responsibility. The company’s success also highlights the potential for women’s empowerment through entrepreneurship and the benefits of the cooperative structure in business. Lijjat Papad’s story serves as an inspiration for other small businesses and entrepreneurs who are looking to make a positive impact in their communities and the world.

lijjat papad business plan

DINESH AHIR

Related posts.

Amazon FBA Fulfillment Center & Warehouse Locations in the USA, Canada & Mexico

Amazon FBA Fulfillment Center & Warehouse Locations in Middle East

gst-exemption-category-sell-online

Sell Without GST for Online Sellers : GST Exemption Category & Product

Explaining amazon easy ship prime: a guide for becoming an amazon prime seller, amazon brand registry : a step-by-step guide, benefit, requirement, amazon great indian festival sale 2023 date announce – how amazon seller prepare, amazon easy ship best practices for new seller, popular categories to sell online on amazon, how to sell on amazon india | 4 step complete guide 2023, how to sell on amazon without gst, leave a reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of new posts by email.

Discover more from EcomLearner

Subscribe now to keep reading and get access to the full archive.

Type your email…

Continue reading

The Captable

Social Story

Enterprise Story

The Decrypting Story

Daily Newsletter

By providing your information, you agree to our Terms of Use and our Privacy Policy. We use vendors that may also process your information to help provide our services. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA Enterprise and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Founder first

Announcement

Startup Sectors

Women in tech

Entertainment

Art & Culture

Travel & Leisure

Curtain Raiser

Wine and Food

ys-analytics

From Rs 80 to Rs 1,600 Crores: The Lijjat Papad Success Story

Lijjat papad: a tale of determination and women's empowerment. from rs 80 to rs 1,600 crores, transforming lives through unity and hard work.

author_logo

Monday October 16, 2023 , 3 min Read

In the heart of India's entrepreneurial journey lies a tale of determination, unity, and women's empowerment that transcends generations. Lijjat Papad, a beloved household snack, isn't just a culinary delight; it's a symbol of resilience and opportunity.

The journey of Lijjat Papad began with seven remarkable women: Jaswantiben Popat, Parvatiben Thodani, Ujamben Kundalia, Banuben Tanna, Laguben Gokani, Jayaben Vithalani, and Diwaliben Lukka. They faced life's challenges head-on and decided to seize control of their destiny. Armed with a modest loan of Rs 80 from a kind-hearted social worker, Chhaganlal Parekh, they embarked on a mission to revive a struggling papad-making business.

Their early days were far from easy. Starting with just four packets of papads, they managed to sell a little over Rs 6,000 worth of products in their first year. However, their unwavering determination and tireless effort began to yield results. By 1962, they adopted the brand name "Lijjat," chosen through a cash prize contest. Sales soared to nearly Rs 2 lakh, marking the beginning of their journey to becoming a household name.

Lijjat Papad operates as the Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad, a women's worker cooperative. This unique cooperative model empowers women by providing them with employment and ownership opportunities, a pivotal step towards financial independence.

As news of Lijjat's delicious, high-quality papads spread, demand skyrocketed. From a handful of women in the early years, the organisation now boasts over 45,000 women involved in papad-making. Today, Lijjat Papad has expanded its reach to 82 branches across India and has even ventured into international markets, exporting to countries like the US and Singapore.

In a significant recognition of their contribution, Jaswantiben Popat, one of the co-founders, was honored with the prestigious Padma Shri award in 2021, one of India's highest civilian honors. This recognition underscores the profound impact Lijjat Papad has had on women's empowerment and the manufacturing sector.

The success story of Lijjat Papad serves as a powerful testament to the potential of determination, unity, and women's empowerment. Seven women with a dream transformed their humble beginnings into a Rs 1,600 crore empire, providing employment and financial independence to thousands of women across India.

In a world where challenges often seem insurmountable, Lijjat Papad reminds us that with vision, hard work, and unwavering commitment, we can achieve greatness and change lives for the better. It's not just a snack; it's an embodiment of hope, opportunity, and the indomitable spirit of women.

lijjat papad business plan

  • women's empowerment
  • Lijjat Papad
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Cooperative Model
  • Indian snacks
  • success story
  • Jaswantiben Popat
  • padma shri award
  • Women entrepreneurs
  • manufacturing sector

MOST VIEWED STORIES

lijjat papad business plan

Excitel's Vivek Raina, five others set up early-stage incubator to support J&K startups

Excitel's Vivek Raina, five others set up early-stage incubator to support J&K startups

Take off: What drone sector stakeholders hope for in Budget to accelerate adoption

Take off: What drone sector stakeholders hope for in Budget to accelerate adoption

Top 5 Phones for Digital Detox with UPI & WhatsApp in 2024

Top 5 Phones for Digital Detox with UPI & WhatsApp in 2024

Forecasting potential fashion trends with AI

Forecasting potential fashion trends with AI

How Lijjat Became a Global Papad Brand

The story of a women-owned cooperative that turned 80 rupees into a business worth millions of dollars..

Lijjat Papad

Priya Krishna

January 4, 2021

Anyone who loves papad is likely familiar with the clear, compact package with the pink bunny and “Lijjat” emblazoned in bold Hindi print. Since its humble beginnings in 1959, the Lijjat brand has cultivated a devoted following for its crisp, shatteringly thin papad — and grown to ₹1,800 crores ( about $244 million) in annual sales.

Like Kleenex, Sharpie, or Google, for many in South Asia and its diaspora, the word “Lijjat” — “taste” in Gujarati — is synonymous with papad. But unlike those other brands, Lijjat Papad is not part of a corporate behemoth. It’s not even a for-profit company. Headquartered in Mumbai, Lijjat Papad — or, formally, Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad — is a women’s co-operative meant to make its members financially independent.

“I used to call Lijjat the pollinators of India,” said Vikas Khanna, the chef who started the Michelin-starred Indian restaurant, Junoon. “They were pollinating different tastes in different homes in different regions so seamlessly.” Papad, often made at home according to regional tastes — masala papad in Punjab, for instance, is made with urad flour and speckled with spices like asafoetida and black pepper, or potato papad in Varanasi — is a South Asian staple. As convenience foods grew more popular worldwide, especially in the ‘80s and ‘90s, Lijjat Papad became ubiquitous with its array of regional offerings. “They became part of every dining table."

“Ever since I can remember, my family has eaten packaged Lijjat Papad, and we continue to do so,” said Shraddha Kamdar, a production editor at Femina , India’s oldest English magazine for women. “It is considered the top standard.”

So how did a women’s co-operative of seven members with 80 rupees as seed money become so popular worldwide?

It starts with the product they chose. Papad is a typical food throughout South Asia — and one that the women who founded Lijjat could make. It’s affordable and can be eaten at any time of day, in myriad ways — popped in the microwave until puffy and crisp, roasted and fried, and then with achaar, crumpled up over dal, as a snack, topped with tomatoes and onions. Papad was sustenance for Indian soldiers during World War I, and it continues to fuel South Asian families, students, and office workers alike.

Papad Business – Lijjat Business Model and Recipe

Starting papad making business.

