Communications and Networking Research Group

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PUBLICATIONS

Journal articles | other papers | conference papers | book chapters | technical reports, journal articles.

134. Vishrant Tripathi, Nick Jones, Eytan Modiano, Fresh-CSMA: A Distributed Protocol for Minimizing Age of Information, IEEE Journal on Communications and Networks, 2024.

133. Bai Liu, Quang Nguyen, Qingkai Liang, Eytan Modiano, Tracking Drift-Plus-Penalty: Utility Maximization for Partially Observable and Controllable Networks, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2024.

132. Xinzhe Fu, Eytan Modiano, Optimal Routing to Parallel Servers with Unknown Utilities – Multi-armed Bandit With Queues, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, January 2022.

131. Bai Liu, Qingkai Liang, Eytan Modiano, Tracking MaxWeight: Optimal Control for Partially Observable and Controllable Networks, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, August 2023.

130. Xinzhe Fu, Eytan Modiano, Joint Learning and Control in Stochastic Queueing Networks with unknown Utilities, Proceedings of the ACM on Measurement and Analysis of Computing Systems, 2023.

129. Vishrant Tripathi, Rajat Talak, Eytan Modiano, Information Freshness in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking,” April 2023.

128.  Xinzhe Fu, Eytan Modiano, “ Learning-NUM: Network Utility Maximization with Unknown Utility Functions and Queueing Delay ,”  IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking,” 2022.

127.  Bai Liu, Qiaomin Xie, Eytan Modiano,  " RL-QN: A Reinforcement Learning Framework for Optimal Control of Queueing Systems ,"  ACM Transactions on Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Computing Systems (TOMPECS), 2022.

126. Xinzhe Fu and E. Modiano,  “ Elastic Job Scheduling with Unknown Utility Functions ,” Performance Evaluation, 2021.

125. Bai Liu and E. Modiano, “ Optimal Control for Networks with Unobservable Malicious Nodes ,”  Performance Evaluation, 2021.

124. Vishrant Tripathi, Rajat Talak, Eytan Modiano, " Age Optimal Information Gathering and Dissemination on Graphs ,”  Transactions on Mobile Computing, April 2021.

123.  Xinyu Wu, Dan Wu, Eytan Modiano, “ Predicting Failure Cascades in Large Scale Power Systems via the Influence Model Framework, ”  IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, 2021.

122.   Roy D. Yates, Yin Sun, D. Richard Brown III, Sanjit K. Kaul, Eytan Modiano and Sennur Ulukus, “ Age of Information: An Introduction and Survey, ”  Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, February 2021.

121.   Jianan Zhang, Abhishek Sinha, Jaime Llorca, Anonia Tulino, Eytan Modiano, “ Optimal Control of Distributed Computing Networks with Mixed-Cast Traffic Flows ,”  IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2021.

120.   Thomas Stahlbuhk, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " Learning Algorithms for Minimizing Queue Length Regret ,”  IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 2021.

119.   Thomas Stahlbuhk, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, “ Throughput Maximization in Uncooperative Spectrum Sharing Networks ,”  IEEE/ACM IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 28, No. 6, December 2020.

118.   Thomas Stahlbuhk, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, “ Learning algorithms for scheduling in wireless networks with unknown channel statistics ,” Ad Hoc Networks, Vol. 85, pp. 131-144, 2019.

117.   Rajat Talak, Eytan Modiano, “ Age-Delay Tradeoffs in Queueing Systems ,”  IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 2021.

116.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Improving Age of Information in Wireless Networks with Perfect Channel State Information ,”  IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 28, No. 4, August 2020.

115.   Igor Kadota and Eytan Modiano, “ Minimizing the Age of Information in Wireless Networks with Stochastic Arrivals ,” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 2020.

114.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, “ Optimizing Information Freshness in Wireless Networks under General Interference Constraints ,”  IEEE/ACM transactions on Networking, Vol. 28, No. 1, February 2020.

113.   X. Fu and E. Modiano, " Fundamental Limits of Volume-based Network DoS Attacks ," Proceedings of the ACM on Measurement and Analysis of Computing Systems, Vol. 3, No. 3, December 2019. 

112.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, “ Capacity and Delay Scaling for Broadcast Transmission in Highly Mobile Wireless Networks ,” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 2019.

111.   Abhishek Sinha and Eytan Modiano, “ Throughput-Optimal Broadcast in Wireless Networks with Point-to-Multipoint Transmissions , IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, Vol. 19, No. 9, September 2020.

110.   Yu-Pin Hsu, Eytan Modiano, Lingjie Duan, “ Scheduling Algorithms for Minimizing Age of Information in Wireless Broadcast Networks with Random Arrivals ,”  IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, Vol. 19, No. 12, December 2020.

109.   Xiaolin Jiang, Hossein S. Ghadikolaei, Gabor Fodor, Eytan Modiano, Zhibo Pang, Michele Zorzi, Carlo Fischione, " Low-latency Networking: Where Latency Lurks and How to Tame It ,”  Proceedings of the IEEE, 2019.

108.   Jianan Zhang, Edmund Yeh, Eytan Modiano, “ Robustness of Interdependent Random Geometric Networks ,” IEEE Transactions on Network Science and Engineering, Vol. 6, No. 3, July-September 2019.

107.   Qingkai Liang, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, “ Robust Design of Spectrum-Sharing Networks ,” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, Vol. 18, No. 8, August 2019.

106.   A. Sinha, L. Tassiulas, E. Modiano, “ Throughput-Optimal Broadcast in Wireless Networks with Dynamic Topology ,”  IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, Vol. 18, No. 5, May 2019.

105. Igor Kadota, Abhishek Sinha, Eytan Modiano, “ Scheduling Algorithms for Optimizing Age of Information in Wireless Networks With Throughput Constraints ,”  IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, August 2019.

104.   Igor Kadota, Abhishek Sinha, Rahul Singh, Elif Uysal-Biyikoglu, Eytan Modjano, “ Scheduling Policies for Minimizing Age of Information in Broadcast Wireless Networks ,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 26, No. 5, October 2018.

103.   Jianan Zhang and Eytan Modiano, “ Connectivity in Interdependent Networks ,”  IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2018.

102.   Qingkai Liang, Eytan Modiano, “ Minimizing Queue Length Regret Under Adversarial Network Models ,” Proceedings of the ACM on Measurement and Analysis of Computing Systems, Volume 2, Issue 1, April 2018, Article No.: 11, pp 1-32. (same as Sigmetrics 2018).

101.   A. Sinha and E. Modiano, “ Optimal Control for Generalized Network Flow Problems ,”  IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2018.

100.   Hossein Shokri-Ghadikolaei, Carlo Fischione, Eytan Modiano  “ Interference Model Similarity Index and Its Applications to mmWave Networks ,”  IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, 2018.

99.   Matt Johnston, Eytan Modiano, “ Wireless Scheduling with Delayed CSI: When Distributed Outperforms Centralized, ’ IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 2018.

98.   A. Sinha, G. Paschos, E. Modiano, “ Throughput-Optimal Multi-hop Broadcast Algorithms ," IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2017.

97.   Nathan Jones, Georgios Paschos, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " An Overlay Architecture for Throughput Optimal Multipath Routing ,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2017.

96.   Greg Kuperman, Eytan Modiano, “ Providing Guaranteed Protection in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks with Interference Constraints ,” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 2017.

95.   Matt Johnston, Eytan Modiano, Isaac Kesslassy, “ Channel Probing in Opportunistic Communications Systems ,”  IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, November, 2017.

94.   Anurag Rai, Georgios Paschos, Chih-Ping Lee, Eytan Modiano, " Loop-Free Backpressure Routing Using Link-Reversal Algorithms ", IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, October, 2017.

93.   Matt Johnston and Eytan Modiano, “" Controller Placement in Wireless Networks with Delayed CSI ,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2017.

92.   Jianan Zheng, E. Modiano, D. Hay, " Enhancing Network Robustness via Shielding ,”  IEEE Transactions on Networking, 2017.

91.   M. Markakis, E. Modiano, J.N. Tsitsiklis, “ Delay Analysis of the Max-Weight Policy under Heavy-Tailed Traffic via Fluid Approximations ,” Mathematics of Operations Research, October, 2017.

90.   Qingkai Liang and E. Modiano, “ Survivability in Time-Varying Graphs ,”  IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 2017.

89.   A. Sinha, G. Paschos, C. P. Li, and E. Modiano, “ Throughput-Optimal Multihop Broadcast on Directed Acyclic Wireless Networks ," IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 25, No. 1, Feb. 2017.

88.   G. Celik, S. Borst, , P. Whiting , E. Modiano, “ Dynamic Scheduling with Reconfiguration Delays ,”  Queueing Systems, 2016.

87.  G. Paschos, C. P. Li, E. Modiano, K. Choumas, T. Korakis, “ In-network Congestion Control for Multirate Multicast ,”   IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking,  2016.

86.   H. Seferoglu and E. Modiano, “ TCP-Aware Backpressure Routing and Scheduling ,” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 2016.

85.   H. Seferoglu and E. Modiano, “ Separation of Routing and Scheduling in Backpressure-Based Wireless Networks ," IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2016.

84.   M. Markakis, E. Modiano, J.N. Tsitsiklis, “ Delay Stability of Back-Pressure Policies in the presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,”  IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2015.

83.   S. Neumayer, E. Modiano,  “ Network Reliability Under Geographically Correlated Line and Disk Failure Models ,” Computer Networks, to appear, 2016.

82.   S. Neumayer, E. Modiano, A. Efrat, “ Geographic Max-Flow and Min-Cut Under a Circular Disk Failure Model ,” Computer Networks, 2015.

81.   Marzieh Parandehgheibi, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, Survivable Path Sets:  A new approach to survivability in multi-layer networks ,”  IEEE Journal on Lightwave Technology, 2015.

80.   G. Kuperman, E. Modiano, A. Narula-Tam, “ Network Protection with Multiple Availability Guarantees ,” Computer Networks, 2015.

79.   G. Kuperman, E. Modiano, A. Narula-Tam, “ Analysis and Algorithms for Partial Protection in Mesh Networks ,” IEEE/OSA Journal of Optical Communications and Networks, 2014.

78.   Krishna Jagannathan, Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John Tsitsiklis, " Throughput Optimal Scheduling over Time-Varying Channels in the presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 2014.

77.   Chih-Ping Li and Eytan Modiano, “ Receiver-Based Flow Control for Networks in Overload ," IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2015.

76.   Matthew Johnston, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, “ A Robust Optimization Approach to Backup Network Design with Random Failures ,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2015.

75.   Guner Celik and Eytan Modiano, “ Scheduling in Networks with Time-Varying Channels and Reconfiguration Delay ," IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 23, No. 1, 2015.

74.   Matt Johnston, H.W. Lee, E. Modiano, “ Robust Network Design for Stochastic Traffic Demands ," IEEE Journal of Lightwave Technology, 2013.

73.   Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John Tsitsiklis, “ Max-Weight Scheduling in Queueing Networks With Heavy-Tailed Traffic, ” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2014.

72.   Kayi Lee, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, " Maximizing Reliability in WDM Networks through Lightpath Routing ,”  IEEE ACM Transactions on Networking, 2014.

71.   Krishna Jaggannathan and Eytan Modiano, “ The Impact of Queue Length Information on Buffer Overflow in Parallel Queues ,”  IEEE transactions on Information Theory, 2013.

70.   Krishna Jagannathan, Ishai Menashe, Gil Zussman, Eytan Modiano, “ Non-cooperative Spectrum Access - The Dedicated vs. Free Spectrum Choice ,” IEEE JSAC, special issue on Economics of Communication Networks & Systems, to appear, 2012.

69.   Guner Celik and Eytan Modiano, “ Dynamic Server Allocation over Time Varying Channels with Switchover Delay ," IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, to appear, 2012.

68.   Anand Srinivas and Eytan Modiano, " Joint Node Placement and Assignment for Throughput Optimization in Mobile Backbone Networks ,” IEEE JSAC, special issue on Communications Challenges and Dynamics for Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles, June, 2012.

67.   Guner Celik and Eytan Modiano, “ Controlled Mobility in Stochastic and Dynamic Wireless Networks ," Queueing Systems, 2012.

66.   Krishna Jagannathan, Shie Mannor, Ishai Menache, Eytan Modiano, “ A State Action Frequency Approach to Throughput Maximization over Uncertain Wireless Channels ,” Internet Mathematics, Vol. 9, Nos. 2–3: 136–160.

65.   Long Le, E. Modiano, N. Shroff, “Optimal Control of Wireless Networks with Finite Buffers ,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, to appear, 2012.

64.   K. Jagannathan, M. Markakis, E. Modiano, J. Tsitsiklis, “Queue Length Asymptotics for Generalized Max-Weight Scheduling in the presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, Vol. 20, No. 4, August 2012.

