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ACCOUNTING ETHICS FINAL

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Chapter 7-ACCT 320 – Flashcards

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  • A Research Guide
  • Writing Guide
  • Assignment Writing

How to Write a Term Paper

  • Purpose of a term paper
  • How to start a term paper
  • Structure and outline

Step-by-step writing guide

Standard term paper format.

  • Term paper examples
  • Writing tips

What is the purpose of a term paper?

How to start a term paper correctly.

  • Choose your topic by focusing on what inspires you unless you are already given a topic.
  • Take time to research and analyze your subject.
  • Start with a term paper outline (see our templates in the next sections).
  • Come up with a strong thesis statement before writing anything for body paragraphs.
  • Provide topic sentences and practical examples.
  • Provide a strong lesson in the conclusion if it suits the subject you write about.
  • Edit and proofread available information for trustworthiness.

Term paper structure and outline

  • Introduction. This is where you talk about the subject and a problem you are researching. It helps to introduce your thesis statement and explain the objectives that have been set.
  • Body Paragraphs. As a rule, in writing college term papers, one must write down several subheadings and headings to divide ideas and arguments into several (at least four) paragraphs. As done below, each body paragraph should contain one idea and a strong topic sentence.
  • Heading 1: History of the argument and background.
  • Heading 2: Extent of the problem that you write about.
  • Heading 3: Effects of the problem and possible causes.
  • Heading 4: Possible solutions and outcomes.
  • Conclusion. The final part should represent a strong summary and a response to your thesis statement.

Step 1: Data collection

Step 2: explaining research relevance, step 3: introducing your subject, step 4: literature review preparation, step 5: offering results and conclusions, step 6: structural term paper evaluation, step 7: check your citations and references.

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Helpful term paper examples

  • Term paper examples that earned an A grade from the University of Delaware
  • Sample term paper offered by the Justus-Liebig Universitat Giessen
  • Purdue Owl Lab Citation Formats Database
  • Simon Fraser University Sample Term Paper

Term paper writing tips

  • Choose a topic that inspires you if you have an opportunity. If you have been given an already existing prompt to write, research your subject online and ask about the use of course materials. It will help you to narrow things down and already have source materials for referencing purposes.
  • If you can choose a subject to write a final paper for your course, think about something you can support with statistical data and some practical evidence.
  • Most importantly, keep your term paper relevant to the main objectives of your study course.
  • Keep your tone reflective and natural as you write.
  • Double-check your grading rubric regarding limitations and obligatory requirements that must be met.
  • Always proofread your term paper aloud!
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kelly and jordan are writing a term paper together

Every Writer's Dilemma 

Are you writing a paper and don't know where to start? Even with a clear prompt, a grasp on the material, and lots of ideas, getting started on any paper can be a challenge. All writers face the dilemma of looking at a blank computer screen without having any idea of how to translate their thoughts into a coherent and carefully articulated essay. You may know all about drafting and editing, but how do you get to that first draft? What comes between a blank computer screen and that polished final paper anyway? 

Prewriting!

The answer to that final question is quite simple. The best and most successful papers always start with prewriting.

So, what is prewriting anyway?

Good question! Prewriting is a term that describes any kind of preliminary work that precedes the actual paper writing. It doesn't necessarily have to be writing. In fact, prewriting can just be concentrated thinking about what you want to write your paper on. Various prewriting techniques are expanded upon below. However, know that you don't have to use all of them, nor is any one better than any of the others. Successful prewriting (and paper writing!) occurs when the writer finds what works best for him/her.

What are good prewriting techniques? 

I'm glad you asked! In the rest of this handout, you'll find a variety of useful techniques to help you get started on pretty much any writing project. If you're not sure where to start, just pick one and try it out. After you've tested a couple, you'll probably develop a sense of your most successful prewriting strategies and can choose the techniques that best suit your writing and thinking style. 

Brainstorming

Brainstorming refers to quickly writing down or taking inventory of all your thoughts as fast as they come to you. In this sense, your ideas are like a gigantic storm swirling around in your brain, and it's your job to get them out of your head. Writing of some kind is very helpful in brainstorming, as it can often be difficult to keep track of all your thoughts and ideas without writing them down. However, your writing does not have to be formal. Many writers simply use bullet points to mark all their ideas; in this sense, brainstorming often looks more like a list, rather than a coherent piece of writing (which is totally fine at this stage!). When brainstorming, don't feel pressured to connect, defend, fully articulate, or censor your ideas. If you allow yourself to simply pour out all the thoughts that are in your head, following them wherever they lead, you might come up with a really interesting topic, theme, motif, etc. to focus your paper on. 

Example:  Brainstorming for Toni Morrison's Beloved.

