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Can't get the right answer while finding angle in C#

I am doing this Introduction To Unity course from coursera. I have reached at first programming assignment which is to find the hypotenuse and angle of two points. I almost got the code right but a few answers are right and a few are wrong! I don't know what is wrong.

You can see the code I added after the Add Your Code comment, so I have succeeded in finding the hypotenuse correctly but angle is where I am going wrong!

These are the two lines to find the angles. So when I input points 5 5 4 4 it gives me correct angle with Math.PI - 180 in the second line but at the same time when I input 2 2 4 4 it gives me wrong answer.

So I played with it for a while and added Math.PI + 180, so this time I got the right angle for 2 2 4 4 and wrong answer for 5 5 4 4. I just don't know where I am going wrong!

Some help would be highly appreciated!

derHugo's user avatar

  • 1 What is the expected result, and what is the actual result you are getting? –  JonasH Commented Feb 26, 2021 at 13:20
  • 1 How exactly is this related to Unity3d ... ? –  derHugo Commented Feb 26, 2021 at 14:55
  • 1 See TonyMkenu's answer. Check the documentation for Math.Atan2(value), which I suspect will yield a surprise for you about how it handles positive and negative X and Y values passed in as arguments. Oftentimes people create reusable functions such as degreesToRadians() and degreesToRadians(). Having separate functions would also make it easier for you to test what happens for angles from 0 to 360 degrees. –  Rethunk Commented Feb 26, 2021 at 16:06
  • @derHugo Never said the program is related to unity, just said Im doing this course –  Jon Commented Feb 26, 2021 at 18:03
  • 1 @Rethunk thanks, will definitely look out! –  Jon Commented Feb 26, 2021 at 18:03

TonyMkenu's user avatar

  • Thanks the formula worked, I tweaked it a bit and added -180 in the end and got the right answers! –  Jon Commented Feb 26, 2021 at 18:11

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programming assignment it's all greek to me

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It's all Greek to me

Something doesn't just add up.

And this is barely a puzzle .

How can everything be so important?

Maybe there's an alternate way to find the answer to what this OP is craving?

The sum of the parts is equal to the whole.
Something does actually add up. But if at first you don't succeed, try again.
There happens to be an entirely different and unrelated answer from what I had in mind that I will accept as well. By happenstance I stumbled upon it and it nearly fits perfectly.
  • enigmatic-puzzle

mkinson's user avatar

  • $\begingroup$ I added a hint above. If you want another let me know. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Jan 22, 2017 at 11:23
  • $\begingroup$ I sure do!!! 😄 $\endgroup$ –  shalvah Commented Jan 23, 2017 at 14:57
  • $\begingroup$ I just added another hint today. This one is a bit more important than the first. This puzzle does not have an obvious solution at first; however you will know when you come to the correct answer based on the puzzle itself. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Jan 23, 2017 at 15:12
  • $\begingroup$ This wouldn't happen to involve greek numerals now would it...? $\endgroup$ –  tox123 Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 2:35
  • $\begingroup$ This was my first puzzle written so it's a bit of a clumsy one, I'm afraid. The words used were very specific, but it may need another hint for people to get onto the right track. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Apr 3, 2018 at 14:59

7 Answers 7

I think the answer is

Considering only the first para is relevant-

Something doesn't add up ... Plus this is barely a puzzle . How can everything be so important ? There must be an alternate way to find the answer ... Assuming there is a Morse Code hidden in the para. And, ?=Dash & .=DOT we get ... . - ... -> SETS So OP is craving for SETS :)

Techidiot's user avatar

  • $\begingroup$ A good effort, but it's a bit more complicated than that. There are key words in the riddle that are used to derive the answer. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Jan 22, 2017 at 11:17

I don't have hard evidence, but I think the OP is craving

Reasoning below, admittedly, this is essentially guesswork.

The terms "Add up" and "Plus" point to something mathematical. The question asks about a craving, indicating food. Considering the title, "It's all Greek to me", we're looking for something Greek, mathematical and alimentary. Therefore, Pi, as a Greek letter, a mathematical constant, and phonetically, a dish, fits pretty well.

karhell's user avatar

  • $\begingroup$ The words "plus" and "add up" are big hints; however, I may have made this riddle too ambiguous. It was one of my first. If you want another hint let me know. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Feb 19, 2017 at 1:48
  • 1 $\begingroup$ I think this is the right track, considering (cv vf gur inyhr bs fbzr snzbhf nygreangvat vasvavgr fhzf!) $\endgroup$ –  AxiomaticSystem Commented Aug 25, 2021 at 14:45

All the clues seem to point towards it being:

Sigma (a greek letter)

For the reasons that

The symbol $\Sigma$ is used for summation in mathematics, also from hint number two "If you first don't succeed" seems to be talking about error, the lower case sigma $\sigma$ is usually used to denote errors.

However I'm not sure what this ties into as far as something the OP desires unless:

They want to be 18 (sigma is the 18th letter of the greek alphabet or make-up brushes .

Lio Elbammalf's user avatar

  • $\begingroup$ Good reasoning. As I stated in a comment above I may have made this a little too ambiguous, being my first riddle. There are important words that should be taken into consideration. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Feb 19, 2017 at 1:49

Is OP craving

Take the number of words in each line and add them up: 5+6+6+6+9+6=38. Add 3 and 8 (suggested by hint 2): 3+8=11. The 11th letter in the Greek alphabet is lambda (lamb).

