How to Write a Mission Statement + 10 Great Examples

Gym owner assisting a client with exercising and reminded of what his mission is.

17 min. read

Updated May 10, 2024

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Why is an effective mission statement so valuable? It’s worth taking a minute to ask what it is about certain brands that keep us coming back. What is it about them that makes us spend more time, money, or effort over other options? Is it the price? Maybe the convenience? Or is it something more?

The brands and businesses that we really connect with do more than just supply a product or service . They showcase a purpose, a mission that we can get behind. This can be displayed in how they interact with customers, the organizations and communities they support, and even the way they develop their products.

And there’s no better way for a business owner to showcase this purpose, than through a well-written mission statement.

On this page

  • What is a mission statement?

Mission statement or vision statement?

  • Why write a mission statement?
  • How to write a great mission statement
  • 10 Examples of Great Mission Statements

A mission statement is a simple action-oriented statement that explains your company’s purpose. It summarizes what your company does for customers, employees, and owners, and typically includes general descriptions of your organization, its core function, and its goals. In short, you’re explaining what you do and why you do it within a mission statement.

Depending on the focus of your business, your mission statement may be even broader. Explaining not just how you serve your customers and employees, but your community and the world at large. Some businesses even opt to separate this larger aspiration into what’s known as a vision statement.

A vision statement is exactly what it sounds like. It’s a vision for the direction of your company and what it aspires to be. 

These two statements aren’t really interchangeable. They both reflect the purpose and goals of your business, but serve completely different purposes. Your mission statement is the roadmap to achieve your vision. Your vision statement is a much broader picture of the aspirations for your business. 

These can be completely separate written statements for your business, or they can be combined into a more comprehensive mission statement. Having all three does allow you to utilize them for different business purposes, so it may be worth developing variations over time.

Speaking of variations, it’s important to note that your mission statement will likely evolve over time as your business grows and changes. So, don’t be afraid to make adjustments when it seems necessary, and avoid looking for the perfect version of your mission statement. 

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I’ve had a 30-year love-hate relationship with mission statements. I’ve read thousands. I love it when a mission statement defines a business so well that it feels like strategy—which does happen—and I hate it when a mission statement is generic, stale, and completely useless. 

Just because a traditional business plan often includes a mission statement isn’t a reason to do one. If it’s not going to be useful for you and help guide your business, don’t bother. The vast majority of the mission statements are just meaningless hype that could be used to describe any business.

Don’t fall into the trap of writing a mission statement just because some checklist or expert said you had to. There are actually sites that poke fun at how most mission statements use vague, high-sounding phrases to say nothing. You should write a mission statement if you want to add clarity to your business goals and you want to get your employees, investors, and customers to understand what your organization is all about. 

Developing your company’s first mission statement, or writing a new or revised one, is your opportunity to define the company’s goals, ethics, culture, and norms for decision-making. The daily routine of business gets in the way sometimes, and a quick refresh with the mission statement helps you take a step back and remember what’s most important: the organization has a purpose. 

So how do you make a useful mission statement? Over the decades I’ve spent reading, writing, and evaluating business plans , I’ve come up with a process for developing a useful mission statement, and it boils down to these five steps.

1. Start with a market-defining story

A really good market-defining story explains the need, or the want, or—if you like jargon—the so-called “why to buy.” It defines the target customer or “buyer persona .” And it defines how your business is different from most others, or even unique. It simplifies thinking about what a business isn’t, what it doesn’t do.

Imagine a real person making the actual decision to buy what you sell. Why do they want it? How did they find your business? What does it do for them? The more concrete the story, the better. And keep that in mind for the actual mission statement wording: “The more concrete, the better.”

This isn’t literally part of the mission statement. Rather, it’s an important thing to have in your head while you write the mission statement. It’s in the background, between the words. If you’re having trouble getting started, make a quick list of what your company does and doesn’t do.

2. Define what your business does for its customers

Start your mission statement with the good you do. Use your market-defining story to suss out whatever it is that makes your business special for your target customer .

Don’t undervalue your business: You don’t have to cure cancer or stop global climate change to be doing good. Offering trustworthy auto repair, for example, narrowed down to your specialty in your neighborhood with your unique policies, is doing something good. So is offering excellent slow food in your neighborhood, with emphasis on organic and local, at a price premium.

This is a part of your mission statement, and a pretty crucial part at that—write it down.

If your business is good for the world, incorporate that here too. But claims about being good for the world need to be meaningful, and distinguishable from all the other businesses. Add the words “clean” or “green” if that’s really true and you keep to it rigorously. Don’t just say it, especially if it isn’t important or always true.

For example, Apple Computer’s 2020 mission statement is:

“Apple revolutionized personal technology with the introduction of the Macintosh in 1984. Today, Apple leads the world in innovation with iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple Watch, and Apple TV. Apple’s four software platforms—iOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS—provide seamless experiences across all Apple devices and empower people with breakthrough services including the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay, and iCloud. Apple’s more than 100,000 employees are dedicated to making the best products on earth, and to leaving the world better than we found it..”

That one obviously passes the test of defining the company with flying colors. Nobody could mistake that mission for generic hype. And it’s an interesting change from the early mission as defined by founder Steve Jobs:

“To make a contribution to the world by making tools for the mind that advance humankind.”

Ikea, on the other hand, starts its mission statement with something that could be any company anywhere. “Our vision is to create a better everyday life for the [sic] many people.” To its credit, it goes on to define a “rest of the mission” that could only be IKEA:

“We make this possible by offering a wide range of well-designed, functional home furnishing products at prices so low that as many people as possible will be able to afford them.”

And note, in this mission statement, how Sweetgreen incorporates a world vision into a product-oriented mission statement:

“Founded in 2007, Sweetgreen is a destination for delicious food that’s both healthy for you and aligned with your values. We source local and organic ingredients from farmers we know and partners we trust, supporting our communities, and creating meaningful relationships with those around us. We exist to create experiences where passion and purpose come together.”

3. Define what your business does for its employees

Good businesses are good for their employees too or they don’t last. Keeping employees is better for the bottom line than turnover. Company culture matters. Rewarding and motivating people matters. A mission statement can define what your business offers its employees.

My recommendation is that you don’t simply assert how the business is good for employees—you define it here and then forever after make it true.

Qualities like fairness, diversity, respect for ideas and creativity, training, tools, empowerment, and the like, actually really matter. However, since every business in existence at least says that it prioritizes those things, strive for a differentiator and a way to make the general goals feel more concrete and specific.

Don’t worry about being fully unique

With this part of the mission statement, there’s a built-in dilemma. On the one hand, it’s good for everybody involved to use the mission statement to establish what you want for employees in your business. On the other hand, it’s hard to do that without falling into the trap of saying what every other business says.

Stating that you value fair compensation, room to grow, training, a healthy, creative work environment, and respect for diversity is probably a good idea, even if that part of your mission statement isn’t unique. That’s because the mission statement can serve as a reminder—for owners, supervisors, and workers—and as a lever for self-enforcement.

If you have a special view on your relationship with employees, write it into the mission statement. If your business is friendly to families, or to remote virtual workplaces, put that into your mission.

You may not need to focus on employees

And this is rare in mission statements. The vast majority are focused on messaging for customers. My recommendation here is not the norm. I include it because it’s good practice, even though not common.

While I consulted for Apple Computer, for example, that business differentiated its goals of training and empowering employees by making a point of bringing in very high-quality educators and presenters to help employees’ business expertise grow. That was part of the culture and, to my mind, part of the mission; but it wasn’t part of the mission statement. It could have been.

American Express, however, includes the team in its mission:

“We have a mission to be the world’s most respected service brand. To do this, we have established a culture that supports our team members, so they can provide exceptional service to our customers.”

4. Add what the business does for its owners

In business school, they taught us that the mission of management is to enhance the value of the stock. And shares of stock are ownership. Some would say that it goes without saying that a business exists to enhance the financial position of its owners, and maybe it does. However, only a small subset of all businesses are about the business buzzwords of “share value” and “return on investment.”

In the early years of my business, I wanted peace of mind about cash flow more than I wanted growth, and I wanted growth more than I wanted profits. So I wrote that into my mission statement. And at one point I realized I was also building a business that was a place where I was happy to be working, with people I wanted to work with; so I wrote that into my mission statement, too.

However, this element too, as with the suggestion about including employees, is unusual. Few mission statements do it. That’s understandable, since most mission statements are outward-facing only, aimed at customers and nobody else.

Still, some of the best mission statements incorporate a much broader sense of mission that includes, or at least implies, the mission of ownership.

Warby Parker, an eyewear company, does a great job at voicing a higher mission that includes customers, employees, and owners.

“Warby Parker was founded with a rebellious spirit and a lofty objective: to offer designer eyewear at a revolutionary price while leading the way for socially-conscious business.”

5. Discuss, digest, cut, polish, review, and revise

Good mission statements serve multiple functions, define objectives, and live for a long time. So, edit. This step is worth it.

Start by considering developing a full mission statement for internal use and using a customer-facing subset for general publication. That’s common. Many companies have segmented mission statements, with sections set aside and categorized by type or goal. Use bullet points or sections if that works for you. Part of the reason people confuse mission with mantra and vision is that many businesses use them together, and many others also redefine them to fit their context. So what a company does for customers is often called vision, despite the formal definition.

Remember, form follows function, in mission statements, as in all business writing. Make it work for your business. Or don’t do it at all. If you want to call it a vision, and that works for employees and customers, then do that.

Cut out general terms

As you edit, keep a sharp eye out for the buzzwords and hype that everybody claims. Cut as much as you can that doesn’t apply specifically to your business, except for the occasional special elements that—unique or not—can serve as long-term rules and reminders. Unique itself, the word, means literally, the only one in the world. Use it sparingly. Phrases such as “being the best possible,” “world-class,” and “great customer service” mean little because everybody uses them. Having great customer service is way harder than writing that into a mission statement.

Read other companies’ mission statements, but write a statement that is about you and not some other company. Make sure you actually believe in what you’re writing—your customers and your employees will soon spot a lie.

Then, listen. Show drafts to others, ask their opinions and really listen. Don’t argue, don’t convince them, just listen. And then edit again.

And, for the rest of your business’s life, review and revise it as needed. As with everything in a business plan, your mission statement should never get written in stone, and, much less, stashed in a drawer. Use it or lose it. Review and revise as necessary, because change is constant.

  • Great Mission Statements: 10 Examples

If you’re looking for some inspiration to get you started on your own mission statement, here are a few of my favorites.

1. Southwest Airlines

“The mission of Southwest Airlines is dedication to the highest quality of customer service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and company spirit.”

What’s most interesting about Southwest’s mission statement is that they don’t mention anything about getting from point A to point B. Their mission is all about how they differentiate what, these days, can be seen as a commodity experience. They also focus on their own employees and the “spirit of the company”, not just the customer experience.

2. Urban Outfitters

“A lifestyle retailer dedicated to inspiring customers through a unique combination of product, creativity and cultural understanding. Founded in 1970 in a small space across the street from the University of Pennsylvania, Urban Outfitters now operates over 200 stores in the United States, Canada, and Europe, offering experiential retail environments and a well-curated mix of women’s, men’s, accessories and home product assortments.”

Urban Outfitters focuses on the experience that they deliver and the focus on what they do. Their mission drives what their stores look like and what their goal is: to inspire. They also nod to their heritage of starting small and growing.

“At Recreational Equipment, Inc. (REI) we believe a life outdoors is a life well-lived. We believe that it’s in the wild, untamed and natural places that we find our best selves, so our purpose is to awaken a lifelong love of the outdoors, for all.”

REI’s mission focuses mostly on what it wants to do for its customers, but hidden in the mission statement is a mission to preserve the environment as well. Their focus on “getting outside” is what creates a connection between them and their customers.

4. Starbucks

“To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time.”

Starbucks expands on its mission statement by stating its core values. This is really an extension of the mission statement and explains how they focus on their customers, how they grow their company, and how they work with employees. You can read their values here .

5. Walgreens

“Walgreens’ mission is to be America’s most-loved pharmacy-led health, well-being, and beauty retailer. Its purpose is to champion everyone’s right to be happy and healthy.”

Walgreen’s mission really defines their goals: what they want to achieve and in what product categories they want to achieve it in. They also bring in their broader purpose when they talk about “everyone’s right to be happy and healthy.”

“Make work-life simpler, more pleasant, and more productive.”

While Slack’s mission statement is short, it implies a lot. “Work” doesn’t just mean their customer’s work, it means their own work at their company. Their mission statement serves them both internally and externally.

7. The Coca Cola Company

“Refresh the world. Make a difference.”

Coca Cola takes a slightly different approach with a statement of purpose and then a vision statement. Their purpose is essentially their mission statement and says a lot for being so short. They want to refresh people in both body and spirit while making a positive impact on the world. Their vision also implies their goal of serving the entire world’s population which hits on their corporate and shareholder goals.

8. Patagonia

“We’re in business to save our home planet.”

Another short mission statement that says so much more than you would think at first glance. First and foremost, Patagonia doesn’t say that they are a non-profit – they state that they’re a business. And, this implies that they need to be a strong, healthy business to meet their goal of saving the planet. Their mission applies to their employees, their customers, their products, and their activism.

9. charity: water

“charity: water is a nonprofit organization bringing clean and safe drinking water to people in developing countries.”

charity: water’s mission statement is clear and to the point – it simply describes what it does and who it does it for. For most non-profit mission statements, this is enough.

 10. Asana

“Asana’s mission is to help humanity thrive by enabling the world’s teams to work together effortlessly.”

Similar to other mission statements, Asana blends a message about what they do with a higher goal of enhancing the world outside of their company. Yet, they still hint at their target market and goals of being a world-wide company, thus improving the lives of their employees and shareholders.

Content Author: Tim Berry

Tim Berry is the founder and chairman of Palo Alto Software , a co-founder of Borland International, and a recognized expert in business planning. He has an MBA from Stanford and degrees with honors from the University of Oregon and the University of Notre Dame. Today, Tim dedicates most of his time to blogging, teaching and evangelizing for business planning.

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Free Mission Statement Template (With Examples)

Shweta

Updated: Jun 28, 2024, 6:32am

Free Mission Statement Template (With Examples)

Table of Contents

What is a mission statement, why a mission statement is important, mission vs. vision statement, mission statement examples, key components of a mission statement, mission statement template, frequently asked questions (faqs).

Crafting a compelling mission statement is a critical task for any business or organization, as it defines the core of what they stand for and aim to achieve. With the right guidance and a clear mission statement template, you can easily create one that resonates with your values and aspirations.

In this article, you will learn the essential elements that make up a powerful mission statement. We will also look at some real-world examples to inspire and guide your mission statement creation. And we will also be sharing a straightforward template to get you started quickly.

Let’s dive in.

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A mission statement describes the purpose and fundamental objectives of an organization. It’s a declaration of the company’s core values and goals, serving as a guidepost for its actions and decisions. Unlike a vision statement, which outlines a future aspiration, a mission statement focuses on the present—the here and now of what an organization does, for whom and why.

A mission statement clearly communicates to stakeholders, employees and customers what the organization stands for and aims to achieve. This clarity can help align internal culture and can be a compelling tool in marketing and branding.

A well-crafted mission statement is more than just a statement of intent; it’s a strategic tool that shapes every aspect of an organization, from internal culture to external communications. It acts as a compass that guides the organization through its journey, ensuring consistency and purpose in all actions. Here are a few major benefits of having a mission statement.

  • Defines Purpose and Direction: A mission statement clearly articulates the organization’s core purpose and direction, guiding day-to-day operations and decision-making processes. It ensures that every action aligns with the overarching goals of the organization.
  • Enhances Organizational Cohesion: By clearly stating what the organization stands for, a mission statement helps unite team members under a common purpose and set of values. This enhances team cohesion and fosters a strong organizational culture.
  • Facilitates Better Decision Making: With a clear mission, organizations can make decisions more effectively. It serves as a criterion to evaluate opportunities and challenges, ensuring that responses align with the organization’s core objectives.
  • Improves Transparency and Communication: A mission statement communicates the organization’s purpose and values to all stakeholders, including employees, customers and investors. This transparency can build trust and improve external relationships.
  • Increases Employee Engagement and Motivation: Employees are more likely to feel connected and committed to their work when they understand how their efforts contribute to the organization’s larger purpose. A mission statement can boost employee motivation and job satisfaction.
  • Guides Marketing and Branding Efforts: The mission statement is a tool in shaping the organization’s brand identity. It helps in creating marketing strategies that reflect the organization’s values and attract customers who share similar beliefs.

While a mission statement describes the organization’s current identity, goals and approach, a vision statement outlines its future aspirations and ultimate goal. Both are essential in providing direction and inspiration, but serve different purposes.

A mission statement defines what an organization does, whom it serves and why it exists. It is a to-the-point declaration of the organization’s core purpose and primary objectives. A mission statement is action-oriented and focuses on how an organization operates in the present. It is grounded in the reality of what the organization is currently doing and is often used as a guide for making decisions and setting the organization’s course. For example, a mission statement might say, “We provide innovative healthcare solutions to improve the quality of life in our community.”

On the other hand, a vision statement is future-oriented. It describes where the organization aspires to be in the future. It’s a source of inspiration and motivation, providing a long-term goal for the organization’s aspirations. Vision statements are about the “next”—they paint a picture of what the future looks like once the organization’s goals are achieved. A vision statement might say, “We aim to be the world leader in healthcare innovation, transforming the everyday health of communities globally.”

Analyzing real-world examples can provide valuable insights into crafting a compelling mission statement. By examining some examples, you can see how each component—purpose, values, goals, target audience and strategy—plays a crucial role in forming a comprehensive and impactful mission statement.

Google: “To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

This mission statement is a powerful reflection of Google’s expansive role in information technology, highlighting its focus on organizing information and making it accessible.

Nike: “To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world.”

Nike’s mission statement is broad yet focused, encapsulating its commitment to inspiration and innovation in sports. It also subtly includes everyone as an athlete, broadening its audience.

Starbucks: “To inspire and nurture the human spirit — one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time.”

Starbucks goes beyond coffee to emphasize community and individual experiences, aligning with its values of connection and quality.

As Google, Nike and Starbucks are fairly popular companies, you can observe how their mission statement encapsulates their essence, ambition and unique approach simultaneously.

Creating an impactful mission statement involves careful consideration of several key elements. These components not only define the essence of an organization but also guide its decision-making processes and strategies. Here are the crucial elements to include:

  • Purpose: This is the heart of your mission statement. It answers the fundamental question, “Why does our organization exist?” The purpose should reflect the core reason for the company’s existence beyond just making a profit.
  • Values: These are the principles and beliefs that guide an organization’s internal conduct as well as its relationship with the external world. Values are the ethical compass of the company, shaping its culture and public persona.
  • Goals: While goals in a mission statement are generally broad and long term, they provide a clear direction for the organization. These objectives should be achievable and reflect the aspirations of the company.
  • Target Audience: Identifying the primary stakeholders or audience is crucial. It could be clients, a specific demographic or the community at large. Understanding who you serve helps focus your mission statement.
  • Strategy or Approach: This element addresses how the organization plans to achieve its goals and fulfill its purpose. It gives a glimpse into the methods and practices the organization adopts.

Remember, an effective mission statement is concise, clear and inspiring. It should resonate with both internal stakeholders and the external audience.

Here’s a mission statement template structured to help you think through each important aspect of your mission statement, ensuring that the final product is both comprehensive and reflective of your organization’s unique values and objectives.

Purpose (Why We Exist)

[Your Organization’s Name] exists to:

[Briefly describe the core reason for your organization’s existence.] Values (What We Believe In)

Our core values include:

[List two to three key principles or beliefs that guide your organization.] Goals (What We Aim To Achieve)

Our primary goals are:

[List two to three broad objectives your organization is working towards.] Target Audience (Who We Serve)

We are dedicated to serving:

[Describe the specific group(s) or community your organization focuses on.] Strategy/Approach (How We Achieve Our Goals)

To achieve these goals, our approach involves:

[Outline the methods or practices your organization will use to achieve its objectives.] Refinement (Making It Resonate)

[Revise and refine the above components to ensure clarity and cohesion. Aim for a concise, impactful statement that encapsulates the essence of your organization.]

Final Mission Statement:

[Combine the above elements into a final, polished mission statement. It should be a clear, concise statement that reflects the unique identity and direction of your organization.]

Bottom Line

Crafting a mission statement is a vital step in defining the identity and direction of your organization. Using the template provided, you can start working at it right away. But remember to avoid vagueness and over-complication; a mission statement should be clear, specific and easy to understand. Also ensure it aligns with your organization’s actual values and goals, and is realistic and achievable.

Involving various stakeholders in its creation ensures wider acceptance and relevance, so take inputs from stakeholders, clients, employees and customers.

What are the three parts of a mission statement?

A mission statement typically has three key elements: the organization’s purpose , which explains why it exists; its values , representing the core principles guiding its actions and decisions; and its goals , outlining the primary objectives it aims to achieve.

What is a good mission statement format?

A good mission statement format should be clear, concise and inspiring. It should start by stating the organization’s purpose—the core reason for its existence—then articulate its key values or principles and conclude with its primary goals or objectives.

What is a simple mission statement?

A simple mission statement is a brief and clear declaration that outlines an organization’s core purpose, its fundamental values and its primary goals. It succinctly communicates the essence of what the organization stands for and aims to achieve, often in just one or two sentences. For example, a simple mission statement could be, “To provide high-quality, affordable educational resources for lifelong learners worldwide.”

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A seasoned small business and technology writer and educator with more than 20 years of experience, Shweta excels in demystifying complex tech tools and concepts for small businesses. Her work has been featured in NewsWeek, Huffington Post and more. Her postgraduate degree in computer management fuels her comprehensive analysis and exploration of tech topics.

75 Mission Statement Examples That Define Companies and Inspire Customers

Plus a guide on how to write a mission statement.

Stephen Gossett

Some skeptics are eager to criticize mission statements. They see them as generic and platitudinous , another startup box that founders need to check.

 Turns out, though, a mission statement’s success depends on how it’s written.

What Is a Mission Statement?

In his influential 1998 research article , consultant and business professor Chris Bart found “a significant and positive correlation” between organizational performance and mission statements when managers were satisfied with those statements . He also found a correlation between performance and the process used to develop statements. Simply having a mission statement was a non-factor, but one created with real buy-in delivered the goods.

Related Reading Tips for Effective Business Storytelling

Mission Statement Examples

Later, we’ll tease out what exactly makes a mission statement effective and explore tips for writing one. But first, here are some examples to fuel your inspiration.

  • Apple: “To bring the best user experience to customers through innovative hardware, software and services.”
  • Procter & Gamble: “To provide branded products and services of superior quality and value that improve the lives of the world’s consumers, now and for generations to come.”
  • Reddit: “To bring community and belonging to everyone in the world.”
  • Nike: “To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world. If you have a body, you are an athlete.”

mission statement of a business plan

Geode Capital Management

Mission statement: “To manufacture precision building blocks to help our clients efficiently achieve their investment objectives.”

mission statement of a business plan

Piaggio Fast Forward

Mission statement: “Our mission is to build technology products that move the way people move.”

mission statement of a business plan

Supernova Technology

Mission statement: “At Supernova, our mission is to enable investors to achieve financial wellness.”

mission statement of a business plan

Jabra Hearing

Mission statement: “We empower people with hearing loss to connect with their world through effortless technology and delightful care.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement:  “At Hivebrite, our mission is to help organizations build vibrant communities.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Humanizing brands to move people.”

mission statement of a business plan

Bectran, Inc

Mission statement: “Our mission is to reshape the credit industry and disrupt traditional processes. We believe in leading our business partners into the digital age to adapt to the tools and technologies that will allow them to remain at the forefront of their industries. Here at Bectran, we are committed to helping businesses leverage the power of SaaS solutions to save time and money and actualize their full growth potential through innovated, automated software.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement:  “To save lives and minimize loss by identifying active threats globally and facilitating timely communications when an emergency situation threatens personal safety and business continuity.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “We help people secure their future and protect the ones they love.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement:  Make a difference: Improve community health and safety through the power of data.

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “We’ve built the nation’s leading social care network with a clear focus on our mission — to connect people to the help they need with dignity and ease.”

W Logo

Mission statement: “In a world rife with complex relationships and hidden risk, we stand as torchbearers of corporate transparency, aiming to illuminate the intricate connections that exist between businesses, people, supply chains and the inner workings of a globalized economy.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission is simple: To provide employers with a uniquely fair, predictive, and easy-to-use assessment that helps them identify the candidates most likely to succeed in all their open roles.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission is to make the best care possible for all pets.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission is to help financial institutions win and keep customers by delivering flawless customer experiences. Pinwheel’s activation and lifecycle management solutions remove friction, increase transparency, and help create a fairer financial ecosystem for all.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Founded on the mission to simplify healthcare and improve outcomes.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission: deliver powerfully-simple email marketing software for small businesses that does 90 percent of the work for you. We leave the last 10 percent for you to have fun!”

mission statement of a business plan

Bridge Legal

Mission statement: “At Bridge Legal, our mission is simple: To improve access to legal services in America.”

Personio company logo

Mission statement:  “At Personio, our mission is to help HR focus on what matters most: people.”

mission statement of a business plan

GrayMatter Robotics

Mission statement: “Our mission is to help your people and your industrial assets become smarter and more visible.”

mission statement of a business plan

Inspira Financial

Mission statement: “We solve complex problems for countless strategic partners and thousands of employers. We help millions of individuals to thrive today, tomorrow and into retirement.”

mission statement of a business plan

Scythe Robotics

Mission statement: “To provide the most advanced and sustainable autonomous technology for maintaining off-road environments safely, effectively, and responsibly.”

mission statement of a business plan

Biz2Credit Inc.

Mission statement: “Our mission is to provide small businesses with the best funding options for each and every project or capital need, with technology that makes business financing easy to understand and easy to access.”

mission statement of a business plan

Gradient AI

Mission statement: “Gradient AI is on a mission to increase precision and automation throughout the insurance industry.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “At Inato, we’re on a mission to bring clinical research to each and every patient, regardless of who they are and where they live.”

mission statement of a business plan

Formation Bio

Mission statement: “Our mission is to bring new treatments to patients faster and more efficiently. We are a tech-driven, AI-native pharma company changing the way drug development is done.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission is to empower every homeowner. We’re creating a world where home ownership comes with ease, security, and financial know-how.”

mission statement of a business plan

Bilt Rewards

Mission statement: “Renting should be rewarding.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “FPFX Tech delivers technology solutions that bridge the gap between what brokers offer and what traders want, with innovative products and applications that create points of differentiation and client loyalty.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission is to make authentication and authorization simple and secure for every developer.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission is to place the right person in the right shift, every time.”

mission statement of a business plan

Invoice Home

Mission statement: “We strive to maximize business efficiency with an affordable and easy-to-use billing and invoicing service. We cater to time-strapped small businesses and freelancers who seek to grow their business and build their brand.”

mission statement of a business plan

LoanStreet Inc.

Mission statement: “Our mission is to provide the most efficient, transparent and robust tools for financial institutions to manage their balance sheets, connect with partners and effectively share risk.

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Meetup’s mission is to help people grow and achieve their goals through real-life, human connections. From professional networking to craft brewery crawls to coding workshops, people use Meetup to get out of their comfort zones, meet new people, learn new things, pursue passions, and find supportive communities that will help them thrive.

mission statement of a business plan

Gogo Business Aviation

Mission statement: “To keep your passengers, pilots and planes seamlessly and continually connected worldwide.”

mission statement of a business plan

Snap! Mobile

Mission: “To empower coaches and educators in their dedication to develop the leaders of tomorrow. Our vision is to strengthen developing programs through technology-driven, community-first solutions that support dedicated leaders and champion the next generation.” 

mission statement of a business plan

VelocityEHS

Mission statement: “Making the world’s best workplaces safer and more sustainable.”

mission statement of a business plan

OTR Solutions

Mission statement: “OTR’s mission is to create exceptional value for our clients by providing industry leading financing and back-office solutions. Three pillars that are crucial to supporting that mission are outstanding customer service, technology that creates efficiency for ourselves and our customers and a culture that provides the opportunity for employees to achieve greatness.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “To be a trusted partner in providing homeowners and their families safety, enjoyment, convenience, and peace of mind through innovative, professionally installed solutions that protect the condition and grow the value of their homes.”

mission statement of a business plan

GameChanger

Mission statement:  “Help families elevate the next generation through sports.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement:  “We exist to advance the economic power of people living and working in the real world.”

MetLife logo, now hiring for IT positions

Mission statement: “Always with you, building a more confident future. MetLife contributes to a more confident future as an employer, an investor and a provider of financial solutions and expertise. Our purpose is at the heart of our virtuous circle of delivering for our colleagues, our communities, our customers and our shareholders.”

Terakeet logo

Mission statement:  “We bring together brands and their audience to make connections that matter.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement:  “For over a decade, we’ve been building tech for food people, so restaurant owners can save money, staff members can save time, and diners can order better. Because when restaurants thrive, they can keep serving food that gives your community its unique flavor. We want to keep it that way.”

mission statement of a business plan

MobilityWare

Mission statement: “Bringing joy to others one game at a time.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement:  “We empower everyday people to move forward on the path to a better financial future.”