63.   Kayi Lee, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, “ Reliability in Layered Networks with Random Link Failures, ” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, December 2011.

62.   Krishna Jagannathan, Eytan Modiano, Lizhong Zheng, “ On the Role of Queue Length Information in Network Control ,” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, September 2011.

61.   Hyang-Won Lee, Long Le, Eytan Modiano, “ Distributed Throughput Maximization in Wireless Networks via Random Power Allocation, ” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, 2011.

60.   Sebastian Neumayer, Gil Zussman, Rueven Cohen, Eytan Modiano, " Assessing the Vulnerability of the Fiber Infrastructure to Disasters, " IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, December 2011.

59.   Kayi Lee, Eytan Modiano, Hyang-Won Lee, “ Cross Layer Survivability in WDM-based Networks ,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, August 2011.

58.   Emily Craparo, Jon How, and Eytan Modiano, “Throughput Optimization in Mobile Backbone Networks,” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, April, 2011.

57.   Hyang-Won Lee, Kayi Lee, and Eytan Modiano, “Diverse Routing in Networks with Probabilistic Failures,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, December, 2010.

56.   Guner Celik, Gil Zussman, Wajahat Khan and Eytan Modiano, “MAC Protocols For Wireless Networks With Multi-packet Reception Cabaility ,” IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, February, 2010.

55.   Atilla Eryilmaz, Asuman Ozdaglar, Devavrat Shah, and Eytan Modiano, “Distributed Cross-Layer Algorithms for the Optimal Control of Multi-hop Wireless Networks,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, April 2010.

54.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, “Minimum Energy Transmission over a Wireless Channel With Deadline and Power Constraints ,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, pp. 2841-2852, December, 2009.

53.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, “A Calculus Approach to Energy-Efficient Data Transmission with Quality of Service Constraints,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2009.

52.   Anand Srinivas, Gil Zussman, and Eytan Modiano, “Construction and Maintenance of Wireless Mobile Backbone Networks,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2009.

51.   Andrew Brzezinski, Gil Zussman, and Eytan Modiano, “Distributed Throughput Maximization in Wireless Mesh Networks Via Pre-Partitioning,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, December, 2008.

50.   Amir Khandani, Eytan Modiano, Jinane Abounadi, Lizhong Zheng, “Reliability and Route Diversity in Wireless Networks,” IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, December, 2008.

49.   Alessandro Tarello, Jun Sun, Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, “Minimum Energy Transmission Scheduling Subject to Deadline Constraints,” ACM Wireless Networks, October, 2008.

48.   Murtaza Zafer, Eytan Modiano, “Optimal Rate Control for Delay-Constrained Data Transmission over a Wireless Channel,” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, September, 2008.

47.   Andrew Brzezinski and Eytan Modiano, “Achieving 100% Throughput In Reconfigurable IP/WDM Networks,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, August, 2008.

46.   Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano and C. Li, “Fairness and Optimal Stochastic Control for Heterogeneous Networks,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, September, 2008.

45.   Amir Khandani, Jinane Abounadi, Eytan Modiano, Lizhong Zheng, “Cooperative Routing in Static Wireless Networks,” IEEE Transactions on Communications, November 2007.

44.   Murtaza Zafer, Eytan Modiano, “Joint Scheduling of Rate-guaranteed and Best-effort Users over a Wireless Fading Channel,” IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, October, 2007.

43.   Krishna Jagannathan, Sem Borst, Phil Whiting and Eytan Modiano, “Scheduling of Multi-Antenna Broadcast Systems with Heterogeneous Users,” IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communications, September, 2007.Amir Khandani, Jinane

42.   Anand Ganti, Eytan Modiano, and John Tsitsiklis, “Optimal Transmission Scheduling in Symmetric Communication Models with Intermittent Connectivity, ” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, March, 2007.

41.   Michael Neely and Eytan Modiano, “Logarithmic Delay for NxN Packet Switches Under Crossbar Constraints,” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, November, 2007.

40.   Jun Sun, Jay Gao, Shervin Shambayati and Eytan Modiano, “Ka-Band Link Optimization with Rate Adaptation for Mars and Lunar Communications,”   International Journal of Satellite Communications and Networks, March, 2007.

39.   Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, "Fair Allocation of A Wireless Fading Channel: An Auction Approach" Institute for Mathematics and its Applications, Volume 143: Wireless Communications, 2006.

38.   Jun Sun, Eytan Modiano and Lizhong Zhang, “Wireless Channel Allocation Using An Auction Algorithm,” IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, May, 2006.

37.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, "Blocking Probability and Channel Assignment for Connection Oriented Traffic in Wireless Networks," IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, April, 2006.

36.   Alvin Fu, Eytan Modiano, and John Tsitsiklis, "Optimal Transmission Scheduling over a fading channel with Energy and Deadline Constraints" IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, March,2006.

35.   Poompat Saengudomlert, Eytan Modiano and Rober Gallager, “On-line Routing and Wavelength Assignment for Dynamic Traffic in WDM Ring and Torus Networks,” IEEE Transactions on Networking, April, 2006.

34.   Li-Wei Chen, Eytan Modiano and Poompat Saengudomlert, "Uniform vs. Non-Uniform band Switching in WDM Networks," Computer Networks (special issue on optical networks), January, 2006.

33.   Andrew Brzezinski and Eytan Modiano, "Dynamic Reconfiguration and Routing Algorithms for IP-over-WDM networks with Stochastic Traffic," IEEE Journal of Lightwave Technology, November, 2005

32.   Randall Berry and Eytan Modiano, "Optimal Transceiver Scheduling in WDM/TDM Networks," IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, August, 2005.

31.   Poompat Saengudomlert, Eytan Modiano, and Robert G. Gallager, “Dynamic Wavelength Assignment for WDM All-Optical Tree Networks,” IEEE Transactions on Networking, August, 2005.

30.   Ashwinder Ahluwalia and Eytan Modiano, "On the Complexity and Distributed Construction of Energy Efficient Broadcast Trees in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks," IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, October, 2005.

29.   Michael Neely, Charlie Rohrs and Eytan Modiano, "Equivalent Models for Analysis of Deterministic Service Time Tree Networks," IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, October, 2005.

28.   Michael Neely and Eytan Modiano, "Capacity and Delay Tradeoffs for Ad Hoc Mobile Networks," IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, May, 2005.

27.   Li-Wei Chen and Eytan Modiano, "Efficient Routing and Wavelength Assignment for Reconfigurable WDM Networks with Wavelength Converters," IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, February, 2005. Selected as one of the best papers from Infocom 2003 for fast-track publication in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking.

26.   Michael Neely and Eytan Modiano, "Convexity in Queues with General Inputs," IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, May, 2005.

25.   Anand Srinivas and Eytan Modiano, "Finding Minimum Energy Disjoint Paths in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks," ACM Wireless Networks, November, 2005. Selected to appear in a special issue dedicated to best papers from Mobicom 2003.

24.   Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charlie Rohrs, "Dynamic Power Allocation and Routing for Time-Varying Wireless Networks," IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communication, January, 2005.

23.   Chunmei Liu and Eytan Modiano, "On the performance of additive increase multiplicative decrease (AIMD) protocols in hybrid space-terrestrial networks," Computer Networks, September, 2004.

22.   Li-Wei Chen and Eytan Modiano, "Dynamic Routing and Wavelength Assignment with Optical Bypass using Ring Embeddings," Optical Switching and Networking (Elsevier), December, 2004.

21.   Aradhana Narula-Tam, Eytan Modiano and Andrew Brzezinski, "Physical Topology Design for Survivable Routing of Logical Rings in WDM-Based Networks," IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communication, October, 2004.

20.   Randall Berry and Eytan Modiano, "'The Role of Switching in Reducing the Number of Electronic Ports in WDM Networks," IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communication, October, 2004.

19.   Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, "Routing Strategies for Maximizing Throughput in LEO Satellite Networks,," IEEE JSAC, February, 2004.

18.   Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, "Capacity Provisioning and Failure Recovery for Low Earth Orbit Satellite Networks," International Journal on Satellite Communications, June, 2003.

17.   Alvin Fu, Eytan Modiano, and John Tsitsiklis, "Optimal Energy Allocation and Admission Control for Communications Satellites," IEEE Transactions on Networking, June, 2003.

16.   Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charles Rohrs, "Power Allocation and Routing in Multi-Beam Satellites with Time Varying Channels," IEEE Transactions on Networking, February, 2003.

15.   Eytan Modiano and Aradhana Narula-Tam, "Survivable lightpath routing: a new approach to the design of WDM-based networks," IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communication, May 2002.

14.   Aradhana Narula-Tam, Phil Lin and Eytan Modiano, "Efficient Routing and Wavelength Assignment for Reconfigurable WDM Networks," IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communication, January, 2002.

13.   Brett Schein and Eytan Modiano, "Quantifying the benefits of configurability in circuit-switched WDM ring networks with limited ports per node," IEEE Journal on Lightwave Technology, June, 2001.

12.   Aradhana Narula-Tam and Eytan Modiano, "Dynamic Load Balancing in WDM Packet Networks with and without Wavelength Constraints," IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communications, October 2000.

11.   Randy Berry and Eytan Modiano, "Reducing Electronic Multiplexing Costs in SONET/WDM Rings with Dynamically Changing Traffic," IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communications, October 2000.

10.   Eytan Modiano and Richard Barry, "A Novel Medium Access Control Protocol for WDM-Based LANs and Access Networks Using a Master-Slave Scheduler," IEEE Journal on Lightwave Technology, April 2000.

9.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, "Communication Protocols for Secure Distributed Computation of Binary Functions," Information and Computation, April 2000.

8.   Angela Chiu and Eytan Modiano, "Traffic Grooming Algorithms for Reducing Electronic Multiplexing Costs in WDM Ring Networks," IEEE Journal on Lightwave Technology, January 2000.

7.   Eytan Modiano, "An Adaptive Algorithm for Optimizing the Packet Size Used in Wireless ARQ Protocols," Wireless Networks, August 1999.

6.   Eytan Modiano, "Random Algorithms for Scheduling Multicast Traffic in WDM Broadcast-and-Select Networks," IEEE Transactions on Networking, July, 1999.

5.   Eytan Modiano and Richard Barry, "Architectural Considerations in the Design of WDM-based Optical Access Networks," Computer Networks, February 1999.

4.   V.W.S. Chan, K. Hall, E. Modiano and K. Rauschenbach, "Architectures and Technologies for High-Speed Optical Data Networks," IEEE Journal of Lightwave Technology, December 1998.

3.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, "Efficient Algorithms for Performing Packet Broadcasts in a Mesh Network," IEEE Transactions on Networking, May 1996.

2.   Eytan Modiano, Jeffrey Wieselthier and Anthony Ephremides, "A Simple Analysis of Queueing Delay in a Tree Network of Discrete-Time Queues with Constant Service Times," IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, February 1996.

1.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, "Communication Complexity of Secure Distributed Computation in the Presence of Noise," IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, July 1992.

Other Papers

5.  Eytan Modiano, "Satellite Data Networks," AIAA Journal on Aerospace Computing, Information and Communication, September, 2004.

4.  Eytan Modiano and Phil Lin, "Traffic Grooming in WDM networks," IEEE Communications Magazine, July, 2001.

3.  Eytan Modiano and Aradhana Narula, "Mechanisms for Providing Optical Bypass in WDM-based Networks," SPIE Optical Networks, January 2000.

2.  K. Kuznetsov, N. M. Froberg, Eytan Modiano, et. al., "A Next Generation Optical Regional Access Networks," IEEE Communications Magazine, January, 2000.

1.  Eytan Modiano, "WDM-based Packet Networks," (Invited Paper) IEEE Communications Magazine, March 1999.

Conference Papers

246. Xinyu Wu, Dan Wu, Eytan Modiano, “ Overload Balancing in Single-Hop Networks With Bounded Buffers ,” IFIP Networking, 2022.

245.  Xinzhe Fu, Eytan Modiano, “ Optimal Routing for Stream Learning Systems ,”  IEEE Infocom, April 2022.

244.  Vishrant Tripathi, Luca Ballotta, Luca Carlone, E. Modiano, “ Computation and Communication Co-Design for Real-Time Monitoring and Control in Multi-Agent Systems ,”  IEEE Wiopt, 2021.

243. Eray Atay, Igor Kadota, E. Modiano, “ Aging Wireless Bandits: Regret Analysis and Order-Optimal Learning Algorithm ,”  IEEE Wiopt 2021.

242. Xinzhe Fu and E. Modiano,  “ Elastic Job Scheduling with Unknown Utility Functions ,” IFIP Performance, Milan, 2021.