Asteria's user avatar

  • $\begingroup$ So far your idea is the closest to what I had in mind. Not quite, but close. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Feb 15, 2018 at 1:28

I think it's:

Something doesn't just add up. And this is barely a puzzle. If I count all the syllables in this sentence I get 15 . Since it doesn't add up I assume one is missing to get 16 or P How can everything be so important? If I simply count all the syllables in this sentence I get 9 or I . Each line must provide a clue. Maybe there's an alternate way to find the answer... Adding up the syllables in these two lines I find 20 or T . Maybe there's an alternate way to find the answer... This lead me to count all the syllables including 'To what OP is craving...' this is exactly 52 . If I add the one added from the previous 'doesn't add up' I get 53 . If I mod 26 then I get 1 or A . Combined with the title It's all Greek to me . I have to assume PITA is what you crave.
Staggering Elk Lager BTW it's a real beer, see: http://www.pintley.com/beer/Staggering-Elk-Lager/5027/
Hints and text suggest the question didn't need much/any text. Treating the title as a cryptic clue... It's all Greek to me Anagram of "all Greek" is "Elk Lager" So a staggering "Elk Lager" could be "all Greek"

Bohemian's user avatar

  • $\begingroup$ The title is certainly important, but this sadly is not the answer I'm looking for.. although I may indeed crave it later. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Jan 22, 2017 at 15:44

Inspired by @Asteria's answer Maybe its-

Η η eta, ήτα

Explanation

Counting all the letters from each line and adding them Something doesn't just add up. COUNTS - 9 6 4 3 2 SUM -24 FURTHER SUM - 6 And this is barely a puzzle. COUNTS - 3 4 2 6 1 6 SUM -22 FURTHER SUM - 4 How can everything be so important? COUNTS - 3 3 10 2 2 9 SUM -29 FURTHER SUM - 11 AGAIN FURTHER SUM - 2 Each line must provide a clue. COUNTS - 4 4 4 7 1 4 SUM -24 FURTHER SUM - 6 Maybe there's an alternate way to find the answer... COUNTS - 5 6 2 9 3 2 4 3 6 SUM - 40 FURTHER SUM - 4 To what this OP is craving. COUNTS - 2 4 4 2 2 7 SUM - 21 FURTHER SUM - 3 Adding all the FURTHER SUM 6 + 4 + 11 + 6 + 4 + 3 = 34 And 3 + 4 = 7 Alternatively Adding all the FURTHER SUM and instead of 11 I added 2(11's digit sum) (for alternative approach) we get 25 2 + 5 = 7 By both way we get 7 and hence the 7th Greek alphabet.

prit.patel's user avatar

  • $\begingroup$ Very close! However, not every word needs to be part of the sum. E.g. "And" $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Apr 5, 2018 at 11:20
  • $\begingroup$ Great idea on adding sums, definitely on the right track! The puzzle did not count the number of letters, but you're certainly the closest in concept for the solution. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Apr 5, 2018 at 11:24
  • $\begingroup$ Something entertaining about this answer is that the 7th letter of the Greek alphabet sounds like "eat a". You have the right idea, but not quite there. $\endgroup$ –  mkinson Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 12:13

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programming assignment it's all greek to me

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

Instructor’s Guide

How can I use this textbook?

  • This textbook is TOO LONG!
  • Start with content/trigger warnings
  • CEFR Levels: Pre-Test

How can I implement discussion questions?

Other kinds of class discussion types, lesson planning for different goals.

There are many ways to use this textbook, and it should be flexible enough to meet all your needs. You could just go through the textbook as is, or you can choose some of the extra resources here or here to have students read or listen to.

You could have students focus only on the stories, or focus only on stories that have academic readings tied in. You could have students read some of the stories, or watch videos or listen to audio of them instead. It’s all up to you and your focus and goals. Click here to see more specific lesson plan advice for different goals.

Unit 1 has a chapter about discussion questions . I have used discussion questions for listening activities, but they can also be used for reading activities as well. You can check out some example discussion questions students have made here .

This textbook was designed to be all-encompassing: it is your choice of whether you want to focus on reading, writing, speaking, or listening skills, or a combination of skills.

Back to top

This textbook is too long!

I know, I know…I am sorry but I keep finding cool stuff to share with you! As a teacher, I have always been exasperated by the lack of resources sometimes, so I want to make sure you have enough materials to choose from to have a great course.

Except for the organization and the flow of topics, this textbook was not designed to be used from beginning to end straight-through. There are some chapters that can be skipped to save time that won’t affect the overall end of the unit writing assignment or presentation topics. Below is a list of the stories that I believe are the most important ones to cover, chosen by the high number of vocabulary words that come from the stories and/or value to critical thinking in class discussion, presentations, or essay writing. However, I also suggest you take a look at my course suggestions for what to focus on. The suggestions below are also good if you want to do an alternating story/article lesson plan as well.

  • Article: Why Study Greek Mythology?

Story: Part 1: The Creation Story

Story: Part 2: The War of the Titans

Story: Part 3: The Olympian Pantheon

  • Article: American Neoclassicism
  • Do you want to also cover the Olympics ? Space? More architecture ?

Story: Hades and the Underworld

Story: Sisyphus and Tantalus

Story: Prometheus and Pandora

  • You can choose between neither–or one: Article: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos or Allegory of the Cave

Story: The Trojan War Part 1: The Apple of Discord

Story: The Trojan War Part 2: Achilles and Hector

Story: The Trojan War Part 3: The Wooden Horse

  • Article: The Hero’s Journey
  • Story: The Adventures of Hercules
  • Story: The Odyssey
  • If you don’t focus on  Story: Jason and the Argonauts or  Story: Perseus and Medusa for one of your goals, you could assign individual students or groups to tackle one of the rest of the hero’s stories in a presentation and have them explain how the story related to the Hero’s Journey. Having them work on one story in groups and then participate in a Jigsaw discussion might be a good idea.
  • Story: Oedipus the King
  • Story: Daedalus and Icarus
  • Story: King Midas and the Golden Touch
  • Story: Arachne
  • Story: Echo and Narcissus
  • Story: Cupid and Psyche
  • This is another good chapter where you could assign students or groups to read one of the remaining stories and summarize them in a presentation, focusing on the theme of metamorphosis. Having them work on one story in groups and then participate in a Jigsaw discussion might be a good idea.

start with content/trigger warnings

The idea of instructors using content or trigger warnings is a controversial one, but if you are dealing with international students who may not be familiar with the American or Western education system, I have found student satisfaction to be much better when I preface what we are going to learn in class with information about what they will learn during the term and why.

nudity in western art

Unless you have students from Europe or South America, most of your international students will not be familiar with Greek myths and thus the strange art that goes along with it. You should inform students that much art concerning these stories contains nudity, and maybe do some research as to why this is the case. If you are teaching in higher ed, emphasize that they are adults and should be able to handle this art and these topics in a mature manner. If this is for high school, you may want to create a note informing parents of these warnings as well. If your audience is too young or you feel it would be too much trouble with these images, don’t forget that all story text has been adapted from public domain, and you also have the permission to adapt the text from this website if you do not want to use the pictures or want to edit out sensitive or “obscene” story elements.

rape, incest, bestiality

Some stories in this textbook have implied sexual assault and rape. Some texts in the additional materials also reference rape and sexual assault. Some stories involve incest (in the beginning, as there weren’t many gods in the first place), and some involve bestiality. In ancient Greek religion, rape seemed to be something allowed to the gods only; it was punishable for humans. Bestiality, too, was a horrible, punishable act. You may want to review how religion functioned in Greek society .

race and cultural appropriation

Recently, the world of Classicism has been rocked with allegations of sexism and racism . But there are two things interesting to note–that Greece and the Mediterranean area is racially diverse–and the ancient Greeks knew and didn’t really care . Also, there is new evidence that most of the white statues you see in museums were actually painted . They were not created in white to symbolize a desired skin color, but as a neutral painting surface. In the past, Hitler used the ancient Greeks (for unknown reasons) to push his idealogy of a perfect race, the Aryans (which are actually people of Indo-Iranian descent), and thus now those who call themselves “Alt-Right” have also latched onto the ancient Greek as the ideal man.