Do you want to know how to start papad making business ? Rajiyab from India firstly introduced the product so called papad. (served in meetings, sold in India and at large in abroad. Basically, Rajiyab- house wife never wanted to make his product a worldwide demand.

That day when she heard her husband is Coming home with friends and relatives. She got some Kirtiraj papad recipe and mixed it up to fry and after tasting and eating to satisfaction. They suggested that she should start selling the snacks to public.

She tried as advice but she never had much gain since the product is never known before. She repackaged the sabudana papad product and now, It is rated among the selling company. ‘Steps to mountain are different from mere walk’.

Here are few tips on how a papad making business model works:  

Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad

(Recognised by Khadi & Village Industries Commission)

An ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 22000:2018 Certified

lijjat papad business plan

Your Cart is empty

Papad

  • Traditional Masala

Ready Mix Masala

  • Ready Mix Masala

Detergent

Add a SPEACIAL feeling to your FOOD

Papad

Adding Spice to your Life

Masal

Clean & Fresh

Sasa

Happy Clients

women_connect.png

Women's Connected

experience.png

Year of Experience

products.png

Active Products

about_img.webp

It all began on 15th march 1959, which was a warm summer day with the sun shining brightly in the cloudless sky. A majority of the women inhabitants of an old residential building in Girgaum (a thickly populated area of South Bombay), were busy attending their usual domestic chores.

A few of them, seven to be exact, gathered on the terrace of the building and started a small inconspicuous function. The function ended shortly, the result - production of 4 packets of Papadsanda firm resolve to continue production. This pioneer batch of 7ladies had set the ball rolling.

News Blog & Success Stories

Pujya Dattanibapa Scholarship - 2018

Pujya Dattanibapa Scholarship - 2018

Pujya Dattanibapa Scholarship given to 439 children of sister -member who achieved success in 10th & 12th Board of Exam of March 2018.

arrow_icon_blog.png

Entrepreneur Award

Smt. Swati R. Paradkar, President of our Institution received Entrepreneur Award 2014

Best Village Industries Institution 2012-13

Best Village Industries Institution 2012-13

Lijjat received National Award as 'Best Village Industries Institution for 2012-13' on 1st March 2014 at Vigyan Bhavan, New Delhi.

Sign Up For Newsletter

Free shipping.

On order above 500

+91 98338 84643 +91 9702420414

Easy returns

Within 3-4 days

Safe Payment

Protect online payment

lijjat papad business plan

Quick Links

  • Diversification
  • Brief Information
  • Our Quality Policies

Useful Links

  • Terms & Condition
  • Privacy Policy
  • Return Policy

Trade Quotation

avatar-place.png

Confirmation

Delete confirmation message

lijjat papad business plan

Delete Your Account

Warning: You cannot undo this action

Note: Don't Click to any button or don't do any action during account Deletion, it may takes some times.

Deleting Account Means:

lijjat papad business plan

If you create any classified ptoducts, after deleting your account, those products will no longer in our system

After deleting your account, wallet balance no longer in our system

From $1 to $200m: An Indian success story

Indian cooperative selling papad grows into hugely successful brand, decades after having very modest start.

Lijjat Papad India

Mumbai, India – Poor and with little education, seven housewives from Lohana Niwas, an old residential building in Mumbai’s Girgaum area, came together in1959 with a borrowed capital of Rs 80 or $1.50 to start a business of making papads , a crispy bread made from flour and spices.

In largely patriarchal India, few took note of the women whose future looked as bleak as their immediate surrounding.

But that was then. Now, five decades later, they are remembered as trailblazers – whose recipe for the traditional snack also turned out to be a great business success.

Today, their venture known as  Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad is India’s largest selling papad brand, with more than $200 million in sales, and employs more than 43,000 women across the country. 

Business model

Founded on the Gandhian principle of Sarvodaya or progress for all, Lijjat Papad is often described as a symbol of women’s empowerment in India.

Just like its early days, most of Lijjat’s current workforce continues to come from the poorest sections of India’s society for whom a life of dignity would otherwise seem difficult.

On its part, Lijjat readily embraces anyone who wants to be a part of the family.

“Any woman who wants to roll papad can approach any of our branches and become a member,” Swati Paradhkar, president of the cooperative, told Al Jazeera.

Once inducted, a member is paid Rs 30 to roll 1kg of dough into papads .

 a crispy bread made from flour and spices [Deborshi Chaki/ Al Jazeera]

“There is no upper limit to how much a member can roll and sometimes members also get their other family members to work with them,” Paradhkar says.

On joining, a member signs a pledge form, which serves as her formal entry, and thereafter she is considered a sister-member, where she can work six days a week and gets paid on a daily basis for the quantity rolled.

The policy of “no refusal” to new members may seem to go against traditional business sense, but surprisingly enough Lijjat Papad has never faced any difficulty in giving work to new members.

Each branch of Lijjat Papad is run in a decentralised manner and is headed by a sanchalika or branch head who is chosen by consensus.

Apart from production, the branch is also responsible for marketing its products in the area allotted to it.

To maintain quality standards of Lijjat products and uniformity in taste, the central office supplies the raw material – mung and urad flour — to all its branches.

This remains the only involvement of the central office in the entire production and marketing exercise of the branch office.

However, in case of surplus production, the excess stock is acquired by the central office and dispatched to other markets.

Level playing field

One of the most significant aspects of Lijjat success story is how it treats its members. Ever since its existence, Lijjat has followed the policy of electing its highest office bearers from the lowest ranks.

“Equality for all its members irrespective of their financial and social position has been one of foremost guiding principles of Lijjat Papad, which has helped it transform lives of women for several decades now,” says Sharda D Kubal, who joined the organisation 20 years ago as a papad roller and eventually rose to become a Secretary in Lijjat Papad’s managing committee, its topmost decision-making body.

However, the top office bearers are in no way superior to sister-members, and are therefore expected to behave accordingly. 

In her late 40s now, Paradhkar has been rolling papads from the age of ten.

“I come from a very poor family but with my earnings I have managed to educate my two sons, both of whom are working in the United States,” she says. “While members can climb the organisational ladder from there but it’s imperative that everyone starts from the bottom.” 

The same principle is also applied when it comes to sharing profits, as Lijjat essentially remains a non-profit organisation.

Of its entire turnover, Lijjat Papad sets aside only 2% of profits for organisational expenditure and distributes the rest among its members thrice a year.

Lijjat also does not accept donations.

“We are a business enterprise and very successful at that,” Paradhkar says.

But how does Lijjat remain so profitable even after so many years, especially in the face of stiff competition by large FMCG companies and multinationals?

In case of surplus production, the excess stock is acquired by the central office [Deborshi Chaki/ Al Jazeera]

“People often ask how we manage to do well without professional managers,” says Pratibha Sawant, Lijjat’s elderly vice president, who has been a papad roller since 1973 and is now in her late 60s.

“We just focus on the quality of the product and value relationships,” she says. “We get papads for testing from all centres everyday and if we find any deviation from our quality, for example, if the salt is less or more we immediately intimate that particular centre to destroy the entire lot, even if it amounts to a million rupees worth of production.”

Similarly, utmost care is taken to maintain the quality of ingredients, for instance urad dal is imported from Myanmar, asafoetida is imported from Iran and black pepper comes from Kerala in South India.