  • Sethe's relationship with her children.
  • Significance of milk and the breast. Possible connection to mother/child relationship.
  • Familial relationships under slavery. Perhaps Morrison is examining (or complicating) this through Sethe's extreme relationship with her children. Possible connection to milk and breast imagery. Breastfeeding her children may be so important because mother/child relationshps are often destroyed under slavery. 
  • Motherly love. Sethe seems to think murder can be taken as an act of motherly love. Maybe she's rewriting the role of the mother under slavery. 
  • Return of Beloved and inability to explain/justify murder. Even though Sethe claims that the murder was right, she seems conflicted. 

Freewriting 

Freewriting is very similar to brainstorming in that it gets all your thoughts out onto paper. However, where brainstorming often looks more like a list of ideas, freewriting usually takes the shape of more formal sentences. Even so, grammar, punctuation, and the like should be far from your mind. Like brainstorming, you should follow the flow of your ideas, and you shouldn't pressure yourself to fully tease out everything. There's plenty of time for that later! And once again, I want to stress that you SHOULD NOT censor your ideas. You may be quick to discount an idea, but if you give it a chance, it may take you somewhere totally unexpected and extremely productive in terms of writing a successful paper. 

Example:  Freewriting for Beloved.

I have to write a paper on Beloved for my English class. There's a lot to write on in this book. When I first read it, I noticed a lot of things about Sethe and her relationship with her kids. Her motherly relationship with her children seemed important to her, especially in terms of breastfeeding them. Perhaps this is symbolic of something. Like milk and the breast represent motherhood itself. This might be why it was so important for Sethe to get milk to her baby; she may have wanted to retain that motherly bond. Perhaps that's important because of the fact that slavery interferes with the mother/child relationship. In slavery, Sethe and her children are just her master's property, so she's not the ultimate guardian/owner of them. Maybe breastfeeding is her way of reestablishing the bond that slavery attempts to destroy by making humans into property. 

Clustering or Mindmapping

Once again, clustering and mindmapping, like brainstorming and freewriting, allow you to take inventory of your ideas. However, they both focus you on a central word (usually something that embodies a theme, topic, motif, etc. that is important to your ideas), which you then work out from by associating other words, thoughts, and ideas to that central word. These may be very useful techniques for extremely visual people. A lot of online diagrams of clustering have the central word in a circle, with all the associated words in their own circles and lines connecting them back to the central word. Similarly, there are very elaborate and decorative examples of mindmaps online. Be as creative as you want—just not at the expense of your ideas themselves! Using these techniques allows you to very easily visualize all the ideas that are in your head.

Example:  Clustering for Beloved. 

kelly and jordan are writing a term paper together

Question-Asking 

This is one of the best and most useful approaches to get yourself started on writing a paper, especially if you really have no idea where to start. Here, you write down all the questions that seem relevant to your material. These should definitely be legitimate questions, possibly ones you have yourself. By generating a lot of questions, as well as forcing yourself to contemplate answers to those questions, you'll get out a lot of the ideas, issues, thoughts, etc. that could potentially get you started on paper writing. Similarly, a lot of great essay topics come out of a question. By focusing on a question that is not easily answered, you'll have a framework for your argument. 

Example:  Question-Asking for Beloved.

  • Why does Morrison focus on Sethe's relationship with her children?
  • What is the significance of mother/child relationships in Beloved?
  • Is milk and breastfeeding important? Why? How does it connect to other themes in the book? Could it be symbolic? If so, what does it symbolize?
  • How does slavery affect Sethe's relationshp with her children? Is Morrison addressing this? If so, how?
  • What does Sethe's murder of her baby signify? Is it clear by the end of the book? Or is it unresolved? How does it connect to slavery, mother/child relationships, and other themes? 

This technique is best used as an on-going process. While brainstorming, freewriting, clustering, mindmapping, and question-asking can wait until you have your paper assignment and are thinking about where to start, journaling is best throughout your engagement with whatever material you could potentially be writing on. Journaling can involve aspects of all previously mentioned techniques. However, the idea behind it is to write down whatever strikes you about the material when it strikes you. That way, rather than trying to remember your first impressions and ideas about the material, you'll have them already conveniently written down. Although many ideas that strike us in the moment don't lead to great papers, many of our initial thoughts become the seeds of a successful essay. 

Example : Journaling for Beloved.

On page (x), Sethe mentions milk and breastfeeding. This seems really important to her, especially as a mother. Is this a theme Morrison is developing? Possibly the relationship between mothers and children. 

On page (x), Morrison describes how Sethe murdered her baby. Why is the detail so vivid? If Sethe's trying to argue that she did it out of motherly love, why does Morrison make the murder so graphic? Also, what does slavery have to do with this? Does the fact that Sethe murdered her baby to protect her from slavery justify her actions? 