First Entertainment Credit Union

Mission statement:  “We build lifelong financial relationships with the people in entertainment based on a deep understanding of how they live and work.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission statement: “Our mission is to rebuild the infrastructure of the travel industry in order to bring freedom, simplicity, and trust to travelers everywhere. We are bringing change to an industry that has been held back by outdated technology and complicated financial incentives that solve for the needs of middlemen instead of providing the best experience to users. Travel matters when communication is essential to building trust, commitment, and a shared sense of purpose. In essence, business travel is a necessity any time success depends on the strength of human connections.”

PatientPoint Logo

PatientPoint

Mission statement:  “ PatientPoint is on a mission to make every doctor-patient engagement better, and that goal is at the core of everything we do. We are the patient engagement platform for every point of care. Our digital solutions impact 750 million patient visits every year, helping drive better health outcomes that enable people to live longer, healthier lives.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement:  “At Trupanion , we’re on a mission to help loving, responsible pet owners budget and care for their pets.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement :  “We’re on a mission to simplify the complexities of payments to help you grow.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “Our mission is to bring the best user experience to customers through innovative hardware, software and services.”

Asana logo

Mission Statement : “To help humanity thrive by enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “To be the most trusted and convenient destination for pet parents (and partners), everywhere.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “Our mission is to increase economic freedom in the world. Everyone deserves access to financial services that can help empower them to create a better life for themselves and their families. If the world economy ran on a common set of standards that could not be manipulated by any company or country, the world would be a more fair and free place, and human progress would accelerate.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “DoorDash is a technology company that connects people with the best of their neighborhoods across the US, Canada, Australia, Japan, and Germany. We enable local businesses to meet consumers’ needs of ease and convenience, and, in turn, generate new ways for people to earn, work, and live. By building the last-mile logistics infrastructure for local commerce, we’re fulfilling our mission to grow and empower local economies.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “Our mission is to design a more enlightened way of working. Dropbox helps people be organized, stay focused and get in sync with their teams.”

mission statement of a business plan

Bright Horizons

Mission Statement :  “Dedicated to the highest quality education and care; making a lasting difference, one child, one student, one teacher, one family, and one employer at a time.”

mission statement of a business plan

EFFECT Photonics

Mission Statement : “To interconnect humanity through fast, affordable, sustainable, and effective communication technologies.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement:  “Our mission is to build the most popular car subscription platform. Our aim is to help anyone who loves driving a car of their own but fears the struggle, commitment, and intransparent costs associated with ownership to get behind the wheel.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “The Fivetran mission is to make access to data as simple and reliable as electricity. The invention of the lightbulb spawned generations to change the world through electricity, creating millions of new products, devices and services. We’re empowering future ‘Thomas Edison’s’ to transform the way the world makes decisions through our always-on access to accurate data. This helps drive better data-driven decisions in pursuits like discovering new drugs, serving humanity in ways big and small (think: banking the underbanked, keeping hospital records up to date, and more!), and enabling social good organizations to do what they do best by improving lives everywhere.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “It is GitLab’s mission to make it so that everyone can contribute. When everyone can contribute, users become contributors and we greatly increase the rate of innovation.”

mission statement of a business plan

Intel Corporation

Mission Statement : “We create world-changing technology that improves the life of every person on the planet.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “Our mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “Our mission is to ensure the Internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all. An Internet that truly puts people first, where individuals can shape their own experience and are empowered, safe and independent.”

NBCUniversal Brand Logo

NBCUniversal

Mission Statement : “To be the premier content provider for television and digital platforms, spanning all television.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world.

*If you have a body, you are an athlete.”

mission statement of a business plan

The Pokémon Company International

Mission Statement : “At Pokémon, our mission is to become an entertainment leader and bring the fun of Pokémon to people around the world!”

mission statement of a business plan

Procter & Gamble

Mission Statement : “We will provide branded products and services of superior quality and value that improve the lives of the world’s consumers, now and for generations to come. As a result, consumers will reward us with leadership sales, profit and value creation, allowing our people, our shareholders and the communities in which we live and work to prosper.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “Our mission is to bring community and belonging to everyone in the world.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “We help people achieve independence by making it easier to start, run, and grow a business. We believe the future of commerce has more voices, not fewer, so we’re reducing the barriers to business ownership to make commerce better for everyone.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “At Smartsheet, our mission is to empower anyone to drive meaningful change — for themselves, their businesses and even for the world.”

mission statement of a business plan

Warby Parker

Mission Statement : “To inspire and impact the world with vision, purpose, and style.”

mission statement of a business plan

Mission Statement : “We’re empowering everyone to create for the web — and leading impactful, fulfilling lives while we do it.”

How to Write a Mission Statement

When it comes time to draft your company’s mission statement, consider the following:

Tips for Writing a Mission Statement

  • Make it simple, aspirational and memorable.
  • Direct it toward stakeholders, but don’t prioritize shareholders.
  • Keep employees — current and future — top of mind.
  • Avoid saying you’re “the best.”
  • Leave room for the mission to evolve.

Make it Simple, Aspirational and Memorable

A successful mission statement has three important traits, according to Jeffrey Abrahams, author of 101 Mission Statements From Top Companies . They are simplicity, aspiration and memorability.

There’s no magic word count, but experts agree that concision is best. Abrahams recommends aiming for a single-sentence statement. “That has greater impact and can be communicated easily, both within the company and to the target audience,” he said.

Bart, meanwhile, recommends capping at around 70 words. And Inés Alegre, a professor at the business school of the University of Navarra who led a 2018 review of mission-statement research, told Built In that three sentences or so is appropriate.

Your precise mileage may vary, but the “KISS” recommendation put forward by Bart in his 1998 paper still seems appropriate: Keep it simple and straightforward.

It’s common to find an organization’s mission statement posted on an “About” page, but it doesn’t have to be merely descriptive; incorporate some ambition, Abrahams suggested. He invoked Microsoft’s statement: “Our mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.”

Memorability

Action verbs, wariness of jargon and bizspeak — these are a CEO’s allies when drafting a statement. It should be organization-specific, too. 

“If the mission statement could be used by a number of companies, especially competitors, it’s not going to be either memorable or serve the company very well,” said Abrahams. “You want it to be distinctive.”

Direct It Toward Stakeholders

“Missions describe why an organization exists, but in particular, they should describe the relationships that the organization wants to have with the stakeholders upon whom it depends for survival, growth and sustainability,” Bart said.

According to him, an effective mission statement should at least speak to two audiences: customers and employees. He cited Southwest Airlines as an illustrative example:

“The mission of Southwest Airlines is dedication to the highest quality of customer service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride and company spirit.   To our employees: We are committed to provide our employees a stable work environment with equal opportunity for learning and personal growth. Creativity and innovation are encouraged for improving the effectiveness of Southwest Airlines. Above all, employees will be provided the same concern, respect and caring attitude within the organization that they are expected to share externally with every Southwest customer.”

In addition to customers and employees, a strong statement will also often address shareholders and the community at large, Bart said. Here’s one he helped draft for a casino resort that directly targets all four groups:

“Our mission is to provide every guest with a ‘blow away experience’ that is inspired by a celebration of the sea and the myth of a lost civilization. We accomplish this by bringing the myth of Atlantis to life by offering warm, positive, engaging service.   At Atlantis, we are a team of individuals who are passionate and committed in everything that we do. We continuously strive for perfection. We are proud to work at Atlantis because we are a caring and learning organization, which rewards accomplishment and promotes teamwork, respect and innovation.   At Atlantis, we are the pride of our community while providing enduring value for our shareholders. When Atlantis succeeds, we succeed as individuals, and we contribute to the success of the Bahamas.”

… But Avoid Prioritizing Shareholders

It may be more obvious today — after the rise of sustainable investing , office-perk culture that caters to employee happiness and the fact that we’re in the midst of a job seekers’ market — but the thrust of the mission can’t simply be shareholder yield.

Statements that center the returns of the investor class will align approximately zero employees to an organization’s mission. “Shareholder value was the typical mission in the nineties — not anymore,” said Alegre.

One possible symptom of such misalignment? Jargon creep. “When buzzwords and platitudes happen, they usually happen when the focus of the company moves from customer to shareholder,” wrote entrepreneur and Built In expert contributor Joe Procopio.

Read Next 3 Reasons to Prioritize Mission Over Profit in Tech

Resist the Superlatives

As mentioned, mission statements should have an air of the aspirational. But, especially in this era of superlative fatigue , beware of “the biggest,” “the boldest” and “the best.” They’ll inspire more shrugs than hearts, especially when unsupported.

“When a company says its mission statement is to be the best [category here] company in the world — the best steel company in the world or the best clothing company in the world, it’s too general,” said Abrahams. “It needs to be backed up by strongly worded core values, a vision, and guiding principles and beliefs.”

Think of It as a Management Tool

Even though mission statements address multiple audiences, they shouldn’t pretend to think each audience is listening with equal attention.

“There’s a question of prioritization of stakeholders — is it the clients, employees, suppliers, investors? You probably cannot satisfy all at the same level,” said Alegre.

That begs a question: Should companies think of mission statements more as an internal compass for culture and strategy, or an external branding — or even recruiting — element? That is, are they management or marketing? 

“My answer is yes,” said Abrahams. 

Ideally, it can serve as both, experts told Built In, but it should be considered first and foremost a management tool. (Indeed, most research on the topic is published in management, not marketing, journals.) “My impression is that it’s much more useful as an internal alignment tool than external branding,” said Alegre.

Think of the statement primarily as something for employees, Bart said, a true north against which the workforce can always orient itself.

Reinforce the Mission Statement in All Your Communications

Once the statement is finalized, think of it as a muscle: Exercise it often to prevent it from losing definition. Reference the mission during onboardings, training, team meetings, board reviews of key projects and wherever else reinforcement makes sense. Post it on your website, of course, but also your wall. “I work in a business school where the first thing you see after the entrance is the mission,” Alegre said.

Mission statements are especially important during times of uncertainty, such as early in an organization’s life or during growth pushes, Alegre said. Still, lean on them in times of greater stability, too. That provides room for the mission to organically evolve.

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Mission statement examples: 16 of the best to inspire you

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  • 15 Jun 2021

More than just a planning exercise, a mission statement focuses your leadership team, inspires employees, and communicates your core values to the larger world.

All in a single sentence. Magic.

A mission statement is one of the most important documents in your company’s arsenal, but it’s also one of the most difficult to craft. We’ve gathered 16 of the best company mission statement examples to help get your creativity flowing.

Level up with a mission statement video:  Deliver your mission statement with the most engaging communication medium — video. Turn your company’s mission statement into a video with Biteable. Start with a brandable  mission statement video template  and let Biteable’s smart editing features do all the heavy lifting for you.

Create videos that drive action

Activate your audience with impactful, on-brand videos. Create them simply and collaboratively with Biteable.

What is a mission statement?

A mission statement sums up the core of who your company is and why it exists. It’s  raison d’etre , if you want to get fancy and speak a little French.

Company mission statements are typically short and sweet, only a sentence or two. And the best mission statements are anything but boring.

When done right, your company’s mission statement acts as a powerful driver that informs every aspect of your organization, from daily operations, to customer loyalty, to employee satisfaction. When done wrong, a mission statement is just another line of jargon everyone pretty much ignores.

Take the Starbucks company mission statement as an example:  To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.

Starbucks could have said:  To challenge the predominant infrastructure of coffee culture and develop a network of coffeehouses in every major market.

Did your eyes glaze over on that second one? Ours too. While technically true, our made-up example of a company mission statement is full of dreaded corporate-speak. It belongs deep in the bowels of a strategic plan, not as it’s headline.

On the other hand, the real Starbucks mission statement makes us want to be a part of it all. And even more than that, it conveys a sense of the beating heart behind the company.

The best mission statements do just this — clearly convey a company’s reason for existing, in language that is exceedingly human.

Mission statements vs. vision statements — what’s the diff?

It’s easy to confuse vision statements and mission statements. But there are a few important differences.

A vision statement is aspirational. It outlines where your company strives to be in the future — whether that is one year from now or ten. In contrast, a mission statement spells out where your company is right now.

Think of your company’s vision statement as a long-term goal post. The end point towards which you are working. If your vision statement is a goal post, then your mission statement is what drives you toward that goal post.

Why your company mission statement is important

You’ll probably write your company mission statement during your strategic planning because it’s a valuable tool that helps your leadership team make big-picture decisions. Chances are, you’ll even look at examples of other company mission statements to help you craft your own.

But the purpose of a mission statement goes far beyond strategic planning.

Consumers value mission-driven companies

It’s no secret that today’s consumer values a company with, well, values. These values don’t have to be centered around saving the world. But they do need to be clear, focused, and genuine.

A 2020 study  by global communications agency Zeno Group found that if consumers think a company has a strong purpose, they are:

  • 4 times  more likely to purchase from the company
  • 4.5 times  more likely to recommend the company to family and friends
  • 6 times  more likely to defend the company in the wake of public criticism

Think about this in terms of your personal life. The more you connect with a person, the more likely you are to invite them over for coffee, introduce them to your other friends, and come to their defense. The same is true for the companies we buy from.

We humans value connection and a shared sense of purpose. All things equal, your company’s mission statement can be a powerful differentiator.

Employees want a sense of purpose

Just as your company mission statement makes an impact on consumer sentiment, the same can be said about employee sentiment.

According to a recent Gallup poll  Gen Z and millennials (who make up nearly half of the full-time workforce in the US) value belonging to a company with a strong moral compass. They appreciate ethical leadership, and they want to know that their own work has a positive impact on the world at large.

The more effectively human resources and the rest of the leadership team communicates the company’s mission to rank and file employees, the better.

But it doesn’t stop there. It is equally important to put your money where your mouth is, so to speak. If your company mission places value on the environment, do you give your employees opportunities to act upon these values in their everyday work life?

The most effective company mission statements are clear and actionable, from the products a company makes all the way down to the food in the employee cafeteria.

How to write an effective mission statement without a lot of headache

Understanding mission statements is one thing. Actually sitting down to write your company’s own mission statement is quite another.

But if you take the time to do it right, the process is a really useful exercise. Think of this as a chance to clarify and fine tune your purpose so you can point the company in the right direction for years to come.

Brainstorming your company mission statement

To get started, gather your leadership team and brainstorm answers to these four questions. If you are the solo founder of a fledgling company, gather key stakeholders or a handful of your professional mentors instead.

Aim for a short paragraph on each question.

  • Why does our company exist?
  • What value do our products or services bring to consumers?
  • What core beliefs guide our work?
  • What makes our company different, better, or more inspiring than our competitors?

After you brainstorm answers to these questions, review your answers and highlight the concepts that are central to your company. You might also pick a few company mission statement examples from businesses you admire and use those to help guide you.

If this brainstorming discussion took place with a group of people, now’s the time to send one or two individuals off to winnow the answers down to a couple of sentences.

Task this pair with writing several drafts of a mission statement, so the final decision makers have choices to work with.

This group process might seem cumbersome, but remember, your company mission statement is a core document. It should reflect the thought processes of as many stakeholders as possible.

Finalizing your work

After you land on a mission statement, do one final check to make sure it meets these criteria:

Plausibility:  Your mission statement is big-picture, but it should ultimately tie back to your everyday business operations. At least in a broad sense.

Readability:  No corporate speak or jargon. Avoid unnecessarily big words or complex sentences. Keep it simple.

  • Voice:  Now isn’t the time to be dry and boring. Use language that’s active and compelling. Your mission statement should reflect the unique voice and culture of your company.

Pro-tip:  Give your mission statement more reach by creating both a text and video version. The video can be simple, just an eye-catching background, animated text, and a soundtrack.

Include your mission statement video as part of hiring announcements or other  HR video communications . Or send it over to your marketing team to use as a Facebook cover, website content, and more.

Company mission statement examples: 16 of the best

How do other leading companies tackle their mission statements? We searched far and wide for the best company mission statement examples.

Starbucks Mission Statement Example

1. Starbucks: Inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.

The Seattle-based coffee giant originated in 1971 and has since become ubiquitous around the world.

Starbucks mission statement :   Inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.

Why it works:  We touched on the Starbucks mission statement earlier, but we’ll elaborate more here. We included this example of the Starbucks company mission statement because it works well for two reasons: it’s ambitious without being overreaching, and it uses down-to-earth language.

Inspiring and nurturing the human spirit isn’t directly related to coffee. But considering the role the company played in reviving coffee house culture in the US, the human spirit and a sense of community doesn’t seem like too big of a stretch. The second part of the statement is exceedingly tangible. It paints a small-scale picture of the company and its work.

The Honest Co - Mission Statement Example

2. Honest Company: Meaningful transparency and thoughtful design. We’re on a mission to change the world, one product at a time.

Honest Company made headlines when it went public in mid-2021, with founder Jessica Alba as the youngest-ever Latina to list a company on the New York Stock Exchange.

Honest Company mission statement :   Meaningful transparency and thoughtful design. We’re on a mission to change the world, one product at a time.

Why it works:  As a company committed to creating “clean” baby products, a mission of meaningful transparency and thoughtful design is two-fold. It’s a necessary part of their business practices, and it also speaks to consumers looking for a higher standard in their products.

Being on a “mission to change the world” might be a bit of a stretch. But considering the  baby products market  is projected to be worth $88.72 billion US dollars worldwide by 2026, maybe it isn’t such a huge stretch after all.

Patagonia - Mission Statement Example

3. Patagonia: We’re in business to save our home planet

The outdoor apparel and equipment company is known for its social and environmental activism.

Patagonia mission statement :   We’re in business to save our home planet.

Why it works:  Patagonia is often used as a good company mission statement example, and for a reason. Although it’s wildly lofty, the company really does put their money where their mouth is.

Patagonia originally began as a scrappy company specializing in steel pitons for rock climbing. But when the founders realized their gear damaged the rock face they so loved, they pivoted to low-impact aluminum chocks.

From the moment Patagonia pivoted to aluminum chocks, it became an environment-first company with far-reaching efforts built into every aspect of their business practices.

Microsoft - Mission Statement Example

4. Microsoft: To empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more

The software giant is currently valued at  approaching $2 trillion .

Microsoft mission statement :   To empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

Why it works:  Notice, Microsoft’s company mission statement makes no mention of software, or PCs, or technology at any level.

This isn’t to say the company is focused on something other than tech. But by concentrating on the “why” not the “what” of the business, this mission statement example remains flexible and agile. No matter where the market moves, Microsoft aims to increase productivity with it’s products.

Square - Mission Statement Example

5. Square: Everyone should be able to participate and thrive in the economy.

Square’s point-of-sale and online payment platforms came out on top during the pandemic. But even before that time, the company was a leader in POS products.

Square mission statement :   Everyone should be able to participate and thrive in the economy.

Why it works:  The company’s extended mission statement goes on to say: No one should be left out of the economy because the cost is too great or the technology too complex.

Similar to Microsoft’s mission statement, Square leaves room for agility here. It aims to produce simple, low-cost payment products, regardless of where the market takes it. We also appreciate Square’s focus on who the company serves and why.

Pinterest - Mission Statement Example

6. Pinterest: Bring everyone the inspiration to create a life they love.

Ah, Pinterest. Inspiration central for crafters everywhere, but also a valuable tool for businesses looking for new marketing platforms.

Pinterest mission statement :   Bring everyone the inspiration to create a life they love.

Why it works:  More than the words it uses, we appreciate how Pinterest discusses the ways its mission evolved along with the company.

According to Pinterest, the platform was originally conceived as “a tool to help people collect the things they were passionate about online.” It quickly became clear that people most enjoy using the site to get inspiration from others. And with this, Pinterest’s current mission was born.

Target - Mission Statement Example

7. Target: Help all families discover the joy of everyday life

Fun fact: According to Target’s website, 75% of the US population lives within 10 miles of a store. And why not? Everyone loves a trip to good old Target.

Target mission statement :   Help all families discover the joy of everyday life.

Why it works:  This company mission statement example is equal parts broad and super-specific, depending on how you look at it.

It speaks to Target’s affordable products, geared toward everyday people. But this mission statement can also easily extend to the company’s focus on community giving, corporate responsibility, and creating a positive employee experience.

Southwest Airlines - Mission Statement Example

8. Southwest Airlines: Connect people to what’s important in their lives through friendly, reliable, and low-cost air travel

The smallest of the “big four” US airlines, Southwest is known for its friendly crew and affordable ticket prices.

Southwest Airlines mission statement :   Connect people to what’s important in their lives through friendly, reliable, and low-cost air travel.

Why it works:  Maybe you can chalk it up to the company’s southern roots, but Southwest consistently ranks high for customer service. Its mission of connecting people to what’s important in their lives touches on this value.

Southwest sees itself as doing more than just moving people from point A to point B.

Spotify - Mission Statement Example

9. Spotify: To unlock the potential of human creativity — by giving a million creative artists the opportunity to live off their art and billions of fans the opportunity to enjoy and be inspired by it

The Swedish audio streaming platform currently has 356 million users across 178 markets.

Spotify mission statement :   To unlock the potential of human creativity — by giving a million creative artists the opportunity to live off their art and billions of fans the opportunity to enjoy and be inspired by it.

Why it works:  We included this example because, technically speaking, this is a mission statement and a vision statement combined into one.

When you write your mission statement, it’s important not to confuse the two. But for marketing purposes, wrapping a mission statement and a vision statement up into one shiny package sometimes works very well.

Google - Mission Statement Example

10. Google: Organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful

This one needs no introduction. After all, to Google is officially listed in Merriam-Webster as a transitive verb. If that isn’t a sign of a powerful company, we don’t know what is.

Google mission statement :   Organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.

Why it works:  Google’s effectiveness is centered around its algorithms. At its heart, an algorithm is a system for organizing information. So Google pretty much nailed it here.

We also appreciate the focus on making information “universally accessible and useful.” Google is arguably the most powerful search engine in the world, yet it’s simple enough for anyone to use. Universally accessible and useful sums that up nicely.

Nike - Mission Statement Example

11. Nike: Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world. If you have a body, you are an athlete

The Oregon-based footwear, apparel, and sports equipment company was founded in 1964 and is now synonymous with athletics.

Nike mission statement :   Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world. If you have a body, you are an athlete.

Why it works:  We admit, we like the asterisk more than we like the actual mission statement. Nike outfits some of the biggest names in professional sports, but its mission specifies “if you have a body, you are an athlete.” The word “inclusion” doesn’t appear in the company’s mission statement, but it says it — and then some — in so many words.

CVS - Mission Statement Example

12. CVS: Helping people on their path to better health

Founded as a drugstore in 1963 by brothers Stanley and Sidney Goldstein and partner Ralph Hoagland, CVS bills itself as a “health care innovation company that is reinventing pharmacy.”

CVS mission statement :   Helping people on their path to better health.

Why it works:  This isn’t one of the most inventive examples of a company mission statement, and it also seems somewhat obvious for a drugstore. But CVS embodies its mission in some pretty bold ways. In 2014, it became the  first national pharmacy in the US  to stop selling cigarettes and tobacco products.

Harley Davidson - Mission Statement Example

13. Harley Davidson: More than building machines, we stand for the timeless pursuit of adventure. Freedom for the soul

Harley-Davidson was founded in Milwaukee in 1903, and it remains one of the most popular motorcycle brands.

Harley Davidson mission statement :   More than building machines, we stand for the timeless pursuit of adventure. Freedom for the soul.

Why it works:  Harley-Davidson is known not only for its iconic design and distinctive engine sound, but also for the unique subculture of Harley riders.

Although Harley enthusiasts might balk at the idea, the company is as much a lifestyle brand as it is a motorcycle manufacturer. And that lifestyle delivers just what is promised in the company’s mission statement: adventure and freedom. And a whole lot of leather.

Dove - Mission Statement Example

14. Dove: Help women everywhere develop a positive relationship with the way they look, helping them raise their self-esteem and realize their full potential

What started as a single product — the Dove Beauty Bar — grew into a major line of personal care products used by women around the world.

Dove mission statement :   Help women everywhere develop a positive relationship with the way they look, helping them raise their self-esteem and realize their full potential.

Why it works:  The company’s mission statement combines seamlessly with their vision statement, which says, “We believe beauty should be a source of confidence, and not anxiety.”

Dove delivers on this promise with its far-reaching body positivity campaigns, research initiatives, and self-esteem projects.

Livestrong - Mission Statement Example

15. Livestrong: Which everyday cancer problem will we fix today?

Livestrong is a nonprofit organization that supports people living with or affected by cancer.

Livestrong mission statement :   Which everyday cancer problem will we fix today?

Why it works:  Because selling products and services to consumers isn’t part of the equation, nonprofit mission statements differ from those of their for-profit counterparts. But we included Livestrong here, because it has such a unique mission statement.

Very few mission statements are in the form of a question. This was very intentional on the part of Livestrong. As the company puts it on their mission page, “We have a Mission Question, not a Mission Statement, because we believe that we can only achieve the best solutions through asking the right questions.”

TED - Mission Statement Example

16. TED: Spread ideas.

The media company solicits keynote-style talks from some of the best minds and makes these available, for free, via video and through their podcast,

Ted mission statement :   Spread ideas.

Why it works:  This is another company mission statement example that makes the rounds on the best-of lists. You can almost imagine the lengthy thought process that transpired as TED execs winnowed their mission statement down to just two words. Two words! But that’s all they need.

This mission statement doesn’t say they are “creating opportunities for…” or “gathering the brightest minds to…” They do all of these things as well. But at the very core of the organization, their mission is to spread ideas.

In those two words, they say it all.

FAQs about company mission statements

These company mission statement examples are just a sample of what’s possible when a company really takes the time to craft a thoughtful mission statement. To help you write yours, here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about mission statements.

What should a company mission statement include?

A company mission statement should include one or two strong, well-written sentences that talk about why a company exists, the value it brings to its customers, the core beliefs that drive its work, and what sets it apart from other companies doing similar work.

What are the 3 parts of a mission statement?

The three parts of a mission statement are:

  • Mission and purpose:  the main reason a company exists. Its purpose in a broad sense.
  • Values:  the core values that drive everyday decisions and behavior in the company.
  • Goals:  what the company hopes to achieve by sticking close to its mission and values.

What is a strong mission statement?

A strong mission statement is short and actionable. The strongest company mission statements are written in accessible language (no corporate speak) that reflects a company’s unique culture and voice. A good mission statement is lofty, but also ties back to a company’s everyday business practices.

What is Coca Cola’s mission statement?

Coca Cola’s mission statement is  “to refresh the world in mind, body, and spirit, to inspire moments of optimism and happiness through our brands and actions, and to create value and make a difference.”

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mission statement of a business plan

Small Business Trends

30 mission statement examples and how to write one for your business.

There’s even a template to follow at the end that’ll help you write your company mission statement in no time at all. By crafting a compelling mission statement, you can articulate your business’s purpose, values, and direction, setting the foundation for your company’s success and differentiation in the competitive market.

Table of Contents

30 Amazing Mission Statement Examples

Tesla’s mission statement reflects the company’s focus on sustainability and its commitment to driving change in the energy sector. It inspires stakeholders to work towards a shared goal of creating a more sustainable future.

Amazon’s mission statement emphasizes its focus on the customer and reflects the company’s commitment to innovation and technology. It communicates the company’s purpose in a memorable way.

The Walt Disney Company

Microsoft’s mission statement emphasizes its focus on innovation and technology, while also reflecting its commitment to helping people and organizations achieve their goals.

Ben & Jerry’s

“To make, distribute and sell the finest quality all-natural ice cream and euphoric concoctions with a continued commitment to incorporating wholesome, natural ingredients and promoting business practices that respect the Earth and the Environment.”

General Electric

General Electric’s mission statement reflects its commitment to innovation and technology, while also emphasizing its focus on improving people’s lives. It communicates the company’s values and purpose in a memorable and inspiring way.

Procter & Gamble

Southwest airlines.

Southwest Airlines’ mission statement reflects its commitment to providing affordable and friendly air travel. It communicates the company’s values and purpose in a memorable and inspiring way.

“To connect the world through the most innovative, reliable, and secure payment network – enabling individuals, businesses, and economies to thrive.”

Apple’s mission statement reflects its focus on innovation and technology, while also emphasizing its commitment to improving people’s lives. It communicates the company’s values and purpose in a memorable and inspiring way.

American Express

Universal health services, inc..

Universal Health Services, Inc.’s mission statement reflects its commitment to providing quality healthcare services that meet the needs of patients, physicians, purchasers, employees, and investors. It communicates the company’s values and purpose in

What is a Mission Statement?

Why your company’s mission statement is so important.

Just like a mission statement, a business needs to establish a process for putting down plans on paper to make sure they are carried out. Creating a one-page marketing plan and even conducting a SWOT analysis are all part of this process. If you establish these disciplines early, you will continue to improve your business and better chance of ensuring the success of your business.

How to Write a Good Mission Statement

A company mission statement should be crafted with your target audience in mind. Consider who your company serves and what problem you’re solving for them. Your mission statement should be clear and concise, using language that resonates with your target audience.

Common Mistakes to Avoid Writing Your Company’s Mission Statement

One common mistake when writing a company’s mission statement is being too broad or generic. A mission statement that is too general or lacks specificity may fail to communicate the unique value proposition of the company, and may not inspire or motivate stakeholders.

Benefits of Having a Mission Statement

Challenges of developing a mission statement, mission statements vs. vision statements.

Mission and vision statements are essential components of any company’s identity and strategic direction. While both are designed to guide decision-making and communicate the company’s values and goals, there are distinct differences between the two. Here are some key differences between mission statements and vision statements:

Use this Mission Statement Template to Create Your Own

The first step in creating a mission statement is to define your company’s purpose. This includes what your company does, why it exists, and the impact it seeks to have on the world. A clear understanding of your purpose is essential for crafting an effective mission statement.