Over the years, Lijjat has also ventured into other product categories that include spices, detergents and homemade snacks, which have met varying degree of success.

At the same time, Lijjat has also expanded into the overseas market and exports a quarter of its production to the Middle East, Europe and the US.

However, when asked about Lijjat biggest achievement till date, Sawant sums it up: “More than the revenues and profits I feel it’s the sense of self assurance and hope that Lijjat has instilled among its members which counts the most.”

And most would agree.

This feature is a part of our ongoing special India coverage. To read more stories  click here .

comscore

  • Sustainability
  • Agriculture
  • Brand Campaigns
  • Watch inspiring videos
  • Advertise With Us
  • Press Coverage

Follow Us On

Download App

Lijjat Papad: 7 Homemakers Turn Their Dreams Into A Rs 1600 Crore Empire

Watch the incredibly inspiring and humbling story of Lijjat Papad, a venture that began with seven Gujarati women, and became India’s most iconic papad brand.

Lijjat Papad: 7 Homemakers Turn Their Dreams Into A Rs 1600 Crore Empire

I n 1959, seven Gujarati women kneaded and sundried their dreams in the form of papads , on a building terrace of South Mumbai.

Today, 63 years later, this dream has grown into a company with a net worth of Rs 1,600 crore and 45,000 women employees.

Jaswantiben Popat, 94-year-old Padma Shri awardee, is the only living co-founder of Lijjat Papad. She received the fourth highest civilian award of the country for her distinguished work under the ‘trade and industry’ category.

Started as Shri Mahila Udyog Lijjat Papad, the company is now India’s oldest all-women cooperative. Jaswantiben and six other homemakers pooled in a loan amount of Rs 80 to start off this business. The business grew organically with contributions from women in the neighbourhood. Lijjat Papad soon became a brand that supported women in achieving financial independence.

On the first day of business, the women earned eight annas by selling one kilogram of papad . Thereon, their market expanded slowly but steadily. A plan to support their households with a stable income grew into an unmatchable business idea.

This business model provides opportunity for employment and financial independence to thousands of illiterate but skilled women who live in abject poverty. That is the sole secret behind their success as well.

Watch how wonderful things happen when women come together:

Sounds Interesting? Share it now!

twitter link icon

  • Today's news
  • Reviews and deals
  • Climate change
  • 2024 election
  • Fall allergies
  • Health news
  • Mental health
  • Sexual health
  • Family health
  • So mini ways
  • Unapologetically
  • Buying guides

Entertainment

  • How to Watch
  • My Portfolio
  • Latest News
  • Stock Market
  • Biden Economy
  • Stocks: Most Actives
  • Stocks: Gainers
  • Stocks: Losers
  • Trending Tickers
  • World Indices
  • US Treasury Bonds
  • Top Mutual Funds
  • Highest Open Interest
  • Highest Implied Volatility
  • Stock Comparison
  • Advanced Charts
  • Currency Converter
  • Basic Materials
  • Communication Services
  • Consumer Cyclical
  • Consumer Defensive
  • Financial Services
  • Industrials
  • Real Estate
  • Mutual Funds
  • Credit Cards
  • Balance Transfer Cards
  • Cash-back Cards
  • Rewards Cards
  • Travel Cards
  • Credit Card Offers
  • Best Free Checking
  • Student Loans
  • Personal Loans
  • Car Insurance
  • Mortgage Refinancing
  • Mortgage Calculator
  • Morning Brief
  • Market Domination
  • Market Domination Overtime
  • Asking for a Trend
  • Opening Bid
  • Stocks in Translation
  • Lead This Way
  • Good Buy or Goodbye?
  • Financial Freestyle
  • Fantasy football
  • Pro Pick 'Em
  • College Pick 'Em
  • Fantasy baseball
  • Fantasy hockey
  • Fantasy basketball
  • Download the app
  • Daily fantasy
  • Scores and schedules
  • GameChannel
  • World Baseball Classic
  • Premier League
  • CONCACAF League
  • Champions League
  • Motorsports
  • Horse racing
  • Newsletters

New on Yahoo

  • Privacy Dashboard

Yahoo Finance

The amazing lijjat papad story: from rs 80 to rs 800 crore.

Does the jingle ‘Karram Kurram Kurram Karram’ ring a bell? The Lijjat Papad ad campaign in the 1990s featuring a muppet bunny created history in more ways than one. But that is nothing compared to the history of the company that the ad was created for: Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad, popularly known as ‘Lijjat’.

Lijjat Papad, one of India’s oldest co-operatives supporting women, is an organisation manufacturing various products — papads, masalas, wheat flour, chhapatis, detergent powder, detergent cake and liquid detergent.

The story of Lijjat (meaning ‘tasty’ in Gujarati) is one of ‘rags to riches’ propelled by the need to make a living by focusing on strengths and core values, rather than the intent of getting rich. And when hard work and determination are actioned, success is bound to follow.

Here’s the story of how Lijjat Papad became a successful cooperative employing 43,000 women, and grew from Rs 80 to Rs 800 crore.

Lijjat was the brain child of seven Gujarati women from Bombay (now Mumbai) who wanted to start a venture to create a sustainable livelihood using the only skill they had– cooking. This was in the 1950s.

The women borrowed Rs 80 from Chhaganlal Karamsi Parekh, a member of the Servants of India Society and a social worker. They took over a loss-making papad making venture and bought the necessary ingredients and the basic infrastructure required to manufacture papads. And what resulted was a historic company established and run by women for the empowerment of determined and dedicated women.

On 15 March 1959, on a warm summer day with the sun shining brightly in the cloudless sky, they gathered on the terrace of their building and started with the production of 4 packets of papads. They started selling the papads to a known merchant in Bhuleshwar, a popular market in Mumbai.

The early days were not easy. The institution had its trials and tribulation. The faith and patience of the members were put to test on several occasion. Self-reliance was the policy and no monetary help was to be sought (not even voluntarily offered donations). So work started on commercial footing.

Chhaganlal Parekh, popularly known as Chaganbapa, became their guide. Initially, the women were making two different qualities of papads, to sell the inferior one at a cheaper rate. Chaganbapa advised them to make a standard papad and asked them never to compromise on quality. He emphasized to them the importance of running it as a business enterprise and maintaining proper accounts.

Lijjat expanded as a cooperative system. Initially, even younger girls could join, but later eighteen was fixed as the minimum age of entry. Within three months there were about 25 women making papads. Soon, the women bought some equipment for the business, like utensils, cupboards, stoves, etc. In the first year, the organisation’s annual sales were Rs 6,196. The broken papads were distributed among neighbours.

During the first year, the women had to stop production for four months during the rainy season as the rains would prevent the drying of the papads. The next year, they solved the problem by buying a cot and a stove. The papads were kept on the cot and the stove below the cot so that the process of drying could take place in spite of the rains.

The group got considerable publicity through word of mouth and articles in vernacular newspapers. This publicity helped it increase its membership. By the second year of its formation, 100 to 150 women had joined the group, and by the end of the third year it had more than 300 members.

By this time, the terrace of seven founders could no longer accommodate the members and the ingredients, so the kneaded flour was distributed among the members who would take it to their homes and make papads. The papads were brought back for weighing and packaging.