On page (x), Morrison writes that Sethe is constantly trying to explain and justify the murder. Elsewhere, Sethe defends it as the right thing to do. Why this conflict? Does this tie into other themes? What is Morrison trying to say?

Outlining can be extremely helpful for some writers, but extremely restrictive for others. Also, it's difficult to jump into outlining without having done some prelimiary work with one of the other techniques. Outlining requires that you have a good sense of your ideas, themes, thoughts, approach, argument, etc. This is why many writers cannot use outlining; for some, a good sense of what you're writing about comes through the actual writing process. You may start off with a sense of what you'll argue, but often, it changes and molds into a coherent argument as you write the paper. However, if you're one of those writers who has a clear sense of your argument from the beginning and you want a way to organize your ideas before starting to write the paper, then outlining is for you! 

For outlining, most usually use bullet points to organize how they'll structure their paper. Beginning with the introduction, lay out your main point/argument. From there, go through each paragraph, highlighting the main idea, evidence, and analysis you'll be using. Be sure to check that it ties into the previous paragraph, as well as your overall argument. Finally, sum up your argument in your conclusion, pointing to the larger significance of your essay's claims.

For those of you who don't like outlining, but find moving straight into the actual writing process more productive, reverse outlining can be very useful. This is where you outline your paper after you've written it. This is extremely helpful when checking to make sure that all your paragraphs move logically from one idea to the next, and that they all work to support your larger argument. 

Example : Outline for an essay on  Beloved . 

Introduction

—Focus on how Morrison highlights the importance of history in terms of slavery and the African American community in her book.

—Thesis: Morrison stresses the necessity of an active communal preservation, retrieval, and even writing of a personal history that many have tried to forget, ignore, or make impersonal.

1st paragraph:

—Topic sentence: In Beloved, Morrison shows the necessity of community and active participation to history's preservation and retrieval by highlighting the importance of telling one's personal story to others.

•   “They sang it out and beat it up, garbling the words so they could not be understood; tricking the words so their syllables yielded up other meanings” (128). 

•   Similarly, Sethe is able to retrieve her forgotten history by “telling” Beloved, who has “distance from the events itself,” stories from her past, as Morrison writes, “she was   remembering something she had forgotten she knew” (Morrison 69, 73).

—Close reading analysis.

2nd paragraph:

—Topic sentence:   And Morrison, through the figure of Beloved, who represents not only Sethe's, but also slavery's history itself, accentuates the need for an active communal retrieval and rewriting of history by illustrating the dangerous effects of an unresolved past on the present. 

—Evidence: 

•  “The flesh between [Sethe's] forefinger and thumb was thin as China silk and there wasn't a piece of clothing that didn't sag on her. Beloved...was getting bigger, plumper by the day” (Morrison 281).

— Close reading analysis.

3rd paragraph:

—Topic sentence: But in Beloved's exorcism, Morrison shows that the past can finally be resolved through an active communal rewriting of personal history. 

•  “They grouped, murmuring and whispering, but did not step foot in the yard...Denver saw lowered heads, but could not hear the lead prayer—only the earnest syllables of agreement that backed it: Yes, yes, yes, oh yea. Hear me. Hear me. Do it, Maker, do it. Yes” (304-305).

•  “Then Denver, running too. Away from [Beloved] to the pile of people out there. They make a hill. A hill of black people, falling” (309).

—   Close reading analysis.

Conclusion:

— Beloved shows that the past has bearing on the present. It is personal and cannot be forgotten. In terms of modern day readers, Morrison seems to be advocating a retrieval of the history of slavery that is often forgotten.

Helpful Resources 

  • Brainstorming (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)  
  • Freewriting: A Way Around Writer's Block (University of Richmond Writing Center)  
  • Prewriting: Clustering (University of Richmond Writing Center)  

Allison Lahl

Student Learning Center, University of California, Berkeley

©2008 UC Regents 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Kelly Jordan | children's author

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TheLittleBlueCottage_KellyJordan

The Little Blue Cottage

Written by Kelly Jordan Illustrated by Jessica Courtney-Tickle Page Street Kids Release date: May 12, 2020 ISBN-10: 1624149235 I SBN-13: 978-1624149238 The little blue cottage waits each year for summer to arrive—and with it, the girl. Through sunny days and stormy weather, the cottage and the girl keep each other company and wile away the long days and nights together. Until one year, and then another, the cottage is left waiting and empty season after season.

In this heartfelt story about change, Kelly Jordan’s lilting text and Jessica Courtney-Tickle's lush art captures the essence of cherishing a favorite place.

Grab a copy through LITTLE SHOP OF STORIES , your local indie book store, or through Amazon , IndieBound , or Barnes & Noble .