After drafting your mission statement, review it carefully and seek feedback from stakeholders. Revise and refine as necessary, ensuring that it accurately reflects your company’s purpose, target audience, and values. A well-crafted mission statement is an essential tool for communicating your company’s identity and inspiring stakeholders to work towards a shared goal.

No.StepsKey PointsDetails
1Define Your Company's Purpose- Identify what your company does and why it exists- Clearly articulate the impact your company aims to have on the world
2Identify Your Target Audience- Consider who your company serves- Understand the problem your company is solving for your target audience
3Consider Your Values- Determine your company's core values- Reflect on the principles that guide your company's behavior and decision-making
4Draft a Statement- Craft a clear, concise, and memorable statement- Summarize your company's purpose, target audience, and core values in an inspiring and motivating way
5Revise and Refine- Seek feedback from stakeholders- Carefully review and revise the mission statement to ensure it accurately reflects your company's purpose, target audience, and values

The Template in Action

Integrating your mission statement into business operations, start writing your mission statement today.

A compelling mission statement is a defining piece of a business plan, articulating the company’s purpose, values, and goals. It sets the direction for the organization, guides decision-making processes, and communicates its purpose to stakeholders.

Remember that a mission statement is a dynamic expression of your company’s ethos, and revisiting and refining it over time can ensure its continued relevance and effectiveness in guiding your business toward a bright and prosperous future.

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Home » Business Plans

How to Write a Business Plan Mission and Vision Statement [Sample Template]

Are you currently writing a business plan? If YES, here’s an in-depth guide and sample template on how to write a workable mission & vision statement for a business. A vision and mission statement are some of the most important requisite for business success and sustainability, but unfortunately, most entrepreneurs and small business owners run their business without these two thing out of ignorance.

What is a Mission and Vision Statement?

A mission and vision statement ( more commonly called a mission statement or a vision statement ) is a brief sentence that declares the goals that a business plans to achieve in the future. Like a compass guides a ship, it guides a business to success by providing continuously inspiring its stakeholders in their daily operations and strategic moves.

A mission statement helps you plan your business effectively. It provides the destination for your journey to business success. Of course, without a destination, you can’t plan a route. Before we discuss the steps involved in developing a mission statement for your business, let’s look at the components of a mission statement and why you really need a mission statement for your business.

Today, I will be sharing with you an underground secret to building a business from scratch. This secret is one of the contributing factors to the success of any business; yet, it’s often ignored. This secret is nothing more than a “ Business Mission Statement. ”

“The thing I really care about is the mission; making the world open.” – Mark Zuckerberg

The importance of a mission statement can never be over emphasized. I have seen so many startups without a mission; even some established firms also make the mistake of operating without a mission.

“Being an entrepreneur, I have come to realize that all successful businesses are driven by three fundamentals. One is the cash flow, two is the team and three is the mission. Of these three, the mission is the most important.” – Ajaero Tony Martins

Now what has a mission statement got to do with building a business? What’s the impact of a mission statement on an entrepreneur undergoing the entrepreneurial process? Is a mission statement a source of ? While I am not going to answer these questions directly, the following points will help you further understand why you need to develop a mission statement for your business?

Why Your Business needs a Mission Statement

1. The mission is the foundation on which your business will be built. It’s the true purpose of your business and that purpose is reflected in the mission statement. Without a strong mission statement, you don’t have a true business. All you have is just a profit making venture that will soon be wiped out with time.

“To turn really interesting ideas and fledging ideas into a company that can continue to innovate for years, it requires a lot of disciplines.” – Steve Jobs

2. The entrepreneurial spirit is found in the mission statement. When I look at the mission statement of any business, I get a peep into the life of the entrepreneur that founded that business. The entrepreneurial spirit is what drives the entrepreneur forward. If the mission is strong, your spirit will be strong towards the pursuit of your goal.

“The IKEA spirit is strong and living reality. Simplicity in our behavior gives us strength. Simplicity and humbleness characterize us in our relations with each others, our suppliers and our customers.” – Ingvar Kamprad

3. Your mission statement is the bond binding you, your team, employees and your customers to the business. Take away the mission and other key elements will fall apart. Your mission also has the power to attract other like-minded individuals and entities to your cause. The reason is that people with the same mission align together; more like birds of the same feather flocking together.

4. With a strong mission, your business will weather any storm. Take a look at businesses that has been around for over 100 years and you will see businesses with a strong mission. As an example:

  • General Electric has stood the test of time because the spirit of its founder “ Thomas Edison ” continues to guide the company through its mission.
  • Henry Ford’s mission statement was: “ To democratize the automobile ” and that mission has kept the Ford Motor Company going.
  • Aliko Dangote’s mission statement goes: “ Providing your basic need ” and this mission drives the Dangote Group to dominate the commodities market of
  • The Rich Dad Company; founded by Robert Kiyosaki keeps waxing strong because of its mission, which is “ To elevate the financial well being of humanity .”

By contrast; I have come to observe that when a company forgets its mission, its starts to lose its relevance. The bond holding the business will be broken and good customers will leave, employees will resign and the business will dwindle. Just as the case of the Dot com burst, many profitable Dot com companies went under because they forgot their mission.

3 Components of a Mission and Vision Statement

1.  a vision.

This, simply put, states the impact you envision your business having on the world in years to come. You can have more than a single statement in here, but don’t go beyond three. Gloss it over to make sure anyone who reads it feels at least one of inspiration, hope, commitment, and awe.

In addition, your vision statement must be compelling, detailed, and reflective of the intended end outcome. Avoid one that is bland, generic, uninspiring, or unreasonable. An example of a good vision statement is that of Amazon:

“Our vision is to be earth’s most customer centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.”

2.  A mission statement

This is a brief statement that states the important goal or purpose that your business is poised to achieve. In other words, it’s a single sentence stating why your business exists in a convincing manner. Keep your mission statement specific and concise ( the shorter it is, the better ), make it connect with both employees and stakeholders, and make it highlight your value proposition. Don’t make it too long, generic, or confusing. An example of a good mission statement is that of Nike:

“To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world.”

Here’s another example of a mission statement:

“To contribute to development of value-added agricultural businesses . ”

3. Core values

These outline the principles and values that the stakeholders in a business will follow in their bid to achieve their vision. They also specify the bounds or limits that the stakeholders must watch while trying to actualize the mission. The following are examples of core values:

  • Respect and protect the environment
  • Offer high quality products that are safe for consumers
  • Meet the ever-changing needs of consumers
  • Practice highly ethical business standards

If your business is going to stand the test of time, then you will have to build it upon a strong mission. With the above in mind, let’s now look at the steps involved in developing a mission and visions statement.

How to Write a Mission and Vision Statement for a Business Plan

Please bear in mind that you are learning as much of yourself each day as you are about your customer. So, don’t feel that anything you state here is etched in stone and cannot be changed. The more you understand your customer and the market, the more necessary it would become for you to shift grounds accordingly. But you need to state here what you have to offer at the moment. This will be a starting point for any changes you may need to effect later ( as your business grows ).

1.  Sit down in a quiet spot and reflect upon your thoughts

Ask yourself what drives you forward? What keeps you motivated? When you have figured out the answer to these questions, put it down in writing.

2.  Ask yourself how best you can serve your customers

What will your business stand for in the heart of your customers? What will be the ultimate benefit your customers can derive from your business? When you figure the answer to these questions out, put it down in writing.

3. Brainstorm for your vision statement

The vision is the most important component of your mission statement. Simply put, this is a picture or idea of what you plan to achieve in future . A vision statement is always concise and easy to remember, and for this reason, every stakeholder in a business can easily focus on it; and their decisions and activities are directed towards achieving the vision. Here is a good example of a vision statement:

“ Creating a vibrant rural economy driven by value-added agriculture. “

Once you get one down, then getting other components becomes very easy. To find the best vision statement for your business, simply ask yourself the question, “Why does this business exist?” Present answers from various angles, and you will find your mission statement among them.

4.  Get down your mission statement

As stated earlier, your mission statement is that action sentence that describes how you will achieve your vision. Finding this is much easier once you have found your vision statement. If you are stuck, just do it this way: If your vision is “A diabetes-free society” , then simply add the word “ To ” and another suitable verb to convert it to an action sentence. And there you will have your mission statement.

Using the same vision, you will get “To bring about a diabetes-free society .” You can go further by tweaking it, so that you will have something like: “To manufacture products that can cure diabetes effectively and permanently.” You get it now?

5.  List your core values

First off, you need to clarify your values. This means taking into account all the various stakeholders that your business is ( or will be ) accountable to—including investors, customers, employees, and suppliers. Now, consider how you would like to ideally conduct business with each of these stakeholders. Start making a list and your core values should start to emerge.

These are the various steps you will follow in your quest to achieve your vision. Brainstorm for as many as possible, list them down, and the prune your list down to as few as possible without leaving out any important ones. Now, let’s look at some additional tips that you will need to keep in mind when preparing your mission and vision statement.

4 Extra Success Tips for Developing a Business Plan Mission and Vision Statement

  • Your mission statement must be brief and simple. Being succinct as demanded by a mission statement isn’t easy. And you may need to go through several hours of tweaking and editing before arriving at the perfect sentence. Though short, your mission statement must capture the very essence of what your business plans to achieve. The fewer words the better. Use just only the few words needed to pass the message without leaving out any vital details.
  • Your mission statement must be in tune with your vision, and both sentences must blend to form a single thought.
  • There’s no rule that says you must get it perfectly at once. You can keep review your mission statement later, if necessary.
  • Your mission and vision statements must give the reader an insight, a covert one, at least into what you offer. This is more important if the name of your business doesn’t suggest what products or services you’re offering.

If you follow the guidelines I shared in this post, you will prepare a perfect vision and mission statement that will drive your business to success. Now I want you to know that no one can help you develop a mission statement. You alone can develop your mission and as a final note, it’s worthwhile you know that of the entire business system, the mission is the most important.

  • Go to Chapter 8 Part C: Writing your Business Plans Goals and Objectives
  • Go Back to Chapter 7 : H ow to Write a Business Plan Executive Summary
  • Go Back to Introduction and Table of Content

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How to write an effective mission statement (with free template)

How to write an effective mission statement article banner image

A mission statement explains your company’s purpose. You should write a mission statement when starting a business so you have a clear idea of what you stand for. Read on to learn how to write an effective mission statement that can help you tackle company goals.

It’s natural to face challenges when leading teams and managing projects, and one way to push forward despite the hard times is to remember your “why.” Your company mission defines why you do what you do, who you do it for, and the impact you’ll create by doing it. When you know your mission, you’ll feel good about where your company is going, even through ups and downs. 

What is a mission statement?

A mission statement is a brief declaration of your company’s what, who, and why. You should share this statement with everyone in your organization so team members understand your collective goals. While a mission statement isn’t specifically for marketing, you’ll likely share it externally as well. This is why it’s important to write it eloquently.

Your mission statement is a foundational piece of content you can use as a jumping-off point for various other materials, including:

Value propositions

Business plans

Company vision statement

Once you’ve solidified your core values and initiatives, you’ll have an easier time expanding on those ideas and getting the message out to your audience.

5 steps to write a mission statement

Your mission statement isn’t something you can craft by yourself. Before you sit down to draft it, recruit other senior and executive leaders at your company who have a sense of what you’re aiming for. Together, use the steps below to get to the root of what your company stands for and the message you want to spread.

[Inline illustration] how to write a mission statement (Infographic)

1. Answer fundamental questions

To figure out what your mission statement should say, you’ll need to answer fundamental questions about your business. 

What do we do?

What do we create?

Who is our audience?

How do we make a difference?

Once you’ve answered the basics, consider questions that can help you craft a strong mission statement.

How do we differ from others in the industry?

How can we make our mission statement stand out from our competitors?

Can we use other mission statements for inspiration?

Consider having each member of your mission statement tiger team answer these questions separately, then pool your answers together. Your mission statement should be evergreen, so think about it in a way that incorporates business growth. It’s important to consider what your company’s purpose is in the context of what your future might be. 

2. Use your answers to brainstorm copy

Now that you have the ideas for your mission statement, you need the right words. Use brainstorming techniques to help you and the other leaders at your company come with creative ways to express yourselves. The goal is to inspire your team without sounding cliché or overly complex.

Some helpful brainstorming techniques include:

Mind-mapping: Mind mapping is a visual brainstorming technique you can use on your own or with your team. Start with one word or idea and use it to inspire other ideas. You’ll need a large piece of paper or whiteboard to write down a topic. Then, draw lines connecting tangential words or ideas to it.

Brain-netting: Brain-netting is great for remote collaboration , and it involves brain dumping ideas virtually, whether on a Slack channel, Google Doc, or through your project management tool . Team members can add ideas whenever inspiration strikes, and the list will be ever-evolving. 

3. Write your first draft

Now that you have solid ideas about what to put in your mission statement and creative ways to express those ideas, you can start experimenting with what sounds best. The following formulas can help you get started:

To [contribution/goal] so [impact] .

Our mission is to [contribution/goal] by [what you offer/how you do it] for [target audience] so [impact] .

To build/offer [what you offer/how you do it] for [target audience] to [contribution/goal] and [impact] .

For example, if you work for a content marketing company, here’s how your first draft might look:

To increase the value and visibility of content so companies can build strong relationships with their audiences . 

Our mission is to increase the value and visibility of content by offering content marketing services for companies so they can build strong relationships with their audiences . 

To offer content marketing services for companies to increase the value and visibility of their content and help them build strong relationships with their audiences. 

4. Ask for feedback

Draft a few versions of your mission statement so you can ask for feedback from current team members. Because the mission statement applies to everyone, it’s nice to include everyone in the feedback process—even if executive feedback gets slightly more weight. Don’t rush through the writing process. Take your time and get your mission statement to a place everyone is comfortable with.

Collaborate with your team by holding a Q&A session or by sending out surveys to ask which version of the mission statement resonates with them most. That way, once you complete your statement, you’ll feel confident that the result was a team effort. 

5. Revise and share

After collecting feedback, revise your mission statement as needed. Then, finalize it and share it with the rest of the organization. You can also include it in your business plan and share it on your website. 

Your mission statement explains your company’s purpose to those working for the company, stakeholders who may get involved with the company, and customers or clients who may spend money at the company. While you shouldn’t craft your mission statement for selling, it’s something you should be proud of and will likely want to display.

Examples of mission statements

Most companies share their mission statements with the public, either front and center on their websites, or in an easily searchable location. By making your mission statement visible to the clients and customers, companies show what they stand for and what they strive to achieve—both as an internal workforce and with the products or services they sell.

[Inline illustration] Mission statement examples: Asana, Paypal, Patagonia (Example)

“To help humanity thrive by enabling the world’s teams to work together effortlessly.” 

At Asana , our mission statement explains who we serve and what we want our impact to be on the world. While we have various goals we work toward as a company, our mission statement is our guiding principle among all others. 

Let's do great things together. Join our team.

“To build the web’s most convenient, secure, cost-effective payment solution.” 

PayPal’s statement is more product-focused, but it’s still effective. Businesses may imply the impact they hope to make by explaining the unique features of their product offering. PayPal’s mission is to create the best product possible for customers because doing so will improve lives.

3. Patagonia

“Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.” 

Patagonia’s mission statement is complex, but it shows that their company has many layers beyond the clothing they sell. While on the surface, Patagonia offers outdoor gear, they set themselves apart from other companies by keeping the environment front of mind in all they do. 

Free mission statement template

Using a mission statement template can help you centralize your company’s most important information. Below, you’ll see how a content marketing company would’ve answered fundamental questions about their business and used those answers to design their mission statement with the provided formula.

[Inline illustration] Mission statement example: Content marketing company (Example)

Use the free mission statement template below to answer relevant questions about your company’s values and goals.

Why is a mission statement important?

Your mission statement is a building block for everything your team does. When you get it right, it leads to a stronger team dynamic in the workplace , more successful projects, and happier customers. Your mission statement should:

Define your brand to team members: Give your team clarity on what product you’re creating, why you’re creating it, and who you’re creating it for.

Present your brand to others: Tell others outside of your company what your team strives for everyday. 

Uphold values and objectives: Refer to your mission statement when you need to hold yourself and your team accountable to your ultimate goals.

Mission statement vs. vision statement

Many people use a mission statement and vision statement interchangeably, and while some companies combine the two, they have different meanings. A mission statement is your company’s “why” statement—in other words, your company’s purpose. Consider your mission statement as what you’re currently trying to achieve.

A vision statement can be a “how” statement or a future-focused statement. It should paint a broad picture of how you want to achieve your mission. Sometimes, companies incorporate the vision statement within their mission statement so they can state and explain their mission simultaneously. 

For example, Google's combined mission and vision statement is:

“To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” 

Mission statement: To organize the world’s information…

Vision statement: ...and make it universally accessible and useful.

While LinkedIn has separate mission and vision statements:

Mission statement: Connect the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful.

Vision statement: Create economic opportunity for every member of the global workforce.

Use a mission statement to drive company success

Your mission statement is the launchpad for your company’s success. It states what you want to achieve and serves as a constant reminder of your purpose. But the only way to accomplish your mission is with small, everyday actions. A goal is just a dream until you put a process in place.

With work management software , you can set up workflows , schedules, and tasks that align with your mission statement and make your purpose a reality. Asana helps you create a purposeful and productive work experience for all your team members by giving them the clarity they need to achieve their goals.

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Mission statements, what is a mission statement.

Your mission clearly states why your organization exists. A company’s mission statement helps clearly articulate your core purpose. It is the summation of your organization’s core reason for being, answering the question, “Why are we here?” A mission needs to boldly state why you exist, and what impact you hope your organization has on the world. The best mission statements clearly express these things to your customers in a way that resonates and engages with them.

When developing your strategic plan, it is important to not overlook the foundation of your plan, including your mission statement. Every organization should have one! Crafting a mission statement may be challenging at first, but with the help of our guide, you’ll be well on your way to making your own great mission statement!

Free Canvas & Guide to Creating a Mission Statement

Whether you’re writing a new mission statement or revisiting your old one as part of a strategic planning process, we’ve created a canvas you can use to create a mission statement that inspires your team. Get started on creating your mission statement today, and download our guide for free!

Why Are Mission Statements Important in Strategic Planning?

A good mission statement is a foundational element in any strategic plan because it helps define your organization’s core purpose, serving as a vantage point from which to look down the road. Combined with your vision statement , it helps define why your organization exists and what you stand for.

Mission statements are sometimes confused and grouped with different kinds of foundational statements or forgotten about entirely. Some of the common planning elements that mission statements get mixed up with are vision statements and value statements.

All three are closely linked but serve entirely different functions and roles in your strategic framework. Below, we explain how the vision and values elements compare against a mission statement, and how they can all be used together to complement your mission statement for a strong foundation to your strategic plan.

Mission Statements Versus Vision Statements – The Differences

While a company’s future vision statement describes the organization’s future state, the mission directly relates to the vision by articulating the greater reason why that vision matters. A powerful mission keeps the organization on track and rallies around the direction the organization is headed. Learn how to write your mission statement here .

Mission Statement – Why You Exist

  • States why your organization exists and articulates your core purpose.
  • Written in the present tense.
  • Helps define the area where you play.

Vision Statement – Where You’re Going

  • States your organization’s bold vision for the future and why that is important.
  • Written in a future tense.
  • Helps create the roadmap for the future.
Pro Tip: Language Matters. We always recommend mission statements be written in present tense using concrete language. Writing in present tense allows your mission to be easily deciphered from your vision statement, which is written in future tense . Solid language leaves little room for interpretation of what exactly your mission statement means.

How Your Vision and Mission Statement Informs & Creates Strategy

Mission and vision statements are really two sides of the same coin. Your mission statement tells them where you are and why you exist, while your vision statement describes your desired future state or aspirational impact.

These two elements combine to inform and create your strategy, which is your plan for how to overcome your current and potential future competitors. The mission and vision are essentially your corporate aspirations, and your strategy is your meticulous plan for achieving it. Because these two statements used in tandem define why you exist now and what you aspire to offer in the future, this can make it easier to pinpoint your unique value proposition within the market.

A vision statement also helps you outline the actions and steps you need to take to make your vision a reality. If you can anchor your plan to your mission and vision, you’ll never lose your direction, even if you must pivot your strategy periodically to respond to different market or environmental conditions and customer feedback.

Mission Statement Versus Core Values Statement

As we’ve stated earlier, a business’s mission statement is all about defining the company’s purpose and objectives. It’s a concise statement that outlines what the business is trying to achieve and how it aims to achieve it.

A value statement , on the other hand, is focused on the core values and beliefs that are central to the organization’s culture. While these statements may serve different purposes, they are not in opposition of one another. Ideally, mission and values statements should be created in tandem, as they complement each other quite well.

For example, an organization’s mission statement may be focused on growth and expansion, while its values might include ideals such as honesty and fairness. By combining these two statements, you get a clear picture of what the organization hopes to achieve and how it aims to do so, while also highlighting the values it holds dear.

Mission Statements – Why You Exist

  • Are usually written in the present tense.

Values Statements – How You’ll Live Out Your Mission

  • Clarifies what your organization stands for, what it believes in, and how you expect your team to behave.
  • Are typically written in present tense.

How Your Mission and Value Statements Complement Each Other

Value statements are the guiding principles your organization has chosen to live by, which give direction to the company culture and behaviors. Core values help businesses remain true to their mission and purpose by providing a framework for decision-making and actions.

A mission statement provides a sense of direction, whereas values give employees a sense of pride and purpose in working to achieve that mission. So, while your mission statement helps to guide the direction of your company, your value statement creates the behaviors that keep you in line with your mission.

Together, these statements complement one another and form a solid foundation for any successful organization. The mission statement outlines the company’s primary objectives, while the core values ensure that the company is meeting its goals the right way. By aligning a organization’s mission statement with its core values, everyone involved in the company, from the management down to the customers, can easily understand its objectives and what it stands for.

Mistakes to Avoid When Drafting Your Mission Statement

Crafting the perfect mission statement can be challenging and potentially lead to pitfalls when not approached carefully. Here are some mistakes to avoid when creating a mission statement:

Being Too Vague or Generic

It’s important to make sure you’re writing a mission statement that is unique to your organization and sets you apart from your competitors. Avoid generic and bland statements like “highest standards” or “quality customer service delivered.” Instead, explain what those statements would mean in the context of your organization.

Pro Tip: You may also want to avoid phrases that feel particularly jargon-y or industry specific. Your mission statement is meant to be public-facing, so ensure that your mission statement is understandable to the general public.

Focusing Solely on Profits

We get it. Of course, we all want to make money and ensure that our business or organization is successful and turning a profit. But is that really what your mission is? Your mission should, ideally, be impact driven. Think about the needs you identified that needed to be fulfilled that inspired you to start your organization in the first place. That’s what your mission statement should stem from.

Forgetting to Consider Stakeholder Input

Unless you’re running a one-person operation, your team and stakeholders should have input in the mission. Interview or conduct surveys with your employees to gain their insight and opinions. You can then elect a smaller, more central committee to come together and find consensus on common themes and craft your mission statement from there.

Neglecting to Update the Mission Statement as the Organization Evolves

Your mission statement needs to reflect your organization’s purpose, above all else. Although you wouldn’t change your mission statement yearly or even bi-yearly, don’t be afraid to update or make tweaks on your mission statement. If your organization grows or changes to the point where your original mission statement doesn’t quite fit anymore, don’t be afraid to update!

Not Reflecting Your Company’s Values

This should go without saying, but a mission statement should clearly express and reflect your organization’s values and purpose in a way that resonates with your team and your customers. Make sure your mission statement describes and accurately reflects your company’s identity.

By being mindful of these potential missteps, your organization can create a mission statement that accurately reflects your values and goals while inspiring your team and community.

What Makes Mission Statements Powerful?

Mission statements help your entire organization clearly understand its core purpose and why you do what you do. As a leader, it’s important to have clarity and a cohesive understanding of why your organization exists. Great leadership requires connecting your organization’s core purpose and vision of the future to your team’s day-to-day activities.

As leaders, we are put under a lot of undue stress to generate a perfect, short, sing-songy mission statement. The result is meaningless drivel, leaving everyone irritated and underwhelmed. The goal is to bring inspiration and innovation to the company for the long term. Don’t let being pragmatic get in the way of this important stage of building a strong foundation of consensus for the organization.

Mission Statement

Video Transcript – Video Title XYZ

Hi, my name is Erica Olsen.

Today’s whiteboard session is on how to write a mission statement. Mission statements are foundational to any strategic plan. You normally build one after you develop your SWOT. And before you go into the rest of your planning process, it’s foundational because it answers the question, “Why do we exist.”

It clearly explains the space that we play in what’s in and what’s out of what we do. And it’s not where we’re going, which is vision. So, let’s break it down.

We’ll use this example to explain the components of a mission statement. We’ll use this checklist to talk about what makes a good mission statement. And we’ll walk through a simple process to create yours.

So let’s jump in.

The example we have up here is Google’s. And we love using Google’s Google’s examples because they’re, they’re great. And why not borrow from the best.

So, starting with our mission, I like to start with our mission, because it gives us a place to go and keeps us thinking about mission, you might get rid of it later, but start it there. It has a verb with present tense to organize. We explain what we do organize the world’s information for whom, in this case, the world?

And what’s the benefit to us existing, what’s the benefit to the world to make information universally accessible, and useful? Really straightforward. We know mission statements are not that easy to write. So, here’s a checklist to make sure that yours is great.

Starting with, it needs to be original. This is really clearly original to Google; they didn’t rip it off from somebody else. It doesn’t sound like anybody else’s mission statement. It sounds like Google’s mission statement. So, make sure yours is original.

Connect with staff, a great mission statement. And you know, yours is great when every single staff member wakes up in the morning and knows that their purpose and the reason, they come to work every day is expressed in your mission statement.

And to do that, it needs to be memorable. Memorable means short and concise. And of course, that’s the balance to strike with a great mission statement. So, here’s your litmus test. It needs to fit on a t shirt, and your staff would wear it that achieves those two goals, you know, you’ve got a great mission statement.

So how do you write one, sometimes it can be hard. So it’s great to get input or ideas from your organization. So, gather staff input, if you’d like via survey, or maybe focus groups, take all that information, synthesize it down and create a couple of versions, you can do it yourself or use one of those folks in your organization who loves to copyright and have them write a couple of different versions.

Take those versions and either have your planning team pick one or put them out to your organization and have people vote on them. So that simple process will help you not go in all kinds of different directions and spend forever doing mission statement development.

With that, I hope this helps you write yours. Thanks for tuning in.

If time isn’t dedicated to articulating your mission on the front-end before developing strategy, the result will likely be goals and objectives without a crystal-clear strategic direction.

A Good Mission Statement the Following Elements:

  • Label: We like to start with “Our mission…”
  • Verb: Use an action verb in the present tense.
  • For Whom: Describe who you do it for.
  • Result: What is the result or benefit of your work?
  • What You Do: Briefly state what you do and how.

Mission Statements Answer At least One of These Core Questions

What is our organization’s reason for existing.

A mission helps clearly articulate your organization’s reason for existing. At the absolute minimum, your mission statement should answer this question above all else: What’s your core purpose?

Example: “LinkedIn – To connect the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful.”

Why Is It Special to Work for This Organization?

The best way to answer this question is to connect to the heart of your employees, customers, or the population you serve. Be compelling, and let people understand and connect with your core purpose. How does your reason for existing impact people in a special way, or why do your employees show up to work every day?

Example: “Tesla – To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.”

What Is Our Business and What Are We Trying to Accomplish on Behalf of Whom?

Some mission statements benefit from clearly stating who benefits from your business, or what you’re setting out to accomplish on behalf of whom. Who does your purpose impact the most and why?

Example: “Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

More mission statement examples can be found here.

Checklist for Good Mission Statements

When evaluating the quality of your current or newly drafted mission statement, it’s important your company’s mission statement meets these four simple criteria:

  • Your Mission Must Be Foundational: It clearly states why your organization or business exists.
  • It’s Original: It’s unique to your organization. If you were to read the mission statements of all the organizations in your industry, yours would be different than your competition.
  • It’s Memorable: Memorable = motivating to employees, prospective employees and customers.
  • It Fits on a T-Shirt: Peter Drucker famously advised that your mission statement should be short and compelling enough to fit on a t-shirt your staff would actually wear.

Other Mission Statement Tips

If you are refreshing your mission statement, complete your swot first.

Mission statements should be developed after completing the SWOT analysis , and before going into the rest of the planning process. This allows your team to be grounded and in alignment with where your organization is today and what the organization’s strengths and contributions are.

The mission statement motivates and inspires staff. Every single staff member knows that their purpose is defined in the mission statement. (e.g. Starbucks’ mission: To inspire and nurture the human spirit — one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.)

A Great Mission Statement Can Be Easily Recited at a Party

Develop the mission statement on a “party level”—it can quickly and briefly be understood by people at a party or on an airplane. The statement gives a profoundly simple focus for everything the team does as an organization. (e.g. Marine Stewardship Council’s mission: To safeguard the world’s seafood supply by promoting the best environmental choices.)

Now that you’ve finished your mission statement, writing your core values and vision is up next.

Get Started on Creating Your Mission Statement

Mission Statement FAQs

What questions do you need to answer to create a mission statement?

Answering these three questions will help create a mission statement:

  • What is our organization’s reason for existing?
  • Why is it special to work for this organization?
  • What is our business and what are we trying to accomplish on behalf of whom?