In 1962, the name Lijjat (Gujarati for ‘tasty’) was chosen by the group for its products. The organisation was named Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad. In many Indian languages, Mahila means women, Griha means home, Udyog means industry. By 1962–63, its annual sales of papads touched Rs 182,000.

In July 1966, Lijjat registered itself as a society under the Societies Registration Act 1860. In the same month, Khadi Development and Village Industries Commission, a statutory body set up by the Government of India for development of rural industries, formally recognised Lijjat as a unit belonging to the ‘processing of cereals and pulses industry group’ under the Khadi and Village Industries Act. It was also recognised as a ‘village industry’. In 1966, KVIC granted it a working capital of Rs 8 lakh and was allowed certain tax exemptions.

After tasting tremendous success with their papads, Lijjat began producing other products like khakhra (1974), masala (1976), vadi, wheat atta, and bakery products (1979). In the 1970s, Lijjat set up flour mills (1975), printing division (1977) and polypropylene packing division (1978). The group also initiated some unsuccessful ventures such as cottage leather (1979), matches (1979), and agarbattis (incense sticks).

In the 1980s and 1990s, Lijjat started attracting attention of foreign visitors and officials. Lijjat started exporting its products with the help of merchant importers in the United Kingdom, the United States, the Middle East, Singapore, the Netherlands Thailand, and other countries. Its annual exports accounted for more than US$2.4 million in 2001. As its popularity grew, Lijjat started facing the problem of fake Lijjat papads being introduced in the market. In June 2001, three persons were arrested in this connection, in Bihar.

In 2002, Lijjat had a turnover of Rs 300 crore and exports worth Rs 10 crore. It employed 42,000 people in 62 divisions all over the country. In 2003, Lijjat received the ‘Best Village Industry Institution’. It also received the PHDCCI Brand Equity Award 2005. Lijjat marked its 50th year of existence on 15 March 2009. Its current annual turnover is at Rs 800 crore.

Lijjat believes in the philosophy of sarvodaya ( the economic and social development of a community as a whole) and collective ownership. It accepts all its working members as the owners and an equal partaker in both profit and loss. The members are co-owners and fondly referred to as ‘sisters’.

All the decisions are based on consensus and any member-sister has the right to veto a decision. Men can only be salaried employees (accountants, drivers or security guards), and not the members of the organisation (i.e. they are not the owners).

The running of the organisation is entrusted to a managing committee of twenty-one members, including the President, the Vice-President, two secretaries, and two treasurers. Sanchalikas are in-charge of various branches and divisions.

The entire cycle begins with a simple recruitment process. Any woman who pledges to adopt the institution’s values and who has respect for quality can become a member and co-owner of the organisation.

In addition to that, those involved in the rolling of the papads also need to have a clean house and space to dry the papads they roll every day. Those who do not have this facility can take up any other responsibilities, like kneading dough or packaging or testing for quality. Packed papads are sealed into a box and the production from each centre is transported to the depot for that area.

In some smaller towns or villages, the branch itself serves as the depot. The depots are our storage areas as well as pick up points for distributors. Distributors pick up the quantity of papad they require and pay cash on delivery to the sisters or ‘bens’ every day.

Profit-distribution

Accountants in every branch and every centre maintain daily accounts. Profit (or loss, if any) is shared among all the members of that branch.

A committee of 21 decide how the profits are to be distributed. Generally gold coins of 5gm or 10 gm, are purchased depending on the profit. Everyone gets an equal share of profit, irrespective of who does what work, irrespective of seniority or responsibility.

Even a ben/ sister who has recently joined gets the same share as others who have been with the company for longer. Each branch calculates its profit and divides it equally among all its members.

Source: http://www.lijjat.com/, wikipedia, and other sources

The Economic Times

The Economic Times daily newspaper is available online now.

How lijjat papad wrote its success story with only rs 80 for seed capital.

Whatsapp Follow Channel

Life at Lijjat's 82 branches begins early, with women lining up before dawn to drop off finished products, pick up freshly prepared lentil dough, and head home.

lijjat

Empower Your Corporate Journey with Strategic Skill Courses

Offering CollegeCourseWebsite
IIM LucknowChief Operations Officer Programme
Indian School of BusinessISB Chief Digital Officer
Indian School of BusinessISB Chief Technology Officer

Read More News on

(Catch all the Business News , Breaking News , Budget 2024 Events and Latest News Updates on The Economic Times .)

Subscribe to The Economic Times Prime and read the ET ePaper online.

The missing heavyweights in Nifty’s amazing run:Image

The missing heavyweights in Nifty’s amazing run

Youngsters are roaming around derivatives fire. Can they be reined in?:Image

Youngsters are roaming around derivatives fire. Can they be reined in?

Small cars below INR6 lakh are facing a stiff competition from used cars: Tata M:Image

Small cars below INR6 lakh are facing a stiff competition from used cars: Tata Motors MD

Key factors Sebi must consider when deciding on regulating derivatives:Image

Key factors Sebi must consider when deciding on regulating derivatives

Three things Vizhinjam can do for India’s maritime trade:Image

Three things Vizhinjam can do for India’s maritime trade

Stock Radar: HOEC breaks out from inverse Head & Shoulder pattern; likely to:Image

Stock Radar: HOEC breaks out from inverse Head & Shoulder pattern; likely to hit fresh 52-week high

The Economic Times

Find this comment offensive?

Choose your reason below and click on the Report button. This will alert our moderators to take action

Reason for reporting:

Your Reason has been Reported to the admin.

avatar

To post this comment you must

Log In/Connect with:

Fill in your details:

Will be displayed

Will not be displayed

Share this Comment:

Stories you might be interested in

Return to frontpage

  • Brand Basics

09 February 2018 13:57:40 IST

lijjat papad business plan

Lijjat Papad: For, of and by the women

lijjat papad business plan

The number seven is considered to be lucky by many. But it was not luck or chance that brought seven illiterate Gujarati women together on the terrace of their housing complex in Girgaum, Mumbai in 1959. It is an oft-repeated and popular story: the women, who were looking for ways to supplement their family incomes, decided to utilise their culinary skills and free time to roll out papad s and sell them for money.

Most Indian meals are incomplete without some form or the other of the papad , a thin, crunchy and (usually) round wafer that can be either roasted, fried or microwaved. Different seasonings make the papad an any time snack as well.

Almost all women, especially those in Maharashtra, know how to knead the dough (comprising lentil, chickpeas, black gram, salt and oil), roll out papad s and dry them in the sun. The seven women who got together to make a business out of this skill were embarking on a journey that would transform their lives and those of many other women.

The humble beginnings

With ₹80 borrowed from a social worker and well-wisher Chhaganlal Karamshi Parekh, or Chaganbapa as he was fondly called, the septet rolled out four packets of papads on March 15, 1959 and gave them to a nearby shop owner. The product was very well received and a repeat order was placed with them the very next day! Within 15 days, the loan was paid off — a remarkable achievement in those days.