As far as these ideas go, this textbook was not created to push any idea that Western civilization is ideal or better than others, or ever was. Emphasize to students that the goal of this course is to help them improve their English with interesting stories and some insight into why American culture is the way it is, as we have borrowed not only vocabulary from the Greeks and their stories, but also ideas of democracy, philosophy, and morality, brought to the US by European immigrants. This is not to say that the Western or American style of education is best, but that if students want to study in the US, this textbook can help them get adjusted and understand American culture more.

Finally, with this emphasis, note that this information about American culture and English is not one way. There will be (and should be) opportunities for students to share similar aspects of their religion, culture, education system, and ideas with the instructor and others. In this way, not only are students learning about American systems and culture, but those of their classmates, and, ultimately, of their own country.

How does this relate to me?

Unit focuses have been chosen carefully to concentrate on universal ideas present in virtually every culture–ideas of life, death, creation, good versus evil, the hero’s journey, and love. Sometimes students feel that stories from thousands of years ago from a dead civilization must be irrelevant to them. Help students make connections with learning about the past and their lives now. They also don’t make the connection between reading stories and learning English. They might be too use to ESL textbook styles for learning that is more directly related to vocabulary and grammar acquisition.

I usually address these issues the day of going over the syllabus, and I ask if students have any questions or qualms. If students have any objections, you may want to avoid some materials, adapt them, or find a more appropriate substitution to give the student(s) that will still fulfill the goals of the assignment. I have found student engagement and understanding to be much better after addressing these concerns early in the term. Also many advanced students feel proud of completing the course and feel it is more authentic, similar to what they might experience in a real university classroom.

(Lastly, if your students have watched and are OK with the content of Game of Thrones, they should be fine with the contents of this textbook.)

CEFR levels: pre-test

At the end of each chapter, a CEFR level analysis of the text can be found. CEFR text analysis was done using http://www.roadtogrammar.com/textanalysis/ . This is so you and your students can better gauge the difficulty of each reading.

At the beginning of the term, it is a good idea to also test your students’ CEFR levels and write them down. This can be done fairly easy by going to https://www.languagelevel.com/english/index.php . It would be best to have students go to a computer lab together to do it, and emphasize that having high results does not matter. This is just an indicator for students and you of how each individual student can handle the reading material. Write down the results of each student, and at the end of the term or semester, you may want to have them take the test again to see if their results have changed. CEFR levels are very broad, so even if their CEFR level stays the same, that doesn’t mean that they haven’t improved.

Here is how I do discussion questions:

  • First, I introduce the topic of discussion questions with the reading in Unit 1.
  • After discussing the concept of how to make discussion questions and why this is important, we would do an example listening or reading–usually something short.
  • After that, students should make around four questions–two level 1-3 and two level 4-6 questions. The teacher also should make some example questions. I usually group level 1-3 questions as basic comprehension questions and level 4-6 questions as critical thinking questions that can be more open-ended.
  • Students share their questions. The teacher asks the other students what level question it should be. Write the questions on the board. Did other students have similar questions? That’s good! Make sure students make quality questions for both sets of levels. Be careful, because (especially the first time) many students may try to just fill in the blanks using random questions from the chart, making for some awkward questions, like “What are the features of Arachne?” Emphasize that those examples are just to get you thinking and are not just easily fill-in-able with random words from the reading.
  • Discuss the questions, even if some of the questions are not worded well or seem strange. Have the creator of the question explain what they mean in their question if it is unclear. Emphasize how the quality of their question impacts the discussion and also how it reflects their understanding of the material.
  • Now that they have done a practice session, steps 3 through 5 can be repeated. I usually assign 10 questions (6 comprehension–level 1-3 questions and 4 critical thinking–level 4-6 questions, or vice versa, depending on the goal of the reading) to be submitted online.
  • I then make a Google Slides document with the best or most repeated questions, and a few of my own if most students didn’t catch some major points. I also usually correct the grammar of the questions–and it is a good time to go over some grammar structures, especially reviewing question grammar. Sometimes I put the students’ names so I can remember who asked what, especially if a question seems intriguing but unclear. In some classes, students feel proud to see their name attached to their question, and sometimes students request their questions be anonymous. You can choose depending on the class or topic.
  • The morning of class (or sometimes a few minutes before or into class), I will either print a copy of the questions or give the link to the discussion questions so they can check them on their phones. Sometimes I have students do group discussion, and sometimes we just do class discussion together.
  • I use both the quality of student questions and their responses during discussion time as both informal and formal assessment.
  • Here is a site with a “thinking cube” that could be used to introduce the ideas involved in creating good discussion questions.
  • Academic Reading Circles
  • Jigsaw Discussion Groups
  • Fishbowl Discussion Groups

Socratic Questions

Academic circles.