What are the 5 elements of a mission statement?

The five parts of a mission statement are Label + Verb in Present Tense + Who You Serve + Result You Wish to Achieve or Reason for Existing + What You Do

What is a mission statement?

The definition of a mission statement is a concise description of your organization’s core purpose, answering the question, “why do we exist?”. A mission needs to boldly state why you exist, and why you do what you do. The best mission statements express your core purpose and why you exist with clarity.

How are mission statements and vision statements different?

A mission statement defines why your organization exists. A vision statement expresses where your organization is going in the future. They work together to express your reason for existing and how you’re setting out to change the world.

How do you know if you have a good mission statement?

Patrick Lencioni said that a mission statement should be able to fit on a t-shirt, and that your staff would want to wear that t-shirt.

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mission statement of a business plan

Ownr Blog  > Ownrship 101  > Business Stages  > Managing Your Business  > Marketing  > How to Write an Effective Mission Statement for Your Business

How to Write an Effective Mission Statement for Your Business

Ownr Author

Writing a mission statement is a fundamental step for any business. A good mission statement effectively communicates to customers, investors, employees, and other businesses who you are, what you do, and why you do it. In this guide, we describe what a mission statement is, provide some mission statement examples to inspire you, and walk you through how to create a mission statement for your own business.

  • What is a Mission Statement?

A mission statement is a clear, succinct explanation of the purpose of a business. You already know exactly what your business does and why, but your mission statement needs to summarize all of that information into a single sentence or short paragraph. 

Unless your company changes drastically, a business mission and mission statement usually don’t change too much over time.

  • What are the 3 Purposes of a Mission Statement?

A mission statement explains a business’s objectives, and in doing so, fulfills the following 3 specific purposes:

  • 1. Communicate Business Values

The main purpose of a mission statement is to clearly express what your business is all about, including your company values. A unique, memorable mission statement can provide you with a competitive advantage by differentiating you from the competition.

  • 2. Connect with Customers and Team Members

A good mission statement fosters genuine connection with potential customers and employees, which in turn can lead to growth in reputation, brand loyalty, and overall profitability.

  • 3. Guide Business Decisions

Being a business owner means having to make all kinds of decisions constantly, both big and small. Your mission statement should act as a guide you can refer back to for all manner of business decisions, as well as a means of evaluating how your company performance is measuring up to the goals you set.

  • Mission Statement Examples

To give you a better idea of exactly what mission statements involve, here are some mission statement examples from leading companies:

  • 1. Starbucks
To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighbourhood at a time.

Why it works: Starbucks is more than a utilitarian coffee shop where you go to get your caffeine fix and leave. They “inspire and nurture the human spirit” by inviting customers to linger and relax in coffee shops outfitted with art and inspiring images and stories about their coffee growers – their “partners”. To create a sense of community and provide a personal touch they ask for customers’ names, making customers feel welcome “one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.” We get a strong sense of Starbucks’ “why” from this mission statement.

To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world. *If you have a body, you are an athlete.

Why it works: Nike provides an excellent example of how you can employ your brand’s tone of voice effectively even in something as brief as a mission statement. Here, their famous commitment to being innovators in the sports apparel space is clear. This mission statement communicates that one of their core “whys” is to inspire. The best part, though, is the cheeky and unexpected asterisk accompanied by the inclusive declaration that “if you have a body, you are an athlete.” This perfectly communicates that Nike is committed to empowering all people, regardless of body type or athletic ability, in an unexpected mission statement structure that is both memorable and on-brand. 

To enrich the lives of everyone in WestJet’s world. We’re proud to have won awards that show us you think we do.

Why it works: This is a great example of a mission statement that reflects a commitment to both customers and employees. By stating that its mission is to “enrich the lives of everyone in Westjet’s world,” Westjet conveys its commitment to provide a satisfying work environment for employees, as well as a rewarding travel experience for customers. By using the word “world” instead of, say, community, it invokes the idea of travel and exploration, reminding us that “Westjet’s world” spans the globe. The second line offers proof their mission statement isn’t just empty words. Not only has the company won awards, they indicate gratitude to the reader for helping them with that achievement. 

To make work life simpler, more pleasant and more productive.

Why it works: Slack’s “why” is all about keeping things uncomplicated, and achieving more with ease. This mission statement shows that brevity can be very effective. It’s short even by mission statement standards, but it reflects the experience that Slack wants its users to have on the platform: simple, pleasant, and productive. The choice of the term “work life” instead of just “life reminds us that work is a major part of life, so we should aim to make it less stressful and complicated, something Slack achieves with their product. Finally, their stated aim to make work life “more pleasant”, evokes their generally positive outlook about work and their mission to make it even better.   

To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.

Why it works: Tesla is a car manufacturer known for its pioneering electric vehicles. Tesla is certainly a car manufacturer with a mission, and even people who don’t know much about cars can associate the name with electric vehicles. Their mission statement reflects a commitment to reducing the world’s reliance on fossil fuels by speeding up a transition that is already underway. Notice that they don’t even mention cars in their mission statement, but rather allude to driving with the word “accelerate”. It’s great copy that is subtle and clearly demonstrates their vehicles are a means to a greener world. 

To create a better everyday life for the many people

Why it works: Ikea’s products have changed the way people furnish their homes by offering sleek, innovative solutions for every room at an affordable price. Their mission statement indicates their broad range of products with the phrase “better everyday life”. And “the many people” conveys their mission to serve as many people in the world as possible. The slightly awkward use of “the” in “for the many people” cheekily invokes their Swedish origins and their often idiosyncratic ads, typically delivered in a Swedish accent. This mission statement is uncomplicated, just like their products. 

To be a company that inspires and fulfills your curiosity. 

Why it works: Since Sony makes such a wide range of electronics and technologies, from cameras and gaming consoles to robotics and AI, they keep it simple by focusing on one thread that runs through their enterprise: curiosity. Whether it’s curiosity about the world, art, music, technology, or entertainment, Sony conveys that their products will not only inspire their customers’ curiosity but also provide the means to fulfill it through innovative products, themselves the result of curiosity and ingenuity.  

  • 8. Microsoft
To enable people and businesses throughout the world to realize their full potential

Why it works: Microsoft’s mission statement is clear, simple, and to the point: their products are made for people and businesses, and by using Microsoft’s suite of products, individual and corporate customers can reach their full potential.  

To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.

Why it works: Google’s concise statement reveals an enormous mission: to catalogue all of the world’s information so that it can be accessed by anyone, anytime. This statement indicates Google’s commitment to democratizing access to information in an organized and easy-to-use manner. 

  • 10. Ben and Jerry’s
To create fantastic ice cream (for its own sake). 

Why it works: Ben and Jerry’s is known for its delicious, ever-expanding variety of ice cream flavours. Its mission statement explains what they do in simple terms: make fantastic ice cream. This clearly indicates their commitment to a delicious, high-quality product. The unique use of parentheses to explain why they do this—”for its own sake”—keeps the tone light and fun, and cheekily affirms that ice cream, itself, is inherently reason enough (as if to say, who doesn’t like ice cream?)

  • 11. sweetgreen
“Building healthier communities by connecting people to real food.”

This mission statement concisely informs the audience of the type of products they provide, while tying into sweetgreen’s broader commitments to animal welfare and becoming carbon neutral.

“Discover and spread ideas that spark conversation, deepen understanding, and drive meaningful change.”

TED’s mission statement effectively communicates their core idea: that sharing ideas can change the world for the better. It’s a lofty goal, but it seems more achievable because of the way they break it down.

“The mission of The Walt Disney Company is to entertain, inform and inspire people around the globe through the power of unparalleled storytelling, reflecting the iconic brands, creative minds and innovative technologies that make ours the world’s premier entertainment company.”

In their mission statement, Disney makes a point of first emphasizing the power of storytelling before moving on to graciously acknowledge and bring attention to the brands, employees, and technology that sets them apart from the competition.

“Giving people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.”

Meta makes it clear right off the bat that they are all about empowering their customers, giving them the ability to connect with consistent innovation and development.

  • 15. Penguin Random House
“To ignite a universal passion for reading by creating books for everyone. We believe that books, and the stories and ideas they hold, have the unique capacity to connect us, change us, and carry us toward a better future for generations to come.”

With their initial statement, Penguin Random House emphasizes that they serve everyone. They go on to explain how they believe that books can connect and change present and future generations. These values can be seen in their focus on equity, inclusion, and amplifying diverse voices.

“Amazon is guided by four principles: customer obsession rather than competitor focus, passion for invention, commitment to operational excellence, and long-term thinking. Amazon strives to be Earth’s most customer-centric company, Earth’s best employer, and Earth’s safest place to work. Customer reviews, 1-Click shopping, personalized recommendations, Prime, Fulfillment by Amazon, AWS, Kindle Direct Publishing, Kindle, Career Choice, Fire tablets, Fire TV, Amazon Echo, Alexa, Amazon Studios, and The Climate Pledge are some of the things pioneered by Amazon.”

Amazon opts for a lengthier mission statement that lists their business principles before expressing their desire to be not only the most customer-centric company, but also the best employer and safest place to work. They then list a number of innovations which may be recognizable to consumers, emphasizing their impressive market share. 

  • 17. YouTube
“Our mission is to give everyone a voice and show them the world. We believe that everyone deserves to have a voice, and that the world is a better place when we listen, share and build community through our stories.”

YouTube keeps their mission statement relatively simple, focusing on giving everyone a voice while providing access to all of the other voices around the world. They take it a step further by expressing the belief that sharing our stories and listening to others makes the world a better place.

“Keep Commerce Human Etsy is the global marketplace for unique and creative goods. It’s home to a universe of special, extraordinary items, from unique handcrafted pieces to vintage treasures. In a time of increasing automation, it’s our mission to keep human connection at the heart of commerce. That’s why we built a place where creativity lives and thrives because it’s powered by people. We help our community of sellers turn their ideas into successful businesses. Our platform connects them with millions of buyers looking for an alternative – something special with a human touch, for those moments in life that deserve imagination. As a company, we strive to lead with our guiding principles and to help spread ideas of sustainability and responsibility whose impact can reach far beyond our own business.”

Etsy’s statement is unique since they choose to summarize their mission in three words, before going into detail about what their business offers the consumer and how they support their sellers, all while emphasizing the human touch.

“We are revolutionizing commerce globally. With this mission as our North Star, we are aligned around one central vision: to make sending and receiving money, selling, and shopping simple, personalized, and secure. Our beliefs are the foundation for how we conduct business every day.”

This statement immediately expresses PayPal’s mission to revolutionize commerce around the world, going on to provide further context by mentioning what services they offer, emphasizing  keeping the experience simple and safe, and stating that these values guide their everyday operations. 

  • 23. Alzheimer’s Association 
“The Alzheimer’s Association leads the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support.”

The Alzheimer’s Association’s mission statement speaks to their future goal of eradicating Alzheimer’s and dementia, while succinctly stating the methods they use at present to achieve these goals. 

  • Why are Mission Statements Important?

A great mission statement can be a valuable tool to keep your business on track, especially when setting goals or making big decisions, ensuring your efforts remain aligned with what you want your business to accomplish. The ability to maintain a clear vision for your business approach is a trait that distinguishes the most successful businesses . 

In addition to helping guide business decisions, a mission statement can also serve to provide guidance and a sense of identity to employees.

  • Not Just for Internal Use

Potential customers, employees, or investors may look at your mission statement when determining whether to work with you. A well-written mission statement can make all the difference.

  • What to Include in Your Mission Statement

Your mission statement should be unique to your business, and what you include will depend on your particular focus and values. Typically, a mission statement includes a basic description of the company, its purpose, its goals, and can also cover how the business serves customers, employees, the community, and the world.

That said, here are the 3 main things you should include in a mission statement:

  • 1. What your Business Does

Anyone reading your mission statement should be able to tell what type of business you do.

  • 2. How your Business Achieves its Goals

Make sure to address what you’re doing differently and why people should choose your business over your competitor.

  • 3. Why you Do What you Do

Give people something to root for by talking about your larger purpose and why it matters.

  • How to Write a Mission Statement

Here’s a step-by-step process to help you create a mission statement:

  • Write some bullet points about what your business does, the product or service you offer, and your target audience .
  • List some of your core values, including what motivated you to start this business, and what principles guide your decision making.
  • Bring the two together by defining how your offering aligns with the values you’ve identified.
  • Finally, take what you’ve written and condense it into a straight-to-the-point mission statement. 
  • Keep it Concise

Part of the challenge of mission statement writing is figuring out how to say everything you want while keeping it brief. Remember, you can include additional information elsewhere: many leading companies have sections on their websites that go into further detail than the initial mission statement.

  • Mission Statement vs Vision Statement

A mission statement differs from a vision statement, although some companies may lump them together. While a mission statement focuses on the company’s fundamental purpose, a vision statement typically outlines where the company plans to be in the future and can provide more details on its strategy to get there.

If you’re looking to craft a vision statement, the Vision Statement module of Ownr’s free business plan generator, Blueprint contains examples to kickstart your imagination and help you build a compelling vision statement for your business.

Here are some vision statement examples to help you tell the difference:

  • Vision Statement Examples
  • 1. LinkedIn

“Create economic opportunity for every member of the global workforce.”

  • 2. Alzheimer’s Association 

“A world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia®”

  • 3. American Express

“Provide the world’s best customer experience every day.”

  • Mission Statement vs Purpose Statement

Some organizations write purpose statements in addition to mission statements. A purpose statement focuses on why a business came into existence in the first place. This may include mentioning a problem the business seeks to solve or a unique opportunity the business is leveraging. It can also be a bit longer and provide a brief summary of how the business came to be. 

  • How to Avoid the Pitfalls of Mission Statements

According to some experts, many companies have mission statements that are too vague , unrealistic, or contain too much business jargon. 

Here are some tips on how to avoid these common pitfalls:

  • Be Accurate

Don’t include words just because they sound good. You may end up with a mission statement that sounds catchy, but serves no use as a guide for your company.

  • Be Realistic

It’s good to be ambitious, but your mission statement should be realistic. If the mission statement sets a purpose and goals that are clearly unobtainable, it won’t be taken seriously.

Avoid writing a mission statement that’s generic or vague. One useful trick is to ask yourself if one of your competitors could use the exact same mission statement. This will help you focus on being more specific about your unique purpose, goals, and values.

Now you know what it takes to craft an effective mission statement. Put these tips into practice and you’ll have a clear and concise statement that keeps your company on track.

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This article offers general information only, is current as of the date of publication, and is not intended as legal, financial or other professional advice. A professional advisor should be consulted regarding your specific situation. While the information presented is believed to be factual and current, its accuracy is not guaranteed and it should not be regarded as a complete analysis of the subjects discussed. All expressions of opinion reflect the judgment of the author(s) as of the date of publication and are subject to change. No endorsement of any third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products or services is expressly given or implied by RBC Ventures Inc. or its affiliates.

35 Vision And Mission Statement Examples That Will Inspire Your Buyers

Lindsay Kolowich Cox

Published: February 28, 2024

Why do you choose to buy products and services from certain brands even when cheaper options exist? It often comes down to a compelling brand mission — like these 35 mission statement examples.

mission and vision statement examples

Brands use a mission statement to express their values. As consumers, we like to patronize businesses that have values we believe in.

→ Free Resource: 100 Mission Statement Templates & Examples

A strong mission statement makes it easy for consumers to understand your values and feel confident purchasing from you.

Still, loyalty doesn’t happen overnight. Building brand loyalty, like creating mission and vision statements, takes time. You may just find the inspiration that you need in someone else’s mission statement, so we’ve gathered 35 example mission statements to help make your research easy.

If you’re in a bit of a time crunch, use this table of contents to find precisely what you’re looking for to inspire the development of your company’s mission.

Table of Contents

What is a mission statement?

How to write a mission statement, what is a vision statement.

  • Mission vs Vision Statements

Mission and Vision Statement Template

Best mission statement examples.

  • Best Vision Statements Examples

A mission statement is a simple statement about the goals, values, and objectives of an organization. A mission statement summarizes why a business exists and helps a company respond to change and make decisions that align with its vision.

This brief description helps customers, employees, and leadership understand the organization’s top priorities.

An effective mission statement will naturally change over time. As a company grows, it may reach its early goals, and they’ll change. It’s important to revise mission statements as needed to reflect the business’s new culture as it achieves its goals and develops new targets.

What makes a good mission statement?

A great mission statement combines physical, emotional, and logical elements into one exceptional customer (and employee) experience that you value as much as they do. A good mission statement will not only explain your brand’s purpose but will also foster a connection with customers.

When your brand creates a genuine connection with customers and employees, they’ll stay loyal to your company, thereby increasing your overall profitability.

Mission statements also help you stand out in the marketplace, differentiating your brand from the competition.

I’ve personally observed that there’s more brand recognition for companies when consumers think they have an important mission.

When wearing a pair of TOMS shoes, I’ve noticed that people comment more on my shoes than when I’m wearing Converse or Nike shoes (which are both more well-known brands). TOMS famously created the One for One® model, where they vowed to donate one pair of shoes for every one purchased.

A memorable company mission makes your product more noteworthy.

What are the three parts of a mission statement?

Your mission statement should clearly express what your brand does, how it does it, and why the brand does it. You can quickly sum this up in your mission statement by providing the following:

  • Brand purpose. What does your product or service do or aim to offer and for whom?
  • Brand values. What does your company stand for? For example, are you environmentally conscious and provide a more sustainable solution to solve a problem? Values are what make your company unique.
  • Brand goals. What does your company accomplish for customers? Why should they purchase from you instead of other competitors?

With these three components, you can create a mission that is unique to your brand and resonates with potential customers. Next, we’ll guide you step by step on how to write a proper mission statement to build on as your company evolves.

You understand the importance of a well-crafted mission statement that effectively summarizes a company’s purpose, but how do you write one? Let’s look at the steps to write a good mission statement, and then we’ll dive into mission statement examples to inspire your creativity.

  • Explain your company’s product or service offering.
  • Identify the company’s core values.
  • Connect how your company’s offering aligns with your values.
  • Condense these statements into one.
  • Refine your mission statement.

1. Explain your company’s product or service offering.

A good mission statement helps prospects understand what your company does in a literal sense. This means explaining your offering in basic, clear terms. Your explanation should answer the most basic questions like:

  • Are you selling a product or service?
  • Why would customers buy it?
  • How does your offering solve for the customer?

Record your answers and focus on how your product or service brings value to your buyer personas , otherwise known as your target audience.

2. Identify the company’s core values.

Now, this is where you can start thinking bigger. You didn’t just make a product or service at random. Instead, you’re most likely motivated by a set of core values . This is particularly important for socially conscious businesses and brands that care about well-being.

Core values are deeply ingrained principles that guide a company’s actions. Take HubSpot’s culture code, HEART , for example:

  • Empathetic.
  • Remarkable.
  • Transparent.

These are principles that not only company employees respect but are principles that our customers appreciate as well. By identifying core values that hold meaning on personal and organizational levels, you’ll have an appealing set to add to your mission statement.

3. Connect how your company’s offering aligns with your values.

So, how can your company offering serve your core values? You need to draw a connection between the two in a way that makes sense to the public.

For example, if one of your core values centers on innovation, you want to frame your product or service as pushing boundaries and explaining how it helps customers innovate their lives or business practices. Essentially, you’re taking the literal benefit of the offering and expanding it to serve a higher purpose.

4. Condense these statements into one.

A mission statement can be as short as a single sentence or as long as a paragraph, but it’s meant to be a short summary of your company’s purpose. You need to state the what, who, and why of your company:

  • What — The company offering.
  • Who — Who you’re selling to.
  • Why — The core values you do it for.

Condense this to be between one and three sentences long. At this stage of development, it’s often helpful to write several mission statement drafts to help process ideas and experiment.

Once you have successfully conveyed your brand’s message, it’s time to refine and perfect your mission statement.

5. Refine your mission statement.

Above all, your mission statement stands as a marketing asset that is meant to be:

  • Free of fluff.

Your mission statement should clearly outline the purpose of your company offering, capture the company spirit, and show the common goals the company is working to achieve.

Have other team members or advisors read your mission statement draft and make adjustments if needed according to their recommendations. This is normally a slow process for brands, and I’ll share ideas and company mission statement examples in a moment to help inspire creativity in the writing process.

A vision statement is aspirational and expresses your brand’s plan or “vision” for the future and potential impact on the world. They often serve as a guide for a brand’s future goals and explain why customers and employees should stick around for the long haul.

What makes a good vision statement?

A good vision statement should be bold and ambitious. It’s meant to be an inspirational, big-picture declaration of what your company strives to be in the future. It gives customers a peek into your company’s trajectory and builds customer loyalty by allowing them to align their support with your vision because they believe in the future of your brand as well.

What are the three parts of a vision statement?

Your company vision is meant to be inspirational while also aligning with the company’s mission. A vision statement should have the following characteristics:

  • Aspirational and ambitious. Have a lofty outlook for what you want your business to accomplish? Here’s the place to put it. Your vision statement should be aspirational and showcase how your business will grow in the future.
  • Practical and achievable. While your statement should be ambitious, it shouldn’t be impossible. Set a goal that is both challenging and practical.
  • General. Your vision should be broad enough to encompass all of your brand’s overall goals. Think of it as an umbrella for your mission statement and company objectives to nest under.

Both mission and vision statements are often combined into one comprehensive “mission statement” to define the organization’s reason for existing and its outlook for internal and external audiences — like employees, partners, board members, consumers, and shareholders.

The difference between mission and vision statements lies in the purpose they serve.

Mission Statement vs. Vision Statement

A mission statement clarifies what the company wants to achieve, who they want to support, and why they want to support them. On the other hand, a vision statement describes where the company wants a community, or the world, to be as a result of the company’s services.

Thus, a mission statement is a roadmap for the company’s vision statement.

A mission statement is a literal quote stating what a brand or company is setting out to do. This lets the public know the product and service it offers, who it makes it for, and why it’s doing it. A vision statement is a brand looking toward the future and saying what it hopes to achieve through its mission statement. This is more conceptual, as it’s a glimpse into what the brand can become in the eyes of the consumer and the value it will bring in the long term.

In summary, the main differences between a mission statement and a vision statement are:

  • Mission statements describe the current purpose a company serves. The company’s function, target audience, and key offerings are elements that are often mentioned in a mission statement.
  • Vision statements are a look into a company’s future or what its overarching vision is. The same elements from the mission statement can be included in a vision statement, but they’ll be described in the future tense.

Now that we know what they are, let’s dive into some useful examples of each across different industries.

100-mission-statements examples

100 Mission Statement Examples & Templates

Mission statements from 100 companies and templates to create one for your business.

  • 100 real examples
  • 10 industries
  • Instructions & guidelines
  • 10 free templates

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10. Cradles to Crayons : Provides children from birth through age 12 living in homeless or low-income situations with the essential items they need to thrive — at home, at school, and at play.

Best mission statement examples: Cradles to Crayons

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100 examples and templates of mission statements to help you build your own.

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How to Write a Mission Statement (Definition & Examples Included)

ProjectManager

Table of Contents

What is a mission statement, mission statement vs. vision statement.

  • How to Write a Mission Statement

25 Best Mission Statement Examples

Mission statements faq.

  • ProjectManager & Mission Statements

When you’re creating a company or working on a business plan , the first thing you should do is create a mission statement. Your mission statement is the base for your company values, vision statement, slogan, value proposition and everything else.

A mission statement is a short action-based declaration that describes the purpose of an organization. Mission statements explain what companies do and are a very important part of their culture, along with the core values and vision statement . Mission statements are an internal guide for organizations, but they also need to be appealing to customers.

Before we learn how to write a mission statement, let’s explain the difference between a mission statement and a vision statement, two very important parts of a business plan.

There are several differences between a mission statement and a vision statement. The main difference between them is that a mission statement explains the purpose of a company, while the vision statement indicates where the company wants to accomplish in the future. Mission statements and vision statements are different but they need to complement each other to provide a clear base for strategic planning.

If you need help creating and delivering a plan for your business, then consider a project management software like ProjectManager . ProjectManager helps organizations plan, execute and track projects and tasks across teams. Make a long term plan on a roadmap, then execute the day-to-day tasks on task lists or kanban boards. It’s easy to collaborate, stay aligned and reach your goals. Get started today for free.

kanban board in projectmanager

How to Write a Mission Statement in 6 Steps

We know that every organization needs a mission statement, but how do you create one? There’s no standardized method to writing a mission statement, but there are some guidelines that you should consider.

Follow these steps to help you with the process of writing a mission statement.

1. Define your Company Culture

The mission and vision statements are elements of your company culture. For this reason, before writing your company mission statement, you’ll need to define the core values or guiding principles of your company culture. Don’t forget to ask yourself what your team members expect from the company too.

Related: Free Team Charter Template

2. Set Goals

Your company mission defines the purpose of your organization, and where it stands now, but that’s only part of the business plan. You’ll also need to define company goals and a long-term company vision.

3. Define your Ideal Customer Profile

It’s impossible to think about a business that doesn’t care about its customers. Before writing a mission statement or a business plan altogether, you need to understand who are your customers and how you can help them. That’s why you must define your ideal customer profile through market research .

4. Create a Value Proposition

Once you have a clear idea of what your ideal customer profile looks like, you need to think about the value proposition that will differentiate you from your competitors.

5. Select a Type of Mission Statement

Every mission statement is unique, but there are some recognizable types of mission statements. The most common ones are:

  • Customer-oriented mission statements
  • Socially conscious mission statements
  • Environmentally conscious mission statements
  • Product-oriented mission statements

6. Add the Mission Statement to Your Business Plan

Now that you’ve thought about all these key aspects of your business, you can start drafting a mission statement for your business plan. Remember to think about how that company mission fits with the other elements of your business plan.

You probably know a lot of mission statements without realizing it. We’ve gathered 25 of the best mission statement examples available in the world to help you create a great mission statement for your business plan.

1. Microsoft

“To empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.”

“To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

3. Facebook

“To give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.”

4. Southwest Airlines

“Dedication to the highest quality of Customer Service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and Company Spirit.”

5. LinkedIn

“To connect the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful.”

“To entertain, inform and inspire people around the globe.”

“To continually raise the bar of the customer experience by using the internet and technology to help consumers find, discover and buy anything, and empower businesses and content creators to maximize their success. We aim to be Earth’s most customer-centric company.”

8. Patagonia

“We’re In Business To Save Our Home Planet.”

9. Life is Good

“To spread the power of optimism”

10. Coca-Cola

“To refresh the world, to inspire moments of optimism and happiness, and to create value and make a difference.”

11. The Humane Society

“Creating animals, confronting cruelty.”

“We reach for new heights and reveal the unknown for the benefit of humankind.”

13. Smithsonian

“The increase and diffusion of knowledge.”

14. American Express

“We work hard every day to make American Express the world’s most respected service brand.”

15. Nordstrom

“To give customers the most compelling shopping experience possible.”

16. JetBlue

“To inspire humanity – both in the air and on the ground.”

“To build the web’s most convenient, secure, cost-effective payment solutions.”

18. Kickstarter

“To help bring creative projects to life.”

“To deliver information on the people, ideas and technologies changing the world to our community of affluent business decision-makers.”

“To be a company that inspires and fulfills your curiosity.”

“Shape the future of the internet by creating unprecedented value and opportunity for our customers, employees, investors and ecosystem partners.”

“To attract and attain customers with high-value products and services and the most satisfying ownership experience in America.”

“To create a better everyday life for the many people.”

“To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world.”

1. How long Should a Mission Statement be?

A good mission statement is short, to the point and memorable. It’s like a tagline in advertising, something that sticks with a person when they hear or read it. In a true sense, the mission statement is an ad in that it identifies your company as one that a customer would want to work with or support.

2. What Is the Difference Between a Mission Statement and a Vision Statement?

Vision statements are about the future. Mission statements stay firmly in the present: who you are and what’s important to you, now. Be timely, explain who you are today and do so clearly.

ProjectManager Turns Your Mission Statement Into a Reality

A mission statement is an idea, but to get there, you need a plan. ProjectManager  is an award-winning tool that organizes your teams and projects to work more effectively. Use our cloud-based software to get real-time data and make your mission statement a mission accomplished.

Build Action Plans with Gantt Charts

Once you have a project approved, you can use the online Gantt chart to schedule your tasks. It’s a visual tool that creates a timeline that shows you the entire project in one place. Some tasks are dependent on others to start or finish. Use our tool to link these task dependencies and avoid having them cause bottlenecks later on in the project.

ProjectManager Gantt chart

Track Progress with Dashboards & Reports

Another way to monitor your progress and performance is with our real-time dashboard. It’s made up of six project metrics displayed in easy-to-read graphs and charts. Our tool automatically calculates time, workload, costs and more and gives you a high-level instant status report to help you meet the goals of your mission statement.

ProjectManager’s dashboard view, which shows six key metrics on a project

ProjectManager has a company mission too. It’s to deliver reliable project management software that helps managers and their teams plan, monitor and report with ease for high levels of efficiency. Our cloud-based tool has a real-time dashboard for live data reporting,  online Gantt charts for effective scheduling and a collaborative platform that frees teams to work more productively. See how it can help your mission by taking this free 30-day trial .

Click here to browse ProjectManager's free templates

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How to Write the Perfect Mission Statement (With Examples)

Learn what a mission statement is, why you need one and how to write the perfect one for your business.

Ross Mudrick

Table of Contents

Developing a mission statement is a lengthy process that involves the input of team members who fully understand your business, employees, customers, industry, and the products and services your company provides.