More papad s were prepared and sent for sale. A few months later, more women joined the venture. As the workforce increased and the terrace became crowded, the problem of space was solved by supplying freshly kneaded dough; the women could then roll the papad s at home. The finished products would then be brought in the next day, tested, weighed and packed for delivery (This procedure is followed even today).

At the end of the first year, the organisation had realised sales of more than ₹6,000. By the second year, problems like cessation of activity during the rainy season were tackled and resolved. As word spread about their entrepreneurial venture, more women came to join in; the number swelled to 300 by the third year.

The highlights

In 1962, the Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad (SMGULP) — a worker’s cooperative following the Gandhian principles of collective ownership or Sarvodaya — was set up. A contest for choosing the brand name resulted in the adoption of ‘Lijjat’ (‘tasty’ in Gujarati). It became so popular that the cooperative itself came to be referred thus.

Sales crossed the one lakh mark in 1962-63. In 1966, there were some important developments.

Lijjat was registered as a society under the Societies Registration Act 1860 and under the Bombay Public Trusts Act 1950. It adopted its first written constitution and the now-familiar logo of a woman’s hand holding aloft a lotus with the slogan ‘Symbol of Women’s Strength’. The Khadi Development and Village Industries Commission (KVIC) officially recognised it as a village industry. The last move meant that Lijjat got some tax exemptions and a working capital of ₹800,000.

Women power!

The organisation is ‘for the women, of the women and by the women’. Any woman above the age of 18 (irrespective of caste, religion or colour) who wants to roll papad s can approach a Lijjat office, sign the pledge and become a sister-member or behn . No one is turned away (It is a mystery to market watchers as to how the organisation, instead of collapsing under the weight of the growing workforce, continues to gain in strength).

After training, she can choose a sphere of work she is comfortable in — kneading the dough; rolling papad s; weighing; packing; printing. The work environment is non-competitive. Each woman is paid on a daily basis for the work done and profits are shared equally. Every behn has the opportunity to rise from the lowest level to the highest ranks in the organisational structure. There is no retirement age, but anyone can voluntarily leave the organisation.

Men can be salaried employees but have no part in the profits or in the decision-making process.

Twenty-one members, chosen by consensus, run the organisation. Sanchalikas or branch heads manage branches. Office-bearers meet regularly to coordinate activities at the State and national level. All branches are autonomous, and handle marketing and profit distribution among the behn s.

Branches and expansion

The emphasis has always been on consistently good quality, which is the brand’s USP. The founders took pains to ensure uniform quality by training women at the branches they opened and through a common source of raw material supply from the centre. Cleanliness and hygiene are also maintained at the workplaces (home and office).

Two attempts to start branches of Lijjat — at Malad and Sangli, in 1961 and 1966 respectively — were unsuccessful. But when it opened its first branch outside Maharashtra at Valod, Gujarat in 1968, the results were favourable. This was followed by diversification into other products and the setting up of other branches.

The 1970s saw Lijjat setting up flour mills, a printing division and a polypropylene packing division. By not outsourcing the last two activities, it cut down on the possibilities of duplication and fake merchandise.

Minimal advertising

By the 1980s, Lijjat was participating in fairs and exhibitions and etching its name in the public memory. Old-timers may recall the endearing bunny advertisement with the infectious laugh and the ‘Kharram kurram’ tagline on Doordarshan in the 1980s: it was the first ad to feature a muppet and captured the public imagination.

But Lijjat did not spend much on advertising, choosing, instead, to let its quality speak for itself.

The papad s continue to be handmade to keep to the initial objective of providing maximum employment to women. Storage space isn’t an issue as a majority of the inventory is not stocked. Pricing is reasonable, with downward revisions being effected when raw material rates fall. The revised rates are even advertised in newspapers to prevent overcharging by distributors.

Products and distribution

Lijjat sells its products through a network of loyal dealers (who get 7 per cent commission) and distributors. It is the leader in the organised papad market, with about 60 per cent market share. Despite this, it is basically a non-profit organisation, with only 2 per cent of the turnover retained for organisational expenditure. The remaining amount is distributed among its members thrice a year in the form of gold or cash. There is no credit method in any of its dealings and all members can access the account books.

An in-house magazine, the Lijjat Patrika, available in English, Gujarati, Marathi and Hindi, keeps the women informed about the co-operative’s activities.

The product range has expanded and today includes Papad (seven for local markets and 14 for exports); Jeera Papad (long variety); Appalam; Masala (traditional and ready mix); Gehun Aata; chapaati ; SASA detergent (powder, cake and liquid); and dishwash bar. All these come in different pack sizes and are priced reasonably.

International attention

Today Lijjat has 81 branches, 27 divisions, a headoffice in Mumbai and more than 40,000 workers. Plans are afoot to increase the number of branches to 100 and scale up the workforce to 50,000. It has also expanded abroad and exports its products to the Middle East, Europe, Singapore, Netherlands, Thailand and the US.

The cooperative’s unique style of functioning has piqued the curiosity of international leaders, with officials from foreign countries such as Israel, the UK, Iran, Sudan, Uganda and Sri Lanka visiting Lijjat’s offices to learn and promote similar ventures in their countries.

The organisation has faced worrying situations like disruption from outside forces and duplication of their flagship product, which were legally tackled.

Awards and CSRs

This ISO 9001:2015 certified company has won several awards: the Best Village Industry award for 1998-99, 2000-01, 2003, 2012-13; ET Award of ‘Businesswomen of the Year’ 2001-02 for Corporate Excellence; Power Brand 2010-11; Entrepreneur Award 2014; Mahila Vikas Award for 2017; the Global Economic Award for outstanding contribution to women’s empowerment and self-reliance; and the Wockhardt Foundation Social Development Award 2017.

Lijjat takes its responsibility to the community seriously. The children of the behn s are educated, given scholarships and provided healthcare. The Valod Centre has an educational and hobby centre that provides courses in tailoring, typing and toy-making, among others, to rural women. In fact, Valod got its first ever tarred road courtesy Lijjat! Earthquake-affected areas like Chincholi (Latur district, Maharashtra) and Bhujpur (Kutch, Gujarat) saw several houses being built for the people with funds from Lijjat.

Other projects voluntarily undertaken by the company include blood donation drives, supply of water tankers and green fodder to drought-hit areas, helping cholera victims by donating more than 25,000 salt-sugar packets, planting trees, participating in cleanliness drives, distributing anti-malaria drugs, supply of nutritious food to poor children, and many others.

In the late 1970s, Lijjat also organised a seminar at Mumbai on ‘Childcare and Mother Welfare’ in collaboration with the UNICEF.

lijjat papad business plan

  • Firstpost Defence Summit
  • Entertainment
  • Web Stories
  • Health Supplement
  • First Sports
  • Fast and Factual
  • Between The Lines
  • Firstpost America

lijjat papad business plan

The feminist success of Lijjat Papad: How the venture started by seven women in 1959 employs thousands today

Lijjat’s commitment to women’s empowerment reflects its inconspicuous beginnings, when seven housewives gathered on a Mumbai rooftop one sunny morning to prepare four packets of papads. They ran the business on a shoestring budget, with annual sales in 1959 amounting to just over Rs 6,000, a fraction of their current revenue.