Winner of the 2021 SCBWI Crystal Kite Award

Winner of the 2020 Northern Lights Book Award in both the Family Category and Cover Art Category

* "A story of a girl, a cottage, and a family tradition that begs to be visited again and again." -- Kirkus Reviews , starred review full review

"[T]he cottage’s personification adds a touch of magic to this ode to a beloved refuge." -- Publisher’s Weekly full review

"The vintage-style artwork is charming, offering heartwarming scenes of family life." — Booklist

Chase the Moon Tiny Turtle cover.jpg

Chase the Moon, Tiny Turtle

Written by Kelly Jordan Illustrated by Sally Walker Page Street Kids Release date: March 2, 2021 ISBN-10: 1645671526 I SBN-13: 978-1645671527 Young readers will witness rare and extraordinary natural event as a baby loggerhead hatches from its shell. With nothing but the light of the moon to act as a guide, readers will follow the newborn turtles’ harrowing attempts to outpace a series of predators on their march toward the glistening shore. After only narrowly avoiding hungry crabs, owls, and foxes, the turtle rides ocean waves to a calm clearing. Following a moment of peace in the still ocean water, the turtle joins the rest of its pack on a dive into the moonlit sea to continue the voyage home. Told with a beautiful, lyrical rhyming sequence, this book introduces readers to the birth cycle of a loggerhead sea turtle. Through the newborn turtle’s eyes, both kids and adults will marvel at the majestic, and sometimes dangerous seaside landscape from a perspective rarely seen before.

Interviews +Media Coverage

Simply 7 with Kelly Jordan - an interview about Chase the Moon with Jena Benton

Children’s Books: Summer is a-Comin’ In . - The Little Blue Cottage is featured in The Wall Street Journal

The Heart of the Story with Kelly Jordan - an interview about writing on author Laura Lavoie’s blog

The Little Blue Cottage’s starred review in Kirkus Reviews

An interview with Kathy Temean on Writing and Illustrating about The Little Blue Cottage

Chitchat with Author Kelly Jordan - An interview on author Rosie Pova’s blog

kelly and jordan are writing a term paper together

Paper vs digital planner: Why paper lovers (like me) need to consider using a digital calendar

kelly and jordan are writing a term paper together

November 14, 2020

kelly and jordan are writing a term paper together

Picking out a paper planner is incredibly fun. That’s probably one of the top reasons to opt for a paper vs digital planner. But the actual using of the planner… well, after the initial two-week honeymoon period, it often ends in frustration.

So, how to use a planner in a way that sticks, helps you get stuff done, and helps you actually enjoy your downtime?

Throw out your paper planner & go all-in on a digital calendar.

If you’re tempted to roll your eyes and hit the “back” button, know this:

I’m a paper lover and fully recognize the benefits of planners.

I used a paper planner through high school, college, and law school. The paper planner aisle at Target still beckons to me with its siren call and gorgeous patterned covers. I process by writing, so I have tons of handwritten notes scattered across my desk on any given day (including right now as I type this).

That said, there’s a reason you as a modern working woman have been struggling to figure out how to make a paper planner work for you for so long. There’s a reason that, despite your best efforts, you’re still overwhelmed.

Paper planners just can’t keep up with a modern working woman’s life.

But the good news is that a digital calendar can.

When done right, making the switch from a paper planner to a digital calendar to manage everything on your plate will change your life.

Because here’s the thing – the question shouldn’t be “how to use a planner” or “what’s the best paper planner technique?”

We’ve got to think bigger and get to the heart of the matter. The question should be, “how do I get everything done with more peace of mind and actually enjoy my downtime?”

And digital calendars get you there. Paper planners just can’t.

In this article, I’ll walk you through ten reasons why even paper lovers like me should make the switch from a paper planner to a digital calendar like Google Calendar or Outlook calendar.

Before we dive in, I want to make one thing very clear:

Going digital with your calendar does NOT mean ditching all of your paper.

If you process by writing and love to brainstorm on paper, same here! Keep going!

We just want to take those ideas and create an actual, clear, and realistic game plan in your digital calendar of how you’ll bring those ideas to life in a way that helps you see how they interact with the rest of your life ( i.e. , other work projects, childcare, partner’s schedules, fun plans, all of it).

Before we discuss why you should go digital vs your paper planner, let’s take a step back and talk about…

How to Use a Planner / Calendar Effectively

Most of us use paper planners like this: events get assigned to a time (a start time or a block of time), and to-do’s end up as a list in their own separate column or even on a separate to-do list, post-it note, phone app, or just live in our head.

So, when we try to figure out where our time is going that day/week/month, we have to look at multiple places and do a lot of mental gymnastics to figure out how to get it all done and what to do next.

Because all the things requiring our time are scattered, we don’t have a clear view of everything on our plate – so we definitely don’t have a clear view of how we’ll get it all done (or if we can get it all done).

And that’s why we struggle to take a break. We’re not sure if we can get it all done to begin with, so we feel like we always need to be working to increase the chances we’ll actually get it done.