Article by Charity Davenport—Academic Reading Circle discussion style created by Tyson Seburn

Academic reading circles are very similar to jigsaw discussion groups, but instead of breaking up bigger readings into smaller parts, readings are analyzed in different ways and then presented to a group or class. They are often used to help students collaborate while also digging deeper into an article or topic. Students are assigned one of the following roles to analyze a reading, although it could also be used for videos as well:

  • Leader: The leader summarizes the main points of the reading and creates comprehension and critical thinking questions for the group to discuss.   Check out this DOK chart or this Bloom’s Taxonomy chart from earlier in the textbook for ways to make great discussion questions.
  • Contextualizer: The contextualizer finds and researches at least 2 to 4 contextualized references that are NOT fully explained by the author. What are contextualized references? They are references used in the background information in an article. This could include people, organizations, places, events, movies, books, or other things that the author might assume the reader already knows about and thus doesn’t give the context. It can also include cultural expressions and idioms (e.g., “pulling my leg,” “George Washington is rolling over in his grave”).
  • Visualizer: The visualizer finds images, infographics or charts for at least 2 to 4 facts the author uses and discusses why each image or graphic is relevant to the reading. The images should be related to background information (dates, statistics, contextualized references) and/or key facts (main references in the article; key people, places, events, cultural expressions).
  • Connector: The connector writes complete answers (3-4 sentences) to how the article connects with other articles we have read or videos we have watched, a current or past event that you are familiar with, or an experience you have had.
  • Vocabulary Master: The Vocab master highlights words 10-15 unknown key vocabulary words that repeat or are important for understanding the article, and gives a synonym, short explanation, or maybe an image to help classmates better understand the words.

With bigger classes, you will need to have students work in a group. There are 5 roles, so group them into groups of 5 and discuss what they learned in their role.

Here is a PowerPoint about academic reading circles by Tyson Seburn , who also literally wrote the book about it!

Back to other discussion group types

Jigsaw discussions

Some Text from CollectEdNY, CC-BY-NC-SA

Have you ever put a jigsaw puzzle together? With the pieces alone, you can’t see the big picture, but once the pieces are put together, the picture is clear to see. For bigger puzzles, you may need some help putting it together.  Jigsaw discussions are very similar.

A jigsaw reading discussion is an organization technique that breaks up longer texts into smaller chunks of text (one-two paragraphs) that students work together in groups to become experts on. Each student then moves into a new group, in which every member has become an expert on a different part of the text. The students then take turns teaching their new group about their portion of the text. This technique emphasizes cooperative learning by giving students the opportunity to help each other build comprehension.

Objective: To develop reading skills and communication skills and build cooperative learning strategies.

  • An appropriate reading text divided into 3-4 sections
  • Copies of comprehension questions for the text with the different sections clearly marked

Description:

  • Tell the students the topic that they will be reading about and encourage them to make predictions about what they will read
  • Pre-teaches critical vocabulary that the students will need before they begin to read the text.
  • Divide the students into different groups, one for each section of the text.
  • Explain that each group will be responsible for reading one section of the text and answering the reading comprehension questions that pertain to their assigned section.
  • Give the students time to work in their groups to read and discuss their section of the text, and answer the reading comprehension questions.
  • When all of the groups have completed the questions, divide the class into new groups. There is one student from each of the original groups in the newly formed groups. Each group represents the entire version of the reading text. Each member of the group shares the answers to the section of the comprehension questions that their original group was responsible for. Students should not read the text out loud; instead, they discuss the questions and answers. At the end of the activity, all of the students will have learned the answers to all of the comprehension questions from the other students in their group.

Image of how jigsaw discussion groups work.

FISHBOWL discussions

Adapted from an article by Peter Pappas , CC-BY-NC

Do you have difficulty managing a class discussion with 30 students? Do you feel like certain students dominate in large group settings making it hard to get everyone involved and staying on task? Consider using a fishbowl discussion format. This strategy allows you to have an intense discussion with only half of your class while the other half observes and analyzes the interactions.

  • For a class of 30, prepare 15 fishbowl index cards and 15 goldfish index cards. Place the cards in a basket and ask students to draw cards randomly.
  • Students who draw goldfish cards will form the inside circle. They will be the ones to have the discussion. Warn them in advance that they will be carefully observed and data will be collected on their discussion.
  • The students who pull out fishbowl cards will form the outside circle. They will be observing only. It is like they are peering into a fishbowl and watching the goldfish. These students will complete a data gathering sheet or discussion rubric.

Students in the outer circle have a job to do:

To keep students in the outside circle attentive, give them a task that requires them to focus on the fishbowl discussion:

  • If you started the discussion by generating a series of questions, have the outer-circle students create T-notes or 2-column notes. Questions go in the left column, the answers the fishbowl generates go in the right column.
  • Students who aren’t in the fishbowl can do two-column notes of the discussion. In the left column, they write at least three important ideas that the group discussed. In the right column, they write their own response to each idea. Minimum credit for just accurately recording topics; better credit for actually responding, best credit for responding in a thoughtful way that shows they have read the book or material.
  • Assign each of the students in the outer circle a member of the fishbowl. The student from the outer circle writes a transcript of everything “their” student says. When the discussion is over, photocopy the transcripts. Highlight the originals to show good ideas or questions that the fishbowl student came up with. Give the photocopy back to the outer-circle student and give feedback on how thoroughly they kept track.
  • Have outer-circle students keep track of the types of comments the fishbowl members make –? if they ask a question, C if they make a connection, I if they make an inference, T if they use specific text to answer a question or make a comment, P if they make a prediction. (These notes can give students feedback on the variety of the comments they make.)
  • Have students in the outer circle write a journal response to the discussion.

Fishbowl Discussion Variations

  • The entire class comes with sticky note questions. In groups of four, they reduce down their group questions to the best three. These are put on the chalkboard and the fishbowl revolves around these questions. The fishbowl is still student lead.
  • The teacher leads discussion around class questions. The teacher is the leader of the fishbowl and sits in the fishbowl. This works great with underclassmen.
  • Warn students ahead of time that you will choose 8 at random to be in the fishbowl when the day for discussion arrives.
  • Make the fishbowl voluntary – only students who want to be in the fishbowl pull in their desks – but they have to show you their sticky notes or other evidence that they’re ready to discuss.
  • The fishbowl consists of four speaker chairs placed in the center of the room.
  • Only those students sitting in these chairs may contribute to the discussion. All others will patiently and quietly for their turn to sit in those chairs.
  • When you move into the chair, you have an opportunity to contribute to the current discussion of the group or when that topic becomes exhausted, to bring up a new topic.
  • You may only bring up one issue or make your point once per sitting (you cannot stay in the bowl forever and dominate the discussion).

Image of how a fishbowl discussion should be arranged.

You may only join the fishbowl a second time after everyone has had a chance to join it for their first time.

Click here to read about fishbowl discussion groups.

  • Here’s a good example of a fishbowl discussion rubric. It might also work well for the following Socratic question discussion groups. 
  • Here is a good example of a fishbowl peer review sheet, which again might also work well for Socratic question discussions. 