241. Bai Liu and E. Modiano, “ Optimal Control for Networks with Unobservable Malicious Nodes ,”  IFIP Performance, Milan, 2021.

240. Bai Liu, Qiaomin Xie,  Eytan Modiano, “ RL-QN:  A Reinforcement Learning Framework for Optimal Control of Queueing Systems ,”  ACM Sigmetrics Workshop on Reinforcement Learning in Networks and Queues (RLNQ), 2021.

239. Xinzhe Fu and E. Modiano,  “ Learning-NUM: Network Utility Maximization with Unknown Utility Functions and Queueing Delay ,  ACM MobiHoc 2021.  

238. Vishrant Tripathi and Eytan Modiano,  “ An Online Learning Approach to Optimizing Time-Varying Costs of AoI ,”  ACM MobiHoc 2021. 

237.   Igor Kadota, Muhammad Shahir Rahman, and Eytan Modiano, " WiFresh: Age-of-Information from Theory to Implementation ,”  International Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (ICCCN), 2021.

236. Vishrant Tripathi and Eytan Modiano, “ Age Debt: A General Framework For Minimizing Age of Information ,”  IEEE Infocom Workshop on Age-of-Information, 2021.

235. Igor Kadota, Eytan Modiano, “ Age of Information in Random Access Networks with Stochastic Arrivals ,” IEEE Infocom, 2020.

234. Igor Kadota, M. Shahir Rahman, Eytan Modiano, Poster: Age of Information in Wireless Networks: from Theory to Implementation , ACM Mobicom, 2020.

233. Xinyu Wu, Dan Wu, Eytan Modiano, “ An Influence Model Approach to Failure Cascade Prediction in Large Scale Power Systems ,” IEEE American Control Conference, July, 2020.

232. X. Fu and E. Modiano, " Fundamental Limits of Volume-based Network DoS Attacks ," Proc. ACM Sigmetrics, Boston, MA, June 2020.

231. Vishrant Tripathi, Eytan Modiano, “ A Whittle Index Approach to Minimizing Functions of Age of Information ,” Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2019.

230. Bai Liu, Xiaomin Xie, Eytan Modiano, “ Reinforcement Learning for Optimal Control of Queueing Systems ,” Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2019.

229. Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, “ A Theory of Uncertainty Variables for State Estimation and Inference ,” Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2019.

228. Rajat Talak, Eytan Modiano, “ Age-Delay Tradeoffs in Single Server Systems ,” IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Paris, France, July, 2019.

227. Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, “ When a Heavy Tailed Service Minimizes Age of Information ,” IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Paris, France, July, 2019.

226. Qingkai Liang, Eytan Modiano, “ Optimal Network Control with Adversarial Uncontrollable Nodes ,” ACM MobiHoc, Catania, Italy, June 2019.

225. Igor Kadota, Eytan Modiano, “ Minimizing the Age of Information in Wireless Networks with Stochastic Arrivals ,” ACM MobiHoc, June 2019.

224. Maotong Xu, Jelena Diakonikolas, Suresh Subramaniam, Eytan Modiano, “ A Hierarchical WDM-based Scalable Data Center Network Architecture ,” IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC), Shanghai, China, June 2019.

223. Maotong Xu, Min Tian, Eytan Modiano, Suresh Subramaniam, " RHODA Topology Configuration Using Bayesian Optimization

222.   Anurag Rai, Rahul Singh and Eytan Modiano, " A Distributed Algorithm for Throughput Optimal Routing in Overlay Networks ,”  IFIP Networking 2019, Warsaw, Poland, May 2019.

221.   Qingkai Liang and Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Network Control in Partially-Controllable Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, Paris, April 2019.

220.   Xinzhe Fu and Eytan Modiano, " Network Interdiction Using Adversarial Traffic Flows ,”  IEEE Infocom, Paris, April 2019.

219.   Vishrant Tripathi, Rajat Talak, Eytan Modiano, " Age Optimal Information Gathering and Dissemination on Graphs ,”  IEEE Infocom, Paris, April 2019.

218.   Jianan Zhang, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, " On the Robustness of Distributed Computing Networks ,”  DRCN 2019, Coimbra, Portugal, March, 2019.

217.   Hyang-Won Lee, Jianan Zhang and Eytan Modiano, " Data-driven Localization and Estimation of Disturbance in the Interconnected Power System ,”  IEEE Smartgridcomm, October, 2018.

216.   Jianan Zhang and Eytan Modiano, " Joint Frequency Regulation and Economic Dispatch Using Limited Communication ,”  IEEE Smartgridcomm, October, 2018.

215.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling Policies for Age Minimization in Wireless Networks with Unknown Channel State ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, July 2018.

214.   Thomas Stahlbuhk, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " Online Learning Algorithms for Minimizing Queue Length Regret ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, July 2018.

213.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Distributed Scheduling Algorithms for Optimizing Information Freshness in Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE SPAWC, Kalamata, Greece, June, 2018.

212.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Optimizing Information Freshness in Wireless Networks under General Interference Constraints ,”  ACM MobiHoc 2018, Los Angeles, CA, June 2018.

211.   Thomas Stahlbuhk, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " Learning Algorithms for Scheduling in Wireless Networks with Unknown Channel Statistics ,”  ACM MobiHoc, June 2018.

210.   Khashayar Kamran, Jianan Zhang, Edmund Yeh, Eytan Modiano, " Robustness of Interdependent Geometric Networks Under Inhomogeneous Failures ,”  Workshop on Spatial Stochastic Models for Wireless Networks (SpaSWiN), Shanghai, China, May 2018.

209.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Optimizing Age of Information in Wireless Networks with Perfect Channel State Information ,”  Wiopt 2018, Shanghai, China, May 2018.

208.   Abhishek Sinha, Eytan Modiano, " Network Utility Maximization with Heterogeneous Traffic Flows ,”  Wiopt 2018, Shanghai, China, May 2018.

207.   Qingkai Liang, Eytan Modiano, " Minimizing Queue Length Regret Under Adversarial Network Models ,”  ACM Sigmetrics, 2018.

206.   Jianan Zhang, Abhishek Sinha, Jaime Llorca, Anonia Tulino, Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Control of Distributed Computing Networks with Mixed-Cast Traffic Flows ,”  IEEE Infocom, Honolulu, HI, April 2018.

205.   Qingkai Liang, Eytan Modiano, " Network Utility Maximization in Adversarial Environments ,”  IEEE Infocom, Honolulu, HI, April 2018.

204.   Igor Kadota, Abhishek Sinha, Eytan Modiano, " Optimizing Age of Information in Wireless Networks with Throughput Constraints ,”  IEEE Infocom, Honolulu, HI, April 2018.

203.   QIngkai Liang, Verina (Fanyu) Que, Eytan Modiano, " Accelerated Primal-Dual Policy Optimization for Safe Reinforcement Learning ,”  NIPS workshop on “Transparent and interpretable machine learning in safety critical environments,"December 2017.

202.   Rahul Singh, Xueying Guo,Eytan Modiano, " Risk-Sensitive Optimal Control of Queues ,”  IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), December 2017.

201.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Minimizing Age of Information in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2017.

200.   Abhishek Sinha, Eytan Modiano, " Throughput-Optimal Broadcast in Wireless Networks with Point-to-Multipoint Transmissions ,”  ACM MobiHoc, Madras, India, July 2017.

199.   Rajat Talak, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Capacity and delay scaling for broadcast transmission in highly mobile wireless networks ,”  ACM MobiHoc, Madras, India, July 2017.

198.5 . Y.-P. Hsu, E. Modiano, and L. Duan, " Age of Information: Design and Analysis of Optimal Scheduling Algorithms ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory (ISIT), 2017.

198.   Qingkai Liang and Eytan Modiano, " Coflow Scheduling in Input-Queued Switches: Optimal Delay Scaling and Algorithms ,”  IEEE Infocom, Atlanta, GA, May 2017.

197.   Jianan Zhang and Eytan Modiano, " Robust Routing in Interdependent Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, Atlanta, GA, May 2017.

196.   Abhishek Sinha, Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Control for Generalized Network Flow Problems ,”  IEEE Infocom, Atlanta, GA, May 2017.

195.   Rajat Talak*, Sertac Karaman, Eytan Modiano, " Speed Limits in Autonomous Vehicular Networks due to Communication Constraints ,”  IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), Las Vegas, NV, December 2016.

194.   Marzieh Parandehgheibi*, Konstantin Turitsyn, Eytan Modiano, " Distributed Frequency Control in Power Grids Under Limited Communication ,”  IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), Las Vegas, NV, December 2016.

193.   Igor Kadota, Elif Uysal-Biyikoglu, Rahul Singh, Eytan Modiano, " Minimizing Age of Information in Broadcast Wireless Networks ,”  Allerton Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2016.

192.   Jianan Zhang, Edmund Yeh, Eytan Modiano, " Robustness of Interdependent Random Geometric Networks ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2016.

191.   Abhishek Sinha, Leandros Tassiulas, Eytan Modiano, " Throughput-Optimal Broadcast in Wireless Networks with Dynamic Topology ,”  ACM MobiHoc'16, Paderborn, Germany, July, 2016. (winner of best paper award)

190.   Abishek Sinha, Georgios Paschos, Eytan Modiano, " Throughput-Optimal Multi-hop Broadcast Algorithms ,”  ACM MobiHoc'16, Paderborn, Germany, July, 2016.

189.   Thomas Stahlbuhk, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " Throughput Maximization in Uncooperative Spectrum Sharing Networks ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Barcelona, Spain, July 2016.

188.   Thomas Stahlbuhk, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " Topology Control for Wireless Networks with Highly-Directional Antennas ,”  IEEE Wiopt, Tempe, Arizona, May, 2016.

187.   Qingkai Liang, H.W. Lee, Eytan Modiano, " Robust Design of Spectrum-Sharing Networks ,”  IEEE Wiopt, Tempe, Arizona, May, 2016.

186.   Hossein Shokri-Ghadikolae, Carlo Fischione and Eytan Modiano, " On the Accuracy of Interference Models in Wireless Communications ,”  IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC), 2016.

185.   Qingkai Liang and Eytan Modiano, " Survivability in Time-varying Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, San Francisco, CA, April 2016.

184.   Kyu S. Kim, Chih-Ping Li, Igor Kadota, Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Scheduling of Real-Time Traffic in Wireless Networks with Delayed Feedback ,”  Allerton conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2015.

183.   Marzieh Parandehgheibi, Eytan Modiano, " Modeling the Impact of Communication Loss on the Power Grid Under Emergency Control ,”  IEEE SmartGridComm, Miami, FL, Nov. 2015.

182.   Anurag Rai, Chih-ping Li, Georgios Paschos, Eytan Modiano, " Loop-Free Backpressure Routing Using Link-Reversal Algorithms ,”  Proceedings of the ACM MobiHoc, July 2015.

181.   Longbo Huang, Eytan Modiano, " Optimizing Age of Information in a Multiclass Queueing System ,”  Proceedings of IEEE ISIT 2015, Hong Kong, Jun 2015.

180.   M. Johnston, E. Modiano, " A New Look at Wireless Scheduling with Delayed Information ,”  Proceedings of IEEE ISIT 2015, Hong Kong, June 2015.

179.   M. Johnston, E. Modiano, " Scheduling over Time Varying Channels with Hidden State Information ,”  Proceedings of IEEE ISIT 2015, Hong Kong, June 2015.

178.   M. Johnston and E. Modiano, " Controller Placement for Maximum Throughput Under Delayed CSI ,”  IEEE Wiopt, Mombai, India, May 2015.

177.   A. Sinha, G. Paschos, C. P. Li, and E. Modiano, " Throughput Optimal Broadcast on Directed Acyclic Graphs ,”  IEEE Infocom, Hong Kong, April 2015.

176.   J. Zheng and E. Modiano, " Enhancing Network Robustness via Shielding ,”  IEEE Design of Reliable Communication Networks, Kansas City, March 2015.

175.   H. W. Lee and E. Modiano, " Robust Design of Cognitive Radio Networks ,”  Information and Communication Technology Convergence (ICTC), 2014.

174.   Greg Kuperman and Eytan Modiano, " Disjoint Path Protection in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks with Interference Constraints ,”  IEEE Globecom, Austin, TX, December 2014.

173.   Marzieh Parandehgheibi, Eytan Modiano, David Hay, " Mitigating Cascading Failures in Interdependent Power Grids and Communication Networks ,”  IEEE Smartgridcomm, Venice, Italy, November 2014.

172.   Georgios Paschos and Eytan Modiano, " Throughput optimal routing in overlay networks ,”  Allerton conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2014.

171.   Nathan Jones, George Paschos, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " An overlay architecture for Throughput Optimal Multipath Routing ,”  ACM MobiHoc, August 2014.