Does that make sense?

By bringing it all together so we see everything on our plate in one view, we can then create one game plan for how we’ll get it all done over time .

When we know we can get it all done over time and in a way that doesn’t require us to work right now, we can take breaks we can actually enjoy without the pressure of feeling like we should be working.

And that brings me to …

Reason #1 to go digital: You can load up a digital calendar with ALL the information in a manageable way (vs a paper calendar, which ends up a cluttered mess)

Digital calendars let us put alllllll the information in one spot.

Personal events and tasks, professional events and tasks, family activities, partner’s schedules, and even reminders to give your dog her monthly meds.

(If you’re someone who likes/has to keep work separate because, e.g., you use Outlook at work and Google Calendar at home, two places is fine! I show clients how to do this in a way that lets them keep their work and personal calendars separate but still see life holistically when planning their weeks.)

Instead of this becoming overwhelming as it would in a paper planner, using a digital calendar lets you divide up the different categories of information into sub-calendars.

Sub-calendars let you filter what you want to see at any given moment.

Want to figure out if your partner will be home tonight? Click on his/her schedule.

Want to live your day-to-day without theirs cluttering up your view? Click theirs off.

Everything is at your fingertips – but is also within your viewing control for clarity’s sake.

Paper calendars just can’t do that.

If you try to load them up with your schedule, your driving time, your time-blocked tasks, your kids’ schedules, and your partner’s work schedule – well, it becomes an overwhelming mess that you can’t filter or control.

We’ve got to bring everything together in one place AND in a manageable way.

Digital calendars are amazing at doing that (especially when using the strategies I teach in my time management program for professional working women ).

Paper planners… not so much. This is why when professional working women ask me how to find the best paper planner for them and use it, while I have small suggestions to help improve how to use it, I often push them away from paper planners and to digital / electronic calendar options.

Are planners helpful and worth it? Sure. Could you get more clarity, confidence and less stress with a digital planner? Most definitely.

Paper vs digital planner - woman looking at notebook

Reason #2 to go digital: Because it’s easy to calendar repeating events, digital calendars help you have more control over your invisible to-do list & lighten your mental load

We all have an Invisible To-Do List.

The stuff that never makes it onto the to-do list or into the paper planner but takes up our time.

Making dinner. Showering. Doing bath time and bedtime with the kids. Walking the dog. Washing bedsheets. Cleaning up the kitchen before bed.

Exacerbating this issue is the fact that during the mental gymnastics of figuring out when we’ll do everything, we often underestimate or completely overlook how much time these things take .

This leads to feeling behind and beating ourselves up for not getting stuff done – when it objectively couldn’t all get done in the first place.

To counteract this outcome, I’m a big fan of making those things visual to help:

  • Free your mind from the juggling act, and
  • Help you realistically plan for how long those things take, so you can feel accomplished at the end of the day – not defeated.

That said, time-blocking those things in a paper calendar (see reason #1 for going digital) not only results in a cluttered mess, but writing those things out for every single day of your life is way too time-consuming.

I mean, I love having those things in my calendar, and even I wouldn’t do it in a paper planner.

So, reason #2 to switch to a digital calendar:

Because it’s easy and quick to create repeating events, your new digital calendar will help you have more control over your invisible to-do list and lighten your mental load.

In a digital calendar, you can get those Invisible To-Do’s out of your head and into a calendar on a repeating basis with just a couple clicks of your mouse.

Even better, as your days shape out, you can easily rearrange those plans by dragging and dropping.

This is game-changing.

It gets all those little things out of your head, helps you remember to do them, and helps you realistically plan for them.

Instead of going to bed defeated by an unrealistic, invisible to-do list, you get to go to bed proud of today and clear about tomorrow.

It’s magical.

Reason #3 to go digital: We want to make paper calendars pretty, and that’s time-consuming and actually takes you away from getting stuff done and enjoying downtime

Back in my paper planner days, I spent way too much time making my paper planner “pretty.”

I’d write and re-write things, box and re-box things, etc. until it looked just right .

And then, plans would inevitably shift, and the process would start all over again.

And that’s not really the point of planners, right?

The reason we plan and schedule in the first place is to help us get out there, get stuff done, and enjoy the fun stuff.

Unless the fun stuff for you is crafting in your calendar (and if it is – keep going!), then stop spending so much time doing that.

But I don’t think many of us are thinking, “man, I wish I had more time so I could spend more time writing in my calendar.”

So, let’s stop spending so much of time writing in your calendar!

Pretty calendars make a great Pinterest photo, but they don’t help get out there, get stuff done, and live your life.

We’ve got to find a balance between pretty (yes, I talk to clients about color palettes of your Google Calendar) and function.

Because, at the end of the day, it doesn’t matter what your calendar looks like.