Once completed, your organization can share its mission statement so consumers, employees, investors and other stakeholders know precisely what your organization does (or doesn’t do), what it values and why it exists. Often a mission statement can help clarify an owner’s ideas about their business’s “whats” and “whys.”

We’ll explore mission statements, why companies need them, and how to craft the perfect mission statement for your organization. 

What is a mission statement?

A mission statement is a declaration of what your company does and why it exists. This message is designed for internal and external audiences; it should ignite interest in the organization as it builds its brand .

The best mission statements have two primary objectives: 

  • Educate: Mission statements educate by sharing what the organization does, how it does it and why.
  • Inspire: If it’s a well-written mission statement, its second objective is to inspire. The best mission statements energize people to learn more about the brand and become supporters.

How to create a mission statement

When creating your mission statement, you’ll need to understand its essential components and ask probing questions to define precisely what your organization does and how. Finally, you’ll need to outline your organizational mission so it’s clear to everyone reading it. 

1. Include three essential components. 

According to Chris Bart, a retired professor of strategy and governance at McMaster University, a well-written mission statement has three essential components. Address each of these components when creating your mission statement:

  • The business’s key market: Who is your customer base ? What industry does your business serve?
  • The company’s contribution, or “what”: What product or service does your business offer? How does it better your local community or humanity?
  • Distinctions between your solution and competing ones: What makes your product or service unique? Why should your audience buy your product over the competition’s?

2. Dig deeper to uniquely portray your business. 

While incorporating the essential elements, ask yourself – and your team – probing questions to truly understand who your business serves, what your organization does and how it works. Here are some questions to start with:  

  • Why do we exist?
  • What do we do?
  • How do we use our products – or services – to achieve our goals?
  • Who do we serve?
  • How do we serve them?
  • What do we do better than anyone else?
  • What differentiates us from our competitors?
  • How do our customers describe us?

3. Define your organizational mission. 

Creating an accurate, inspiring mission statement isn’t purely a philosophical exercise. It has to be practical, too. A mission statement must make sense to those who read it, whether they know about your organization or not.

Keep these four tips in mind as you define your organizational mission:

  • Make the connection obvious: People unfamiliar with your company who read your mission statement should come away with a clear, concise understanding of what your organization does and why it exists.
  • Be brief, yet informative: Keep the statement under 25 words. If it’s longer, people won’t read it or remember your company.
  • Talk to stakeholders: Before finalizing your mission statement, speak to as many stakeholders as possible to see if it makes sense to them. Encourage feedback by seeking out board members’, long-time customers’ and trusted vendors’ opinions.
  • Develop a long-term mission: This may be one of the more challenging aspects of writing a mission statement because defining what your organization is about today can be easier than providing predictions. However, you can update your long-term goals as  events and changes occur. 

Avoid common mission statement mistakes

Since your mission statement helps define your business, getting it right is crucial. Avoid these typical mistakes: 

  • Using elaborate language: Avoid the pitfalls of “fancy” writing and using ambiguous words. Aim for clarity and brevity, and don’t make your mission statement overly formal. You want people to relate to it, not misunderstand it.
  • Failing to update your statement as your business evolves . Revisit your mission statement over time to ensure it still resonates with your company’s current purpose. While it may seem like a clear, concise mission statement should cover all your bases – like any business-defining feature – it must also evolve as your business grows.

What do effective mission statements have in common? 

Effective mission statements are succinct and thoughtful.  

  • Succinct: The more succinct your mission statement, the more likely it will resonate with audiences. A lengthy mission statement that’s challenging to remember can fall flat. A good test to see if your mission statement hits the mark is if your employees can recite it. For example, the mission statement of media organization TED, famous for its TED Talks, is “Spread ideas.” In two short words, TED outlines what it does and why people might be interested in learning more about it.
  • Thoughtful: Other companies take a more creative, thoughtful approach. LEGO, whose mission statement, “Inspire and develop the builders of tomorrow,” clearly defines what the company does – inspire and develop – and who its target customers are – the builders of tomorrow. In 2009, LEGO’s CEO Jørgen Vig Knudstorp said, “We make very clear the values we promise everyone we interact with – whether they are colleagues, partners in retail, the wider community, or – most important of all, of course – the children we deeply care for.” Its mission is woven through the entire organization, which is when mission statements come to life.

When companies don’t have well-constructed mission statements (or any mission statement), customers, potential customers and the public are forced to identify for themselves what the company is and why it exists.

What’s the difference between mission and vision statements?

Mission statements and vision statements are both crucial, but they have different objectives. A mission statement is focused on today, while a vision statement is focused on the future – what you want to become and how you want to impact people. 

Here are some questions that will define your vision statement:

  • What are the organization’s goals and dreams?
  • What will the world look like if we are successful?
  • What problem(s) is the organization solving for the greater good?
  • Who and what are we inspiring to change over the long term?

To help understand how mission statements and vision statements differ, compare Airbnb’s mission and vision statements.

  • Airbnb’s mission statement: “Belong anywhere.” This mission statement is short and to the point. The message conveys that you can stay anywhere in the world and feel included when doing business with Airbnb.
  • Airbnb’s vision statement: “Tapping into the universal human yearning to belong – the desire to feel welcomed, respected, and appreciated for who you are, no matter where you might be.” This message taps into a larger picture of what a future could look like when the global community imbues Airbnb’s philosophy.

Examples of effective mission statements

Here are examples of effective mission statements from well-known brands. These mission statements briefly define the organization, its purpose and its impact on humanity:

  • Nike: “To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world. If you have a body, you are an athlete.”
  • JetBlue: “To inspire humanity – both in the air and on the ground.”
  • Warby Parker: “To offer designer eyewear at a revolutionary price while leading the way for socially conscious business.”
  • Tesla: “To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.”
  • LinkedIn: “Connect the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful.”
  • Microsoft: Early days: “A computer on every desk and in every home.” Now: “To empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.”
  • Disney: “To entertain, inform, and inspire people around the globe through the power of unparalleled storytelling.”
  • Ford: “To help build a better world, where every person is free to move and pursue their dreams.”

Finding your mission statement language

To get started, start tossing around words with trusted stakeholders. However, remember that you’re not looking for what “sounds good” as much as gaining clarity about what your business does. Brainstorm with others in low-stake sessions and see what language resonates with your brand. 

Remember that sounding good is important, but first you must define yourself. If your mission statement includes a nod to your business’s philosophy, values and culture of ethical behavior , the more benefits you’ll reap.

As with any other business plan or project, you may need to explore dozens of ideas before landing on your best fit. 

Patrick Proctor contributed to the writing and reporting in this article.

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How to Write a Mission Statement

A mission statement serves as a concise summary of a company’s purpose and its aspirations for a positive influence. It’s a powerful tool that businesses employ to articulate their goals and values, allowing their audience to grasp a deeper understanding of their mission. Knowing what to incorporate into this statement can assist a brand in not only drawing in new customers but also expanding its clientele.

In this article, we emphasize the significance of a mission statement, detail the process of crafting one, offer advice on creating an impactful one, and furnish a template and examples to guide you through the process.

Why is a mission statement important?

The essential components of a mission statement, what should a mission statement accomplish, 6 steps mission statement template.

  • 1.Explain the Company's Goal

2.Detail How the Company Achieves Its Objectives

  • 3.Consider the Motivation Behind the Company's Actions

4.Review and Improve the Mission Statement

Mission statement writing tips, what makes a good mission statement, mistakes to avoid when writing mission statements, mission statement vs vision statement, examples of great mission statements.

A mission statement is essential as it outlines a company’s ambitions, goals, and why it matters. It provides employees with ethical guidelines, offers insights into the company’s values, and clarifies its purpose. Key elements within a mission statement include:

  • Objectives: Defining company goals unifies the organization, guiding employees toward success and fostering efficiency.
  • Values: Mission statements define a company’s culture, ethics, and values, signaling expected behavior to the public.
  • Purpose: They communicate the company’s role in benefiting the community and explain why it exists, setting it apart from others.
  • Value – What does the business offer that benefits both customers and employees?
  • Inspiration – Why would individuals aspire to be part of this company?
  • Plausibility – Ensure it sounds realistic and attainable.
  • Specificity – Connect it directly to the business’s core.

A mission statement should explain why a business is here and what makes it special.

  • Why they’re here: To stop and ease human suffering during emergencies.
  • What makes them special: They get volunteers to help and people who want to give things help too.

sample mission statements

Download The Mission Statement Template as a Word,   PDF , Or Excel  file

When you write a mission statement, it’s important to make it clear and concise and address all the key elements. Here are steps for writing an effective mission statement:

1.Explain the Company's Goal

  • Start by describing why the company exists.
  • Highlight what makes the company different from competitors.
  • For instance, a restaurant’s goal could be to serve locally sourced, organic ingredients in all its dishes, promoting sustainability and supporting local farmers.
  • Express how the company goes about its work.
  • Outline the company’s main principles and beliefs.
  • Company values can include providing equal access to resources or delivering top-notch products to customers.
  • For example, a tech company may specialize in creating innovative, eco-friendly gadgets, designing them with recyclable materials and energy-efficient technology to reduce environmental impact.

3.Consider the Motivation Behind the Company's Actions

  • Incorporate the company’s passion and the reasons behind its actions.
  • Reflect on why the company was founded and its purpose.
  • If you’re creating a mission statement for a bakery, their motivation could be to delight customers with delicious, freshly baked goods while fostering a sense of community through shared culinary experiences.
  • After drafting the mission statement, read it aloud and check for grammar or spelling errors.
  • Consider rephrasing it for greater clarity if needed.
  • Periodically revisit the mission statement to ensure it remains accurate and aligned with the company’s goals and values.

Here are some easy ways to make your company’s mission statement better:

  • Be short and clear: Keep your mission statement under 150 words. Use strong words to show what your company wants to achieve.
  • Think about the future: Make sure your mission statement talks about what your company will do in the future. Even if things change, your mission statement should still fit.
  • Ask for help: Talk to your co-workers about your mission statement. They might have good ideas to make it better.

A good mission statement is concise, clear, and inspiring. It should succinctly convey the core purpose of your organization and why it matters, while also reflecting your values and unique approach. The best mission statements motivate and guide both internal teams and external stakeholders, making them feel connected to your vision and goals.

Experts believe that many companies have mission statements that are too vague, unrealistic, or are just a collection of meaningless business jargon. The following are some tips for avoiding the common pitfalls of mission statements.

Accuracy is key- A mission statement should be accurate and only include aspects of your business that are relevant to your business. Don’t just use phrases that sound nice. If you do that, it may sound catchy, but it may lose its value as a guide for your company.

Don’t be unrealistic -Your mission statement should be both ambitious and realistic. Mission statements that set unattainable goals will not be taken seriously by employees. As a result, it can discourage employees by reminding them how far they are behind.

Make yourself unique – Avoid writing a generic or vague mission statement. A handy trick is to ask yourself if one of your competitors could use the same mission statement. It will help you focus on your unique purpose, goals, and values.

Using Buzzwords and Jargon – Common mistake companies commit when crafting their mission statements is bogging them down with buzzwords and jargon. The best mission statements consist of simple, clear language that communicates a company’s purpose directly. Focus on concrete descriptions and aspirations rather than vague phrases such as the following:

  • The best in the world
  • Excellent customer service
  • Maximizing investor returns
  • Satisfactory
  • Highly valued

Identify other generic words that you can delete from your message.

Now you know what goes into crafting a mission statement.Therefore, put these tips into practice and you’ll be able to produce a clear and concise statement that will keep your business on track.

Mistakes to avoid when writing mission statements

An effective mission statement can serve several purposes. First of all, it can help keep your business on track.

Your business is something you can always come back to whenever you’re setting goals or making big decisions. By looking at a clear, concise statement of purpose for your business, you can decide what is the best way to achieve that purpose.

Essentially, a mission statement is a foundation for all that your business does. It can help you with:

  • Planning your business.
  • Assessing your performance.
  • Guidance for employees.
  • Ensure that all stakeholders work towards the same goals.
  • Giving employees a sense of belonging.

The vision statement focuses on tomorrow and what the organization wants to become. It lets the public know what the company makes, who it makes it for, and why it does it.

A vision statement is a way for a brand to look toward the future and define what it strives to accomplish through its mission statement.

Despite the fact that companies commonly use mission and vision statements interchangeably, it is important to have both.

Basically, a mission statement and a vision statement differ in the following ways:

  • A vision statement describes a company’s long-term goals. The same elements from the mission statement can be found in the vision statement but will be defined in the future tense.
  • A mission statement describes the current purpose of an organization. Mission statements typically include information about the company’s purpose, target audience, and key offerings.

Now that we know what they are, let’s take a look at some examples from different industries.

It’s often easiest to understand how mission statements work by looking at examples. Here are a few of my favorites fictional examples to help you better understand how you can structure and present your own mission statement:

Workday Mission Statement

"To put people at the center of enterprise software"

Nike Mission Statement

“Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world.* If you have a body, you are an athlete.”

Paypal mission statement

“To be Earth’s most customer-centric company, where customers can find and discover anything they might want to buy online, and endeavors to offer its customers the lowest possible prices.”

Ferrari Mission Statement

“To make unique sports cars that represent the finest in Italian design and craftsmanship, both on the track and on the road.”

Loreal Mission Statement

“Offering all women and men worldwide the best of cosmetics innovation in terms of quality, efficacy and safety”

cocacola mission statement

“To refresh the world…To inspire moments of optimism and happiness…To create value and make a difference.”

Etsy Mission Statement

“To reimagine commerce in ways that build a more fulfilling and lasting world. We are building a human, authentic and community-centric global and local marketplace.”

Walmart Mission Statement

“We save people money so they can live better.”

Asana Mission Statement

“To help humanity thrive by enabling all teams to work together effortlessly.”

Toyota mission statement

“To attract and attain customers with high-valued products and services and the most satisfying ownership experience in America.”

American express

“We work hard every day to make American Express the world’s most respected service brand.”

Forbes Mission Statement

“To deliver information on the people, ideas and technologies changing the world to our community of affluent business decision makers.”

Tesla mission statement

“To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.”

Microsoft Mission Statement

“To enable people and businesses throughout the world to realize their full potential.”

Helpful Resources

A mission statement is a concise statement that defines the purpose, values, and goals of an organization. It captures the essence of what the organization aims to achieve and guides its actions and decision-making.

A mission statement is important as it serves as a guiding principle for an organization. It helps align employees, stakeholders, and customers by communicating the organization’s core values, purpose, and direction. A well-crafted mission statement can inspire and motivate individuals while providing clarity and focus for the organization’s activities.

A mission statement should include the organization’s purpose, its target audience or customers, the value it provides, and its unique selling proposition or competitive advantage. It should also reflect the organization’s core values and future aspirations.

A mission statement should be concise and easily understood. Ideally, it should be no longer than a few sentences or a short paragraph. Keeping it concise ensures that it is memorable and effectively communicates the organization’s essence.

A mission statement should be periodically reviewed to ensure it remains relevant and aligned with the organization’s goals and values. It may need to be updated if there are significant changes in the organization’s direction, market conditions, or strategic objectives. However, it is not necessary to review it too frequently if the organization’s core purpose remains consistent.

A mission statement generator streamlines the process by offering templates and prompts, helping entrepreneurs articulate their organization’s purpose and values in their business plan with ease.

To make your mission statement unique, focus on what sets your organization apart, your values, and the specific positive impact you aim to achieve.

Yes, involving key stakeholders, such as employees and leadership, can provide diverse perspectives and ensure the mission statement resonates with everyone.

A mission statement defines the organization’s purpose and values, while a vision statement describes its long-term goals and aspirations.

Yes, mission statements can evolve over time to align with changing goals, values, and priorities as the organization grows and adapts to new challenges and opportunities.

A mission defines the fundamental purpose and values of an organization, answering ‘why’ it exists, while objectives are specific, measurable goals that outline ‘what’ the organization aims to achieve within a set timeframe.

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BUSINESS STRATEGIES

21 powerful mission statement examples that stand out

  • Cecilia Lazzaro Blasbalg
  • Jul 20, 2023
  • 12 min read

Mission statement examples

Mission statements have come a long way since they were popularized in the 1980s as a way for companies to articulate who they are. Today, these declarations of intent are also likened to a mantra toward professional success, appearing throughout an organization’s most valuable assets, from marketing campaigns and promotional material to its business website .

When starting a business , you'll want to craft your own, unique mission statement. But before you do, we recommend you first review what a mission statement is and some helpful guidelines to writing one. Then, check out our selection of the best mission statement examples, created by some of the most influential companies and corporations many of us swear we could not live without.

What is a mission statement?

A mission statement is a brief description of an organization’s purpose and how it serves audiences through the types of products or services it provides them with. It may also include your core values, philosophies, business ethics or goals, all of which can help to reflect your uniqueness and what sets your business apart from others.

By writing your company mission statement, you're able to define the cause behind your brand. Then, you’ll be able to use it in your business proposal , your elevator pitch and a fundraising website once you start to gather funding for your business. Think of a mission statement as a form of corporate communication, that allows you to establish your transparency and leadership as a brand to both stakeholders and your users or customers.

Furthermore, a good mission statement is effective in acting as a guiding light for the way in which a company conducts itself. This means that the statement should become a key part of your company and corporate culture to make sure everyone is aiming for the same goals. It will help employees understand the value of what they do.

Mission statements and vision statements are often confused because many organizations will use the two terms interchangeably. However, a company statement focuses on the day-to-day activities of the business thus declaring what you’re doing to pursue your cause, while a vision statement describes what your company wants to be in the future. A mission statement is a chance to establish your leadership as a company and as a brand.

A mission statement is also not to be confused with a company slogan, which is often a tagline used in marketing and advertising campaigns. It may end up being more commonly associated with a company or brand than its mission statement however.

mission statement versus vision statement

Tips for creating a great mission statement

As you start writing a mission statement , you’ll want to first answer some vital questions that will help you define the purpose of your business or brand. These include “What does your business do,” “Who are your customers,” “Why does your company do what it does,” or “What sparks the passion behind it?”

Afterwards, you will be better equipped to sit down - whether with your team or alone - and draft up a mission statement that will motivate your brand and drive your business’s success. Here are some key points you’ll want to consider:

1. Make it plausible and attainable. Your mission statement should be achievable by giving you something tangible to work on, such as having a business plan . It should fall between what you’re already doing and what you can work toward. Something like this one from American Express, "Our mission is to become essential to our customers by providing differentiated products and services to help them achieve their aspirations"

2. Be inspirational. Let your company’s personality shine through your mission statement. It should reflect the ideas that make your company different from others. That said, you’ll want to write yours in a way that not only makes it unique, but identifiable so that it strengthens your brand identity and perception. At this stage you can also ask yourself if you plan to use your mission statement to be not only inspirational, but also to establish your social responsibilities as a company? For some brands this is a priority, for others less so but this is the time to decide for your brand. For non-profits this is often easier, than for profit corporations. Take the Make a Wish foundation's statement as an example, " Together, we create joy, happiness and magical memories through life-changing wishes for children with critical illnesses ." Or UNICEF'S , " UNICEF is mandated by the United Nations General Assembly to advocate for the protection of children's rights, to help meet their basic needs and to expand their opportunities to reach their full potential." Caterpillar also gets it right with this one , "to provide the best value to customers, grow a profitable business, develop and reward people, and encourage social responsibility"

3. Use clear and simple language. Keeping it short and simple will help you convey all the important elements of the mission statement, like core values, to employees and customers alike. In order to make sure there won’t be room for any misinterpretation or misunderstanding, avoid using buzzwords or flowery language. Additionally, aim for 20 words or less to get to the point. Don't neglect the grammatical aspect of your statement, make sure it contains no mistakes and reads properly. Take this example from Pinterest, " Our mission is to give everyone the inspiration to create a life that they love. " It's short, just 15 words long but it creates an inspirational punch that it's hard not to connect with. Another short but impactful one is from Uber, “ We ignite opportunity by setting the world in motion."

Mission statement vs. vision statement

A mission statement and a vision statement are both important for businesses, but they serve different objectives. A mission statement is a brief description of the company's purpose and what it does, whereas a vision statement is a more aspirational document that describes its long-term goals.

A good way to put it is that a mission statement describes the business in the present, whereas a vision statement describes the business in the future, giving employees and customers a sense of what the company is working towards. A good vision statement answers questions like "What do we want to achieve in the future?" "What kind of impact do we want to have on the world?" and "What are our long-term goals?"

Best mission statement examples

So, we’ve gone over the basics of a mission statement, as well as guidelines for crafting a solid one for your business. Now we’re ready to unveil some of the best mission statement examples to use as inspiration for your own.

American Red Cross

Peace Corps

The Walt Disney Company

01. WIX : “Create your own professional web presence—exactly the way you want.”

wix mission statement

At first glance, Wix’s mission statement encapsulates what website builders do: help people create an online space for themselves. While this declaration seems simple and to the point, it’s also effective as it places an emphasis on its users who are truly succeeding in building the website of their dreams.

Wix mission statement example

02. Google: “To organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

It sounds like an impossible goal to meet, but Google has managed to collect all the information in the world and put it into a free space. As part of its ongoing mission, the company is always working to find new ways that will improve getting the answers you’re looking for in seconds. That also means making the platform accessible to all who come to search their queries.

google mission statement

03. TED : “Spread ideas.”

TED mission statement

This concise declaration by TED, which stands for Technology, Education and Design, not only happens to be the shortest mission statement on the list but also one of the most memorable ones to date. For a media organization built on boundless content, TED is able to convey, in two words, the essence of what it does - spreading ideas in the form of discourse.

TED mission statement example

04. Tesla : “To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.”

Being completely self-aware in its mission statement, Tesla does not shy away from its core value: to enhance the use of clean energy across the globe. This statement mirrors the hard work Tesla puts in on a daily basis to “accelerate” its mission to bring a culture of sustainability to the automobile industry.

tesla mission statement

05. LinkedIn : “Connect the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful.”

LinkedIn wants to help professionals become more successful and efficient by facilitating ways for them to build meaningful connections. This is what the social media platform sets out to pursue since it officially launched in 2003. These days, almost every professional across most fields uses LinkedIn to grow their career, some of whom have flourished to become thought leaders.

linkedin mission statement

06. Asana : “To help humanity thrive by enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly.”

asana mission statement

This personalized mission statement example lets us grasp Asana’s unique approach as a business. It wants to express warm sentiment to its audience, which is kind of unexpected coming from a tech company. It also lays out an inclusive goal to expand its reach to the “world’s team,” leaving no one out.

Asana mission statement example

07. Forbes : “To convene, curate and cover the most influential leaders and entrepreneurs who are driving change, transforming business and making a significant impact on the world.”

Forbes isn’t just a publication, it’s a brand. Its mission statement shines the spotlight on those selected individuals it caters to - influential leaders and entrepreneurs - and what that should mean to the rest of us. If we aren’t paying attention to Forbes, then we should really start doing so, as to not fall behind in this ever changing world.

forbes mission statement

08. Microsoft : “To empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.”

This sounds more like a motivational poster on high school walls rather than a mission statement brought to you by the multi-billion dollar corporation Microsoft. It conjures up the image of a utopian society promoting unity and transparency. Essentially, Microsoft believes in us so that we can elevate our world to a better position.

microsoft mission statement

09. Starbucks : “To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.”

starbucks mission statement

Personally, this mission statement example hits home. For many, it's impossible to think of a morning without a cup of coffee. Starbucks is not only dedicated to its customers but has the intention to also reach customers’ communities, taking a vow in the people and places it serves.

Starbucks mission statement example

10. American Red Cross : “To prevent and alleviate human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors.”

American Red Cross has been around for over a century. It’s an established organization that is synonymous with helping people in times of crises. Nonetheless, its mission statement is solid as a rock and resonates with a brighter message of hope, unity and humanity.

red cross mission statement

11. MoMA : “To share great modern and contemporary art with the public.”

The Museum of Modern Art is an international gem. Artists and art lovers alike flock to its pristine structure in Midtown, New York, but this institution wants its audience to know through its mission statement example that MoMA’s doors are open to all. Art is for everyone.

MoMA mission statement

12. Peace Corps : “To promote world peace and friendship by fulfilling three goals: To help the people of interested countries in meeting their need for trained men and women. To help promote a better understanding of Americans on the part of the peoples served.”

Some organizations don’t just dream big, they act on it. The Peace Corps enjoys an outstanding reputation as being an entity of volunteers who are making a difference through their service and commitment to “world peace.” Its mission statement clearly defines the group’s goals and inspires others to embrace those same values.

peace corps mission statement

13. The Walt Disney Company : “To entertain, inform and inspire people around the globe through the power of unparalleled storytelling, reflecting the iconic brands, creative minds and innovative technologies that make ours the world’s premier entertainment company.”

walt disney mission statement

All of Disney’s core values are on display in this lengthy mission statement. In it, you can also find elements that are typically seen in a business plan, including the different products and services (storytelling and iconic brands) and management and organization (world’s premier entertainment company). This is why The Walt Disney Company is a global powerhouse.

The Walt Disney Company mission statement example

14. Twitter : “To give everyone the power to create and share ideas and information instantly without barriers.”

Presidents can’t seem to go a day without Twitter and neither can we. The social media giant has forever changed our way of communicating with the rest of the world as it has elegantly stated in its mission statement, “share ideas and information… without barriers.”

twitter mission statement

15. Airbnb : “To create a world where anyone can belong anywhere and we are focused on creating an end-to-end travel platform that will handle every part of your trip.”

Belonging is a big part of Airbnb’s story. The company wants to regain the feeling of a community and rebuild trust in one another that existed hundreds of years ago when “cities used to be villages.” That’s why, when you do business with Airbnb, you’re also being welcomed into an extensive network of other like-minded people with whom you’ll connect.

airbinb mission statement

16. Casper : “To awaken the potential of a well-rested world.”

casper mission statement

The use of “awaken” in Casper’s mission statement is a great play on words that reflects what they do: create high-quality mattresses and pillows. Casper is indeed an award-winning sleep company solely focused on a single goal, as highlighted in its mission statement, that supports a “well-rested world.”

Capser mission statement example

17. Ikea: “To offer a wide range of well-designed, functional home furnishing products at prices so low, that as many people as possible will be able to afford them.”

Like its products, Ikea tries to be as straightforward with its approach. In its mission statement, we understand that this is a business that wants to be accessible and flexible to just about any budget.

IKEA mission statement

18. Prezi : “To reinvent how people share knowledge, tell stories, and inspire their audiences to act.”

Think about your last presentation and whether it captivated your viewers or not. Prezi wants to push the envelope on the act of presenting. It boldly sets out to change the way we share information in the hope that we can engage our audiences on a whole new level.

prezi mission statement

19. Patagonia : “Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.”

When you shop at Patagonia, you’re also making an investment in the greater case of environmental protection. This is part of a popular shift where more individuals are concerned with ecological sustainability when it comes to production and consumption. During their shopping experience, Patagonia customers want to know that they are not only receiving but also giving back.

patagonia mission statement

20. Sony : “To fill the world with emotion, through the power of creativity.”

At its core, Sony is a company based on innovation. It has banked on its ability to see things differently than the rest. Yet, Sony also wants to reach and fill our hearts, as it eloquently insinuates in its mission statement.

sony mission statement

21. Nike : “To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world.”

nike mission statement

Nike knows that we can’t all be athletes, but this sports company thrives on its ability to inspire us to find the inner athlete in ourselves. Then, Nike adds in its follow-up message, “If you have a body, you are an athlete,” making a definitive call for inclusion in the sports and fitness arena.

Nike mission statement examples

Common mission statement mistakes to avoid

When you are coming up with your mission statement, it is important to be aware of potential pitfalls. Make sure to avoid these 3 common mistakes:

Making it too long. Your mission statement should be concise and to the point, no more than a few sentences long. Many people think that the more they write, the clearer their message will be, but the opposite is true. Sometimes less truly is more. Coca Cola , one of the largest brands in the world gets it right with their short but telling statement " refresh the world, make a difference ." Amazon also opted for a very short one, " to be Earth's most consumer-centric company." This sums up their commitment to customer service.

Making it too vague. Your mission statement should be specific and actionable. It should not be so vague that it is impossible to measure your progress. A mission statement like "to make the world a better place", for example, gives you almost no clue what the company is for or what they want to do. A more effective mission statement might be "to provide clean water to people in developing countries."

Not being unique. Your mission statement should be unique, written only with your company in mind. It should never be a copy of someone else's mission statement. This helps you stand out from the competition and make a positive impression on your customers and employees.

What to do with your mission statement

Once you have your mission statement ready, it’s time to debut it to your team. This will ensure that everyone understands your company's purpose and how their work contributes to achieving that purpose.

Your mission statement should also be a guiding force for your decisions. When you are faced with a decision, ask yourself how it aligns what you have already written. For example, if your mission statement is to "provide quality education to all children," you wouldn't make a decision to cut funding for after-school programs. If the decision doesn't align with your mission statement, then it may not be the best use of your time and resources.

As your company grows and changes, it's important to review your mission statement to make sure it's still relevant. If it isn't, then it may not be as effective in guiding your decision-making or motivating your team.

You can review your mission statement on a regular basis, such as once a year or every two years. When you review your mission statement, ask yourself the following questions:

Does the mission statement still accurately reflect our purpose?

Is the mission statement still inspiring and motivating to our team?

Is the mission statement still relevant to our current goals?

If you answer "no" to any of these questions, then you may need to revise your mission statement.

Mission statement examples FAQ

What is a good mission statement example.