Adapted from an article by Rebecca Grodner, CC-BY-NC-SA

Do you know Socrates? He was a famous philosopher in ancient Greece, around 370 to 399 BCE. He is one of the founders of Western philosophy and thought. Socrates was famous for asking a lot of questions. He said, “The only thing I know is that I know nothing.” And so he spent much of his time trying to learn by asking questions. Even his answers might be questions.

We get two major teaching and learning activities from Socrates—the Socratic Method and Socratic Questioning. The Socratic Method is used as a tool of argumentation, often used to ask another person questions until you prove the other wrong. This may sound frustrating, but in actuality, the goal is to keep asking questions and trying to clear away any weaknesses in their answers. It is to help the answerer think through their opinion or idea, to think more critically and more deeply about an issue.

Socratic Questioning is often used by teachers, who will ask questions to students even if they know the answer in order to stimulate student thinking and discussion, in hopes of encouraging students to ask similar questions on their own as the learn new information.

Socratic Smackdown is a combination of both styles that grew out of a need to support students in developing and practicing discussion skills. During the discussion game, teams of 4-6 students discuss texts and use textual evidence to make connections and ask thought-provoking questions. Students win points whenever they make constructive contributions to the discussion and lose points if they exhibit disrespectful behaviors, such as interrupting their teammates. By the end of game play, students have learned how to work together as teams and a class and contribute meaningfully to a discussion. Teachers have seen amazing changes in student engagement and discussion skills during and after game play.

Student Teams: Divide students into teams of 4 to 6 participants. These teams will participate in the Socratic Smackdown discussion. Decide if you want to put students in homogeneous or heterogeneous groups based on your own criteria.

Text/Topic Choice: Choose a text or topic for the Socratic Smackdown discussion. We suggest that you choose texts about debatable or controversial topics because then students must use textual evidence to support their ideas and arguments.

Question Sets: We recommend that the first few times the class plays the game, the teacher provides a well-crafted list of text-dependent questions. It may be helpful to give students the questions in advance to allow them to prepare. Questions may be asked by the teacher, or by students who have been assigned to ask the questions, whenever they feel it is appropriate. A shorter Socratic Smackdown could focus only on one teacher-given question at a time. Ultimately, the teacher’s goal may be to teach students to create their own questions for Socratic Smackdown, so that they can teach each other how to effectively discuss text-based questions.

Discussion Strategies for Game: Choose specific discussion strategies for the game and write them on the game board assigning point values to these strategies. Some examples of strategies can be found in the resources at the end of this section.

Rules (get set…):

  • Teams of 4 to 6 students will be given a topic, text, or issue that will be the focus of the Socratic Smackdown, as well as a question set. Students will prepare answers to the questions prior to the Socratic Smackdown.
  • The teacher will reveal which discussion skill strategies will be part of the game. The point value of the different strategies will also be shared.
  • When it is time for the Smackdown, the class will set up chairs in a fishbowl arrangement. A fishbowl is when there is an inner circle of 4 to 6 chairs—dependent on the size of the student discussion team—within a larger circle of chairs.
  • One student from each team will be asked to go inside the Socratic Smackdown ring to have a 6-minute discussion (or Smackdown) based on the topic, text, or issue given earlier. During the Smackdown, they will earn points for using discussion skills. They can also lose points if they disrupt the discussion.
  • Using the Socratic Smackdown Scorecard, a number of students (from 2 to the entire class) will track points during the 6-minute Smackdown. The first time the class plays the game the teacher can track points to model scoring.
  • Students who aren’t scoring will complete the Coach Card during the Smackdown; if all students are scoring they will then complete the Coach Card after the Smackdown.
  • When 6 minutes is up, the teacher or a student will collect all of the Scorecards, determine the average score for each student in the discussion team, and then sum up the average scores to figure out the team score.
  • After the Smackdown, the students in the ring will complete the Instant Replay Card (found in the resources below).
  • After individual and team scores are revealed, the class will have a brief discussion to share thoughts from their Coach Cards.

Click here to learn more about the Socratic Smackdown!

Here are some options to use this textbook and suggested lessons to use. There are so many resources you can use in the Additional Materials page .

In addition to the goals below, there are more than enough resources to include audio and video into your lessons as well. Just check out the additional materials page!

①  Literature – academic focus only

② Literature – vocabulary focus only

③  Critical Thinking, project or writing based focus

  • In this style, you will be reading one story and then reading an article related either to the story or vocabulary from the story. For each unit, I suggest choosing 3-4 stories and then 3-4 related articles either in the textbook or additional materials.
  • Here you would only choose to read or watch videos about the stories and vocabulary. This plan might be more focused on literary analysis.
  • Final project: what life lessons can be learned from the stories of Greek myths?
  • Listen to this podcast (or at least about 47 mins. in) about the analysis of the Titanomachy
  • How does this apply to their countries’ current government? Another government system they know of?
  • How does this apply to American democracy?
  • Architecture influences in the US
  • Check out presentation topics
  • You may want to explore more about the culture of death and funeral rites in students’ countries.
  • Have students present / write about a modern Prometheus; dive deeper into the idea of knowledge is power.
  • Read about the Socratic Method for teachers. This might be especially good if you have students struggling with participation in class or are not used to American classroom communication. Have students create statements and pair them with a student that disagrees. Have them formulate questions to try to debunk the other students’ statement. Emphasize civility and not getting angry! This is all about using “logos” to argue and not “pathos”!
  • Jason and Medea: focus on Medea, read summary about Euripedes’ Medea play
  • Good podcast for this project
  • Overall focus on heroes and role of women in mythology
  • This unit focus is about the hubris and nemesis
  • You may want to refer back to the theme of hubris and nemesis in the story of Narcissus.
  • Much of the critical thinking in this unit concerns narcissism and social media and the body’s chemicals that control our emotions. You may want to research further into those two topics.
  • You could have students read a short, easy version of Romeo and Juliet and have them compare it with Pyramus and Thisbe.
  • Have students write or discuss what their halcyon days were (are?)
  • Final project: final writing (or presentation) topics

It’s All Greek to Me! Copyright © 2018 by Charity Davenport is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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It's all Greek to me

A few days ago an interesting article came across my RSS feeds: It’s All Greek (or Chinese or Spanish or…) to Me . Basically, in English, when you’re confused, you’ll often say ‘It’s all Greek to me’. It turns out that man (if not all) languages around the world have a similar saying, but the target varies. Luckily, Wikipedia has a lovely page about it: Greek to me .