It matters that you feel clear on how you want your day to run, empowered to make it happen, and proud of today when your head hits the pillow.

And then, if you want pretty notebooks and other creative outlets, let’s get you there! Those are valid desires.

It’s just that calendars and time management aren’t where we prioritize time-consuming Pinterest-worthy-pages over peace of mind.

Reason #4 to go digital: Digital calendars allow for better communication with partners, family members & work teammates compared to paper planners, which means a lighter workload for you

Before I met my husband, I managed work out of my Outlook calendar and my personal life out of… well, kinda a Google Calendar but, candidly, mostly my head.

Enter Matt and his crazy then-med school rotations schedule (now replaced by a crazy ER shift schedule).

After a couple months of dating, we created a joint Google Calendar so I could see when he was working. (A sign of true love!)

After we started that joint calendar, not only could I easily factor his schedule into my plans, but it also freed up the time we did have together from me asking him a bajillion times when he worked next/this weekend/next month.

Fast forward seven years later: we now additionally share other calendars, including ones specifically about our daughters so we can both see when they have school/daycare, childcare, doctor’s appointments, and activities.

Paper calendars obviously can’t hold a candle to this. Even if you have a single family-hub-type calendar, those things typically live at home, which is pretty worthless when you’re on the go.

And this can be brutal for women.

Women often shoulder the burden of organizing a family’s life, activities, housework, and meals. If there’s no communication mechanism, the workload can’t easily be communicated and shared, so by default, it falls on the woman.

If, instead, you create an easy way to get things on your partner’s plate, suddenly, you’re able to share the load and lighten your own.

And THAT’s where life really does start to feel lighter – because it is.

Reason #5 to go digital: If you want to think long-term, you need to be able to plan long-term. And for that, you need to go digital.

So, your driver’s license expires in a couple of years. Your passport – a couple of years later.

Want to avoid the last-minute scramble to renew them?

Me too! Calendar their deadlines and when you’ll start the renewal process in the months beforehand.

If you use a digital calendar, this is easy peasy. Just go to those dates and plug in the info.

If you use a paper planner, your pages don’t go that far. You have to write out those dates on the last page and hope you remember to carry the dates over – for multiple years until you finally have a planner for the year they need to be renewed.

That’s a pretty big room for error and dropping a ball, which you do not want to discover as you’re trying to board a plane for your dream vacation…

Similarly, let’s talk birthdays. They come around every year. With a digital calendar, you repeat those puppies on an annual basis, and you’re done. Even better, you can repeat reminders a couple weeks ahead of time to plan presents and parties, set those for annual repetitive, and you’re all set. FOREVER.

Paper calendars – nope.

Digital calendars let you plan for the long-term in a more efficient, effective way.

With paper calendars, you’re forced to limit your planning until the last date in your calendar, and that’s just silly.

In short, reason #5 for going digital vs a paper planner:

If you want to think long-term, you need to be able to plan long-term. And for that, you need to go digital.

Paper vs digital calendar: Close-up of table with laptop computer eyeglasses and documents at office

Reason #6 to go digital: Digital calendars have easy integration with email; Paper planners don’t

Google Calendar integrates with my Gmail and GSuite email accounts, so it pulls flights and events from my email and puts them right into my calendar. Efficient.

Paper planners – nope.

Reason #7 to go digital: A digital calendar virtually taps you on the shoulder to remind you to do things. A paper calendar cannot.

In my paper planner days in college, I once stood up the most senior female professor at my school at a restaurant.

The lunch was in my paper planner. I just didn’t pull out my calendar to check it at the end of class. Instead, I threw my laptop in my bag and went home to take a nap. I woke up and realized my mistake far too late. (Ughhhh my tummy still turns when I think about it.)

Here’s the thing: a calendar only works if it helps you do the actual things you schedule.

This goes beyond just writing down the events in your calendar like a champ.

Your calendar needs to help you know to do the thing when the time rolls around, even if you’re on the go.

Paper planners require YOU to remember to look at them. Lots of room for forgetting to look – and therefore forgetting to do things.

Digital calendars actually virtually tap you on the shoulder – via phone and desktop alerts – to tell you to do the thing when you planned to do it.

On that day I stood up my college professor, if I’d been using a digital calendar, both my laptop and my phone would have helped me avoid standing her up.

And today? Well, with little kids, my life is even more fast-paced and on-the-go, making my phone alerts all the more critical. I can’t tell you the number of times they’ve saved me.

At the end of the day, your brain has more important things to do than somehow remember the things you need to do or to remember to look at your calendar six times a day.

Instead, leverage your phone. Make it your tiny little personal assistant who reminds you to do the things you need/want to do when you need to do them.

Let it help you show up how you want to show up.

Paper calendars just can’t do that. Believe me – my track record proves it.