The feminist success of Lijjat Papad: How the venture started by seven women in 1959 employs thousands today

The fairytale success of Lijjat Papad — a multi-million-dollar venture founded by seven women in a crowded Mumbai tenement in 1959 with seed capital of Rs 80 — belies its revolutionary feminist aspirations.

The cooperative employs 45,000 women across India, offering them a job for life as “co-owners” of the enterprise, whose wafer-thin snacks — known locally as papads and as papadums in the West — have become a byword for good business and female empowerment in a patriarchal country.

Life at Lijjat’s 82 branches begins early, with women lining up before dawn to drop off finished products, pick up freshly prepared lentil dough, and head home.

That’s when the work shifts into high gear, as they deftly stretch and roll out the dough — flecked with cumin seeds and black pepper — into small flat rounds that are then left to dry.

The job relies on skill but doesn’t require formal education, opening up opportunities for multitudes of Indian women to become financially independent.

That is a huge accomplishment in a country where female workforce participation — never high to begin with — has been declining for years, plunging from 34 to 20 percent in the two decades to 2019, according to the International Labour Organisation.

As a young bride aged 24, Darshana Pundalik Parab fretted about managing household expenses with her husband’s meagre salary, realising that her employment prospects as a school dropout were dire.

Then she heard about Lijjat.

Not only did the cooperative have a job for her, it allowed thousands of housewives like her to work from home, no questions asked.

In the 35 years that followed, Parab was able to keep earning while raising three boys.

“It was difficult when the kids were small, to watch over them and do the job,” said Parab, recounting the early years when she kept one eye on her sons, and the other on the papads .

The extra cash was welcome, she told AFP , relaying her pride in being able to pay her children’s school fees and teach them crucial life lessons.

“My sons know that there is no such thing as women’s work,” she said, adding that her youngest, 27, still chips in to help prepare the crunchy snacks.

Humble beginnings

Lijjat’s commitment to women’s empowerment reflects its inconspicuous beginnings, when seven housewives gathered on a Mumbai rooftop one sunny morning to prepare four packets of papads .

They ran the business on a shoestring budget, with annual sales in 1959 amounting to just over Rs 6,000, a fraction of their current revenue.

Every woman is paid according to her production capacity and role in the organisation, with Parab earning around 12,000 rupees a month on average.

Men are only hired as shop assistants, drivers or errand boys.

“Some of our women earn more than their husbands — and their families respect them for it,” said Lijjat president Swati Ravindra Paradkar.

Paradkar was just 10 years old when her father died at 37, leaving the family’s finances in precarious shape.

Every morning before school, she would help her mother — who was part of the cooperative — make papads .

“I found it very hard… especially during vacations, when my friends would all be out playing and I would have to work,” Paradkar, now 61, told AFP .

She persevered, eventually joining the cooperative full-time and becoming its president, thanks to a policy that sets Lijjat apart from other businesses.

“We believe that only someone who can roll out papads can become president,” she said.

Bollywood calling

Although the coronavirus pandemic slashed sales by nearly a fifth according to early estimates, Paradkar said there had been no layoffs, with staff even receiving modest salary hikes.

The cooperative has expanded into other categories, including chapatis and laundry detergent, but the papad remains its flagship product, sold across India and in foreign markets from Singapore to the United States.

The inexpensive snack — a 100-gram packet costs Rs 31 — is even making the leap to the silver screen, with Lijjat’s story now the subject of a Bollywood film under production.

“People will be able to learn something from it,” said Usha Juvekar, who has been part of the cooperative for 15 years.

“If everyone in this country cared as much about women as Lijjat does, we would make so much more progress,” she told AFP .

Latest News

Find us on YouTube

Vantage

Related Stories

Big financial changes you must keep an eye on

Big financial changes you must keep an eye on

Global Health IPO to be listed today: Check issue size, GMP, and other details

Global Health IPO to be listed today: Check issue size, GMP, and other details

SBI shares hits record high at NSE, trades at Rs 580 with a spike of 25%

SBI shares hits record high at NSE, trades at Rs 580 with a spike of 25%

After 18 months delay, BYJU's is all set to issue its financial report for FY21

After 18 months delay, BYJU's is all set to issue its financial report for FY21

Big financial changes you must keep an eye on

₹80 to 1600 Cr Empire: Lijjat Papad Case Study

lijjat papad case study

A cooperative movement aims to encourage individuals to produce, buy, and sell commodities together and share the profits without making anyone the sole owner of the franchise. It is an initiative to form a collective community, and Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad did just that. The extraordinary story of Lijjat Papad— a venture founded by seven women of Mumbai, which is now worth multi-million dollars, is the epitome of female empowerment in a patriarchal society. This Lijjat Papad case study will explore how the cooperative grew from Rs 80 to Rs 800 crore. 

The modest beginnings of Lijjat started in 1959 when seven housewives of Mumbai met on a rooftop one bright morning to make four packages of papads. The founders had resolved from the start that they would not ask anyone for money or assistance, even if the organization suffered loss and slowly increased its manpower, which only included women. The group gained considerable popularity only through word of mouth and could incur an annual sale of Rs 6196 in the first year. By the end of the third year, there were more than 300 Lijjat sisters, as they like to call themselves. 

Currently, Lijjat Papad cooperation employs 45,000 women spread over India. The women are primarily housewives who are offered opportunities to use their cooking skills and become the ‘co-owners’ of the establishment from the comfort of their homes. Their wafer-thin snacks, called papads or papadums have become a symbol for the upliftment of women from disadvantaged backgrounds. Lijjat Papad has now taken its journey toward 82 branches in 17 states of India. Moreover, the women-led cooperative also has a strong base in 25 different nations of the world. They have an annual revenue of Rs. 1600 crores. 

You can also check this out Sweetening the beauty industry- Vineeta Singh

Life of a Lijjat sister begins before dawn when they line up in the morning to drop off finished goods and pick up the freshly prepared lentil dough through which the papads are made. They stretch out and roll the dough, which is speckled with black pepper and cumin seeds, into small circular-shaped flats that are then allowed to dry. The job doesn’t require any formal education but only a handful of skills that make it possible for workers to gain financial independence. Every woman earns according to their production capacity and role in the organization, and men are only allowed for the roles of assistants or drivers. 

Due to the cooperative’s stringent sourcing policies, they are now able to expand their business to other products such as masalas, chilis, detergent, and soap. Lijjat’s enthusiasm, transparency, and profit-sharing model are the byproducts of the cooperative’s core vision to provide a common purpose to the women of the marginalized communities of India, where female workforce participation has been declining for years. From the very beginning, Lijjat Papad has made sure to follow a business-oriented perspective that not only earns their women financial security but also a way through which they can gain control over their lives.

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Related Posts

food delivery platform

Evolution in Food Delivery Platforms – Restaurant Services

Perplexity AI

Perplexity AI: Redefining Search with Innovation and Transparency

lijjat papad business plan

Get the best stories on the Newsletter

Lijjat's Production and Supply Chain for Papad

Lijjat's Production and Supply Chain for Papad

Figure 1: Lijjat's Production and Supply Chain for Papad

  • Rosa Lombardi

Paoloni Niccolò

  • Recruit researchers
  • Join for free
  • Login Email Tip: Most researchers use their institutional email address as their ResearchGate login Password Forgot password? Keep me logged in Log in or Continue with Google Welcome back! Please log in. Email · Hint Tip: Most researchers use their institutional email address as their ResearchGate login Password Forgot password? Keep me logged in Log in or Continue with Google No account? Sign up

lijjat papad business plan

  • News & Media
  • Case Studies
  • Economic Research Reports

Sign up as an Investor

Explore wider investment opportunities across various debt instruments enabled by hassle-free online execution and post-settlement support.