A good mission statement is clear, concise, and memorable. It should be specific enough to guide decision-making, but general enough to allow for growth and change. A good mission statement should also be inspiring and aspirational, and should motivate employees, volunteers, and donors to work hard to achieve the organization's goals.

Here are some examples of good mission statements:

Wix: “Create your own professional web presence—exactly the way you want.”

Google: “To organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

Ted: “Spread ideas.”

What are the 3 parts of a mission statement?

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Productivity

How to Write a Mission Statement for Your Business

January 12, 2023

10 min read

by Agata Chydzinski

Agata Chydzinski

CEO, Co-Founder

Chicago, IL

From retail and food manufacturing, Aggie moved into the world of commercial laundry. As COO and partner of a top producer of laundry equipment, she helped substantially scale the company by growing the team, decreasing expenses, and developing a customer-centric approach.

July 27, 2022

When it comes to defining the purpose of your company, you’ll want to put together an effective mission statement. This is important for your business plan.

When you’re starting your company, you have a bigger picture in mind. When it comes to defining the purpose of your company and what makes it stand out, you’ll want to put together an effective mission statement. This is an important facet of your business plan that outlines why you founded your company and what you’re hoping to achieve. When written properly, your mission statement can serve as a guiding light and a marketing tool.

How to write a mission statement isn’t as complicated as it may seem. Let’s take a look at the definition of a mission statement and the recommendations of our Cultivate Advisors experts to help you write your own.

What Is a Mission Statement for a Business?

Business mission statements outline the purpose and the core values of a business. It helps to set the stage for where you currently are as a business and it only needs to be a few sentences long. The majority of effective mission statements outline what a company does, how it does it, and the reasoning behind the mission.

It’s not uncommon for a mission statement to include information on where a company is based in addition to its target audience or market. While some may include generalized statements about company goals, others may include a company’s core values, philosophy, and noteworthy competitive advantages.

Why Does Your Business Need a Well-Thought Mission Statement?

company mission statement

Whether you’re writing a new mission statement or updating one that you currently have in place, it might cross your mind as to how necessary a mission statement is for your business. In reality, well-written and strategic mission statements are beneficial to both your internal employees as well as your target audience.

A company mission statement provides a framework and jumping-off point when you’re building your brand and helps differentiate yourself from your competitors. From a company morale standpoint, well-written mission statements are an easy way to unite your team and can attract and retain talent . Think of your mission statement as a guide to your employees to show them where you want to take the company.

What Makes a Good Mission Statement?

At this point, you may be wondering how to write a mission statement for a business. The length doesn’t need to be more than a couple of sentences and it shouldn’t be too specific. When thinking of what makes a good mission statement, keep in mind that it should have some sort of employee buy-in to help get them excited about your organization and make them happy to work there.

If you currently have core values that govern how you operate your company, this is a good starting point. Consider what your business is, how you are operating your business, and for whom you’re doing it. Finally, mission statements can change so don’t be afraid to approach them like a living, breathing document.

How to Write a Mission Statement for a Business

At Cultivate Advisors, we like to approach mission statements with a strategic visioning exercise. Here’s an example of how we would help you curate your mission statement.

  • Write a sentence that outlines what your company does in the most basic terms. For example, if you own a catering company, your sentence could be something like “we are a catering company in Chicago”.
  • Next, you’ll want to outline your core values. Your core values are a representation of what is the most important to your company and often include examples such as integrity, teamwork, accountability, diversity, etc. If you don’t yet have core values established, you’ll want to do so before moving forward with the mission statement writing process.
  • Now that you have your core values in mind, the next step in creating a mission statement for a business is to write a sentence that explains how your company does what it does. Then comes writing a sentence that explains why your company does what it does. In the case of a catering company, the “why” could be something like “We want to make catering a simple, enjoyable, and affordable experience”.
  • Finally, reflect on the three sentences that you’ve written and try to combine them so your mission statement is as to the point as possible.

This might not happen overnight and it could take some trial and error to get the statement to a point that you’re happy with, stay patient!

Mission Statement Examples

creating a mission statement for a business

Sometimes, it’s easiest to see mission statement examples to help inspire you. We’ve outlined three mission statement examples for business owners below.

One great mission statement is Southwest Airlines. It reads: “The mission of Southwest Airlines is dedicated to the highest quality of customer service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and company spirit.” As you’ll notice, the company doesn’t say that they’re an airline or will help you get from one location to another. They focus on a commodity experience and put their employees at the forefront.

Starbucks has another interesting mission statement: “To inspire and nurture the human spirit — one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time.” Again, there is no mention of coffee but rather an emphasis on inspiration and a larger company mission.

Glasses Company Warby Parker has another great example of a mission statement: “To offer designer eyewear at a revolutionary price while leading the way for socially conscious businesses.” This mission statement outlines its offerings and unique selling point without being too specific.

Tips for Writing a Mission Statement

Mission statements are not one-size-fits-all and there are different approaches to creating them. There are, however, some dos and don’ts to keep in mind when you’re writing yours:

  • Keep it short: You’ll only want to use a few sentences to write your mission statement. Anything longer and your audience will quickly lose interest.
  • Make it memorable: It’s tempting to write an essay that conveys why your company is so great and why people should care about you, but the most memorable mission statements are short and punchy.
  • Think ahead: Remember that a mission statement is like an investment in the future of your company. You’ll want to keep it open-ended enough that you can tweak it to reflect your long-term goals.
  • Don’t make it too limiting: Don’t get too specific in terms of the service area of offerings. You’ll want to appeal to a larger audience than just your current town.
  • Loop in your employees: Mission statements should include the opinions of your employees so you get their buy-in and so they become passionate about what your company stands for.
  • Don’t be afraid to make changes! Things are always changing in the world of business. If you pivot or expand, your mission statement can as well.

Mission Statement Help Is a Phone Call Away!

Although it might take some time and thought, developing and writing a mission statement is an integral part of your brand identity and appeal. Our leadership development advisors are highly skilled in helping companies like yours develop impactful mission statements. If you’re interested in seeing how we can help, please reach out to our team of experts, we’re happy to help!

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The Art of Words: How to Write the Perfect Mission Statement

Do your customers have the same idea of your company as you do? If not, you need to work on your mission statement.

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When you think about the vision and heart of your company, what comes to mind? Do your employees and customers clearly understand these same ideas? If not, it’s a pretty good sign that you don’t have a clear and effective mission statement.

A mission statement is a concise summary of your business’s purpose, values and objectives. Developing the right mission statement for your company can be a challenge, but once it’s established, it can serve as your guiding principle to ensure your workforce is aligned and to differentiate your company from your competitors.

How to write the perfect mission statement

The most effective mission statements inspire and educate. While the result is a short, concise statement, the process of developing your mission statement can be anything but brief. You can choose to involve as many or as few collaborators as you’d like, but the final message should resonate with everyone at your organization, from the founding team to your frontline workers. 

Follow these steps to craft an effective mission statement:

1. Incorporate three key elements. 

Your mission statement should incorporate three things:

  • Your company’s purpose and the unique service or product it provides – to your customers, the community and employees 
  • The industry your company serves
  • Characteristics that set your business apart from others in the industry

By defining these three elements, you’ll understand the problems your business solves, the customers you’re aiming to serve and how your business differs from your competitors . One way to do this concisely is to share what inspired you to launch your business. Origin stories are often compelling, and incorporating the main elements of yours into the mission statement celebrates your history and future goals.

2. Be informative, yet keep it brief.

Your mission statement must function as a brief introductory statement for your company, defining your company’s purpose. Try to keep your mission statement to no more than 25 words. The longer your mission statement is, the less likely people are to read it. 

3. Share, edit and refine.

Your mission statement needs to resonate with both internal and external audiences. Therefore, your mission statement creation process should include sharing your draft with applicable stakeholders – including some trusted customers, vendors and partners – to ensure the message rings true to your colleagues across the business. Be open to feedback , and tweak your messaging to ensure clarity. 

A common way to ensure your mission statement aligns with all audiences is to develop one statement to share internally and another to share externally. From there, work to consolidate and polish your messaging so it applies to anyone who reads it.

The value of a mission statement

A mission statement is an often-misunderstood element of business. It’s not the same thing as a slogan, which is designed to grab customers’ attention in marketing settings, or a vision statement, which defines the trajectory of your organization. It’s much more precise and strategic.

“Your company’s mission statement is your opportunity to define the company’s goals, ethics, culture, and norms for decision-making,” said entrepreneur Tim Berry. “The best mission statements define a company’s goals in at least three dimensions: what the company does for its customers, what it does for its employees and what it does for its owners.” He added that there are also fourth and fifth dimensions in some cases: what the company does for the community and for the world. [Learn more about the keys to scaling your business .]

Because mission statements must cover a lot of information in a very concise format, you’ll discover that most companies have poorly worded statements that are meaningless and vague. However, if you look at successful companies, you’ll notice that their mission statements are well crafted and incredibly valuable.

So, what makes a mission statement work? Most experts agree that an effective mission statement answers several key questions:

  • What opportunities or needs does our company address?
  • How do we address these opportunities and needs?
  • Who are we serving?
  • What unique value do we provide customers?

This is an oversimplified look at the mission statement development process, but you’ll notice that each of these questions is addressed (in one way or another) in quality mission statements.

Common characteristics of strong mission statements

The easiest way to understand what makes a strong mission statement is to study successful companies’ statements, which can help you identify the common characteristics needed to develop your own.

Let’s look at three case studies and highlight a few of their commonalities. Consider these companies’ mission statements:

  • Sixthreezero: “The bicycle is one of the most powerful movement devices in the world. Our mission is to provide an innovative bicycle experience to all adventurous souls in the world. Empowering people to embark on the most challenging journeys in their life … one bike and one ride at a time.”
  • Sweetgreen: “Founded in 2007, Sweetgreen is a destination for delicious food that’s both healthy for you and aligned with your values. We source local and organic ingredients from farmers we know and partners we trust, supporting our communities and creating meaningful relationships with those around us. We exist to create experiences where passion and purpose come together.”
  • Warby Parker: “Warby Parker was founded with a rebellious spirit and a lofty objective: to offer designer eyewear at a revolutionary price while leading the way for socially-conscious businesses.”

These companies couldn’t be more different. One sells modern bicycles, one serves fresh food, and one is a popular online eyewear company. However, each company does an effective job of revealing these common characteristics of a strong mission statement:

  • It’s succinct. A good mission statement is typically between one and three sentences long. As you can see, these statements differ in length, but they all fit this basic parameter. If the customer or employee wants to learn more about a particular aspect of the statement, they can find this information elsewhere.
  • It focuses on current objectives. Although there are some references to the past, including Sweetgreen’s mention of its founding date, the critical elements of a mission statement describe present goals. These statements effectively describe why these  companies exist and whom they currently serve.
  • It uses strong verbiage. Vague generalities don’t work in a mission statement. Your mission statement should rely on strong language to grab the reader’s attention and speak to your company’s true priorities . Notice some of the words used in these three examples: powerful, innovative, challenging, passion, rebellious and revolutionary. These words jump off the page.
  • It’s unique. While it can be tempting to look to your competitors’ statements to provide the framework for your own, it’s very important for your mission statement to be distinct. These three mission statements are clearly one-of-a-kind.
  • It’s malleable. Contrary to popular belief, a mission statement isn’t some concrete element that holds true year after year. While your company vision may remain the same, your mission statement can shift. It shouldn’t be manipulated often, but it should reflect any new opportunities or company-wide goals that arise.
  • It speaks to the “how.” Every mission statement pays respect to what a company stands for, but only the best mission statements touch on the “how” behind it. In other words, a strong mission statement doesn’t just list objectives; it indicates how these specific objectives are to be accomplished. [Discover the best tools for tracking your business’s key performance indicators (KPIs) .]

Wendy Maynard – a business strategist, marketing consultant and business coach – challenges every company she works with to write a mission statement that’s actionable and quantifiable, not sentimental or nebulous, as this is the only way to extract real value.

“If you have an old wonky mission statement that sounds like a corporate Hallmark card (you know what I’m talking about), then take it and rip it to shreds,” she said. “Then reflect on your true passions and values, and write a mission statement using the guidelines above that reflects the difference your business will make in the world.”

Connect the dots with a mission statement

A mission statement is designed to connect the dots of your business. It brings customers, employees and company leaders together under a single statement that accurately defines the business’s ethos and goals .

Don’t rush it, but the sooner you find your mission statement, the sooner you’ll truly understand and be able to communicate the purpose of your business. Creating a mission statement that accurately reflects the passions and values of your business isn’t easy, but the rewards for doing so are great. 

Larry Alton contributed to the writing and reporting in this article. Some source interviews were conducted for a previous version of this article. 

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Examples

Mission Statement for Business Plan

mission statement of a business plan

Welcome to our comprehensive guide on Mission Statement for Business Plan. Here, we delve into the importance of a compelling mission statement in your business plan, explore exemplary real-world examples, provide a step-by-step process for crafting your own, and share essential tips to avoid common mistakes. Let’s embark on this journey to articulate your business’s core purpose and guide its strategic planning.

What is an Example of Mission Statement for Business Plan?

A mission statement for a business plan articulates the company’s core purpose and direction. Here’s an example:

“ABC Tech strives to make innovative technology accessible for businesses of all sizes, empowering them to optimize operations, enhance productivity, and drive growth. Our mission is to provide high-quality, user-friendly solutions that address our clients’ unique needs and help them navigate the digital landscape with confidence and ease.”

This mission statement clearly outlines the company’s purpose (making innovative technology accessible), their target audience (businesses of all sizes), their value proposition (high-quality, user-friendly solutions), and their desired impact (empowering clients to optimize operations and drive growth).

Mission Statement Examples for Generic Business Plan

Example of Mission Statement for Business Plan

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Crafting solutions for diverse needs, creating positive impact and driving business growth through innovation and integrity.

  • Our mission is to empower businesses with tailor-made solutions, driving growth and sustainability in a dynamic market.
  • Committed to fostering a culture of excellence, our aim is to deliver unmatched value to our clients and stakeholders.
  • Aiming to create innovative products and services that leave a lasting positive impact on society and the environment.
  • Our mission is to be a catalyst for positive change, revolutionizing industries through creativity and cutting-edge technology.
  • Striving to be the trusted partner that sets new standards in reliability, efficiency, and customer satisfaction.
  • Passionate about creating a company culture that promotes diversity, collaboration, and a passion for excellence.
  • Dedicated to empowering businesses with strategic insights, innovative approaches, and customer-centric solutions.
  • Our mission is to be the driving force behind our clients’ success, anticipating market trends and exceeding expectations.
  • Aiming to foster a culture of continuous improvement, innovation, and ethical business practices.
  • Committed to making a meaningful difference through our commitment to corporate social responsibility.

Mission Statement Examples for Food Business Plan

Serving culinary delights that ignite taste buds and create lasting memories, celebrating the power of food to unite people and cultures.

  • Our mission is to delight customers with diverse culinary experiences that tantalize taste buds and create lasting memories.
  • Aiming to celebrate food’s power to bring people together and promote cultural appreciation through our flavorful offerings.
  • Striving to be a culinary destination known for our dedication to quality, sustainability, and customer satisfaction.
  • Committed to using locally sourced ingredients, supporting communities, and promoting environmentally responsible practices.
  • Our mission is to be the go-to choice for food enthusiasts seeking authentic flavors and extraordinary dining experiences.
  • Passionate about crafting dishes that not only taste delicious but also promote health and well-being.
  • Dedicated to promoting food education, fostering a love for culinary arts, and inspiring the next generation of chefs.
  • Our mission is to make every meal a moment of joy, enriching lives through our delectable culinary creations.
  • Aiming to be the culinary innovator, constantly exploring new tastes, techniques, and culinary traditions.
  • Committed to catering to diverse dietary preferences, ensuring everyone can enjoy our delicious offerings.

Mission Statement Examples for Bakery Business Plan

Creating confections that evoke cherished memories, being the neighborhood bakery that feels like home, crafting treats with love and passion.

  • Our mission is to create delightful confections that evoke cherished memories and spread happiness one treat at a time.
  • Aiming to be the heart of our community, where locals find comfort, joy, and a sense of belonging.
  • Striving to use high-quality ingredients, crafting baked goods that taste as good as they look.
  • Committed to delivering confections made with love and attention to detail, leaving customers craving more.
  • Our mission is to be the bakery known for combining tradition and innovation, celebrating the art of baking.

Mission Statement Examples for Corporate Business Plan

Driving corporate excellence with ethics, customer-centricity, and environmental responsibility, fostering a culture of inclusivity and employee growth.

  • Driving corporate excellence through a commitment to ethical practices, employee development, and customer-centricity.
  • Our mission is to be the preferred partner, providing innovative solutions that shape our clients’ success.
  • Aiming to lead by example, demonstrating that corporate success can coexist with social and environmental responsibility.
  • Committed to transparency, integrity, and accountability, earning the trust and loyalty of all stakeholders.
  • Our mission is to be a corporate leader that sets new benchmarks for industry best practices and innovation.
  • Striving to foster an inclusive and collaborative corporate culture that values diversity and encourages creativity.
  • Passionate about making a positive impact in the communities where we operate, giving back and uplifting lives.
  • Dedicated to empowering employees, nurturing their growth, and providing a fulfilling and rewarding work environment.
  • Our mission is to be a force for positive change, actively contributing to a more sustainable and equitable world.
  • Aiming to be the corporate brand synonymous with excellence, integrity, and positive social impact.

Mission Statement Examples for Laundry Business Plan

Making laundry effortless and eco-friendly, providing quality services that surpass customer expectations, striving to be the trusted choice for laundry solutions.

  • Our mission is to simplify and streamline laundry services, making life easier and freeing up valuable time for our customers.
  • Aiming to provide top-quality laundry services that cater to busy lifestyles, offering convenience without compromising quality.
  • Striving to be the laundry service that goes above and beyond, ensuring customer satisfaction with every load.
  • Committed to eco-friendly laundry practices, reducing our carbon footprint while providing exceptional services.
  • Our mission is to be the trusted laundry partner, providing efficient and reliable solutions for all laundry needs.
  • Passionate about delivering laundry services that stand out for their attention to detail and commitment to excellence.
  • Dedicated to creating a seamless and enjoyable laundry experience, with easy-to-use platforms and friendly customer support.
  • Our mission is to give back time to our customers, letting them focus on what truly matters while we take care of laundry.
  • Aiming to be the laundry service that customers can depend on, always delivering quality results and timely service.
  • Committed to continuous improvement, exploring innovative technologies and practices to enhance our laundry services.

Personal Mission Statement Examples for Business Plan

Empowering individuals and enhancing lives, leading with integrity, empathy, and a commitment to positive change, building a legacy that inspires others. See more Personal mission statement examples .

  • My mission is to create a business that empowers others to pursue their dreams and achieve their full potential.
  • Aiming to lead with integrity, authenticity, and compassion, making a positive impact in the lives of my customers and employees.
  • Striving to build a business that aligns with my values and brings out the best in everyone it touches.
  • Committed to being a force for good, using my skills and resources to make a meaningful difference in the world.
  • My mission is to inspire others to discover their passion, take risks, and embrace the journey of entrepreneurship.
  • Aiming to create a business that values work-life balance, nurturing a supportive and collaborative work environment.
  • Striving to be a role model for innovation and creativity, setting an example of fearlessness and perseverance.
  • Committed to building a legacy that leaves a positive and lasting impact on future generations.
  • My mission is to build a business that promotes inclusivity, diversity, and equal opportunities for all.
  • Aiming to be a leader who leads with empathy, compassion, and a dedication to continuous learning and growth.

Mission Statement Examples for Financial Business Plan

Empowering clients to secure their financial future with personalized strategies, delivering financial expertise that transforms lives and drives prosperity.

  • Our mission is to be the financial partner that helps clients achieve their dreams and secure their financial future.
  • Aiming to be a trusted source of financial expertise, guiding clients through life’s financial milestones with confidence.
  • Striving to be a reliable and transparent financial advisor, prioritizing the best interests of our clients.
  • Committed to delivering tailored financial solutions that address individual needs and aspirations.
  • Our mission is to empower clients with financial knowledge and resources, paving the way for financial independence.

Mission Statement Examples for Investment Business Plan

Maximizing wealth and minimizing risks through strategic investment solutions, navigating the investment landscape with foresight and expertise.

  • Maximizing wealth and minimizing risks for our clients through strategic investment solutions and expert guidance.
  • Aiming to be the investment partner that leads clients towards a secure and prosperous financial future.
  • Striving to set new benchmarks in investment performance, focusing on long-term value and sustainable growth.
  • Committed to navigating the investment landscape with foresight and market expertise.
  • Our mission is to be a catalyst for financial success, guiding clients towards their investment goals.

Mission Statement Examples for Product Business Plan

Innovating products that enrich lives, address needs, and inspire creativity, setting new standards with user-centric product offerings.

  • Our mission is to be the driving force behind products that enhance lives, address needs, and spark creativity.
  • Aiming to create a diverse range of products that cater to a wide range of customer preferences.
  • Striving to set new standards in product innovation, design, and functionality.
  • Committed to delivering products that exceed customer expectations and inspire loyalty.
  • Our mission is to make a positive impact in every product we offer, fostering a loyal customer base.

Mission Statement Examples for Restaurant Business Plan

Creating culinary experiences that delight the senses and create lasting memories, being a destination for food enthusiasts seeking unique dining experiences. See Restaurant mission statement examples

  • Creating culinary experiences that delight the senses and create lasting memories for our valued customers.
  • Aiming to be the restaurant of choice for food enthusiasts seeking exceptional flavors and unique dining experiences.
  • Striving to elevate the dining experience through culinary innovation and personalized service.
  • Committed to serving exceptional food with genuine warmth and hospitality.
  • Our mission is to be the culinary destination that celebrates diverse flavors and cultures.

Mission Statement Examples for Hotel Business Plan

Providing exceptional hospitality, comfort, and unparalleled experiences, creating a sanctuary of relaxation, style, and top-tier amenities.

  • Providing exceptional hospitality, comfort, and memorable experiences for our valued guests.
  • Aiming to be the preferred choice for travelers seeking luxurious accommodations and top-tier amenities.
  • Striving to create a sanctuary of relaxation and style, making every stay extraordinary.
  • Committed to delivering unparalleled service and personalized experiences for each guest.
  • Our mission is to be the hotel that guests return to for exceptional hospitality and memorable experiences.

Mission Statement Examples for Construction Business Plan

Building a better world through innovative solutions and sustainable practices, delivering structures that stand as testaments to quality and craftsmanship.

  • Building a better world through innovative construction solutions, sustainable practices, and top-notch craftsmanship.
  • Aiming to be the construction partner that brings clients’ visions to life, ensuring quality and excellence in every project.
  • Striving to set new standards in construction safety, efficiency, and project management.
  • Committed to delivering structures that stand as testaments to quality, durability, and aesthetic appeal.
  • Our mission is to be a force for positive change in the construction industry, promoting sustainability and innovation.

Mission Statement Examples for Retail Business Plan

Empowering customers through top-quality products and unmatched service, setting new retail trends while preserving personalized care.

  • Empowering customers through top-quality products, exceptional service, and an unforgettable shopping experience.
  • Aiming to be the go-to destination for unique and diverse products that cater to various tastes and preferences.
  • Striving to set new retail trends, combining traditional values with modern innovations.
  • Committed to fostering customer loyalty and building lasting relationships through outstanding service.
  • Our mission is to be the retail brand that customers trust and turn to for their shopping needs.

Mission Statement Examples for Online eCommerce Business Plan

Making online shopping a pleasure with diverse products and efficient delivery, redefining the eCommerce experience with a user-friendly platform.

  • Making online shopping a pleasure by offering a diverse range of products, seamless user experience, and efficient delivery.
  • Aiming to redefine the eCommerce experience through a user-friendly platform and exceptional customer service.
  • Striving to be the eCommerce leader, offering convenience, value, and a wide selection of products.
  • Committed to exceeding customer expectations with prompt delivery and unparalleled customer support.
  • Our mission is to be the ultimate online marketplace that caters to every need and desire.

Mission Statement Examples for Startup Business Plan

Revolutionizing industries with innovative solutions and agile practices, nurturing innovation and creativity in a culture of entrepreneurship.

  • Revolutionizing industries with innovative solutions, fostering a culture of creativity, resilience, and entrepreneurship.
  • Aiming to be the catalyst for groundbreaking ideas, transforming them into successful and impactful ventures.
  • Striving to set new standards in business agility, adaptability, and forward-thinking.
  • Committed to nurturing innovation and creating a supportive ecosystem for startups to thrive.
  • Our mission is to be the go-to incubator for entrepreneurial visionaries, empowering them to shape the future.

Simple Mission Statement Examples for Business Plan

Making life better through products and services, delivering excellence, innovation, and customer satisfaction, creating value through ethical practices.

  • Making life better through products and services that deliver excellence, innovation, and customer satisfaction.
  • Aiming to create value for all stakeholders through ethical practices and sustainable business approaches.
  • Striving to be the trusted brand that people turn to first for their needs and aspirations.
  • Committed to making a positive impact in every aspect of our business, from product design to customer support.
  • Our mission is to embody simplicity in our operations, products, and interactions with customers.

Mission Statement Examples for Marketing Business Plan

Empowering businesses to thrive with strategic marketing solutions and brand building, setting new standards in creativity, ROI, and customer engagement.

  • Empowering businesses to thrive through strategic marketing solutions, brand building, and customer engagement.
  • Aiming to be the marketing partner that elevates brands and drives growth through creative and data-driven campaigns.
  • Striving to set new standards in marketing effectiveness, ROI, and customer-centric strategies.
  • Committed to cultivating long-term relationships with clients, understanding their unique needs and goals.
  • Our mission is to be the catalyst for brand success, building lasting connections between brands and their audience.

Mission Statement Examples for Coffee Shop Business Plan

Crafting coffee experiences that awaken the senses and foster community, serving exceptional coffee with warmth and enthusiasm.

  • Crafting coffee experiences that awaken the senses and foster a sense of community among coffee enthusiasts.
  • Aiming to serve exceptional coffee with genuine warmth, creating a welcoming space for coffee lovers.
  • Striving to be the go-to destination for quality coffee and moments of relaxation.
  • Committed to promoting sustainability by sourcing ethical and locally roasted coffee beans.
  • Our mission is to be the coffee shop that enriches lives, one cup of coffee at a time.

Mission Statement Examples for Salon Business Plan

Enhancing beauty and well-being with top-notch services and personalized care, striving to be the go-to destination for beauty needs.

  • Enhancing beauty and well-being with top-notch services and personalized care for every customer.
  • Aiming to be the go-to salon for exceptional hair and beauty services, nurturing self-confidence and inner beauty.
  • Striving to create a welcoming and relaxing environment, making every salon visit a rejuvenating experience.
  • Committed to continuous learning and staying updated with the latest beauty trends and techniques.
  • Our mission is to be the salon that empowers customers to look and feel their best, inside and out.

Importance of a Mission Statement in a Business Plan

A well-crafted mission statement plays a crucial role in a business plan, providing direction and purpose for the entire organization. It serves as a guiding light, aligning the company’s actions with its core values and goals. Here’s why a mission statement is vital for a successful business plan:

1. Defines Purpose and Identity: A mission statement succinctly outlines the company’s purpose, values, and long-term vision, giving it a unique identity. 2. Guides Decision-Making: It acts as a compass, helping leaders make strategic decisions that align with the company’s mission. 3. Sets Direction: The mission statement establishes clear goals and objectives, guiding the company towards growth and success. 4. Inspires Stakeholders: A well-crafted mission statement inspires employees, investors, and customers, fostering loyalty and trust. 5. Enhances Brand Perception: A strong mission statement enhances the company’s reputation and brand perception in the market. 6. Attracts Top Talent: It serves as a powerful tool to attract and retain top talent who align with the company’s mission and values. 7. Facilitates Resource Allocation: The mission statement aids in allocating resources effectively, maximizing efficiency and productivity. 8. Measures Success: It provides a benchmark to measure the company’s progress and success over time.

9+an Effective Mission Statement for Business Plan

Crafting an effective mission statement requires thoughtful consideration and strategic planning. A compelling mission statement should be concise, inspiring, and reflective of the company’s core values and purpose. Here are the steps to write an impactful mission statement:

1. Understand Your Purpose:

Define the company’s purpose, values, and long-term vision, and identify its unique selling proposition.

2. Keep It Concise:

Aim for simplicity and brevity, ensuring the mission statement is easy to remember and understand.

3. Reflect Company Values:

Align the mission statement with the company’s core values and culture.

4. Consider Stakeholders:

Take into account the interests of customers, employees, investors, and the community.

5. Avoid Jargon:

Use clear and straightforward language to make the mission statement accessible to all.

6. Be Inspirational:

Infuse the mission statement with a sense of purpose and inspiration to motivate stakeholders.

7. Test and Refine:

Gather feedback from key stakeholders and refine the statement to ensure its effectiveness.

8. Stay True to the Brand:

Ensure the mission statement reflects the brand’s identity and communicates its unique value.