Reason #8 to go digital: Digital calendars help you quickly and easily rearrange when the inevitable curveball strikes

We all know curveballs can derail our best-laid plans.

Whether one derails your next hour, day, or even weeks at a time, digital calendars let you drag and drop your little time-blocks to create a new plan.

Paper calendars require a lot of erasing and re-writing, which is far more time-consuming.

We know the curveballs are coming. Let’s use a system that sets us up to be more nimble and helps us get back out there quickly.

Reason #9 to go digital: Since we usually leave home with our phone, you’ll always have your calendar with you

Your digital calendar is always with you in your phone. Since we all leave our house with our phones, even when I dash out chasing after our kids, you’ll always have it with you.

If you use a paper planner and you’re out and about, your paper planner is at home, and you need to know what’s on deck or schedule a new appointment, you’re in a pickle.

Reason #10 to go digital: Your digital calendar’s backed up

Despite my tendency to lose physical things like my keys twice a day, I’ve thankfully never lost a paper planner. But I can only imagine.

When your whole life is in a paper planner and you lose it, that’s it.

With a digital calendar, if you lose your phone, a lost calendar thankfully isn’t a concern – you just access it by signing into a computer. Sweet relief – and peace of mind.

(Bonus) Reason #11 to go digital (I can’t help it): Digital calendars let you use apps like Acuity and Calendly to more easily set up meetings, which also protect your boundaries better than you can

Do you love those email threads along the lines of “when works best for you?” and “oh, I can’t do those times – how about these?”

No? No one does.

Apps like Acuity and Calendly allow you to send a link to someone to book a specific appointment on your calendar during only the windows of time you want to allow meetings, while also cross-checking your calendar to make sure you’re not double-booked.

It’s nothing less than modern-day magic.

Moreover, at least for Minnesotan people-pleasers like me, these apps are game-changers because they protect my calendar way better than I ever could. While I’ll waver and offer people meetings when it works best for them (but not me), these apps show only your available time – protecting your boundaries better than you can.

So, how to set up and use a digital calendar to reduce your stress & up your confidence?

If you’re thinking, “alright – I’m in! Let’s go digital!,” congrats! Given the empowerment and clarity that waits on the other side, I’m thrilled for you!

If you’d like my help learning how to do it, consider joining my time management program for professional working women .

In the time management training program, not only do I show you step-by-step how to set up your digital calendar, we also work through strategies of getting real work done during work hours (freeing up nights and weekends for the fun stuff!), managing email, getting that Invisible To-Do List out of your head and into your system, planning your weeks in a realistic and effective way, and feeling confident drawing and maintaining workload boundaries.

In the words of a client, Monica Campbell, an attorney, she shared,

“I was a bit nervous when I joined [Kelly’s program] since I’ve done other programs and bought numerous books and watched untold number of YouTube videos on time management and made no real improvement, at least not any lasting changes. “Now I think that I couldn’t afford NOT to take this program. It has changed the way I looked at time and the way my mind processes it. This was a game-changer for me. “I am now much more hopeful and a lot calmer. I don’t feel like I’m juggling all these balls in the air and possibly forgetting something anymore. I feel much more confident because I have a definite structure to keep track of things, and I can see where I before set myself up to fail.”

If you’re ready for that, let’s get you there. Join me in my next time management program for professional working women . I’d love to see you in there.

A bit about me

Hi there! I'm Kelly Nolan, an attorney-turned-time management strategist and mom of two girls. I teach the Bright Method,  a realistic time management system that took me from an overwhelmed attorney to one managing it all with clarity and less stress. Let's empower you with this strategy, too.

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  1. Chapter 7 Flashcards

    Kelly and Jordan are writing a term paper together on the concept of "faithful representation" in the financial statements. Kelly is assigned the task of defining it in the context of an amount being an estimate.

  2. ETHICS 7 Flashcards

    Recording sales that lack economic substance. Kelly and Jordan are writing a term paper together on the concept of "faithful representation" in the financial statements. Kelly is assigned the task of defining it in the context of an amount being an estimate. Which of the following statements should NOT be used by Kelly in her description?

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    Assume you were assigned a term paper and decided to surf the web to identify a provider of papers for a fee. You chose what you thought was the best paper available. With respect to Rest's model of morality it can be said that: ... Kelly/Jordan are writing paper together on the concept of "faithful representation" in the fin statements. Kelly ...

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    Kelly and Jordan are writing a term paper together on the concept of "faithful representation" in the financial statements. Kelly is assigned the task of defining it in the context of an amount being an estimate. Which of the following statements should NOT be used by Kelly in her description? A.

  5. 51 kelly and jordan are writing a term paper together

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    Award:6.67 out of 6.67 points Kelly and Jordan are writing a term paper together on the concept of "faithful representation" in the financial statements. Kelly is assigned the task of defining it in the context of an amount being an estimate. Which of the following statements should NOTbe used by Kelly in her description?