Sign up as a Borrower

Get access to 500+ investors from public and private sector banks, mutual fund companies, NBFCs, insurance companies and more.

Already have an account? Log In

  • Supply Chain Finance
  • RE & Infra Financing

lijjat papad business plan

Home / Knowledge Hub / Blog / Lijjat Papad: A Success Story Like No Other

' src=

Lijjat Papad: A Success Story Like No Other

Lijjat papad started its journey in 1959 when 7 women borrowed Rs. 80, as seed capital, from a social worker to buy ingredients for their product. The aim was to empower women, who were treated as family members and called ‘ben’ in the enterprise. The motto of Lijjat Papad is Sarvodhya, which means ownership (in professional as well as personal lives). Currently, the company has about 45,000 ‘Lijjat Sisters’ working for them and it has clocked in a turnover of INR 1600 crores in 2019.

lijjat papad

In this article test

All of us are nostalgic about the 1980’s and 90’s. Some of our favourite shows, music and films are from that very era and you would agree that nothing can replicate the good old age of cable TVs and landline phones. A very distinct memory we might have is of an advertisement showing a large white rabbit talking about papad, a popular Indian snack and the brand synonymous to it was Lijjat Papad . Today we’ll delve deeper into the story of how that mascot came into existence and highlight Lijjat Papad’s success story. 

How it Began 

Today’s epic tale begins in 1959, in a small colony in Mumbai, where 7 Gujarati women decided they would put to use their most veritable skill – cooking. 

Led by Jaswantiben Popat, the women borrowed Rs. 80 from a social worker, Chhaganlal Karamsi Parekh and bought ingredients to make this popular Indian snack. The women finally gathered on their building’s terrace to produce 4 packets of papad and thus, started their journey. 

With the guidance of Chaganlal, the women started selling their product to a local shop. Soon, adjoining shops showed interest in the product and wanted to buy it wholesale. This prompted the company to expand.  

The women, although inexperienced in running a business, were clear about few things:

  • Their goal would never be to make more money, it would always be to empower women and their families;
  • Women who were part of the venture, would not be considered ‘employees’, but family members. In fact, the women addressed each other as ‘ben’, which meant sister in Gujarati;
  • They would never lay off any team member due to regulatory measures or company advancements, since livelihood was more important than profit;
  • Quality would be paramount and every papad would have to go through a grade check to ensure standardisation.

This unique approach got them ample coverage in vernacular newspapers and in their second year itself, they had 300 women working for the cooperative. Finally, a name was given to this budding enterprise – Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad. 

Distinguished Milestones of Lijjat Papad

In 1966, the unit registered itself as a society under the ‘ Societies Registration Act 1860’ and in September of the same year, the company was recognised as a, ‘processing of cereals and pulses industry group’ under the Khadi and Village Industries Act.

Key Achievements

  • Jaswantiben won the Economic Times Award for ‘Business Women of the Year’ in 2022
  • Won the best “Best Village Industry Institution” Award in 2003
  • Won the “Brand Equity Award from Former President, Dr. Abdul Kalam
  • Chosen as the ‘Power Brand’ by Indian Consumers in 2011
  • Expanded to 82 branches in 17 states and exports to 25+ countries

Financial Growth 

In the 1950’s, only 8% of India’s women population was receiving higher education. Most women could not even think of stepping outside their homes, let alone starting a profitable venture.

For the ‘Lijjat Sisters’, changing this narrative was a challenge. But half a century worth of resilience showed impeccable results:

  • What started with a seed capital of INR 80, reached an annual sale of INR 1,82,000 in 1962;
  • After expanding its products in the 1980’s and 90’s, the business expanded its range geographically and earned US $2.4 Million from exports in 2001 and recorded a turnover of INR 300 crores;
  • Today the company has 45,000 ‘Lijjat Sisters’ working for them and recorded a turnover of INR 1600 crores in 2019.

Also read: How The Delhivery Business Model Disrupted The Indian E-Logistics Industry

Lijjat Papad: For, Of, and By the Women

The motto of Lijjat Papad is Sarvodhya, which means ownership. Ownership in their professional as well as personal lives. This unique belief prompted the company to start off with literary campaigns for Lijjat sisters in 1980’s and also begin a scholarship programme for meritorious daughters of their team members. 

Slowly, these campaigns spread across different branches and later extended for the creation of recreational centres, as well as infrastructural development projects in rural areas where the women came from. 

The organisation was eventually recognised by the United Nations, and representatives of the society have participated in UN Summits on women and child health and literacy.

Lijjat Papad #LeveragesIndia

Yubi looks up to the entrepreneurial spirit of Lijjat to have not just created a successful enterprise, but to have built a society which empowers their women. 

It also applauds forward-thinkers like  Changala Parekh, for had he not believed in the potential of those 7 women, today one of India’s most loved brands may not have existed. 

And this is the power of dreamers meeting believers and of capital propelling businesses forward. And at Yubi, this is the core of our mission, a mission which makes us believe that we are helping businesses like Lijjat Papad. 

In a country where innumerable women are still shackled by society, Lijjat gives them a voice to rise and is leveraging the girls of India economically and socially. 

Yubi lauds the Lijjat Sisters!

Learn More About #LeverageIndia Here

Related blogs.

Phoenix UI

  • At Yubi     Technology

June 12th, 2024

Phoenix ui: leveraging monorepo for greater agility and productivity.

Deepak Surya S

batch processiong framework

  • At Yubi     Data

May 2nd, 2024

Batch processing framework.

Sai Avinash

Enhancing Loan Processing Efficiency with DuckDB

April 24th, 2024

Enhancing loan processing efficiency with duckdb: a redis alternative.

Yogesh Sthapak

IMAGES

  1. A Case Study on LIJJAT PAPAD

    lijjat papad business plan

  2. Lijjat Papad

    lijjat papad business plan

  3. Lijjat Papad: A Success Story Like No Other

    lijjat papad business plan

  4. ️⋆ Papad Business: modello di business e ricetta Lijjat ⋆ Business

    lijjat papad business plan

  5. From Rs 80 to Rs 800 Cr, how Lijjat Papad became a successful

    lijjat papad business plan

  6. Making High Value Business with Low Margins: Lijjat Papad Story

    lijjat papad business plan

VIDEO

  1. Lijjat Papad

  2. Lijjat papad

  3. ✅LIJJAT PAPAD KI RECIPE🔥🤤#youtubeshorts #shortsvideo

  4. Lijjat Papad

  5. lijjat papad ...😁

  6. Business case study of lijjat papad 🔥😮❣️ #business #gujarat #lijjatpapad #earning

COMMENTS

  1. How 7 Ordinary Women With Rs 80 Built Rs 1600 Crore Empire

    The popularity of Lijjat Papad is as great as the story of its success. Started by seven friends and housewives - Jaswantiben Jamnadas Popat, Parvatiben Ramdas Thodani, Ujamben Narandas Kundalia, Bhanuben N. Tanna, Laguben Amritlal Gokani, Jayaben V. Vithalani, and Diwaliben Lukka, Lijjat Papad has now become a successful and inspiring story.