When I posted the link to Facebook, I got a quick question: are there any cycles? While one could just scan through the document, it would be a lot more interesting (at least to me!) if you could do it automatically. Let’s toss together a quick script to do it.

First thing we need: a way to get the content of the Wikipedia page. Python is great for this, with requests to grab the page and BeautifulSoup to process it:

Basically, we download the page. Then we go through each of the rows ( tr ). Skip any rows without column elements ( td ) as that’s probably the header, otherwise, pull them out. The first column (index 0 ) is the language with the idiom (English in the example) while the last column (index -1 ) is the target (Greek). There’s one caveat though, that sometimes the table uses a rowspan when one source can have multiple targets but is only listed once. We check that by only changing the srcs when there are 5 columns.

Parse through all of that and what do you have?

Exactly what I was looking for. Okay, next step. Find any cycles in the graph. This is straight forward enough by performing a depth first search :

The basic idea is to make a generator that returns each cycle as it finds it. It does so by search down each branch, maintaining a list of all nodes it has seen . If it sees the same node twice, that’s a cycle. Otherwise, try all of the neighbors. We avoid infinite loops since there’s a guaranteed base case to the recursion: seen is always one bigger on each step and it’s maximum size is the number of nodes in the graph.

So how does it work?

Neat! We’ve already found 5 cycles that involve English alone. But how many cycles are there all together? For that, we need a way to determine if a cycle is actually unique. If you have the cycles A -> B -> C -> A , that’s the same as B -> C -> A -> B . You can do this by putting the cycles in lexical order (so that the ‘smallest’ element in the cycle is first).

It also is smart enough that if we pass it a list with the first and last node the same (as we will), it trims that off automatically.

Bam. So we use that and a set to keep track of what we’ve seen:

Huh. So they all go through English. I didn’t actually expect that. :) Still, it’s cool to be able to unify them like that.

Okay, one last trick. Let’s visualize them. Luckily, there’s a nice Python interface for graphviz that we can use:

It’s not the easiest thing in the world to read, but if you look carefully you can pick out a few interesting things. Let’s tweak it a bit to color nodes if and only if they have both an inward edge and an outward one:

That’s a little better, all of the nodes in any cycle are in there. Let’s go ahead and show all of the edges in any cycle:

So they’re all in that pocket. If I had a few more minutes, I could show all of the cycles as different colors, but that gets complicated in that many re-use the same paths. So it goes.

If you’d like to see / run the code, you can grab it from GitHub: greek-to-me.py

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“All Greek to Me”

All greek to me.

  • Something that you don’t understand or comprehend

Frequency of Use : Medium

Sample Sentences

  • English is all Greek to me.
  • I can’t understand this computer program because it is so complicated to use. It’s all Greek to me .
  • I tried to answer the questions on the TOEFL Test, but many were all Greek to me .
  • I wanted to play the game with my friends, but the rules were all Greek to me .
  • When my roommate talks with his friends in Japanese, I don’t understand a thing. It’s all Greek to me .

Conversation Questions

  • Your best friend always talks about economics, and it is all Greek to you. You want to talk about other things, but you don’t want to hurt your friend’s feelings. What can you say or do in this situation?
  • When your boss asks you to speak to a client in English, and you are afraid you won’t understand some technical words about a product, how can you prepare?

Speaking Situation

You are a new student at an English program in California, but you realize that everyone understands the lessons much better than you do in your class. You were happy when you told your parents that you were in the intermediate level in your school, but you are afraid to tell them that you are now not passing the class. Last night, you called your best friend and said, “Hey, I’m thinking about dropping out of school. Everything is all Greek to me .” So, what can you do to improve your situation so you don’t feel like a failure?

Possible Answer : 

“I guess I could study with some other students in the class, but I’m not sure what they will say.”

Language Practice

Sometimes, learners know the meaning of an idiom, but they don’t know how to use it correctly in conversation or writing. Thus, this activity checks your grammatical accuracy with the idiom so you become more confident in using it. 

All Greek to Me – Idiom

These chinese characters ____ all greek to me. can you read them they look like symbols from another planet..

Using this phone _____ all Greek to me until my son showed me how to use it.

I think that Arabic ______ Greek to me, no matter how much I study from now on.

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  • Academic English Listening

LAB Assignment 6 - All Greek to Me Assignment 6 - All Greek to Me...

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It’s All Greek to Me! Using Authentic Readings to Improve Knowledge of the English Language and Western Culture

(3 reviews)

programming assignment it's all greek to me

Charity Davenport, University of Tennessee

Copyright Year: 2019

Publisher: The University of Tennessee Libraries

Language: English

Formats Available

Conditions of use.

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

Learn more about reviews.

Reviewed by Rallou Rice, Adjunct Faculty, North Hennepin Community College on 6/12/23

This book is divided into units with a theme for each one. Comprehension questions follow the readings, and critical thinking/discussions add to the content. read more

Comprehensiveness rating: 5 see less

This book is divided into units with a theme for each one. Comprehension questions follow the readings, and critical thinking/discussions add to the content.

Content Accuracy rating: 5

The book consists of stories described as myths and the concept of versions of myths is addressed. The readings can be used as models for student writing.

Relevance/Longevity rating: 5

Mythology will always be relevant to students. There are many opportunities to apply the principles learned from the stories.

Clarity rating: 4

A glossary would be helpful to the students but none is included in this book. The references to "fake news" connecting to the readings need more context and explanations to be fully understood.

Consistency rating: 5

I did not find any inconsistencies and an instructor can choose any parts seen fit to teach.

Modularity rating: 4

The book consists of introductory material and five thematic units. Any of them can be used for teaching. Instructors need to explain and offer more context as many readings require knowledge of the myths.

Organization/Structure/Flow rating: 5

The book includes introductory material and explanations of how it can be used. Instructors can choose any of the readings to teach.

Interface rating: 5

I did not find any major difficulties with the interface.

Grammatical Errors rating: 4

I only found minor typographical errors that can be edited to improve the overall presentation of the book.

Cultural Relevance rating: 5

This book offers a rather rich context and is helpful for a variety of cultures.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I found that it is well-organized. I really like the infographics, art, and illustrations as they add to the content.