170.   Matt Johnston, Eytan Modiano, Yuri Polyanskiy, " Opportunistic Scheduling with Limited Channel State Information: A Rate Distortion Approach ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Honolulu, HI, July 2014.

169.   Chih-Ping Li, Georgios Paschos, Eytan Modiano, Leandros Tassiulas, " Dynamic Overload Balancing in Server Farms ,”  Networking 2014, Trondheim, Norway, June, 2014.

168.   Hulya Seferonglu and Eytan Modiano, " TCP-Aware Backpressure Routing and Scheduling ,”  Information Theory and Applications, San Diego, CA, February 2014.

167.   Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John Tsitsiklis, " Delay Stability of Back-Pressure Policies in the presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,”  Information Theory and Applications, San Diego, CA, February 2014.

166.   Kyu Soeb Kim, Chih-ping Li, Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling Multicast Traffic with Deadlines in Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, Toronto, CA, April 2014.

165.   Georgios Paschos, Chih-ping Li, Eytan Modiano, Kostas Choumas, Thanasis Korakis, " A Demonstration of Multirate Multicast Over an 802.11 Mesh Network ,”  IEEE Infocom, Toronto, CA, April 2014.

164.   Sebastian Neumayer, Eytan Modiano, " Assessing the Effect of Geographically Correlated Failures on Interconnected Power-Communication Networks ,”  IEEE SmartGridComm, 2013.

163.   Marzieh Parandehgheibi, Eytan Modiano, " Robustness of Interdependent Networks: The case of communication networks and the power grid ,”  IEEE Globecom, December 2013.

162.   Matt Johnston, Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Channel Probing in Communication Systems: The Two-Channel Case ,”  IEEE Globecom, December 2013.

161.   Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John N. Tsitsiklis, " Delay Analysis of the Max-Weight Policy under Heavy-Tailed Traffic via Fluid Approximations ,”  Allerton Conference, October 2013.

160.   Matthew Johnston, Isaac Keslassy, Eytan Modiano, " Channel Probing in Communication Systems: Myopic Policies Are Not Always Optimal ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, July 2013.

159.   Krishna P Jagannathan, Libin Jiang, Palthya Lakshma Naik, Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling Strategies to Mitigate the Impact of Bursty Traffic in Wireless Networks ,”  11th International Symposium on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks Wiopt 2013, Japan, May 2013. (Winner – Best Paper Award).

158.   Hulya Seferoglu and Eytan Modiano, " Diff-Max: Separation of Routing and Scheduling in Backpressure-Based Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, Turin, Italy, April 2013.

157.   Chih-Ping Li, Eytan Modiano, " Receiver-Based Flow Control for Networks in Overload ,”  IEEE Infocom, Turin, Italy, April 2013.

156.   Nathan Jones, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " Distributed CSMA with Pairwise Coding ,”  IEEE Infocom, Turin, Italy, April 2013.

155.   Greg Kuperman and Eytan Modiano, " Network Protection with Guaranteed Recovery Times using Recovery Domains ,”  IEEE Infocom, Turin, Italy, April 2013.

154.   Greg Kuperman and Eytan Modiano, " Providing Protection in Multi-Hop Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, Turin, Italy, April 2013.

153.   Greg Kuperman, Eytan Modiano, Aradhana Narula-Tam, " Network Protection with Multiple Availability Guarantees ,”  IEEE ICC workshop on New Trends in Optical Networks Survivability, June 2012.

152.   Nathaniel Jones, Brooke Shrader, Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Routing and Scheduling for a Simple Network Coding Scheme ,”  IEEE Infocom, Orlando, Fl, March, 2012.

151.   Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John Tsitsiklis, " Max-Weight Scheduling in Networks with Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,”  IEEE Infocom, Orlando, Fl, March, 2012.

150.   Guner Celik and Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling in Networks with Time-Varying Channels and Reconfiguration Delay ,”  IEEE Infocom, Orlando, Fl, March, 2012.

149.   Sebastian Neumayer, Alon Efrat, Eytan Modiano, " Geographic Max-Flow and Min-cut Under a Circular Disk Failure Model ,”  IEEE Infocom (MC), Orlando, Fl, March, 2012.

148.   Marzieh Parandehgheibi, Hyang-Won Lee, and Eytan Modiano, " Survivable Paths in Multi-Layer Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, March, 2012.

147.   Greg Kuperman, Eytan Modiano, and Aradhana Narula-Tam, " Partial Protection in Networks with Backup Capacity Sharing ,”  Optical Fiber Communications Conference (OFC), Anaheim, CA, March, 2012.

146.   Krishna Jagannathan, Libin Jiang, Eytan Modiano, " On Scheduling Algorithms Robust to Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,”  Information Theory and Applications (ITA), San Diego, CA, February 2012.

145.   M. Johnston, H.W. Lee, E. Modiano, " Robust Network Design for Stochastic Traffic Demands ,”  IEEE Globecom, Next Generation Networking Symposium, Houston, TX, December 2011.

144.   S. Neumayer, E. Modiano, " Network Reliability Under Random Circular Cuts ,”  IEEE Globecom, Optical Networks and Systems Symposium, Houston, TX, December 2011.

143.   H.W. Lee, K. Lee, E. Modiano, " Maximizing Reliability in WDM Networks through Lightpath Routing ,”  IEEE Globecom, Optical Networks and Systems Symposium, Houston, TX, December 2011.

142.   Guner Celik, Sem Borst, Eytan Modiano, Phil Whiting, " Variable Frame Based Max-Weight Algorithms for Networks with Switchover Delay ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, St. Petersburgh, Russia, August 2011.

141.   Krishna Jaganathan, Ishai Menache, Eytan Modiano, and Gil Zussman, " Non-cooperative Spectrum Access - The Dedicated vs. Free Spectrum Choice ,”  ACM MOBIHOC'11, May 2011.

140.   Krishna Jagannathan, Shie Mannor, Ishai Menache, Eytan Modiano, " A State Action Frequency Approach to Throughput Maximization over Uncertain Wireless Channels ,”  IEEE Infocom (Mini-conference), Shanghai, China, April 2011.

139.   Guner Celik, Long B. Le, Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling in Parallel Queues with Randomly Varying Connectivity and Switchover Delay ,”  IEEE Infocom (Mini-conference), Shanghai, China, April 2011.

138.   Gregory Kuperman, Eytan Modiano, Aradhana Narula-Tam, " Analysis and Algorithms for Partial Protection in Mesh Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom (Mini-conference), Shanghai, China, April 2011.

137.   Matthew Johnston, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, " A Robust Optimization Approach to Backup Network Design with Random Failures ,”  IEEE Infocom, Shanghai, China, April 2011.

136.   Krishna Jagannathan, Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John Tsitsiklis, " Queue Length Asymptotics for Generalized Max-Weight Scheduling in the presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,”  IEEE Infocom, Shanghai, China, April 2011.

135.   Guner Celik and Eytan Modiano, " Dynamic Vehicle Routing for Data Gathering in Wireless Networks ,”  In Proc. IEEE CDC'10, Dec. 2010..***

134.   Long B. Le, Eytan Modiano, Changhee Joo, and Ness B. Shroff, " Longest-queue-first scheduling under the SINR interference model ,”  ACM MobiHoc, September 2010..***

133.   Krishna Jagannathan, Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John Tsitsiklis, " Throughput Optimal Scheduling in the Presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2010..**

132.   Delia Ciullo, Guner Celik, Eytan Modiano, " Minimizing Transmission Energy in Sensor Networks via Trajectory Control ,”  IEEE Wiopt 2010, Avignon, France, June 2010, (10 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).

131.   Sebastian Neumayer and Eytan Modiano, " Network Reliability with Geographically Correlated Failures ,”  IEEE Infocom 2010, San Diego, CA, March 2010, (9 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

130.   Long Le, Eytan Modiano, Ness Shroff, " Optimal Control of Wireless Networks with Finite Buffers ,”  IEEE Infocom 2010, San Diego, CA, March 2010, (9 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).

129.   Kayi Lee, Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano, " Reliability in Layered Network with Random Link Failures ,”  IEEE Infocom 2010, San Diego, CA, March 2010, (9 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

128.   Krishna Jagannathan, Eytan Modiano, " The Impact of Queue length Information on Buffer Overflow in Parallel Queues ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2009, pgs. 1103 -1110 **

127.   Mihalis Markakis, Eytan Modiano, John Tsitsiklis, " Scheduling Policies for Single-Hop with Heavy-Tailed Traffic ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2009, pgs. 112 – 120..**

126.   Dan Kan, Aradhana Narula-Tam, Eytan Modiano, " Lightpath Routing and Capacity Assignment for Survivable IP-over-WDM Networks ,”  DRCN 2009, Alexandria, VA October 2009, pgs. 37 -44..**

125.   Mehdi Ansari, Alireza Bayesteh, Eytan Modiano, " Opportunistic Scheduling in Large Scale Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Seoul, Korea, June 2009, pgs. 1624 – 1628.

124.   Hyang-Won Lee, Eytan Modiano and Long Bao Le, " Distributed Throughput Maximization in Wireless Networks via Random Power Allocation ,”  IEEE Wiopt, Seoul, Korea, June 2009. (9 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).

123.   Wajahat Khan, Eytan Modiano, Long Le, " Autonomous Routing Algorithms for Networks with Wide-Spread Failures ,”  IEEE MILCOM, Boston, MA, October 2009. (6 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

122.   Guner Celik and Eytan Modiano, " Random Access Wireless Networks with Controlled Mobility ,”  IEEE Med-Hoc-Nets, Haifa, Israel, June 2009, pgs. 8 – 14.**

121.   Hyang-Won Lee and Eytan Modiano, " Diverse Routing in Networks with Probabilistic Failures ,”  IEEE Infocom, April 2009, pgs. 1035 – 1043.

120.   Kayi Lee and Eytan Modiano, " Cross-layer Survivability in WDM-based Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, April 2009, pgs. 1017 -1025..**

119.   Krishna Jagannathan, Eytan Modiano, Lizhong Zheng, " On the Trade-off between Control Rate and Congestion in Single Server Systems ,”  IEEE Infocom, April 2009, pgs. 271 – 279.**

118.   Sebastian Neumayer, Gil Zussman, Rueven Cohen, Eytan Modiano, " Assessing the Vulnerability of the Fiber Infrastructure to Disasters ,”  IEEE Infocom, April 2009, pgs. 1566 – 1574.**

117.   Long Le, Krishna Jagannathan and Eytan Modiano, " Delay analysis of max-weight scheduling in wireless ad hoc networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, Baltimore, MD, March, 2009, pgs. 389 – 394.**

116.   Krishna Jagannathan, Eytan Modiano, Lizhong Zheng, " Effective Resource Allocation in a Queue: How Much Control is Necessary? ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, September 2008, pgs. 508 – 515.**

115.   Sebastian Neumayer, Gil Zussman, Rueven Cohen, Eytan Modiano, " Assessing the Impact of Geographically Correlated Network Failures ,”  IEEE MILCOM, November 2008. (6 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

114.   Emily Craparo, Jonathan P. How, and Eytan Modiano, " Simultaneous Placement and Assignment for Exploration in Mobile Backbone Networks ,”  IEEE conference on Decision and Control (CDC), November 2008, pgs. 1696 – 1701 **

113.   Anand Srinivas and Eytan Modiano, " Joint node placement and assignment for throughput optimization in mobile backbone networks ,”  IEEE INFOCOM'08, pp. 1130 – 1138, Phoenix, AZ, Apr. 2008, pgs. 1130 – 1138.**

112.   Guner Celik, Gil Zussman, Wajahat Khan and Eytan Modiano, " MAC for Networks with Multipacket Reception Capability and Spatially Distributed Nodes ,”  IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ, Apr. 2008, pgs. 1436 – 1444.**

111.   Gil Zussman, Andrew Brzezinski, and Eytan Modiano, " Multihop Local Pooling for Distributed Throughput Maximization in Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE INFOCOM'08, Phoenix, AZ, Apr. 2008, pgs 1139 – 1147.**

110.   Emily Craparo, Jonathan How and Eytan Modiano, " Optimization of Mobile Backbone Networks: Improved Algorithms and Approximation ,”  IEEE American Control Conference, Seattle, WA, June 2008, pgs. 2016 – 2021.**

109.   Atilla Eryilmaz, Asuman Ozdaglar, Devavrat Shah, Eytan Modiano, " Imperfect Randomized Algorithms for the Optimal Control of Wireless Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, Princeton, NJ, March, 2008, pgs. 932 – 937.

108.   Anand Srinivas and Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Path Planning for Mobile Backbone Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, Princeton, NJ, March, 2008, pgs. 913 – 918.