  2. Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad

    Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad (transl. "Women Home Industry Tasty Papad"), popularly known as Lijjat, is an Indian women's worker cooperative involved in manufacturing of various fast-moving consumer goods.The organisation's main objective is empowering women by providing them employment opportunities. Started in 1959 by seven gujarati women in Mumbai with a seed capital of only Rs.80 ...

  3. Making High Value Business with Low Margins: Lijjat Papad Story

    They started with four packets of papad and started selling them to known merchants in the locality. Through word of mouth, their business expanded and soon, they upgraded to a cooperative system. In the first year, their sales were Rs. 6196. In 1962, the name Lijjat was chosen for the group, and in July 1966, Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat ...

  4. The story of Lijjat Papad: Seven Women Who Made a Business Worth Over

    By 2019, Lijjat Papad had grown into a formidable enterprise with 45,000 women, known as "Lijjat Sisters," working for the cooperative. The same year, Lijjat received the "Business Women of the Year" award from the Economic Times.

  5. Lijjat Papad: A Success Story Of Empowering Women And Building A

    Lijjat Papad's business model, which is based on a cooperative structure and decentralized production units, allows the company to keep its overhead costs low, which in turn results in higher profit margins. In terms of growth, Lijjat Papad has expanded both domestically and internationally, with a presence in more than 60 countries. The ...

  6. Lijjat Papad

    A story of seven ordinary women who had no background in business, no significant educational qualification, and with just $2 in capital, could build a business empire worth $213 million spread ...

  7. From Rs 80 to Rs 1,600 Crores: The Lijjat Papad Success Story

    Lijjat Papad: A tale of determination and women's empowerment. From Rs 80 to Rs 1,600 crores, transforming lives through unity and hard work Nucleus_AI 1968 Stories

  8. How Lijjat Became a Global Papad Brand

    How Lijjat Became a Global Papad Brand. The story of a women-owned cooperative that turned 80 rupees into a business worth millions of dollars. Anyone who loves papad is likely familiar with the clear, compact package with the pink bunny and "Lijjat" emblazoned in bold Hindi print. Since its humble beginnings in 1959, the Lijjat brand has ...

  9. Papad Business

    There must be well finance budget to run your lijjat papad business in Pune. Though many might have little but loans an grant can be a cool inclusion in a papad making business plan. If you had vision on how giant and vast the company will be. Payments of workers, transportation, local bills, variable cost and others must in your budget, so as ...

  10. Lijjat papad

    Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad. It all began on 15th march 1959, which was a warm summer day with the sun shining brightly in the cloudless sky. A majority of the women inhabitants of an old residential building in Girgaum (a thickly populated area of South Bombay), were busy attending their usual domestic chores.

  11. From $1 to $200m: An Indian success story

    Indian cooperative selling papad grows into hugely successful brand, decades after having very modest start. Lijjat Papad is India's largest selling papad brand with more than $200 million in ...

  12. Lijjat Papad: 7 Homemakers Turn Their Dreams Into A Rs 1600 Crore Empire

    Lijjat Papad soon became a brand that supported women in achieving financial independence. On the first day of business, the women earned eight annas by selling one kilogram of papad. Thereon, their market expanded slowly but steadily. A plan to support their households with a stable income grew into an unmatchable business idea.

  13. The amazing Lijjat Papad story: from Rs 80 to Rs 800 crore

    The Lijjat Papad ad campaign in the 1990s featuring a muppet bunny created history in more ways than one. Lijjat Papad, one of India's oldest co-operatives supporting women, is an organisation ...

  14. Lijjat Papad: How Lijjat Papad wrote its success story with only Rs 80

    The fairytale success of Lijjat Papad-- a multi-million-dollar venture founded by seven women in a crowded Mumbai tenement in 1959 with seed capital of 80 rupees ($1.10) -- belies its revolutionary feminist aspirations. The cooperative employs 45,000 women across India, offering them a job for life as "co-owners" of the enterprise, whose wafer-thin snacks -- known locally as papads and as ...

  15. Lijjat Papad: For, of and by the women

    The seven women who got together to make a business out of this skill were embarking on a journey that would transform their lives and those of many other women. The humble beginnings. ... In 1962, the Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad (SMGULP) — a worker's cooperative following the Gandhian principles of collective ownership or ...

  16. The feminist success of Lijjat Papad: How the venture ...

    Lijjat's commitment to women's empowerment reflects its inconspicuous beginnings, when seven housewives gathered on a Mumbai rooftop one sunny morning to prepare four packets of papads. They ran the business on a shoestring budget, with annual sales in 1959 amounting to just over Rs 6,000, a fraction of their current revenue.

  17. The incredible story of Lijjat Papad!

    Today, Lijjat is more than just a household name for 'papad' (India's most popular crispy bread). Started with a modest loan of Rs 80, the cooperative now has annual sales exceeding Rs 301 crore ...

  18. Lijjat Papad

    Lijjat Papad is a women's cooperative started in 1959 in Mumbai with 80 rupees of seed capital. It now employs over 43,000 women across 17 states with an annual turnover of 290 million including exports. The cooperative empowered women by providing employment making papads in a decentralized cottage industry model from home. Key to its success has been maintaining high quality standards, a ...

  19. ₹80 to 1600 Cr Empire: Lijjat Papad Case Study

    The extraordinary story of Lijjat Papad— a venture founded by seven women of Mumbai, which is now worth multi-million dollars, is the epitome of female empowerment in a patriarchal society. This Lijjat Papad case study will explore how the cooperative grew from Rs 80 to Rs 800 crore. The modest beginnings of Lijjat started in 1959 when seven ...

  20. Lijjat's Production and Supply Chain for Papad

    Download scientific diagram | Lijjat's Production and Supply Chain for Papad from publication: The story of Lijjat: Women's entrepreneurship and empowerment in India | This paper narrates the ...

  21. The Story of Lijjat Papad

    The Story of Lijjat Papad. This is an extraordinary story of 7 ordinary women, who had no background in business and no significant educational qualification. Yet, with just 80 rupees in capital, they were able to build a business empire of 1600 crores. Their company which is spread across 69 branches, employs more than 42,000 people.

  22. Lijjat Papad: A Success Story Like No Other

    Learn about the Lijjat Papad success story, the company that has captured the Indian FMCG pulse for years and empowered a whole nation. ... After expanding its products in the 1980's and 90's, the business expanded its range geographically and earned US $2.4 Million from exports in 2001 and recorded a turnover of INR 300 crores;

  23. Effectiveness of Distribution Channel

    This document is a project report on a study of the effectiveness of Lijjat Papad's distribution channels. It was submitted in partial fulfillment of an MBA degree. The report provides background information on Lijjat Papad, including its founding, products, branches, members, and financial information. It then outlines the research design, including the objectives, scope, importance, data ...