Fitting the Mission Statement Seamlessly into Your Business Plan

Integrating the mission statement seamlessly into the business plan is essential to ensure a cohesive and purpose-driven strategy. Here are the key steps to fitting the mission statement into your business plan:

  • Introduction: Start the business plan with a brief introduction, highlighting the company’s mission and its importance.
  • Mission Statement Placement: Place the mission statement prominently in the executive summary or introduction section.
  • Alignment with Goals: Ensure that all business goals and objectives align with the mission statement.
  • Strategic Initiatives: Outline specific strategic initiatives that support and fulfill the mission statement.
  • Employee Engagement: Emphasize the importance of the mission statement in employee engagement and motivation.
  • Market Positioning: Position the company in the market based on the mission statement and unique value proposition.
  • Customer Experience: Highlight how the mission statement influences the customer experience and drives loyalty.
  • Regular Refinement: Commit to regularly reviewing and refining the mission statement to keep it relevant and impactful.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing a Mission Statement for Your Business Plan

Crafting a mission statement requires precision and clarity. To ensure its effectiveness, avoid these common mistakes:

  • Lack of Clarity: Avoid vague language and unclear statements that don’t communicate the company’s purpose clearly.
  • Being Too Generic: A mission statement should be unique to the company and not sound generic or clichéd.
  • Overcomplicating: Keep the mission statement concise and straightforward, avoiding unnecessary complexity.
  • Neglecting Stakeholders: Consider the interests of all stakeholders while writing the mission statement.
  • Ignoring Values: Ensure that the mission statement reflects the company’s core values and principles.
  • No Emotional Connection: Craft a mission statement that emotionally resonates with employees and customers.
  • Inconsistent Messaging: Align the mission statement with the overall brand message to maintain consistency.
  • Lack of Relevance: Ensure the mission statement reflects the current market landscape and business goals.

Revising and Updating Your Business Plan’s Mission Statement

A mission statement should evolve alongside the company’s growth and changes in the market. Here’s how to revise and update your mission statement effectively:

  • Regular Evaluation: Periodically assess the mission statement’s alignment with the company’s goals and values.
  • Gather Feedback: Seek input from key stakeholders, including employees, customers, and investors.
  • Stay Relevant: Update the mission statement to reflect changing market trends and customer needs.
  • Capture Growth Aspirations: Revise the mission statement to encompass the company’s future growth plans.
  • Refine Language: Reframe the statement using clear and impactful language to strengthen its messaging.
  • Ensure Consistency: Confirm that the updated mission statement aligns with the overall business strategy.
  • Internal Communication: Communicate the revised mission statement to all employees to ensure a unified vision.
  • Celebrate Milestones: Use milestone achievements as opportunities to revise and refine the mission statement.

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Mission Statement: How It Works and Examples

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A mission statement is used by a company to explain, in simple and concise terms, its purpose(s) for being. The statement is generally short, either a single sentence or a short paragraph.

Key Takeaways

  • A mission statement is used by a company to explain, in simple and concise terms, its purpose(s) for being.
  • It is usually one sentence or a short paragraph, explaining a company's culture, values, and ethics.
  • Mission statements serve several purposes, including motivating employees and reassuring investors of the company's future.
  • To craft a mission statement, consider how your company impacts customers, donors, investors, or your community and why you strive to help these parties.
  • A mission statement might slightly overlap other marketing content, but it is different from a vision statement, value statement, brand, or slogan.

How a Mission Statement Works

Mission statements serve a dual purpose by helping employees remain focused on the tasks at hand, and encouraging them to find innovative ways of moving toward increasing their productivity with the eye to achieving company goals.

A company’s mission statement defines its culture, values, ethics, fundamental goals, and agenda. Furthermore, it defines how each of these applies to the company's stakeholders —its employees, distributors, suppliers, shareholders, and the community at large. These entities can use this statement to align their goals with that of the company.

The statement reveals what the company does, how it does it, and why it does it. Prospective investors may also refer to the mission statement to see if the values of the company align with theirs. For example, an ethical investor against tobacco products would probably not invest in a company whose mission is to be the largest global manufacturer of cigarettes.

It is not uncommon for large companies to spend many years and millions of dollars to develop and refine their mission statements. In some cases, mission statements eventually become household phrases.

Mission statements aren't just for small or large companies. Many successful individuals, professionals, and investors have taken the time to craft a personal mission statement. These personal mission statements often incorporate the financial, professional, spiritual, and relational aspects of life. This, in turn, helps an individual maintain a healthy work/life balance that increases their personal achievement in all of these areas.

While it may be difficult to narrow down the focus of your company in a single statement, here are some tips to help you write a good mission statement.

  • First, outline what your company does. This may be a good you produce or a service you provide to your customers —whatever makes your business run.
  • Next, describe the way in which your company does what it does. Instead of being technical—that's not the point here—think of what values go into the core of your business. Maybe you value quality, customer service, or being sustainable. Alternatively, you may foster creativity and innovation in your business. These are key points to outline in your mission statement.
  • Finally, include why you do what you do in your mission statement. This is key. It helps you stand out as a business, highlighting what sets you apart from the others in your industry. Remember to keep the mission statement short and to the point.

After you've drafted it, remember to look it over, edit it, and have someone else give it a once over. After you've approved it, you'll need to find a way to incorporate it wherever you can. In addition, be mindful to periodically review your mission statement. Although it's never ideal to constantly pivot your image and change your mission statement, your company may outgrow or shift directions resulting in the need of a new statement.

A company’s mission is its identity, and its vision is its journey to accomplishing its mission. A company should take as long as it needs to craft the right statement to describe its mission.

Once a mission statement is crafted, it's up to the company to make it publicly known. A mission statement only holds value if it is shared with existing and potential customers, vendors , donors, or employees.

Because a company's mission statement is often pretty short, it is easy to incorporate into marketing material. A mission statement should always be found somewhere on a company's website. In addition, it can also be used in marketing documents. A company may solicit employees to incorporate adding its mission statement as part of a company-wide standard e-mail signature block.

A mission statement is also a perfect "elevator pitch" sentence that key members of your company should know. Because it's so brief, it is easy to memorize. In addition, it's a perfect introduction for someone who has never heard of your company or wants to know more. Whether it's at a networking event, social gathering, or bus ride to work, a mission statement is an easy way to captivate a stranger's interest in your company should they ask what your company does.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Mission Statements

Companies can benefit from having a mission statement. First, it outlines a company's goals and position in the industry for its customers, competitors, and other stakeholders. It also helps the organization focus and stay on track to make the right decisions about its future.

Furthermore, the mission statement helps clarify a company's purpose. With a mission statement, a company's customers and investors can rest assured that the company is fully committed to achieving its goals and maintaining its values. It is also useful to guide and motivate employees, keeping them in line with the company's values.

Last, a mission statement adds validity to an organization. From the outside looking in, a mission statement demonstrates that a company has considered the big picture and the major goals it wants to accomplish. It demonstrates thoughtful leadership, reputability, and inspiration to potential investors, employees, or donors.

There are drawbacks to having a mission statement. Mission statements may sometimes be very lofty and far too unrealistic, which can distract employees from the company's goals. Management may become too distracted with high-level targets that shorter-term, necessary steps to get there become neglected.

Even though a mission statement is short and concise, it may take a lot of time and money to develop. The resources spent on a bad mission statement could be better spent elsewhere, creating an opportunity loss . The difficulty of crafting such a concise statement is many parties often have ideas, and there's not room for many of them. After the bulk of the work has been done, companies may struggle with "wordsmithing" or simply rearranging words instead of trying to generate value.

Last, by publicly announcing to the world the company's mission, some people on the outside (or even the inside) may disagree with the mission. In the examples below, some individuals may be skeptical of alternative sources of energy and may be scared away when learning of Tesla's mission statement. A mission statement doesn't give much opportunity for a rebuttal to clarify or further explain what a company is all about.

A mission statement is not required, though it may be a grant application for a nonprofit or asked for by an interested investor of a company.

Mission Statement Examples

Mission statements vary considerably from company to company. The following examples are the mission statements of some of the world's largest companies:

  • Nike ( NKE ): "To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world."
  • Walmart ( WMT ): "We save people money so they can live better."
  • Starbucks ( SBUX ): "With every cup, with every conversation, with every community - We nurture the limitless possibilities of human connection."
  • Tesla ( TSLA ): "To accelerate the world's transition to sustainable energy."
  • JP Morgan ( JPM ): "We aim to be the most respected financial services firm in the world."

Mission Statements vs. Other Statements

A mission statement is often confused or grouped with other types of organizational statements. Here are some other types of content and how they vary from a mission statement.

Mission Statement vs. Vision Statement

A company’s mission statement differs from its vision statement. While the mission statement remains unchanged for the most part and represents who the company is or aspires to be for the entirety of its existence, the vision statement can change. The latter outlines what the company needs to do to remain the way it has presented itself to be. In effect, a company’s mission is its identity, and the vision is its journey to accomplishing its mission.

Mission Statement vs. Value Statement

A company's value statement is also centered around a company's core principles and philosophy. However, it is more direct in guiding how decisions will be made and what will impact the daily culture of the organization. A value statement often includes actionable direction such as "taking ownership", "acting ethically", "doing what is right", or "being transparent." Whereas a mission statement describes the highest level of purpose, a vision statement starts to describe how that purpose will be achieved.

Mission Statement vs. Company Goals

A company's goals or business plan may be publicly disclosed or kept private/internal. In general, a company's goals are often even more specific, potentially referring to specific business lines, growth percentages, geographical regions, or new initiatives. While a mission statement often does not mention a specific aspect of the business, company goals are often measurable relating to departments or products so a company can track progress. A company's mission statement should drive the goals that are set.

Mission Statement vs. Brand

A brand is an suite of elements that encompasses a company's identity. This includes its marketing materials, engagement in community events, reviews from current and former employees, and its logo presence. A company's brand is also shaped by its mission statement. Though a small component, a mission statement helps customers, employees, and investors form an opinion of a company.

Mission Statement vs. Slogan

A slogan is a very brief, often memorable phrase that people primarily outside of your company can remember. Utter a great slogan such as "Just Do It" can invoke memories, commercials, logos, brand ambassadors, and emotions through a successful ad campaign . Although a mission statement is brief, it is longer and relatively more detailed compared to a slogan. A mission statement isn't meant to necessarily be catchy; it's meant to be informative and useful for guiding high-level decisions. Alternatively, a slogan is a very pointed marketing phrase used to be memorable even if it is less informative.

A mission statement is a brief description of the overarching meaning of the company or nonprofit. A mission statement does not explain what a company does or how it does it. It attempts to succinctly explain why a company exists and what its purpose is.

What Is an Example of a Mission Statement?

Microsoft's mission statement is: "Our mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more."

What Is in a Good Mission Statement?

A good mission statement is concise. It should be limited to one sentence, though it shouldn't be too limiting as it should encompass the entire company's purpose. A good mission statement also focuses on the long-term goal it wishes to deliver to customers.

How Do You Write a Mission Statement?

There's no single best way to come up with a mission statement. In general, the mission statement writing process should start with considering what a business does for the customers, employees, and general public. It's often best to begin by collecting more content than needed, then later refining the mission statement into a single sentence.

One method of brainstorming ideas of a mission statement is to think about personal experiences from the company. This could also include soliciting ideas or memories from employees. Instead of focusing directly on the narrow business element of your company, embrace the broader aspect. For example, Microsoft did not craft its mission statement around delivering Windows '98. Rather, it crafted its mission statement around the possibilities it presented through its product.

A mission statement is a simple and brief description that encompasses the purpose of a company defining its culture, goals, and values. It helps customers, employees, and investors have a clear vision of the company's top priorities. A good mission statement can also motivate employees and help them stay focused, as well as reassure investors of the company's future.

Nike. " What is Nike's Mission? "

Walmart. " History ."

Starbucks. " Message from Starbucks ceo: A Revitalized Mission for Our Limitless Future ."

Tesla. " About Tesla ."

JP Morgan. " About Us ."

Microsoft. " About Us. "

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How to Write a Business Plan Executive Summary (Example Included!)

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How do you turn your brilliant business idea into a reality? You've done your homework and know that to get investors or partners, you need a business plan . But more than that, you want to really stand out and make a strong first impression—and that's where the business plan executive summary steps in.

This key section gives a quick snapshot of your entire business strategy, and is designed to catch the interest of potential investors, stakeholders, or partners. It can be the difference between landing that dream deal or getting lost in the slush pile.

So, what's better than a business plan executive summary example to point you in the right direction? Below, you'll find a great one—plus tips on what to include, what to avoid, and how to craft yours.

What is a business plan executive summary?

A business plan executive summary is a condensed overview of the key elements of your business plan. It introduces your business, what you offer (products or services), your target market, and what sets you apart from the competition. It also outlines your financial projections and funding needs (if applicable) and gives a clear picture of your company description and vision.

Your business plan executive summary could be decisive in several situations:

  • Pitching to investors: Investors often make preliminary decisions based on the executive summary. A well-crafted summary can get you a meeting and a chance to present your full business plan.
  • Summarizing for stakeholders: Stakeholders need to quickly understand your business's direction and key strategies. An executive summary gives them a concise update.
  • Business competitions: In many business plan competitions, judges rely on the executive summary to decide which plans move to the next round.

Now that you understand the importance of an executive summary in a business plan, let’s see the key components that make up a winning one.

What should an executive summary include in a business plan

Crafting an effective executive summary means transforming the most critical elements of your business plan into a clear and compelling story. It's typically positioned at the beginning of the document but is written last to ensure it accurately reflects the entire plan.

Here are the key parts of an executive summary in a business plan:

Mission statement

Your mission statement is the heart of your business; it can grab your audience's attention and clarify your business’s core values and objectives. Briefly describe your company’s purpose and what you aim to achieve.

Company history and management team

Provide a brief overview of your business’s history, noting key milestones and achievements. Introduce your management team, highlighting their experience and expertise. This section helps build credibility and shows that you have a capable team behind the business.

Products or services

Describe the products or services your business offers, focusing on what makes them unique and how they meet market needs. This part should clearly explain the value your offerings provide.

Target market

Define your target customers, including their demographics, needs, and pain points. Highlight the demand for your products or services and how your business meets this demand. Assess your main competitors, identifying their strengths, weaknesses, and market share.

Competitive edge

Identify what sets your business apart from the competition. This could be unique technology, excellent customer service, a strong brand, patents, or trademarks—anything that really gives you an edge. Emphasize these strengths to show why your business will thrive in the market.

Financial projections

Give a high-level overview of your financial projections, covering revenue, profit margins, and growth expectations. This section should reassure readers about your business’s financial viability and potential for success. Do not forget to include the amount of funding you're seeking and how you'll use it to achieve your goals.

Speaking of funding, you can build your dream business with the help of a high-paying job—browse open jobs on The Muse »

How to write a business plan executive summary: Dos and Don'ts

So, how do you write an executive summary for a business plan? Here's what you should do—and what you should avoid.

  • Hook them early: Start with a captivating introduction that grabs the reader's attention. This could be a strong opening statement or an impactful statistic that highlights your most compelling value proposition.
  • Write with clarity: Keep your language clear and straightforward. Using jargon or technical terms could confuse your audience.
  • Tell a story : People are naturally drawn to stories. Try to frame your business plan executive summary as a narrative that includes challenges and successes.
  • Focus on impact: Prioritize the most important information. Remember, it's a summary, not the full story.
  • Quantify your success: Use data and metrics whenever you can to back up your claims about market size, growth potential, and financial projections.
  • Proofread like a pro: Typos and grammatical errors can leave a negative impression. Double (or triple) check your work before sending it out. Don’t just use spelling and grammar check—actually re-read it to catch any mistakes.
  • Showcase your passion: That should be the easy part. Just let your enthusiasm for your business and its mission shine through!
  • Bury the lead: Don't wait until the end to share your most important information. Start strong and capture their interest right away.
  • Be too vague: Instead, be specific and provide concrete details. Vague statements don’t add value or clarity, so they don't belong in your business executive summary.
  • Ignore your audience: Tailor your summary to the needs and interests of your audience. Consider what they need to know and what will capture their interest.
  • Overpromise and underdeliver: Be realistic about your projections and timelines. Setting unrealistic expectations can damage your credibility.
  • Get bogged down in details: Save the nitty-gritty details for your full business plan. Focus on the key highlights in your executive summary.
  • Forget the call to action: Tell your readers what you want them to do next. Do you want them to invest? Partner with you? Clearly outline your desired outcome.
  • Write in a vacuum: Get feedback from trusted advisors or mentors before finalizing your summary. Fresh eyes can help spot areas for improvement.

Business plan executive summary example

Wondering how these tips look in action? Here's the business plan summary example you've been looking for.

This one is for a fictitious company—let's call it Econnovate—specializing in renewable energy solutions. Use it as a guide to craft your own business plan executive summary.

Mission and vision statements

Econnovate is revolutionizing the energy landscape with innovative, sustainable solutions that empower businesses and communities to embrace a cleaner future. Our mission is to use the power of renewable energy sources to provide innovative, affordable, and sustainable energy solutions to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and create a more environmentally conscious world.

Founded in 2021, Econnovate is a team of passionate engineers and environmental enthusiasts dedicated to developing cutting-edge renewable energy technologies. Our team boasts over 50 years of combined industry experience, including experts in technology, marketing, and operations. Headquartered in Denver, CO, we operate with a global mindset, serving clients across diverse industries and geographies.

Our products

Econnovate's flagship product, SolarMax, is a cutting-edge solar panel system that offers 20% more efficiency than conventional panels. Additionally, we provide EcoBattery, a state-of-the-art energy storage solution that maximizes the utility of our solar panels, ensuring energy availability even during non-sunny periods. Our products are designed to be both cost-effective and easy to install, making sustainable energy accessible to a wider audience.

The global renewable energy market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.8% over the next decade. Our target market includes environmentally conscious homeowners and businesses seeking sustainable energy solutions. With increasing regulatory support and growing environmental awareness, the demand for our products is poised for substantial growth.

Econnovate’s proprietary solar technology not only increases efficiency but also reduces costs, giving us a significant edge over competitors. We not only provide renewable energy solutions but also adhere to sustainable practices in our own operations. Additionally, our exceptional customer service and strong brand reputation further differentiate us in the marketplace. We also offer comprehensive warranties and maintenance services, ensuring long-term customer satisfaction and loyalty.

We project a 30% annual revenue growth over the next five years, with profitability expected to be achieved by year three. Our robust financial model is based on conservative estimates and thorough market analysis. By year five, we anticipate generating $50 million in annual revenue, with a healthy profit margin of 15%.

We are seeking $2 million in funding to scale our manufacturing capabilities and expand our market reach. This investment will enable Econnovate to double production capacity and increase market share by 15% within two years. The funds will be allocated to enhancing our production facilities, boosting our marketing plan, and expanding our sales team.

1. What is an executive summary in a business plan?

It's a concise summary of the key points of a business plan, highlighting the business’s mission, products or services, market, competitive advantages, financial projections, and funding needs. The goal is to give a quick overview that captures the reader’s interest and encourages them to read the full plan.

2. How long should an executive summary be?

An executive summary is typically one to two pages long. It should provide a concise overview without overwhelming the reader. Focus on the most important aspects of your business plan, making sure each point is clear and impactful.

3. Can I use a template to write an executive summary?

Yes! Templates offer an effective structure and help ensure you cover all essential elements. But don't just fill in the blanks. Tailor the template to fit your business and make it your own. (Feel free to use our example as a guide.)

4. Should an executive summary be written in first person or third person?

An executive summary is typically written in the third person to maintain a professional tone. However, if your business plan is for internal use or a more personal presentation, using the first person can be appropriate. The key is to keep your writing clear and professional at all times.

5. How do I make my executive summary stand out?

To make your executive summary stand out, focus on being clear and compelling. Start with a strong opening statement that grabs attention. Use visual elements like bullet points, headings, and charts to make it easy to read. Highlight your unique selling points and ensure your summary is free of complex jargon and technical language.

Remember, your executive summary is often the first impression of your business, so make it count!

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Guide to Business Plan Introduction

Business Plan Template

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  • July 8, 2024

how to write a compelling business plan introduction with example

Be it a blog post, your business plan, or even a grocery list—catchy introductions can turn casual skimmers into avid readers.

Now imagine turning these casual readers into people who hang on to every word, eager to dive deeper into what your business has to offer. That’s the magic of a stellar business plan introduction!

But the main question is: How do you write such an irresistible introduction?

Well, we’ll help you with that in this blog post. We’ve also added a template and an example to enhance your overall understanding.

So let’s get started.

What is a business plan introduction?

An introduction sets the stage for your business plan by offering context and a high-level overview of what the subsequent sections will cover.

It’s different from your executive summary and is placed right after it. Rather than summarizing the entire plan, this section of your business plan focuses on providing essential background information.

Introductions are crisp and can be anywhere between 2 paragraphs to 1 page long.

Why do you need a business plan introduction?

You must be wondering: Why do I need an introduction when there’s an executive summary summarizing my entire plan?

Well, primarily to set the readers’ expectations straight. With its contextual overview, an introduction helps the readers understand what details they will uncover in the plan.

Besides, business plans are quite extensive. If a reader just wants a basic business overview and understanding of your objectives, they shouldn’t have to read your entire plan. An introduction should offer that by providing a quick insight into your business.

Additionally, introductions give your business plan a professional and organized head start. It sets the tone of your plan and generates excitement amongst readers to read further.

Whether you need a business plan to establish credibility for your business or generate funds—an introduction plays a huge role in setting up your business plan for success.

Let’s now understand the process of writing an introduction for your business plan.

How to write a compelling introduction for business plans?

how to write a introduction for business plan

Wondering what you should include in your introduction and how to place it together? Check this step-by-step process and learn:

1. Determine the details

Writing an introduction gets much easier when you have a thorough understanding of what to include in it.

While there’s no fixed rule, here are a few points you can quickly touch in your introduction:

  • Business background
  • Business objectives
  • Management overview
  • Mission statement
  • Core values

However, depending on the specialty or core focus of your plan, you can also include a general overview of a financial plan, marketing plan, target market, competitive analysis, and customer segments in your introduction.

Determine which of these will add value and context to your business plan before creating an outline of your introduction.

2. Create an outline

Before you start writing, take some time to create an outline. It will help you fill in the details more quickly and efficiently.

A general outline or structure of an introduction can be as follows:

  • Opening statement
  • Business overview
  • Purpose of a business plan
  • Preview of each section (optional)
  • Closing statement

You don’t need to cover these sections in detail (specific sections of a business plan will do that). Just a line or two offering a macro overview of these aspects is enough.

3. Write your introduction

It’s now time to write an introduction by filling in the outline.

However, before that, finish writing your business plan . This will help translate the essence of your business plan more efficiently.

Now, place all the information you want to add to your introduction and weave them together in a cohesive narrative. Keep the tone persuasive and the content short.

4. Revise and review

Ask people from your team or someone professional to read your introduction.

Could they gather the context of your plan? Can they merely understand what the business does and aims to achieve from an introduction? Are they compelled to read your entire plan after reading an introduction?

If the answer to any of these questions is no, your introduction needs a revision and rework. Get it right before adding it to your business plan.

That’s how you write an introduction. Not a ninja task after all!

Business plan introduction template

Introductions don’t follow a strict structure. It simply answers a few core fundamental questions and sets the tone for your business plan.

Refer to this business plan introduction template and answer its questions to structure your section.

  • Why are you starting this business?
  • What are the problems you’re trying to solve?
  • Who will buy from you?
  • What makes your business different from competitors?
  • How will you become profitable?
  • When will you become profitable?
  • What can the reader expect from your business plan?

It’s just a template. You can refine and remove these questions to suit your needs.

Business plan introduction example

Refer to this introduction example for a new-age gourmet restaurant, TasteBites, in the city.

TasteBites aims to create a unique dining experience combining gourmet flavors with a cozy, family-friendly atmosphere. Positioned in the heart of downtown, our location is ideal, surrounded by offices and residential areas, ensuring a steady stream of customers seeking high-quality dining options.

Managed by culinary experts and seasoned restaurateurs, TasteBites will feature a diverse menu highlighting local ingredients, catering to various tastes while maintaining high-profit margins. Our strategic location and commitment to quality will establish TasteBites as a beloved dining destination in the community.

The bottom line

Introductions are supposed to be exciting and persuasive. It should offer a true overview of your business opportunity and must reflect your preparedness to start this new venture.

Don’t focus too hard on proving your business’s capabilities in this section. You have an entire plan to do so. The idea here is to excite your readers and nudge them to read your business plan further.

Now, before you work on the introduction, ensure that you have your entire plan ready. If not, use Upmetrics’s AI business plan generator to whip up a fresh business plan in less than 10 minutes.

Build your Business Plan Faster

with step-by-step Guidance & AI Assistance.

crossline

Frequently Asked Questions

Can i modify the introduction after writing the rest of the business plan.

Yes, you can. In fact , it’s r ecommended to review and edit your introduction in the end. By doing so, you can ensure that the introduction covers all the high-value points and that it offers an appropriate contextual overview of your plan.

What tone should I use in the business plan introduction?

You should use a professional confident tone while writing your business plan introduction. The introduction should portray your business in the best light and should confide in the reader’s interest. It should be sincere and subtle; persuading the readers to read your plan till the end.

How can I make my business plan introduction engaging?

To make your introduction engaging, start with a compelling question or statement to highlight the unique aspect of your business. Include details about profitability, new technology, or a strategic location to generate excitement in your readers. And most importantly, adapt a storytelling narrative to keep your readers hooked.

How long should the business plan introduction be?

A business plan introduction is ideally 2-3 paragraphs long. However, if there’s a lot to cover you can extend your introduction to 1 page. Anything longer than that needs to be redone.

About the Author

mission statement of a business plan

Upmetrics Team

Upmetrics is the #1 business planning software that helps entrepreneurs and business owners create investment-ready business plans using AI. We regularly share business planning insights on our blog. Check out the Upmetrics blog for such interesting reads. Read more

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I Started Over 300 Companies. Here Are 4 Things I Learned About Scaling a Business. It takes a delicate balance of skill, hard work and instinct to grow a successful business. This serial entrepreneur loves the unique challenge; here are the key lessons she's learned along the way.

By Dr. Christina Rahm Edited by Maria Bailey Jun 26, 2024

Key Takeaways

1. business success is only possible with passion, 2. your mission, vision and value statements are more important than a business plan.

  • 3. Hiring is essential to scaling a business — so take it seriously

4. Incentivize for good performances and good attitudes

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Starting a business requires a delicate balance of risk, passion, intel, research and confidence in yourself. You have to trust your instinct — and rest on the hard work you've done to prepare for business growth . You also have to weigh potential risks against the confidence and belief that you have what it takes to succeed. I know this dance well; I've started over 300 businesses.

I believe business development is my greatest strength. Building businesses is the outlet for my many interests, from humanitarianism to scientific research and design. I've always enjoyed the unique challenges of business leadership , defining a company's "why" and navigating the choppy waters as a company takes off and grows. It's not for everyone, but it's definitely for me. Business ownership is how I do my part to improve the world around me.

With so many businesses under my belt , I've learned much about scaling companies. Here are my top four tips for successful business growth.

Related: 7 Strategies to Scale Your Small Business and Achieve Sustainable Growth

Every business is unique, and learning what works will require trial and error. For every win I've experienced, there's been at least one failure. Every loss is an excellent opportunity to learn — so trust me when I say I've learned a lot.

My businesses continue to grow because my passion for my work has never faltered. Success is rooted in an insatiable desire to make your dreams come true through every hardship and failure you encounter.

I am passionate about producing products that meet the needs of its customers while also contributing to the greater good. That means creating products that support the health of individuals, animals, and the earth, with environmental attention also paid to land, air, and water conservation. And that means creating sustainable solutions that challenge the status quo scientifically and artistically. This is my calling, which drives me to work hard every day.

No successful entrepreneur can stand behind a business they have no passion for. Having the numbers to prove your dream can reap actual monetary value is one thing. But before that, when it's just you against the world, passion is a vital life source for staying afloat.

Each of my many companies shares one mission: to drive positive change and make a difference in people's lives worldwide. Based on the products and services offered and the teams I assembled, I defined each company's vision (how we'll achieve the mission) and values (the factors that drive our decision-making).

Mission, vision and value work are imperative to achieving business success. They allow you to differentiate your businesses from competitors and ensure that the same compass leads your entire team and makes decisions that positively impact the greater team.

It's far easier to know the "why" and figure out the "how" than to understand the "how" and fabricate the "why." When you genuinely care for the mission you're pursuing, you bring creativity when figuring out the "how," encouraging innovation within the process. Your business plan can come later.

Related: Why I Didn't Go on Shark Tank — and How That Decision Actually Helped Me Scale

3. Hiring is essential to scaling a business, so take it seriously.

You can't achieve growth without a team supporting the business, so hiring is essential when scaling. Your employees need to understand your company's philosophy, and you should emphasize the importance of only hiring employees who align with that philosophy. An employee who ignores the company mission is a burden, and filtering those employees out during the hiring process is imperative. I will vouch for a candidate with less experience and more internal alignment with my company's philosophy than the latter. You want to build a team, not a workforce.

I also practice progressive policies for hiring employees with varied backgrounds and am open to second-chance hiring . Look for the right person to fill each role, and don't exclude people with records, disabilities, or unique experiences. An open hiring policy dramatically expands your pool of candidates and gives you a better chance of finding the perfect fit. If you are too set on hiring employees with pristine backgrounds, you are cutting your company short of massive potential. Employees with differing experiences and viewpoints are essential to innovation. Make a character judgment without letting bias hinder your decisions.

Once you have built your team, you must retain that talent. Don't expect that everyone that works for you views their job as their calling. That kind of view is naive and, frankly, egotistical. Incentivize your employees to work their hardest and bring good vibes to the office, then reward them.