107.   Kayi Lee and Eytan Modiano, " Cross-layer Survivability in WDM Networks with Multiple Failures ,”  IEEE Optical Fiber Communications Conference, San Diego, CA February, 2008 (3 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).

106.   Andrew Brzezinski, Gil Zussman and Eytan Modiano, " Local Pooling Conditions for Joint Routing and Scheduling ,”  Workshop on Information Theory and Applications, pp. 499 – 506, La Jolla, CA, January, 2008, pgs. 499 – 506.

105.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, " Minimum Energy Transmission over a Wireless Fading Channel with Packet Deadlines ,”  Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), New Orleans, LA, December, 2007, pgs. 1148 – 1155.**

104.   Atilla Eryilmaz, Asuman Ozdaglar, Eytan Modiano, " Polynomial Complexity Algorithms for Full Utilization of Multi-hop Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, Anchorage, AK, April, 2007, pgs. 499 – 507.

103.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, " Delay Constrained Energy Efficient Data Transmission over a Wireless Fading Channel ,”  Workshop on Information Theory and Application, University of California, San Diego, CA, February, 2007, pgs. 289 – 298.**

102.   Atilla Eryilmaz, Eytan Modiano, Asuman Ozdaglar, " Randomized Algorithms for Throughput-Optimality and Fairness in Wireless Networks ,”  Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), San Diego, CA, December, 2006, pgs. 1936 – 1941.

101.   Anand Srinivas, Gil Zussman, and Eytan Modiano, " Distributed Mobile Disk Cover - A Building Block for Mobile Backbone Networks ,”  Proc. Allerton Conf. on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton, IL, September 2006, (9 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

100.   Krishna Jagannathan, Sem Borst, Phil Whiting, Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling of Multi-Antenna Broadcast Systems with Heterogeneous Users ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control and Computing, Allerton, IL, September 2006, (10 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

99.   Andrew Brzezinski, Gil Zussman, and Eytan Modiano, " Enabling Distributed Throughput Maximization in Wireless Mesh Networks - A Partitioning Approach ,”  Proceedings of ACM MOBICOM'06, Los Angeles, CA, Sep. 2006, (12 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

98.   Eytan Modiano, Devavrat Shah, and Gil Zussman, " Maximizing Throughput in Wireless Networks via Gossiping ,”  Proc. ACM SIGMETRICS / IFIP Performance'06, Saint-Malo, France, June 2006, (12 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available). (best paper award)

97.   Anand Srinivas, Gil Zussman, and Eytan Modiano, " Mobile Backbone Networks – Construction and Maintenance ,”  Proc. ACM MOBIHOC'06, Florence, Italy, May 2006, (12 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

96.   Andrew Brzezinski and Eytan Modiano, " Achieving 100% throughput in reconfigurable optical networks ,”  IEEE INFOCOM 2006 High-Speed Networking Workshop, Barcelona, Spain, April 2006, (5 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

95.   Krishna P. Jagannathan, Sem Borst, Phil Whiting, Eytan Modiano, " Efficient scheduling of multi-user multi-antenna systems ,”  Proceedings of WiOpt 2006, Boston, MA, April 2006, (8 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

94.   Andrew Brzezinski and Eytan Modiano, " Greedy weighted matching for scheduling the input-queued switch ,”  Conference on Information Sciences and Systems (CISS), Princeton, NJ, March 2006, pgs. 1738 – 1743.**

93.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Adaptive Data Transmission over a Fading Channel with Deadline and Power Constraints ,”  Conference on Information Sciences and Systems (CISS), Princeton, New Jersey, March 2006, pgs. 931 – 937.**

92.   Li-Wei Chen and E. Modiano, " A Geometric Approach to Capacity Provisioning in WDM Networks with Dynamic Traffic ,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems (CISS), Princeton, NJ, March, 2006, pgs. 1676 – 1683, **

91.   Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, " Channel Allocation Using Pricing in Satellite Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems (CISS), Princeton, NJ, March, 2006, pgs. 182 – 187.**

90.   Jun Sun, Jay Gao, Shervin Shambayatti and Eytan Modiano, " Ka-Band Link Optimization with Rate Adaptation ,”  IEEE Aerospace Conference, Big Sky, MN, March, 2006. (7 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).

89.   Alessandro Tarello, Eytan Modiano and Jay Gao, " Energy efficient transmission scheduling over Mars proximity links ,”  IEEE Aerospace Conference, Big Sky, MN, March, 2006. (10 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).

88.   A. Brzezinski and E. Modiano, " RWA decompositions for optimal throughput in reconfigurable optical networks ,”  INFORMS Telecommunications Conference, Dallas, TX, March 2006 (3 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

87.   Li Wei Chen and E. Modiano, " Geometric Capacity Provisioning for Wavelength Switched WDM Networks ,”  Workshop on Information Theory and Application, University of California, San Diego, CA, February, 2006. (8 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

86.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, " Joint Scheduling of Rate-guaranteed and Best-effort Services over a Wireless Channel ,”  IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Seville, Spain, December, 2005, pgs. 6022–6027.**

85.   Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, " Opportunistic Power Allocation for Fading Channels with Non-cooperative Users and Random Access ,”  IEEE BroadNets – Wireless Networking Symposium, Boston, MA, October, 2005, pgs. 397–405.**

84.   Li Wei Chen and Eytan Modiano, " Uniform vs. Non-uniform Band Switching in WDM Networks ,”  IEEE BroadNets-Optical Networking Symposium, Boston, MA, October, 2005, pgs. 219– 228.**

83.   Sonia Jain and Eytan Modiano, " Buffer Management Schemes for Enhanced TCP Performance over Satellite Links ,”  IEEE MILCOM, Atlantic City, NJ, October 2005 (8 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

82.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, " Continuous-time Optimal Rate Control for Delay Constrained Data Transmission ,”  Allerton Conference on Communications, Control and Computing, Allerton, IL, September, 2005 (10 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

81.   Alessandro Tarello, Eytan Modiano, Jun Sun, Murtaza Zafer, " Minimum Energy Transmission Scheduling subject to Deadline Constraints ,”  IEEE Wiopt, Trentino, Italy, April, 2005, pgs. 67–76. (Winner of best student paper award).**

80.   Amir Khandani, Eytan Modiano, Jinane Abounadi, Lizhong Zheng, " Reliability and Route Diversity in Wireless Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Baltimore, MD, March, 2005, (8 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

79.   Andrew Brzezinski, Iraj Saniee, Indra Widjaja, Eytan Modiano, " Flow Control and Congestion Management for Distributed Scheduling of Burst Transmissions in Time-Domain Wavelength Interleaved Networks ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC), Anaheim, CA, March, 2005, pgs. WC4-1–WC4-3.

78.   Andrew Brzezinski and Eytan Modiano, " Dynamic Reconfiguration and Routing Algorithms for IP-over-WDM Networks with Stochastic Traffic ,”  IEEE Infocom 2005, Miami, FL, March, 2005, pgs. 6–11.**

77.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, " A Calculus Approach to Minimum Energy Transmission Policies with Quality of Service Guarantees ,”  IEEE Infocom 2005, Miami, FL, March, 2005, pgs. 548–559.**

76.   Michael Neely and Eytan Modiano, " Fairness and optimal stochastic control for heterogeneous networks ,”  IEEE Infocom 2005, Miami, FL, March, 2005, pgs. 1723 – 1734.**

75.   Aradhana Narula-Tam, Thomas G. Macdonald, Eytan Modiano, and Leslie Servi, " A Dynamic Resource Allocation Strategy for Satellite Communications ,”  IEEE MILCOM, Monterey, CA, October, 2004, pgs. 1415 – 1421.

74.   Li-Wei Chen, Poompat Saengudomlert and Eytan Modiano, " Optimal Waveband Switching in WDM Networks ,”  IEEE International Conference on Communication (ICC), Paris, France, June, 2004, pgs. 1604 – 1608.**

73.   Michael Neely and Eytan Modiano, " Logarithmic Delay for NxN Packet Switches ,”  IEEE Workshop on High performance Switching and Routing (HPSR 2004), Phoenix, AZ, April, 2004, pgs. 3–9.**

72.   Li-Wei Chen and Eytan Modiano, " Dynamic Routing and Wavelength Assignment with Optical Bypass using Ring Embeddings ,”  IEEE Workshop on High performance Switching and Routing (HPSR 2004), Phoenix, Az, April, 2004, pgs. 119–125.**

71.   Randall Berry and Eytan Modiano, " On the Benefits of Tunability in Reducing Electronic Port Counts in WDM/TDM Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom, Hong Kong, March 2004, pgs. 1340–1351.

70.   Andrew Brzezinski and Eytan Modiano, " A new look at dynamic traffic scheduling in WDM networks with transceiver tuning latency ,”  Informs Telecommunications Conference, Boca Raton, FL, March 2004, pgs. 25–26.**

69.   Chunmei Liu and Eytan Modiano, " Packet Scheduling with Window Service Constraints ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2004, pgs. 178–184.**

68.   Jun Sun, Eytan Modiano, and Lizhong Zheng, " A Novel Auction Algorithm for Fair Allocation of a Wireless Fading Channel ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2004, pgs. 1377–1383.**

67.   Murtaza Zafer and Eytan Modiano, " Impact of Interference and Channel Assignment on Blocking Probability in Wireless Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2004, pgs. 430–436.**

66.   Chunmei Liu and Eytan Modiano, " An Analysis of TCP over Random Access Satellite Links ,”  IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference (WCNC), Atlanta, GA, February, 2004, pgs. 2033–2040..**

65.   Randall Berry and Eytan Modiano, " Using tunable optical transceivers for reducing the number of ports in WDM/TDM Networks ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC), Los Angeles, CA, February, 2004, pgs. 23–27.

64.   Aradhana Narula-Tam, Eytan Modiano and Andrew Brzezinski, " Physical Topology Design for Survivable Routiing of Logical Rings in WDM-based Networks ,”  IEEE Globecom, San francisco, CA, December, 2003, pgs. 2552–2557.

63.   Jun Sun, Lizhong Zheng and Eytan Modiano, " Wireless Channel Allocation Using an Auction Algorithm ,”  Allerton Conference on Communications, Control and Computing, October, 2003, pgs. 1114–1123..**

62.   Amir Khandani, Jinane Abounadi, Eytan Modiano, Lizhong Zhang, " Cooperative Routing in Wireless Networks ,”  Allerton Conference on Communications, Control and Computing, October, 2003, pgs. 1270–1279.**

61.   Poompat Saengudomlert, Eytan Modiano and Robert Gallager, " Dynamic Wavelength Assignment for WDM all optical Tree Networks ,”  Allerton Conference on Communications, Control and Computing, October, 2003, 915–924.**

60.   Aradhana Narula-Tam and Eytan Modiano, " Designing Physical Topologies that Enable Survivable Routing of Logical Rings ,”  IEEE Workshop on Design of Reliable Communication Networks (DRCN), October, 2003, pgs. 379–386.