  7. BA406 Chapter 6 Flashcards

    Kelly and Jordan are writing a term paper together on the concept of "faithful representation" in the financial statements. Kelly is assigned the task of defining it in the context of an amount being an estimate. Which of the following statements should not be used by Kelly in her description?

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  9. Chapter 7-ACCT 320

    Kelly and Jordan are writing a term paper together on the concept of "faithful representation" in the financial statements. Kelly is assigned the task of defining it in the context of an amount being an estimate.

  10. How to Write a Good Term Paper (Format, Structure, Outline)

    The volume determines which approach you take to writing. For example, if your paper is short, you need to state your thoughts concisely and clearly, going straight to the point. If it is long, do not fill the pages with hot air, but try to do thorough research and look at the issue from different angles.

  11. How to Write a Term Paper Step-by-step Guide with Examples

    Body Paragraphs. As a rule, in writing college term papers, one must write down several subheadings and headings to divide ideas and arguments into several (at least four) paragraphs. As done below, each body paragraph should contain one idea and a strong topic sentence. Heading 1: History of the argument and background.

  12. PDF Steps to a Better Term Paper

    b. There are at least four main types of notes: (1) Direct quotation, repeating the author's exact words. (2) Paraphrase, putting the author's idea in your own words. (3) Combination of quotation and paraphrase is very effective. You paraphrase the author's main idea, but include in the paraphrase a single word or small group of words in quotation marks.

  13. PDF COmmOn CORE StandaRdS

    Together Now" may be about. Within each team one student offers a suggestion, another student echoes it, and all students write the sug-gestion on their papers without discussion. 3. Students should help each other write ideas in the best possible way, and should not proceed until the four have already completed writing the idea on their paper.

  14. How to Write a Research Paper Outline In 7 Steps

    2 Make a list of all the topics, subtopics, and points you want to cover. Go through your research and note each topic, subtopic, and supporting point. Be sure to keep related information together. Remember that everything you discuss in your paper should relate to your thesis, so omit anything that seems tangential.

  15. Solved as a student jordan spends 40 hrs per week writing

    as a student jordan spends 40 hrs per week writing term papers and completing homewoke assignments. on one axis of ber production possibilities frontier is measured the number of term osorrs written per week. on the other axis is measured the number of homework assignments completer per week. jordyns production possibilities frontier is a strai...

  16. English Formal Writing Quiz Flashcards

    What other 4 rules in formal writing should you not do? avoid using he or she phrase, don't write the reason is because, don't use the repetitive because statement, don't use the word a lot. What is the solution to a sentence using he or she phrasing? use plural nouns (they) and (them) and the corresponding third-person pronouns.

  17. Before You Start Writing That Paper...

    Prewriting is a term that describes any kind of preliminary work that precedes the actual paper writing. It doesn't necessarily have to be writing. In fact, prewriting can just be concentrated thinking about what you want to write your paper on. Various prewriting techniques are expanded upon below. However, know that you don't have to use all ...

  18. Kelly Jordan

    The Little Blue Cottage. Written by Kelly Jordan. Illustrated by Jessica Courtney-Tickle. Page Street Kids. Release date: May 12, 2020. ISBN-10: 1624149235. I SBN-13: 978-1624149238. The little blue cottage waits each year for summer to arrive—and with it, the girl. Through sunny days and stormy weather, the cottage and the girl keep each ...

  19. Mintz Chpt 7 HW Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like "Cookie jar reserves" can best be described as: Buying a lot of chocolate chip cookies, storing them for when you have a hunger attack, and then releasing them into your stomach Overstating or understating allowances and reversing amounts in the future to smooth out net income over time Accelerating the recording of revenues into ...

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  21. Paper vs digital planner: Why paper lovers (like me) need to consider

    Reason #3 to go digital: We want to make paper calendars pretty, and that's time-consuming and actually takes you away from getting stuff done and enjoying downtime. Back in my paper planner days, I spent way too much time making my paper planner "pretty." I'd write and re-write things, box and re-box things, etc. until it looked just ...

  22. The Little Blue Cottage by Kelly Jordan

    Kelly Jordan, Jessica Courtney-Tickle (Illustrations) The little blue cottage waits each year for summer to arrive—and with it, the girl. Through sunny days and stormy weather, the cottage and the girl keep each other company and wile away the long days and nights together. Until one year, and then another, the cottage is left waiting and ...

  23. Chapter 7-ACCT 320 Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like The Harrison Industries case deals with: Using non-GAAP measures of earnings Acceptability of recording unpaid severance accruals Using EBITDA to obscure earnings All of the above., One result of earnings management is: It brings into question the quality of earnings It uses a non-GAAP financial measure to manipulate earnings ...