I have no problem compensating for good attitudes just as much as I do good performances. Positive attitudes, a can-do outlook, and a sense of urgency work wonders when your team works towards lofty growth goals. And if you comprise your staff of individuals you care for personally and wish to see thrive, then bonuses and incentives should be a joy to hand out. It means you did your job during the interview process.

I even allow employees to bring their kids and animals to work when needed. Not many CEOs take this approach for fear of being viewed as "weak." However, I encourage entrepreneurs to promote inclusivity at the office and to foster a welcoming environment. I'm willing to accommodate my employee's needs because I value their contributions and want them to know that. The traditional workplace setting was designed for a cookie-cutter type of employee, a mold that not everyone can fit. Celebrate diversity among your staff and encourage a work environment that suits everyone.

To successfully scale a business, I've learned that you need to focus on what matters the most: the passion and mission behind the company and the people who make it function. Invest in those things first, then watch as your business grows.

Entrepreneur Leadership Network® Contributor

Founder of DRC Ventures

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

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Table of contents, a comprehensive guide to a video game development business plan.

  • 1 June, 2024

video game development business plan

Starting Your Business Plan

Before diving into the exciting world of video game development, it’s essential to create a solid foundation for your business. This involves laying the groundwork and defining your vision and mission. By establishing these key elements, you will have a clear direction and purpose for your video game development business.

Creating a Solid Foundation

To create a solid foundation for your video game development business, it’s crucial to have a roadmap that outlines your goals, objectives, and strategies. One way to achieve this is by utilizing a business plan template specifically designed for video game developers, such as the one offered by ClickUp. This template encompasses all aspects of a game development venture, from the overall vision to marketing strategies and projected budgets ( ClickUp ).

By using a comprehensive business plan template, you can structure your ideas and plans in a systematic manner. This will help you analyze and evaluate the feasibility of your business, identify potential risks and opportunities, and create a roadmap for success.

Defining Vision and Mission

Defining your vision and mission is a critical step in starting your video game development business. Your vision statement should articulate your long-term goals and aspirations for the company. It provides a clear picture of what you want to achieve and the impact you aim to make in the gaming industry.

On the other hand, your mission statement outlines the purpose and values of your business. It communicates the fundamental reasons behind your existence as a video game developer and the principles that guide your work. Your mission statement should capture the essence of your business and serve as a guiding light for decision-making and strategic planning.

When crafting your vision and mission statements, it’s important to consider your target audience, the unique value you bring to the gaming industry, and the impact you want to make. These statements should be concise, inspiring, and memorable, reflecting the core values and aspirations of your video game development business.

By creating a solid foundation and defining your vision and mission, you are setting yourself up for success in the dynamic world of video game development. These foundational elements will guide your decision-making, shape your business strategies, and help you stay focused on your goals. As you move forward, remember to refer back to your vision and mission statements to ensure alignment and to keep your business on track.

Market Research and Analysis

Before diving into the world of video game development, it is essential to conduct thorough market research and analysis. This step is crucial for understanding the gaming industry, identifying opportunities, and recognizing the challenges that lie ahead.

Understanding the Gaming Industry

The gaming industry is a rapidly growing sector with a global market expected to reach $293.5 billion by 2027, as reported by Fin Models Lab . North America, in particular, contributes significantly to this revenue. To ensure a successful video game development business, it is crucial to have a solid grasp of the industry’s dynamics.

Understanding various aspects of the gaming industry, such as market trends, player demographics, and popular gaming platforms, is essential for making informed decisions. Analyzing the current state of the industry can help you identify target markets, niche opportunities, and potential areas for growth. By staying up-to-date with industry news and trends, you can adapt your business strategies to align with the ever-evolving gaming landscape.

Identifying Opportunities and Challenges

Market research and analysis also allow you to identify the opportunities and challenges that exist within the gaming industry. By conducting thorough research, you can gain insights into consumer preferences, emerging technologies, and potential gaps in the market.

Identifying opportunities involves recognizing untapped markets, unmet consumer needs, or innovative ideas that can set your video game development business apart from competitors. Whether it’s creating games for a specific genre, target audience, or platform, finding unique opportunities can give your business a competitive edge.

However, it is equally important to be aware of the challenges that come with video game development. These challenges may include intense competition, changing player preferences, technological advancements, and budget constraints. By anticipating and understanding these challenges, you can develop strategies to overcome them and position your business for success.

By conducting comprehensive market research and analysis, you can gain valuable insights into the gaming industry, identify lucrative opportunities, and prepare for the challenges ahead. Armed with this knowledge, you can make informed decisions when developing your business plan for a video game development company. For more tips and guidance on starting a video game development business, check out our article on video game development business tips .

Developing Your Unique Selling Proposition

To succeed in the competitive video game development industry, it’s crucial to develop a unique selling proposition (USP) that sets your games apart from the competition and attracts and retains customers. Your USP is what makes your games stand out and gives them a distinct appeal.

Setting Your Games Apart

To establish a strong USP, you need to identify what makes your games unique and different from the others in the market. This involves understanding your target audience, analyzing competitors, and crafting a compelling value proposition. Consider the following factors when setting your games apart:

Gameplay Innovation : Introduce innovative gameplay mechanics, storytelling techniques, or immersive experiences that captivate players and offer a fresh and unique gaming experience.

Visual and Audio Excellence : Focus on high-quality graphics, stunning visuals, and captivating sound design to create a visually and audibly engaging experience that sets your games apart.

Engaging Storylines : Develop captivating and immersive storylines that keep players hooked and emotionally invested in your games.

Unique Artistic Style : Establish a distinct artistic style that sets your games apart visually, creating a recognizable and memorable brand identity.

Targeted Niche : Identify a specific niche or genre in the gaming market that is underserved or has untapped potential. Tailor your games to cater to the preferences and desires of this niche audience.

Attracting and Retaining Customers

Once you have defined your USP, it’s essential to develop strategies to attract and retain customers. Here are some key factors to consider:

Targeted Marketing : Craft marketing campaigns that effectively communicate your USP to your target audience. Utilize social media platforms, online communities, and influencers to reach and engage with your potential customers.

Customer Engagement : Foster a strong connection with your customers by actively engaging with them through social media, forums, and other online platforms. Encourage player feedback and implement their suggestions to enhance the gaming experience.

Regular Updates and Expansions : Keep your games fresh and exciting by releasing regular updates and expansions that add new content, features, and gameplay experiences. This not only retains existing customers but also attracts new players.

Customer Support : Provide excellent customer support to address any issues or concerns promptly. A responsive and helpful support system can contribute to customer satisfaction and loyalty.

By developing a clear and compelling USP and implementing effective strategies to attract and retain customers, you can position your video game development business for success in the competitive gaming industry. Remember to continually analyze the market, stay abreast of industry trends, and adapt your USP and strategies accordingly.

Financial Planning and Forecasting

To ensure the success of your video game development business, financial planning and forecasting are essential components of your business plan. Determining the startup costs and creating a financial forecast will help you understand the financial feasibility of your venture and attract potential investors.

Determining Startup Costs

Before launching your video game development business, it’s crucial to determine the startup costs involved. These costs can vary depending on factors such as the scale of your operations, the complexity of your games, and the technology and equipment required.

To accurately estimate your startup costs, consider the following expenses:

Technology and Equipment : This includes computers, software licenses, development tools, and hardware required for game development.

Office Space : If you plan to have a dedicated workspace, factor in the cost of rent, utilities, and office furniture.

Staffing : Consider the costs associated with hiring and retaining a team of skilled developers, designers, artists, and other professionals.

Marketing and Promotion : Allocate a budget for marketing efforts such as advertising, website development, and attending industry events.

Legal and Licensing : Include expenses related to legal services, intellectual property protection, and obtaining licenses and permits.

Other Miscellaneous Expenses : Don’t forget to account for miscellaneous expenses such as insurance, taxes, and professional fees.

By thoroughly analyzing and estimating these costs, you can develop a realistic budget and secure the necessary funding for your video game development business. For more tips on starting a video game development business, check out our article on video game development business tips .

Creating a Financial Forecast

A financial forecast is a crucial part of your business plan that demonstrates the economic potential of your video game development company. It involves estimating future financial outcomes and performance based on historical data and analysis of current trends.

The financial forecast typically includes the following components:

Income Statement : This statement projects your revenue, expenses, and net income over a specific period. It helps you understand the profitability of your business and identify areas for improvement.

Balance Sheet : The balance sheet provides a snapshot of your company’s financial position, including assets, liabilities, and equity. It helps assess your company’s financial health and solvency.

Cash Flow Statement : This statement tracks the inflows and outflows of cash in your business. It helps you manage your cash flow effectively and ensures you have sufficient funds to cover expenses and investments.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) : Identify and track key metrics that are crucial for the success of your video game development business. Examples include average revenue per game, customer acquisition cost, and employee productivity.

Accurate financial forecasting enables you to make informed decisions, set realistic goals, allocate resources effectively, and plan for the future. It also provides valuable insights for potential investors who are evaluating the viability of your business. Remember to update your financial forecast regularly as your business evolves.

Financial planning and forecasting are invaluable tools that contribute to the overall success of your video game development business. By carefully considering startup costs and creating a comprehensive financial forecast, you can ensure the financial stability and growth of your company.

Competitive Analysis

To ensure the success of your video game development business, conducting a thorough competitive analysis is essential. This analysis provides valuable insights into the current state of the market, helps identify competitors, and allows you to position your games effectively. In this section, we will explore two key components of a competitive analysis: analyzing competitors and identifying market trends.

Analyzing Competitors

When conducting a competitive analysis for video game development, it’s crucial to dive deep into understanding what your competitors are doing in the market. This involves researching their games, target audiences, and marketing strategies. By analyzing your competitors, you can gain valuable insights and make informed decisions to create a unique and successful game.

One effective approach is to identify similarities between the game you are developing and its competitors. This analysis allows you to understand the current landscape and identify areas where you can differentiate your game. Additionally, analyzing keyword overlap can provide insights into the market positioning of your competitors and help you make strategic decisions regarding your game’s marketing and visibility.

The “Genre Breakdown” section of your competitive analysis is also important. It provides insights into how saturated the genre is for the game you are developing. By looking at factors such as average price, average revenue, and the quantity of games in the genre, you can assess the market potential for your game. Tools like VGInsights.com can be used to gather this data and other market trends easily.

Identifying Market Trends

Identifying and understanding market trends is another vital aspect of a competitive analysis in video game development. By keeping up with the latest trends in the industry, you can make informed decisions about game design, development, and marketing strategies.

To identify market trends, research industry reports, gaming conventions, and news sources dedicated to video game development. Stay up to date with the latest technological advancements, emerging game genres, and popular game mechanics. This knowledge will help you stay ahead of the curve and create games that resonate with players.

Another important aspect of identifying market trends is understanding your target audience. By conducting research on demographics, preferences, and characteristics of potential players, you can visualize your target audience and tailor your game accordingly. This understanding will guide your marketing strategies and ensure that your game appeals to the right audience.

Remember, a competitive analysis is not limited to analyzing your direct competitors. It also involves understanding the broader market landscape and staying informed about industry trends and developments. By conducting a comprehensive competitive analysis, you can position your video game development business for success and create games that captivate your target audience.

Marketing Strategies

In the competitive world of video game development, effective marketing strategies are essential for success. Two key marketing approaches that can help promote your video game development business are leveraging social media and incorporating video marketing.

Leveraging Social Media

Social media marketing plays a vital role in gaining an initial base of targeted audience for a gaming application. By integrating your game with popular social media platforms like Facebook and creating dedicated marketing pages, you can expand the reach of your game and engage with potential players ( Logic Simplified ).

Integrating your gaming application with social media platforms allows users to play the game directly on these platforms and invite more users, enhancing its reach and engagement. This approach leverages the power of social networks to create a buzz around your game and attract a wider audience.

To effectively leverage social media for your video game development business, consider the following strategies:

  • Create engaging and shareable content related to your game, such as game trailers, behind-the-scenes footage, and sneak peeks. Encourage your audience to share this content with their networks, increasing visibility and generating interest.
  • Engage with your followers by responding to comments, addressing concerns, and providing updates on the development process. Building a strong community around your game can create loyal fans who will support and promote your game.
  • Collaborate with influential gamers or gaming communities on social media platforms. Their endorsement and gameplay videos can significantly boost the exposure of your game.

Incorporating Video Marketing

Video marketing is another powerful tool for promoting your video game development business. Platforms like YouTube, Vimeo, and MotionPicture provide a vast audience base and allow you to showcase your game through engaging video content. Videos are not only easy to understand but also more visually captivating than written content, making them an effective way to showcase gameplay, trailers, and tutorials ( Logic Simplified ).

To incorporate video marketing into your strategy, consider the following:

  • Create high-quality gameplay trailers that highlight the unique features and exciting aspects of your game. These trailers should grab the attention of potential players and leave them eager to experience the game themselves.
  • Develop informative and captivating video content, such as developer diaries or behind-the-scenes videos. This gives insight into the game’s creation process, which can help build anticipation and foster a connection between players and the development team.
  • Collaborate with popular gaming influencers or YouTubers who specialize in game reviews or gameplay videos. Their coverage and positive reviews can significantly increase the visibility and credibility of your game.

Remember, while social media and video marketing are important, they should be part of a broader marketing strategy that includes other channels such as niche gaming websites and search engine optimization ( Logic Simplified ). By combining these marketing efforts, you can maximize the exposure of your video game development business and attract a dedicated player base.

As you develop your marketing strategies, keep in mind that every video game development business is unique and requires tailored approaches. Experiment with different tactics, track the results, and adapt your strategies based on what resonates best with your target audience.

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mission statement of a business plan

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mission statement of a business plan

Chancellor Rachel Reeves is taking immediate action to fix the foundations of our economy

In her first speech as Chancellor, Rachel Reeves laid out plans to rebuild Britain and make every part of the country better off.

Rachel Reeves in front of the Union Jack.

Good morning.

Last week, the British people voted for change.

And over the last 72 hours I have begun the work necessary to deliver on that mandate.

Our manifesto was clear:

Sustained economic growth is the only route to the improved prosperity that country needs and the living standards of working people.

Where previous governments have been unwilling to take the difficult decisions to deliver growth…

… or have waited too long to act…

… I will not hesitate.

Growth [political content removed]. It is now our national mission.

There is no time to waste.

This morning I want to outline the first steps [political content removed] taken to fix the foundations of our economy.

So we can rebuild Britain and make every part of our country better off.

But first, let me address the inheritance.

I have repeatedly warned that whoever won the general election would inherit the worst set of circumstances since the Second World War.

What I have seen in the past 72 hours has only confirmed that.

Our economy has been held back by decisions deferred and decisions ducked.

Political self-interest put ahead of the national interest.

A government that put party first, country second.

We face the legacy of fourteen years of chaos and economic irresponsibility.  

That is why over the weekend I instructed Treasury officials to provide an assessment of the state of our spending inheritance so that I can understand the scale of the challenge. And I will present this to Parliament before the summer recess. 

This will be separate from a Budget that will be held later this year – and I will confirm the date of that Budget, alongside a forecast from the Office for Budget Responsibility, in due course.

All governments face difficult choices – and I will not shrink from those choices.

Those choices are made harder, however, by the absence of the economic growth necessary to not only balance the books but also to improve living standards.

New Treasury analysis that I requested over the weekend shows that, had the UK economy grown at the average rate of other OECD economies this last 13 years, our economy would have been over £140 billion larger.

This could have brought in an additional £58 billion in tax revenues in the last year alone. That’s money that could have revitalised our schools, our hospitals, and other public services.

Growth requires difficult choices – choices that previous governments have shied away from.

And it now falls to [political content removed] fix the foundations.

We have promised a new approach to growth – one fit for a changed world.

That approach will rest on three pillars – stability, investment, and reform.

Let me turn first to stability.

In the run-up to the general election, I set out the crucial first steps in our economic plans:

To deliver economic stability, so we can grow our economy and keep taxes, inflation and mortgages as low as possible.

And that commitment stands.

I emphasised this commitment in a meeting with the Governor of the Bank of England on Friday, and I will do the same when I meet the chair of the Office for Budget Responsibility this week.

These institutions are guarantors of our economic stability and I will not be playing games at their expense.

Over the weekend I made clear to Treasury officials that the manifesto commitments that we were elected on will be kept to and they will be delivered on.

That includes robust fiscal rules.

And it includes our commitments to no increases in National Insurance, and the basic, higher, or additional rates of Income Tax, or VAT.

Now I know there are some who will argue that the time for caution is past.

[Political content removed].

That a large majority in Parliament means we have the licence to row back on the principles of sound money and economic responsibility.

I know that many of you aren’t used to hearing this after recent years. But I believe that the promises that a party is elected on should be delivered on in government and we will do so.

We do not take lightly the trust of voters who have been burned too often by incompetence, irresponsibility, and recklessness.

And to investors and businesses who have spent fourteen years doubting whether Britain is a safe place to invest, then let me tell you:

After fourteen years, Britain has a stable government. A government that respects business, wants to partner with business, and is open for business.

In an uncertain world, Britain is a place to do business.

Let me turn to how we will unlock private investment that we so desperately need.

[Political content removed] …plans to launch a new National Wealth Fund, with a remit to invest – and so to catalyse private sector investment – in new and growing industries.

And in March, the former governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, agreed to lead a Taskforce on the establishment of a new National Wealth Fund.

I can tell you today that I have received the report from that Taskforce, and I will be announcing the next steps in short order.

Alongside investment must come reform.

Because the question is not whether we want growth, but how strong is our resolve – how prepared are we to make hard choices and face down the vested interests;

How willing, even, to risk short-term political pain to fix Britain’s foundations.

The story of the last fourteen years has been a refusal to confront the tough and responsible decisions that are demanded.

This government will be different.

And there is no time to waste.

Nowhere is decisive reform needed more urgently than in the case of our planning system.

Planning reform has become a byword for political timidity in the face of vested interests and a graveyard of economic ambition.

Our antiquated planning system leaves too many important projects getting tied up in years and years of red tape before shovels ever get into the ground.

We promised to put planning reform at the centre of our political argument – and we did.

We said we would grasp the nettle of planning reform – and we are doing so.

Today I can tell you that work is underway.

Over the weekend, I met with the Prime Minister and the Deputy Prime Minister to agree the urgent action needed to fix our planning system.

Today, alongside the Deputy Prime Minister, I am taking immediate action to deliver this [political content removed] government’s mission to kickstart economic growth;

And to take the urgent steps necessary to build the infrastructure that we need, including one and a half million homes over the next five years.

The system needs a new signal. This is that signal.

First, we will reform the National Planning Policy Framework, consulting on a new growth-focused approach to the planning system before the end of the month, including restoring mandatory housing targets.

And, as of today, we are ending the absurd ban on new onshore wind in England. We will also go further and consult on bringing onshore wind back into the Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects regime, meaning decisions on large developments will be taken nationally not locally.

Second, we will give priority to energy projects in the system to ensure they make swift progress…

… and we will build on the spatial plan for Energy by expanding this to other infrastructure sectors.  

Third, we will create a new taskforce to accelerate stalled housing sites in our country…

…beginning with Liverpool Central Docks, Worcester Parkway, Northstowe and Langley Sutton Coldfield, representing more than 14,000 homes.

Fourth, we will also support local authorities with 300 additional planning officers across the country.

Fifth, if we are to put growth at the centre of our planning system, that means changes not only to the system itself, but to the way that ministers use our powers for direct intervention.

The Deputy Prime Minister has said that when she intervenes in the economic planning system, the benefit of development will be a central consideration and that she will not hesitate to review an application where the potential gain for the regional and national economies warrant it.

… and I welcome her decision to recover two planning appeals already, for data centres in Buckinghamshire and in Hertfordshire.

To facilitate this new approach, the Deputy Prime Minister will also write to local mayors and the Office for Investment to ensure that any investment opportunity with important planning considerations that comes across their desks is brought to her attention and also to mine.

The Deputy Prime Minister will also write to Local Planning Authorities alongside the National Planning Policy Framework consultation, making clear what will now be expected of them…

…including universal coverage of local plans, and reviews of greenbelt boundaries. These will prioritise Brownfield and grey belt land for development to meet housing targets where needed.

And our golden rules will make sure the development this frees up will allow us to deliver thousands of the affordable homes too, including more for social rent.

Sixth, as well as unlocking new housing, we will also reform the planning system to deliver the infrastructure that our country needs.

Together, [political content removed] we will ask the Secretaries of State for Transport and Energy Security and Net Zero to prioritise decisions on infrastructure projects that have been sitting unresolved for far too long.

And finally, we will set out new policy intentions for critical infrastructure in the coming months, ahead of updating relevant National Policy Statements within the year.

I know that there will be opposition to this.

I’m not naïve to that;

And we must acknowledge that trade offs always exist: any development may have environmental consequences, place pressure on services, and rouse voices of local opposition.

But we will not succumb to a status quo which responds to the existence of trade-offs by always saying no, and relegates the national interest below other priorities.

We will make those tough decisions, to realise that mandate. 

Be in no doubt – we are going to get Britain building again.

We are going to get Britain’s economy growing again.

We will end the prevarication and make the necessary choices to fix the foundations:

We will introduce a modern industrial strategy, to create good work and drive investment in all of our communities.

We will reform our skills system, for a changing world of work.

We will tackle economic inactivity and get people back to work.

We will take on the hard work of reforming our public services, to make them fit for the future.

We will work closely with our national, regional and local leaders to power growth in every part of Britain.

And we will turn our attention to the pensions system, to drive investment in homegrown businesses and deliver greater returns to pension savers.

I know the voters’ trust cannot be repaid through slogans or gimmicks – only through action, only through delivery.

The Treasury I lead is proceeding on that basis.

I was appointed to this post less than 72 hours ago.

Upon my arrival, I told Treasury staff that the work starts straight away.

That work has begun.

I have commissioned and received economic analysis from HMT officials on the lost growth of the past 14 years, which I have set out today.

I have instructed Treasury officials to prepare an assessment of the state of our spending inheritance, to be presented to Parliament before the summer recess.

I have started working with the Prime Minister, to make the necessary preparations for the establishment of a Growth Mission Board, and that board will meet before summer recess, focused squarely on reviving our country’s economic growth and prosperity

I have established a new Growth Delivery Unit here, at the heart of  the Treasury.

I have received the recommendations of the National Wealth Fund Taskforce, and will shortly be announcing next steps.

There is much more to do.

More tough decisions to be taken.

You have put your trust in us.

And we will repay that trust.

The work towards a decade of national renewal has begun.

And we are just getting started.

Thank you very much.

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IMAGES

  1. Mission Statement Template

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COMMENTS

  1. 15 Mission Statement Examples For Your Business

    3. Capture your why. Think about why you started your business in the first place, and what impact you hope to make. Customers want to know the backstory for a brand and why they should feel ...

  2. How to Write a Mission Statement + 10 Great Examples

    This is really an extension of the mission statement and explains how they focus on their customers, how they grow their company, and how they work with employees. You can read their values here. 5. Walgreens. "Walgreens' mission is to be America's most-loved pharmacy-led health, well-being, and beauty retailer.

  3. The 28 Best Mission Statement Examples (+Templates!)

    🌱 Download our free, editable growth strategy template to walk through seven simple steps for creating the right plan to grow your business.. Mission statement vs vision statement vs values. Mission statements often get confused with other aspects of a brand's identity, so let's separate them out:. Mission statement: This is what you do, why you do it, how you do it, and what value you ...

  4. Free Mission Statement Template (With Examples)

    A mission statement is action-oriented and focuses on how an organization operates in the present. It is grounded in the reality of what the organization is currently doing and is often used as a ...

  5. How to Write a Mission Statement (With 75 Examples)

    Mission Statement Examples. Apple: "To bring the best user experience to customers through innovative hardware, software and services.". Procter & Gamble: "To provide branded products and services of superior quality and value that improve the lives of the world's consumers, now and for generations to come.".

  6. Mission statement examples: 16 of the best to inspire you

    It belongs deep in the bowels of a strategic plan, not as it's headline. On the other hand, the real Starbucks mission statement makes us want to be a part of it all. ... But by concentrating on the "why" not the "what" of the business, this mission statement example remains flexible and agile. No matter where the market moves ...

  7. 30 Mission Statement Examples and How to Write one for Your Business

    Uber. "To ignite opportunity by setting the world in motion.". Uber's mission statement reflects its focus on innovation and technology, while also emphasizing its commitment to providing opportunities for people. It communicates the company's values and purpose in a clear and concise way.

  8. Business Plan Mission and Vision Statement [Sample Template for 2022]

    1. The mission is the foundation on which your business will be built. It's the true purpose of your business and that purpose is reflected in the mission statement. Without a strong mission statement, you don't have a true business. All you have is just a profit making venture that will soon be wiped out with time.

  9. How to Write an Effective Mission Statement in 3 Steps

    Having that is the first step toward writing a mission statement for your company. Whether you're a small business owner or the chairman of a Fortune 500 company, you've probably thought about why you do what you do. If you're serious about your business, it's because you have a sense of mission.

  10. How to write an effective mission statement (with free template)

    By making your mission statement visible to the clients and customers, companies show what they stand for and what they strive to achieve—both as an internal workforce and with the products or services they sell. 1. Asana. "To help humanity thrive by enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly.".

  11. What is a Mission Statement? A Must-Use Guide + Cheat Sheet

    Mission Statement - Why You Exist. States why your organization exists and articulates your core purpose. Written in the present tense. Helps define the area where you play. Vision Statement - Where You're Going. States your organization's bold vision for the future and why that is important. Written in a future tense.

  12. How to Write a Mission Statement for Your Business

    1. Communicate Business Values. The main purpose of a mission statement is to clearly express what your business is all about, including your company values. A unique, memorable mission statement can provide you with a competitive advantage by differentiating you from the competition. 2.

  13. 35 Vision And Mission Statement Examples That Will Inspire Your Buyers

    Starbucks: To inspire and nurture the human spirit — one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time. Google: Google's mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful. 1. Life Is Good: To spread the power of optimism.

  14. How to Write an Unforgettable Mission Statement (With Examples)

    You probably know a lot of mission statements without realizing it. We've gathered 25 of the best mission statement examples available in the world to help you create a great mission statement for your business plan. 1. Microsoft. "To empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.". 2.

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    Examples of effective mission statements. Here are examples of effective mission statements from well-known brands. These mission statements briefly define the organization, its purpose and its ...

  16. How to Write a Mission Statement for Business Plan With Examples

    Here are some examples of well-crafted mission statements by famous companies: 1. Starbucks. To inspire and nurture the human spirit - one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time. In the first part of the statement, Starbucks describes the work culture it promotes and the customer service delivered.

  17. How to Write a Mission Statement

    Here are some easy ways to make your company's mission statement better: Be short and clear: Keep your mission statement under 150 words. Use strong words to show what your company wants to achieve. Think about the future: Make sure your mission statement talks about what your company will do in the future. Even if things change, your mission ...

  18. 21 Powerful Mission Statement Examples That Stand Out

    A good way to put it is that a mission statement describes the business in the present, whereas a vision statement describes the business in the future, giving employees and customers a sense of what the company is working towards. ... In it, you can also find elements that are typically seen in a business plan, including the different products ...

  19. How to Write a Mission Statement for Your Business

    As COO and partner of a top producer of laundry equipment, she helped substantially scale the company by growing the team, decreasing expenses, and developing a customer-centric approach. When it comes to defining the purpose of your company, you'll want to put together an effective mission statement. This is important for your business plan.

  20. How to Write the Perfect Mission Statement

    Follow these steps to craft an effective mission statement: 1. Incorporate three key elements. Your mission statement should incorporate three things: Your company's purpose and the unique service or product it provides - to your customers, the community and employees. The industry your company serves.

  21. How To Write a Mission Statement (With Template and Examples)

    A mission statement is a short message that explains the company's purpose and primary driver. Usually, you can find a company's mission statement included in its business plan, specifically as a part of the executive summary. Many companies publish their mission statements on their websites, so their prospective customers can read them.

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    A compelling mission statement should be concise, inspiring, and reflective of the company's core values and purpose. Here are the steps to write an impactful mission statement: 1. Understand Your Purpose: Define the company's purpose, values, and long-term vision, and identify its unique selling proposition. 2.

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    Here are the key parts of an executive summary in a business plan: Mission statement. Your mission statement is the heart of your business; it can grab your audience's attention and clarify your business's core values and objectives. Briefly describe your company's purpose and what you aim to achieve. Company history and management team

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    Wondering what is a business plan introduction and how to write one? Read this blog post and get everything you need to write an engaging introduction. Read now. ... Mission statement; Core values; However, depending on the specialty or core focus of your plan, you can also include a general overview of a financial plan, marketing plan, target ...

  26. How to Write a Business Plan

    1. Draft an Executive Summary and Mission Statement. The executive summary belongs at the top of your business plan. It's your opportunity to grab your reader's attention by highlighting all ...

  27. I Started Over 300 Companies. Here Are 4 Things I ...

    Your mission, vision and value statements are more important than a business plan. Each of my many companies shares one mission: to drive positive change and make a difference in people's lives ...

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    Here's a business plan example of a competitor analysis for a new plumbing company planning to launch in the Epsom area of Surrey. Step 4: Complete a SWOT analysis. SWOT stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is a very important part of your business plan, because it helps you drill down into your idea.

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    Your mission statement should capture the essence of your business and serve as a guiding light for decision-making and strategic planning. When crafting your vision and mission statements, it's important to consider your target audience, the unique value you bring to the gaming industry, and the impact you want to make.

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