59.   Anand Srinivas and Eytan Modiano, " Minimum Energy Disjoint Path Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks ,”  ACM Mobicom, San Diego, Ca, September, 2003, pgs. 122–133.**

58.   Michael Neely and Eytan Modiano, " Improving Delay in Ad-Hoc Mobile Networks Via Redundant Packet Transfers ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Baltimore, MD, March, 2003 (6 pages; CD proceedings – page numbers not available).**

57.   Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charles Rohrs, " Dynamic Power Allocation and Routing for Time Varying Wireless Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom 2003, San Francisco, CA, April, 2003, pgs. 745–755.**

56.   Alvin Fu, Eytan Modiano, and John Tsitsiklis, " Optimal Energy Allocation for Delay-Constrained Data Transmission over a Time-Varying Channel ,”  IEEE Infocom 2003, San Francisco, CA, April, 2003, pgs. 1095–1105.**

55.   Poompat Saengudomlert, Eytan Modiano and Rober Gallager, " On-line Routing and Wavelength Assignment for Dynamic Traffic in WDM Ring and Torus Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom 2003, San Francisco, CA, April, 2003, pgs. 1805–1815.**

54.   Li-Wei Chen and Eytan Modiano, " Efficient Routing and Wavelength Assignment for Reconfigurable WDM Networks with Wavelength Converters ,”  IEEE Infocom 2003, San Francisco, CA, April, 2003, pgs. 1785–1794. Selected as one of the best papers of Infocom 2003 for fast track publication in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking.**

53.   Mike Neely, Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, " Delay and Complexity Tradeoffs for Dynamic Routing and Power Allocation in a Wireless Network ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton, Illinois, October, 2002, pgs. 157 –159.**

52.   Anand Ganti, Eytan Modiano and John Tsitsiklis, " Transmission Scheduling for Multi-Channel Satellite and Wireless Networks ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton, Illinois, October, 2002, pgs. 1318–1327.**

51.   Poompat Saengudomlert, Eytan Modiano, and Robert G. Gallager, " Optimal Wavelength Assignment for Uniform All-to-All Traffic in WDM Tree Networks ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton, Illinois, October, 2002, pgs. 528–537.**

50.   Hungjen Wang, Eytan Modiano and Muriel Medard, " Partial Path Protection for WDM Networks: End-to-End Recovery Using Local Failure Information ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Computer Communications (ISCC), Taormina, Italy, July 2002, pgs. 719–725.**

49.   Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, " Capacity Provisioning and Failure Recovery in Mesh-Torus Networks with Application to Satellite Constellations ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Computer Communications (ISCC), Taormina, Italy, July 2002, pgs. 77–84.**

48.   Alvin Fu, Eytan Modiano, and John Tsitsiklis, " Optimal Energy Allocation and Admission Control for Communications Satellites ,”  IEEE INFOCOM 2002, New York, June, 2002, pgs. 648–656.**

47.   Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charles Rohrs, " Power and Server Allocation in a Multi-Beam Satellite with Time Varying Channels ,”  IEEE INFOCOM 2002, New York, June, 2002, pgs. 1451–1460..**

46.   Mike Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charles Rohrs, " Tradeoffs in Delay Guarantees and Computation Complexity for N x N Packet Switches ,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, Princeton, NJ, March, 2002, pgs. 136–148.**

45.   Alvin Fu, Eytan Modiano and John Tsitsiklis, " Transmission Scheduling Over a Fading Channel with Energy and Deadline Constraints ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2002, pgs. 1018–1023.**

44.   Chunmei Liu and Eytan Modiano, " On the Interaction of Layered Protocols: The Case of Window Flow Control and ARQ ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2002, pgs. 118–124.**

43.   Mike Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charles Rohrs, " Packet Routing over Parallel Time-varying Queues with Application to Satellite and Wireless Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2002, pgs. 360–366.**

42.   Ahluwalia Ashwinder, Eytan Modiano and Li Shu, " On the Complexity and Distributed Construction of Energy Efficient Broadcast Trees in Static Ad Hoc Wireless Networks ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2002, pgs. 807–813.**

41.   Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, " Capacity Provisioning and Failure Recovery for Satellite Constellations ,”  Conference on Information Science and System, Princeton, NJ, March, 2002, pgs. 1039–1045.**

40.   Eytan Modiano, Hungjen Wang, and Muriel Medard, " Partial Path Protection for WDM networks ,”  Informs Telecommunications Conference, Boca Raton, FL, March 2002, pgs. 78–79.**

39.   Poompat Saengudomlert, Eytan H. Modiano, and Robert G. Gallager, " An On-Line Routing and Wavelength Assignment Algorithm for Dynamic Traffic in a WDM Bidirectional Ring ,”  Joint Conference on Information Sciences (JCIS), Durham, North Carolina, March, 2002, pgs. 1331–1334.**

38.   Randy Berry and Eytan Modiano, " Switching and Traffic Grooming in WDM Networks ,”  Joint Conference on Information Sciences (JCIS), Durham, North Carolina, March, 2002, pgs. 1340–1343.

37.   Eytan Modiano, Hungjen Wang, and Muriel Medard, " Using Local Information for WDM Network Protection ,”  Joint Conference on Information Sciences (JCIS), Durham, North Carolina, March, 2002, pgs. 1398–1401.**

36.   Aradhana Narula-Tam and Eytan Modiano, " Network architectures for supporting survivable WDM rings ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC) 2002, Anaheim, CA, March, 2002, pgs. 105–107.

35.   Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano, Charles Rohrs, " Packet Routing over Parallel Time-Varying Queues with Application to Satellite and Wireless Networks ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton, Illinois, September, 2001, pgs. 1110-1111.**

34.   Eytan Modiano and Randy Berry, " The Role of Switching in Reducing Network Port Counts ,”  Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Allerton, Illinois, September, 2001, pgs. 376-385.

33.   Eytan Modiano, " Resource allocation and congestion control in next generation satellite networks ,”  IEEE Gigabit Networking Workshop (GBN 2001), Anchorage, AK, April 2001, (2 page summary-online proceedings).

32.   Eytan Modiano and Aradhana Narula-Tam, " Survivable Routing of Logical Topologies in WDM Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom 2001, Anchorage, AK, April 2001, pgs. 348–357.

31.   Michael Neely and Eytan Modiano, " Convexity and Optimal Load Distribution in Work Conserving */*/1 Queues ,”  IEEE Infocom 2001, Anchorage, AK, April 2001, pgs. 1055–1064.

30.   Eytan Modiano and Randy Berry, " Using Grooming Cross- Connects to Reduce ADM Costs in Sonet/WDM Ring Networks ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC) 2001, Anaheim, CA March 2001, pgs. WL1- WL3.

29.   Eytan Modiano and Aradhana Narula-Tam, " Designing Survivable Networks Using Effective Rounting and Wavelenght Assignment (RWA) ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC) 2001, Anaheim, CA March 2001, pgs. TUG5-1 – TUG5– 3.

28.   Roop Ganguly and Eytan Modiano, " Distributed Algorithms and Architectures for Optical Flow Switching in WDM networks ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Computer Communications (ISCC 2000), Antibes, France, July 2000, pgs. 134–139.

27.   Aradhana Narula-Tam, Philip J. Lin and Eytan Modiano, " Wavelength Requirements for Virtual topology Reconfiguration in WDM Ring Networks ,”  IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC 2000), New Orleans, LA, June 2000, pgs. 1650–1654.

26.   Eytan Modiano, "Optical Flow Switching for the Next Generation Internet,”  IEEE Gigabit Networking Workshop (GBN 2000), Tel-aviv, March 2000 (2 page summary-online proceedings).

25.   Aradhana Narula and Eytan Modiano, " Dynamic Reconfiguration in WDM Packet Networks with Wavelength Limitations ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC) 2000, Baltimore, MD, March, 2000, pgs. 1210–1212.

24.   Brett Schein and Eytan Modiano, " Quantifying the benefits of configurability in circuit-switched WDM ring networks ,”  IEEE Infocom 2000, Tel Aviv, Israel, April, 2000, pgs.1752–1760..***

23.   Aradhana Narula-Tam and Eytan Modiano, " Load Balancing Algorithms for WDM-based IP networks ,”  IEEE Infocom 2000, Tel Aviv, Israel, April, 2000, pgs. 1010–1019.

22.   Nan Froberg, M. Kuznetsov, E. Modiano, et. al., " The NGI ONRAMP test bed: Regional Access WDM technology for the Next Generation Internet ,”  IEEE LEOS ’99, October, 1999, pgs. 230–231.

21.   Randy Berry and Eytan Modiano, " Minimizing Electronic Multiplexing Costs for Dynamic Traffic in Unidirectional SONET Ring Networks ,”  IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC ’99), Vancouver, CA, June 1999, pgs. 1724–1730..***

20.   Brett Schein and Eytan Modiano, "Increasing Traffic Capacity in WDM Ring Networks via Topology Reconfiguration,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, Baltimore, MD, March 1999, pgs. 201 – 206.

19.   Eytan Modiano and Richard Barry, " Design and Analysis of an Asynchronous WDM Local Area Network Using a Master/Slave Scheduler ,”  IEEE Infocom ’99, New York, NY, March 1999, pgs. 900–907.

18.   Randy Berry and Eytan Modiano, " Grooming Dynamic Traffic in Unidirectional SONET Ring Networks ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC) ’99, San Diego, CA, February 1999, pgs. 71–73.

17.   Angela Chiu and Eytan Modiano, " Reducing Electronic Multiplexing Costs in Unidirectional SONET/WDM Ring Networks Via Efficient Traffic Grooming ,”  IEEE Globecom '98, Sydney, Australia, November 1998, pgs. 322–327.

16.   Eytan Modiano, " Throughput Analysis of Unscheduled Multicast Transmissions in WDM Broadcast-and-Select Networks ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Boston, MA, September 1998, pg. 167.

15.   Eytan Modiano and Angela Chiu, "Traffic Grooming Algorithms for Minimizing Electronic Multiplexing Costs in Unidirectional SONET/WDM Ring Networks,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, Princeton, NJ, March 1998, 653–658.

14.   Eytan Modiano and Eric Swanson, " An Architecture for Broadband Internet Services over a WDM-based Optical Access Network ,”  IEEE Gigabit Networking Workshop (GBN '98), San Francisco, CA, March 1998 (2 page summary-online proceedings).

13.   Eytan Modiano, " Unscheduled Multicasts in WDM Broadcast-and-Select Networks ,”  IEEE Infocom '98, San Francisco, CA, March 1998, pgs. 86–93.

12.   Eytan Modiano, Richard Barry and Eric Swanson, " A Novel Architecture and Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol for WDM Networks ,”  IEEE/OSA Optical Fiber Conference (OFC) '98, San Jose, CA, February 1998, pgs. 90–91.

11.   Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling Algorithms for Message Transmission Over a Satellite Broadcast System ,”  IEEE MILCOM 97, Monterey, CA, November 1997, pgs. 628–634.

10.   Eytan Modiano, " Scheduling Packet Transmissions in A Multi-hop Packet Switched Network Based on Message Length ,”  IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (IC3N) Las Vegas, Nevada, September 1997, pgs. 350–357.

9.   Eytan Modiano, "A Simple Algorithm for Optimizing the Packet Size Used in ARQ Protocols Based on Retransmission History,”  Conference on Information Science and Systems, Baltimore, MD, March 1997, pgs. 672–677.

8.   Eytan Modiano, " A Multi-Channel Random Access Protocol for the CDMA Channel ,”  IEEE PIMRC '95, Toronto, Canada, September 1995, pgs. 799–803.

7.   Eytan Modiano Jeffrey Wieselthier and Anthony Ephremides, " A Simple Derivation of Queueing Delay in a Tree Network of Discrete-Time Queues with Deterministic Service Times ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Trondheim, Norway, June 1994, pg. 372.

6.   Eytan Modiano, Jeffrey Wieselthier and Anthony Ephremides, "An Approach for the Analysis of Packet Delay in an Integrated Mobile Radio Network,”  Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, Baltimore, MD, March 1993, pgs. 138-139.

5.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, " A Method for Delay Analysis of Interacting Queues in Multiple Access Systems ,”  IEEE INFOCOM 1993, San Francisco, CA, March 1993, pgs. 447 – 454.

4.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, " A Model for the Approximation of Interacting Queues that Arise in Multiple Access Schemes ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, San Antonio, TX, January 1993, pg. 324.

3.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, " Efficient Routing Schemes for Multiple Broadcasts in a Mesh ,”  Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, Princeton, NJ, March 1992, pgs. 929 – 934.

2.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, " On the Secrecy Complexity of Computing a Binary Function of Non-uniformly Distributed Random Variables ,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Budapest, Hungary, June 1991, pg. 213.

1.   Eytan Modiano and Anthony Ephremides, "Communication Complexity of Secure Distributed Computation in the Presence of Noise,”  IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, San Diego, CA, January 1990, pg. 142.

Book Chapters

  • Hyang-Won Lee, Kayi Lee, Eytan Modiano, " Cross-Layer Survivability " in Cross-Layer Design in Optical Networks, Springer, 2013.
  • Li-Wei Chen and Eytan Modiano, " Geometric Capacity Provisioning for Wavelength-Switched WDM Networks ," Chapter in Computer Communications and Networks Series: Algorithms for Next Generation Networks, Springer, 2010.
  • Amir Khandani, Eytan Modiano, Lizhong Zhang, Jinane Aboundi, " Cooperative Routing in Wireless Networks ," Chapter in Advances in Pervasive Computing and Networking, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2005.
  • Jian-Qiang Hu and Eytan Modiano, " Traffic Grooming in WDM Networks ," Chapter in Emerging Optical Network Technologies, Kluwer Academic Publishers, to appear, 2004.
  • Eytan Modiano, " WDM Optical Networks ," Wiley Encyclopedia of Telecommunications (John Proakis, Editor), 2003.
  • Eytan Modiano, " Optical Access Networks for the Next Generation Internet ," in Optical WDM Networks: Principles and Practice, Kluwer Academic Prublishers, 2002.
  • Eytan Modiano, Richard Barry and Eric Swanson, " A Novel Architecture and Medium Access Control protocol for WDM Networks ," Trends in Optics and Photonics Series (TOPS) volume on Optical Networks and Their Applications, 1998.
  • Eytan Modiano and Kai-Yeung Siu, "Network Flow and Congestion Control," Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, 1999.