Reviewed by Patricia Patton, Teaching Instructor, West Virginia University on 4/13/22

The “Glossary” link has only one word and there is no index, however the contents are quite comprehensive. Each unit is based on themes, with 8 – 12 stories and articles for each theme. Each reading has factual comprehension questions; most have... read more

Comprehensiveness rating: 4 see less

The “Glossary” link has only one word and there is no index, however the contents are quite comprehensive. Each unit is based on themes, with 8 – 12 stories and articles for each theme. Each reading has factual comprehension questions; most have vocabulary exercises and critical thinking/discussion questions as well. There is more material than you could use in a semester.

In most cases, the book presents articles and stories and asks students to consider their meaning and/or truthfulness, rather than asserting them as true. The fact that myths often have various versions is addressed, and in some cases alternate versions are included in the supplementary materials.

These myths have proven themselves timeless. Some articles address more “current” events (fake news, specific political situations), but context is typically provided in those cases. There are plenty of opportunities for students and teachers to apply the principles and ideas to present day situations.

The vocabulary exercises are great, but a glossary would be helpful, either for each reading or at the end. The questions are well-written and easy to understand.

Consistency rating: 4

The readings vary from B1 to C2 proficiency level on the Common European Framework of Reference (quite a wide range!). However, as there is more materials than could be used in a semester, this may make using the book more flexible, as the instructor can choose what is appropriate to the level of their specific students.

Each reading is broken down into numbered paragraphs. There are basic background stories in the first unit with exercises helping students to track the main "characters" of Green mythology. After that, the units and/or readings could be chosen individually without much problem. Articles and other readings do assume knowledge of the myths, so the instructor would need to curate and sequence the chosen activities carefully.

The book is well organized in units with similar activities peppered throughout (For example, asking students to apply an idiom to present-day context; figure out meaning of a word from context; etc.)

There are links from table of contents to each reading. It is well-formatted with attractive images; I experienced no problems with the interface.

Grammatical Errors rating: 5

I found no major issues; there were one or two minor typos in punctuation, as you might find in any published book.

Cultural Relevance rating: 4

This book offers rich context for understanding many references in western, English-language-based culture. Greek myths are often bloody; some of the extra materials are labelled with content warnings.

Reviewed by Melissa Stanton, English Professor, Hutchinson Community College on 1/5/22

I am impressed by the scope and creativity of this colorful text. The writer connects Greek myths with thought-provoking contemporary articles which are thematically related. (Spoiler alert: Human behavior hasn't changed much since Ancient... read more

I am impressed by the scope and creativity of this colorful text. The writer connects Greek myths with thought-provoking contemporary articles which are thematically related. (Spoiler alert: Human behavior hasn't changed much since Ancient Greek times.) It's the perfect way to make Greek mythology relevant to college students. Each section includes vocabulary in context and questions over the reading as well as questions for students to use in writing assignments.

Content Accuracy rating: 4

I assume this text would be used for an ESL composition course, such as Comp. I or II. Because composition is a skills course rather than a content course, there's less emphasis on accuracy of content. My only concern with the book is that some of the reading selections need revision or editing to serve as the best models for student writing.

Classical mythology will never become irrelevant, and the carefully chosen contemporary news articles that accompany the ancient stories illustrate why. This book certainly does a great job of connecting recent newsworthy topics with the classic stories. I assume that the writer will want to occasionally update some of the news articles she includes, but this could be easily done without disrupting the larger content.

I do think the writer should add more context about "fake news" before asking students to discuss it in terms of Plato's "Allegory of the Cave." First, the writer should define the term more thoroughly and give several examples. Many American students bring preconceived notions to the term "fake news," using it to dismiss the perspectives of those they disagree with. Students from other cultures might need even more help with the concept. However, the infographic about how to spot fake news is useful and concise.

I saw no inconsistencies.

Modularity rating: 5

The book is composed of introductory material plus 5 thematic units, from which stories and articles can be chosen. Teachers could do individual works from each unit or focus more thoroughly on just a few of the units.

The book begins with introductory material which illustrates the relevance of the content and shows how it can be used. Although theoretically, a teacher could begin with any of the units, they seem to be ordered well in terms of developing more complexity as the book continues.

I didn't see any problems except that a link to a comic strip seems to be broken.

Grammatical Errors rating: 3

Because the text is a compilation of readings, the quality varies. Unfortunately, the first reading I looked at, "The Allegory of the Cave: How It Still Matters When it (sic) Comes to 'Fake News,'" needs significant revision. The writing is ponderous and wordy in spots with occasional awkward phrasing and even comma splices. The other readings I sampled were certainly better. However, since these readings are collected in part as models of good writing, I believe the work would be improved by a thorough editing.

The book is geared toward students from a variety of cultures. Except for the use of the word "man" to mean "humankind" in a contemporary piece, I didn't see any problems. (The word "man" might legitimately be retained from an older story to show how the language was used in the past.)

I am deeply impressed by the creativity and scope of this lively book. The writer found colorful graphics to accompany the text. Photographs, art, and infographics make the content appealing. My curiosity was piqued by the connection between contemporary topics and Greek mythology, and I enjoyed reading the material.

Table of Contents

  • Unit 1: Why Study Greek Mythology?
  • Unit 2: Crime and Punishment
  • Unit 3: Adventure and The Hero's Journey
  • Unit 4: Hubris and Nemesis
  • Unit 5: Love and Metamorphosis

Ancillary Material

About the book.

“It’s All Greek to Me!” has everything—entertaining stories, academic articles in a variety of disciplines, vocabulary crossover in literary and academic readings, connections to local, American, and Western culture, and plenty of chances for critical thinking for advanced students of English as a Second Language (ESL). All readings are authentic with minimal adaptation from a variety of sources.

This textbook also gives help for advanced level grammar and writing issues, using outside sources, and reading and vocabulary strategies.

About the Contributors

Charity Davenport has been teaching at the University of Tennessee's English Language Institute since 2008 and has experience teaching middle school students in Nashville and South Korea. She studied Latin and Hellenics in high school for 5 years and won many JCL awards. This love for Latin and Greek helped shape her love for English and other cultures as well.

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My solutions for Coursera course Introduction to C# Programming and Unity

Darina1801/Introduction_to_C-Sharp_Programming_and_Unity

Folders and files.