Technical Reports

  • Amir Khandani, Eytan Modiano, Jinane Abounadi, Lizhong Zheng, "Reliability and Route Diversity in Wireless Networks, " MIT LIDS Technical Report number 2634, November, 2004.
  • Anand Srinivas and Eytan Modiano, "Minimum Energy Disjoint Path Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks, " MIT LIDS Technical Report, P-2559, March, 2003.
  • Eytan Modiano and Aradhana Narula-Tam, "Survivable lightpath routing: a new approach to the design of WDM-based networks, " LIDS report 2552, October, 2002.
  • Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charles Rohrs, "Packet Routing over Parallel Time-Varying Queues with Application to Satellite and Wireless Networks," LIDS report 2520, September, 2001.
  • Jun Sun and Eytan Modiano, "Capacity Provisioning and Failure Recovery in Mesh-Torus Networks with Application to Satellite Constellations," LIDS report 2518, September, 2001.
  • Hungjen Wang, Eytan Modiano and Muriel Medard, "Partial Path Protection for WDM Networks: End-to-End Recovery Using Local Failure Information, " LIDS report 2517, Sept. 2001.
  • Alvin Fu, Eytan Modiano, and John Tsitsiklis, "Optimal Energy Allocation and Admission Control for Communications Satellites, " LIDS report 2516, September, 2001.
  • Michael Neely, Eytan Modiano and Charles Rohrs, "Power and Server Allocation in a Multi-Beam Satellite with Time Varying Channels, " LIDS report 2515, September, 2001.
  • Eytan Modiano, "Scheduling Algorithms for Message Transmission Over the GBS Satellite Broadcast System, " Lincoln Laboratory Technical Report Number TR-1035, June 1997.
  • Eytan Modiano, "Scheduling Packet Transmissions in A Multi-hop Packet Switched Network Based on Message Length, " Lincoln Laboratory Technical Report number TR-1036, June, 1997.

research papers in networking

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A Better Approach to Networking

  • Christie Hunter Arscott

research papers in networking

Move from “small talk” to “deep talk.”

Meeting strangers — especially in the context of work — is uncomfortable for most people. Just the thought of networking can provoke discomfort and anxiety. As humans, we have an innate need to be liked. Research shows we even have a tendency to connect our self-worth to the number of people who like us.

  • Because of this, many struggle with performance anxiety when it comes to networking. You’re afraid you might say the wrong thing, forget what you were going to say, or stumble over your words. The result would be the other person not liking you. But there’s a better way to network.
  • Focus on what you’re going to ask, not what going to say. Instead of preparing what you’d say when meeting someone new or how you’d respond to questions from a stranger, focus on what you’d ask in those same scenarios.
  • Then, practice moving from small talk to deep talk. We tend to underestimate how much other people, and especially first-time contacts, might enjoy and find satisfaction in meaningful conversation. Instead of asking “Where are you from?” ask, “What places have you lived in and traveled to during your educational and career journey that have shaped who you are?”

Do you shy away from talking to new people at networking events? Have you ever walked into the room and felt a tightness in your chest as you stood there, sweating, wondering what to say? Most of us can relate to some version of this experience. Meeting strangers — especially in the context of work — is uncomfortable. Just the thought of networking can provoke discomfort and anxiety.

research papers in networking

  • Christie Hunter Arscott is an award-winning advisor, speaker, and author of the book Begin Boldly: How Women Can Reimagine Risk, Embrace Uncertainty, and Launch A Brilliant Career . A Rhodes Scholar, Christie has been named by Thinkers50 as one of the top management thinkers likely to shape the future of business.

Partner Center

Networking is central to modern computing, from WANs connecting cell phones to massive data stores, to the data-center interconnects that deliver seamless storage and fine-grained distributed computing. Because our distributed computing infrastructure is a key differentiator for the company, Google has long focused on building network infrastructure to support our scale, availability, and performance needs, and to apply our expertise and infrastructure to solve similar problems for Cloud customers. Our research combines building and deploying novel networking systems at unprecedented scale, with recent work focusing on fundamental questions around data center architecture, cloud virtual networking, and wide-area network interconnects. We helped pioneer the use of Software Defined Networking, the application of ML to networking, and the development of large-scale management infrastructure including telemetry systems. We are also addressing congestion control and bandwidth management, capacity planning, and designing networks to meet traffic demands. We build cross-layer systems to ensure high network availability and reliability. By publishing our findings at premier research venues, we continue to engage both academic and industrial partners to further the state of the art in networked systems.

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Career Development International

ISSN : 1362-0436

Article publication date: 6 May 2014

The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesize research and theory on the definition, antecedents, outcomes, and mechanisms of networking in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptions of networking are reviewed and an integrated definition of networking in organizations is presented. Approaches for measuring and studying networking are considered and the similarities and differences of networking with related constructs are discussed. A theoretical model of the antecedents and outcomes of networking is presented with the goal of integrating existing networking research. Mechanisms through which networking leads to individual and organizational outcomes are also considered.

Networking is defined as goal-directed behavior which occurs both inside and outside of an organization, focussed on creating, cultivating, and utilizing interpersonal relationships. The current model proposes that networking is influenced by a variety of individual, job, and organizational level factors and leads to increased visibility and power, job performance, organizational access to strategic information, and career success. Access to information and social capital are proposed as mechanisms that facilitate the effects of networking on outcomes.

Originality/value

Networking is held to be of great professional value for ambitious individuals and organizations. However, much of the research on networking has been spread across various disciplines. Consequentially, consensus on many important topics regarding networking remains notably elusive. This paper reviews and integrates existing research on networking in organizations and proposes directions for future study. A comprehensive definition and model of networking is presented and suggestions to researchers are provided.

  • Social network

Gibson, C. , H. Hardy III, J. and Ronald Buckley, M. (2014), "Understanding the role of networking in organizations", Career Development International , Vol. 19 No. 2, pp. 146-161. https://doi.org/10.1108/CDI-09-2013-0111

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Copyright © 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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Networking and Collaborating in Academia: Increasing Your Scientific Impact and Having Fun in the Process

  • First Online: 09 November 2022

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  • Elaine Toomey 3  

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Networking is an essential element of an academic career, though it can spark a multitude of reactions ranging from delight to distress. For early career researchers, having a strong network of collaborators can be invaluable in terms of supporting you through the difficult times of academia, as well as helping you to enjoy the good moments. Networking is also particularly important for expanding the reach and impact of your research to a multitude of audiences. In this chapter, I aim to provide an overview of the challenges and benefits of networking. I will explain my core principles underpinning my approach to building networks and collaborations, and provide some practical recommendations and action points based on my experiences or advice given to me that I have found useful. Although there is no one right or wrong approach to networking and building collaborations, this chapter aims to help you reflect on your own core principles and priorities when it comes to networking, and to support you to develop or further enhance your own approach.

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Toomey, E. (2022). Networking and Collaborating in Academia: Increasing Your Scientific Impact and Having Fun in the Process. In: Kwasnicka, D., Lai, A.Y. (eds) Survival Guide for Early Career Researchers. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-10754-2_8

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The Relationship Between Networking, LinkedIn Use, and Retrieving Informational Benefits

1 Department of Social Media, Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Tübingen, Germany.

2 Department of Psychology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

Johannes Breuer

3 Department of Data Linking and Data Security, GESIS Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Colonge, Germany.

Previous research has shown that users of social network sites designed for professional purposes, such as LinkedIn , report higher professional informational benefits than nonusers. However, this effect could only be partly explained by social media use as there was also a selection effect, such that people who have more informational benefits were more likely to use LinkedIn . The goal of this study was to explore whether differences in networking, defined as a set of behaviors with the aim of building, maintaining, and using internal and external contacts for instrumental purposes, can explain this selection effect. We used data from a panel study with a representative sample of Dutch Internet users ( n  = 685; 259 LinkedIn users) to examine the relationships between networking and LinkedIn use as well as professional informational benefits, that is, timely access to relevant information. The results showed that people scoring high on external networking (but not internal networking within their organization) are also more likely to use LinkedIn . External networking was also positively correlated with active and passive use as well as the number of strong and latent ties on LinkedIn . However, in a mediation model the direct effect of networking on informational benefits was not mediated by actual social media use and network composition; instead, the number of weak ties had a direct effect on informational benefits. The results thus indicate that networking is a major driver of informational benefits from LinkedIn use.

Introduction

Research on social networking sites (SNS) designed for professional purposes (professional networking services [PNS]), 1 such as LinkedIn or Xing , has shown that users of these platforms report higher informational benefits, that is, (timely) access to resources and referrals to career opportunities, than nonusers do. 2 , 3 However, these studies also revealed that only a small percentage of the variance in informational benefits could be explained by social media use. There was also a selection effect, such that people who already had more informational benefits were more likely to use these platforms. The goal of this article is to bring together research on PNS and research from organizational psychology to test whether networking is the variable that could explain this selection effect. Networking is a concept from organizational psychology and defined as building and maintaining informal relationships that might give access to information and resources. 4 So far, research on networking in professional settings did not pay special attention to the role of the medium; a recent review 5 even explicitly excluded studies that focused on SNS. Research on SNS, however, focused mainly on personality traits, such as the Big Five or narcissism, when looking for predictors of social media use, 6–8 but did not consider networking as a key variable. We aim to enrich both streams of literature by examining the role of networking behavior in using and retrieving informational benefits from LinkedIn.

Networking is defined as a set of behaviors aimed at building and maintaining interpersonal relationships that possess the (potential) benefit to facilitate work-related activities by providing access to resources and jointly maximizing advantages of the individuals involved. 4 Researchers commonly distinguish between internal networking with colleagues in one's own organization and external networking with people from other organizations. 9

Wolff et al. provide a model of the antecedents and consequences of networking. 10 They list demographic variables, structural variables (e.g., job function), and individual characteristics (e.g., personality) as antecedents and divide the consequences into individual and organizational benefits (job performance). Individual benefits are further differentiated into access to primary (work-related support and strategic information) and secondary (career success, visibility, and power) resources. Several retrospective, cross-sectional, and prospective studies have focused on the secondary resources and demonstrated that networking can lead to subjective (e.g., career satisfaction) or objective (e.g., promotion) career benefits. 5 , 11 , 12 The effects of networking on informational benefits as primary resource, however, received considerably less attention.

For our study, we define and operationalize informational benefits as (timely) access to work-related information and referrals to career opportunities. 13 Based on the model by Wolff and Moser, 10 a positive relationship between networking and informational benefits can be expected. There is also indirect support for this assumption because several studies could show that networking is positively related to career outcomes, 11 , 12 , 14 and that access to information predicts positive career outcomes. 15

H1: Networking is positively related to informational benefits.

The relationship between networking and social media use

Research focusing on Facebook or other SNS mainly used for leisure purposes generally found that most users maintain existing relationships rather than build new relationships. 16 Compared with Facebook , PNS such as LinkedIn or Xing are explicitly designed for professional networking. 17 Hence, using these platforms represents a very specific form of online networking behavior. We, therefore, assume that networking is positively related to using LinkedIn . In contrast to company-internal enterprise social networks, platforms such as LinkedIn allow people also to connect with others across organizational boundaries. Most people on professional SNS have more connections with people from different organizations but the same field than with colleagues from their own company. 18 We, therefore, expect a positive relationship between external networking and LinkedIn use, but also want to explore whether internal networking might predict LinkedIn use as well.

H2: People scoring high on external networking are more likely to use LinkedIn .
RQ1: Are people scoring high on internal networking more likely to use LinkedIn?

Networking and informational benefits retrieved from professional SNS use

In the next step, we want to examine whether people scoring higher on external networking are not only more likely to use LinkedIn , but also to use it in a way that further increases informational benefits. Basically, two effects could be expected. First, networking might be related to the size and composition of the LinkedIn network. Second, networking might also be related to actual LinkedIn use.

Since networking is defined as building and maintaining contacts, we also expect people scoring high on external networking to have a larger number of contacts. First, they probably already have larger offline networks when they start using LinkedIn , which should be mirrored in their online networks. Second, we assume that people who score high on external networking also use social media platforms more for making new contacts, for example, by reacting to contact recommendations made by the platforms. Reacting to such recommendations often creates so-called latent ties, which are ties that are “technologically possible but not yet activated socially.” 19 (p137)

H3: External networking is positively related to the number of strong, weak, and latent ties on LinkedIn .

It is less clear whether people scoring high on networking also use LinkedIn in a way that is beneficial for retrieving informational benefits. People scoring high on networking engage in various offline activities, such as attending conferences or going for a beer with colleagues. Hence, we expect that they also use LinkedIn in an active way. In previous empirical studies, posting professional content and activity in groups turned out as predictors of informational benefits. 2 , 3 Research on enterprise social media as well as on LinkedIn argued and found that passive use, that is, reading or skimming social media updates is positively related to building ambient awareness, a cognitive representation of who knows what, which is an antecedent of retrieving informational benefits. 20–22 People engaging in networking behavior usually want to be well informed about what is going on in the field. Accordingly, we also expect a positive relationship with passive LinkedIn use.