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ProgrammingAssignment1 ProgrammingAssignment1
ProgrammingAssignment2 ProgrammingAssignment2
Programming Assignment 3 Programming Assignment 3

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Introduction_to_c-sharp_programming_and_unity.

IMAGES

  1. "It's All Greek to Me" by Chris Rogers

    programming assignment it's all greek to me

  2. "All Greek to Me"

    programming assignment it's all greek to me

  3. It's All Greek To Me!! Greek Roots Task Cards by Fifth Grade Fabuloso

    programming assignment it's all greek to me

  4. Its All Greek to Me

    programming assignment it's all greek to me

  5. It's all greek to me!

    programming assignment it's all greek to me

  6. Its all Greek to me poster

    programming assignment it's all greek to me

COMMENTS

  1. GitHub

    In this assignment, you'll calculate the distance between two points and the angle a game character would need to move in to go from the second point to the first point.

  2. C-Sharp-Practice-Codes/It's All Greek to Me!.cs at master

    You can't perform that action at this time. Contribute to sps619/C-Sharp-Practice-Codes development by creating an account on GitHub.

  3. GameDesignCurriculum/Unit-2-Programming-Assignment-2-Its-All-Greek-to-Me

    Refer to Instructions folder for detailed assignment requirements and step-by-step instructions.

  4. Coding (it's all greek to me)

    Flashcard from it's all greek to me Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

  5. Coding 1: It's All Greek to Me

    It's All Greek to Me Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

  6. Can't get the right answer while finding angle in C#

    I am doing this Introduction To Unity course from coursera. I have reached at first programming assignment which is to find the hypotenuse and angle of two points. I almost got the code right but a few answers are right and a few are wrong! I don't know what is wrong.

  7. It's all Greek to me

    Something doesn't just add up. And this is barely a puzzle. How can everything be so important? Maybe there's an alternate way to find the answer to what this OP is craving? HINT: HINT 2: HINT 3:

  8. Coursera C# programming assignment2 solution & walkthrough

    This is the Solution and walkthrough for the week 2 programming assignment of c# game programming course on courser by university of Colorado.Fully working s...

  9. Introduction to C# Programming and Unity

    This course is all about starting to learn how to develop video games using the C# programming language and the Unity game engine on Windows or Mac. Why use C# and Unity instead of some other language and game engine? Well, C# is a really good language for learning how to program and then programming professionally. Also, the Unity game engine is very popular with indie game developers; Unity ...

  10. 04.02: It's All Greek to Me by Hailey Johnston on Prezi

    Its All Greek to Me By: Hailey Johnston Question (cont.) Questions (cont.) 10. What is the structure of hemoglobin and how is oxygen bound to it? "Hemoglobin is made up of four symmetrical subunits and four heme groups. Iron associated with the heme binds oxygen."

  11. Instructor's Guide

    This strategy allows you to have an intense discussion with only half of your class while the other half observes and analyzes the interactions. For a class of 30, prepare 15 fishbowl index cards and 15 goldfish index cards. Place the cards in a basket and ask students to draw cards randomly.

  12. It's all Greek to me

    A few days ago an interesting article came across my RSS feeds: It's All Greek (or Chinese or Spanish or…) to Me. Basically, in English, when you're confused, you'll often say 'It's all Greek to me'. It turns out that man (if not all) languages around the world have a similar saying, but the target varies. Luckily, Wikipedia has a lovely page about it: Greek to me.

  13. Assign2.pdf

    COSC 1P02 Assignment 2 "It's all Greek to me" revised: 06/10/2016Due: Oct. 21, 2016 @ 4:00 pm (late date Oct. 24 @ 4:00 pm) The emphasis for this assignment is methods without parameters. In preparation for this assignment, create a folder calledAssign_2 and three subfoldersAssign_2_A, Assign_2_B andAssign_2_C for the DrJava projects for the assignment. Part A A Greek Key is a border ...

  14. LAB Assignment 6

    View Homework Help - LAB Assignment 6 - All Greek to Me.pdf from CS 3A at Foothill College. 2018/6/21 LAB Assignment 6 - All Greek to Me LAB Assignment 6 ‐ All Greek to Me 6 6 10 23:59 4 6:00 6

  15. Unit 4 It's All Greek to Me Vocabulary

    an individual 0 or 1 in binary. byte. a group of 8 bits. circuit board. thin, green boards on the inside of a computer that contain electrical circuits. switch. a tiny device that opens or closes circuits depending on what signal is received-- can only have two states, on or off (1 or 0) dictionary. a data structure that associates or maps ...

  16. sps619/C-Sharp-Practice-Codes

    Contribute to sps619/C-Sharp-Practice-Codes development by creating an account on GitHub.

  17. All Greek to Me

    I can't understand this computer program because it is so complicated to use. It's all Greek to me.

  18. Answered: LAB Assignment 6

    24houranswers.com Parker Paradigms, Inc Nashville, TN Ph: (845) 429-5025. Solved: LAB Assignment 6 - All Greek to Me Assignment 6 - All Greek to Me code for first part output of first part code for SECOND PART output of SE...

  19. How I Found A Way To Programming Assignment It's All Greek To Me

    How I Found A Way To Programming Assignment It's All Greek To Me When I'm not coding or working remotely, I've spent years playing with a mixture of Haskell, Python, and Ruby. Not at all an unusual experience, but ultimately what I've come to associate it with is how something is usually managed in an easy and transparent way.

  20. Unit-2-Programming-Assignment-2-Its-All-Greek-to-Me/README.md ...

    Refer to Instructions folder for detailed assignment requirements and step-by-step instructions.

  21. Manodhayan/C-Sharp-Programming-and-Unity

    Learn C# programming and Unity game development from Coursera courses with this GitHub repository. Code examples, assignments and solutions included.

  22. It's All Greek to Me! Using Authentic Readings to Improve Knowledge of

    "It's All Greek to Me!" has everything—entertaining stories, academic articles in a variety of disciplines, vocabulary crossover in literary and academic readings, connections to local, American, and Western culture, and plenty of chances for critical thinking for advanced students of English as a Second Language (ESL). All readings are authentic with minimal adaptation from a variety ...

  23. Darina1801/Introduction_to_C-Sharp_Programming_and_Unity

    My solutions for Coursera course Introduction to C# Programming and Unity - Darina1801/Introduction_to_C-Sharp_Programming_and_Unity