H4: External networking is positively related to (a) active and (b) passive LinkedIn use.

In a last step, we examine whether social media use and network composition partly or fully mediate the effect of external networking on informational benefits. This would be a first hint that people scoring high on external networking have higher informational benefits because they use PNS in a more efficient way. If there is an independent effect of networking behavior, this could imply that, although online platforms are used as additional channels, the informational benefits are obtained outside of them (i.e., offline).

RQ2: Do network composition and LinkedIn use mediate the effect of external networking on informational benefits?

Sample and procedure

We used a subsample of working people ( n  = 685; 262 women, 423 men; age: 13.4 percent between 18 and 29, 20.7 percent between 30 and 39, 25.8 percent between 40 and 49, 34.7 percent between 50 and 64, and 5.3 percent older than 65) from wave 6 from a larger longitudinal study of Dutch Internet users (eight waves with a time interval of 6 months; see https://www.redeftiedata.eu/ for all measures and data). Among those, 43 percent ( n  = 297) reported that they use PNS; in most cases, this was LinkedIn ( n  = 259).

LinkedIn use

We asked participants whether they used LinkedIn or another PNS. For this article, we focused on people who use LinkedIn .

Passive and active LinkedIn use

To measure frequency of passive use, we asked LinkedIn users how often they read posts. For frequency of active use, we assessed how often they posted on LinkedIn . Answers were given on a scale from (1) “never” to (5) “very often.” One item specifically addressed activity in groups on a scale from (1) “not at all” to (5) “regularly.” In addition, we assessed posting professional content by asking respondents how often they post about professional success, general information about work, or ask for job-related advice on five-point scales ranging from (1) “never” to (5) “very often” (5). Cronbach's alpha for this three-item scale was 0.87.

Network composition

Respondents were told that it would be helpful to open their account in another window or tab of their browser for answering the network questions. They first reported the overall number of contacts they have. After reading a brief description of strong and weak ties, they were asked to estimate how many of those are strong or weak ties, respectively, and how many they would not even recognize when they meet them on the street (to capture the even weaker latent ties). Since these numbers showed severe skewness and kurtosis, we log-transformed them using the formula ln(x + 1) to avoid missing values for people who reported zero ties.

Professional informational benefits

We used five items from the scale by Wickramasinghe and Weliwitigoda. 23 Respondents indicated their agreement on five-point scales ranging from (1) “strongly disagree” to (5) “totally agree” (5). Cronbach's alpha for this scale was 0.89.

Networking was assessed with nine items on networking within one's own company (internal networking, Cronbach's α = 0.90) and nine items on networking with people outside one's own company (external networking, Cronbach's α = 0.95). 24

Descriptives and correlations

The descriptives and zero-order correlations for internal and external networking, informational benefits, LinkedIn use indicators, and network composition are presented in Table 1 .

Descriptives and Intercorrelations of the Central Variables

The means for strong, weak, and latent ties are based on the untransformed values; the correlations are based on the log-transformed values.

As can be seen in Table 1 , both, external and internal networking, were positively correlated with informational benefits. Hypothesis 1 is thus supported. The correlations also provide some support for H3. External networking was positively related to the number of strong and latent ties, but not to the number of weak ties. Also, H4 was largely supported by the correlation analysis: External networking was positively related to frequency of reading (H4a), activity in groups and posting professional content (H4b). Only the correlation with frequency of posting was not significant ( p  = 0.061).

Networking and LinkedIn use

To test H2 and answer RQ1, we conducted a logistic regression with using LinkedIn (no/yes) as criterion and internal and external networking as predictors. This analysis only revealed a significant effect for external networking, Exp(B) = 1.53, 95 percent confidence interval (CI) [1.20–1.95], Wald = 11.98, p  < 0.001. H2 is thereby supported. The answer to RQ1 is that internal networking is not related to LinkedIn use, Exp(B) = 1.12, 95 percent CI [0.84–1.49], Wald = 0.62, p  = 0.433.

Indirect effects of external networking on informational benefits

To answer RQ2, we ran a mediation model using PROCESS 25 model 4. External networking was the independent variable, informational benefits the dependent variable, and frequency of reading, activity in groups, professional content as well as number of strong, weak, and latent ties (log-transformed) were the predictors. We did not include frequency of posting since the correlation analysis showed that it was unrelated to networking and informational benefits ( Table 1 and Fig. 1 ).

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Results of the Process Model (Hayes 25 ) testing for indirect effects of external networking on informational benefits (unstandardized effect sizes).

The mediation analysis revealed, again in line with H1, a direct effect of external networking on informational benefits, 0.38, standard error ( SE ) = 0.06, 95 percent CI [0.26–0.50]. As in the correlational analysis, networking was positively related to frequency of reading, activity in groups, posting professional content, and number of strong and latent ties in this more complex model (see Fig. 1 for coefficients and CIs). However, none of the indirect effects was significant because the relationships between the various indicators of LinkedIn use and network composition and informational benefits were weaker when controlling for external networking. Only the direct effect of number of weak ties on informational benefits was significant: 0.16, SE  = 0.05, 95 percent CI [0.06–0.25]. The answer to RQ2 is, hence, that LinkedIn use and network composition do not mediate the effect of external networking on informational benefits.

The aim of this article was to bring together research on PNS and research on networking behavior to explore whether networking behavior is related to LinkedIn use and the informational benefits derived from PNS use. The results show that people scoring higher on external networking are more likely to use LinkedIn as a tool for managing their networks. External networking was also positively related to passive and active use of LinkedIn , as well as to the number of strong and latent ties. Whereas the LinkedIn use indicators and the network variables (with the exception of posting frequency) were positively correlated with informational benefits, in the mediation model only external networking and number of weak ties remained as significant predictors.

Our results have implications for several domains. First, we extend prior research on social media use by introducing a new predictor from organizational psychology. We demonstrate that this makes sense in the context of professional networking: external but not internal networking predicts the likelihood of using LinkedIn . Within the group of LinkedIn users, networking was further positively related to passive and active use as well as the number of strong and latent ties. Whereas it has been argued that SNS such as Facebook are mainly used for maintaining existing relationships but not for building new relationships, 16 we find that LinkedIn is also used for extending networks as indicated by the high number of latent ties.

On the correlational level, we also replicated prior findings on the relationships between passive (reading) and active use and informational benefits. 2 The correlation between reading and informational benefits fits with theoretical work on ambient awareness. 21 , 26 Passive social media use is often regarded as having negative consequences, for example, for life satisfaction. 27 However, our findings suggest that the quality of these effects strongly depends on the domain. Professional informational benefits are positively related to career satisfaction, which is also a determinant of overall life satisfaction. 28 Future research should examine whether and how PNS use contributes to career satisfaction and, thus, potentially also overall life satisfaction.

Interestingly, the effects of the LinkedIn use indicators were no longer significant when all predictors were included in one mediation model. Instead, external networking had a direct effect on informational benefits. Earlier work has found that LinkedIn use explains only a part of the variance in informational benefits. This research indicates that networking might be the crucial variable that explains why LinkedIn users report higher informational benefits. A reason for the smaller relationship between LinkedIn use and informational benefits when controlling for external networking might be that many informational benefits are obtained in offline situations, such as conferences or social events. Using LinkedIn could also be a proxy for a stronger career orientation or working in a sector in which information and referrals are very important.

Interestingly, the number of weak ties was not correlated with external networking, but predicted informational benefits independently of networking. Thus, we find support for the assumption that weak ties provide access to nonredundant information, 29 and show that using LinkedIn for keeping in touch with weak ties also benefits people who do not score high on external networking. It is still puzzling that external networking was positively correlated with the number of strong and latent ties, but unrelated to the number of weak ties. This finding could be due to the particular measure we used. It might, however, point to an important difference between skilled networkers and people who network less: Whereas it seems common to add weak ties, such as former colleagues, on LinkedIn , regardless of one's networking skills, people who frequently engage in networking seem to focus more on the other types of ties. On the one hand, they are more likely to strategically add people that might become useful at some point of time (latent ties). On the other hand, they might report a higher number of strong ties because they also leverage their networks more frequently and, therefore, interact more frequently with more people (the correlations with active use support this notion). To further explore this explanation, it might be valuable to investigate this in future research using more detailed network measures. As the survey was part of a larger study also including Facebook and Twitter use, and many people have several hundreds of LinkedIn contacts, it was not feasible to assess tie strength for each and every contact.

Our study also extended prior research on networking that mostly focused on indicators of career success by looking at informational benefits, thereby testing another part of the model by Wolff et al. 10 We found that both, internal and external networking, correlated with informational benefits. However, only external networking predicted LinkedIn use. This shows the value of the distinction between internal and external networking. This pattern can be explained by the affordances of the platform. LinkedIn explicitly promises its members to connect them with professionals from all over the world. These are mainly external contacts, so external networking is the better predictor of using this platform. Future research could examine whether internal networking predicts the (frequency of) use of enterprise social media.

Before closing, we would like to note the strengths and limitations of the study. A limitation is that we had single items measures for reading and activity in groups because the data are part from a larger survey covering a variety of topics related to SNS use. The number of strong, weak, and latent ties is also a somewhat crude proxy of network structure. The finding that networking is unrelated to the number of weak ties could thus be due to the operationalization. Future research should use measures of network structure (e.g., density, bridging ties). A key strength of our study is that our sample is largely representative for Dutch online users. We assume that the general pattern also holds for other Western countries because positive effects of networking on organizational outcomes have been found for German and American samples 11 , 12 , 14 ; what might differ is the social media platform use. In German-speaking countries, Xing is more popular than LinkedIn . 18

Taken together, this is the first article to bring together research on PNS and research on networking behavior. The results show that networking is a promising variable when it comes to social media use in the professional domain.

Acknowledgment

The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)/ERC grant agreement no. 312420.

Author Disclosure Statement

No competing financial interests exist.

This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue:

Published on 11.4.2024 in Vol 26 (2024)

Patients’ Experiences With Digitalization in the Health Care System: Qualitative Interview Study

Authors of this article:

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Original Paper

  • Christian Gybel Jensen 1 * , MA   ; 
  • Frederik Gybel Jensen 1 * , MA   ; 
  • Mia Ingerslev Loft 1, 2 * , MSc, PhD  

1 Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark

2 Institute for People and Technology, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark

*all authors contributed equally

Corresponding Author:

Mia Ingerslev Loft, MSc, PhD

Department of Neurology

Rigshospitalet

Inge Lehmanns Vej 8

Phone: 45 35457076

Email: [email protected]

Background: The digitalization of public and health sectors worldwide is fundamentally changing health systems. With the implementation of digital health services in health institutions, a focus on digital health literacy and the use of digital health services have become more evident. In Denmark, public institutions use digital tools for different purposes, aiming to create a universal public digital sector for everyone. However, this digitalization risks reducing equity in health and further marginalizing citizens who are disadvantaged. Therefore, more knowledge is needed regarding patients’ digital practices and experiences with digital health services.

Objective: This study aims to examine digital practices and experiences with public digital health services and digital tools from the perspective of patients in the neurology field and address the following research questions: (1) How do patients use digital services and digital tools? (2) How do they experience them?

Methods: We used a qualitative design with a hermeneutic approach. We conducted 31 semistructured interviews with patients who were hospitalized or formerly hospitalized at the department of neurology in a hospital in Denmark. The interviews were audio recorded and subsequently transcribed. The text from each transcribed interview was analyzed using manifest content analysis.

Results: The analysis provided insights into 4 different categories regarding digital practices and experiences of using digital tools and services in health care systems: social resources as a digital lifeline, possessing the necessary capabilities, big feelings as facilitators or barriers, and life without digital tools. Our findings show that digital tools were experienced differently, and specific conditions were important for the possibility of engaging in digital practices, including having access to social resources; possessing physical, cognitive, and communicative capabilities; and feeling motivated, secure, and comfortable. These prerequisites were necessary for participants to have positive experiences using digital tools in the health care system. Those who did not have these prerequisites experienced challenges and, in some cases, felt left out.

Conclusions: Experiences with digital practices and digital health services are complex and multifaceted. Engagement in digital practices for the examined population requires access to continuous assistance from their social network. If patients do not meet requirements, digital health services can be experienced as exclusionary and a source of concern. Physical, cognitive, and communicative difficulties might make it impossible to use digital tools or create more challenges. To ensure that digitalization does not create inequities in health, it is necessary for developers and institutions to be aware of the differences in digital health literacy, focus on simplifying communication with patients and next of kin, and find flexible solutions for citizens who are disadvantaged.

Introduction

In 2022, the fourth most googled question in Denmark was, “Why does MitID not work?” [ 1 ]. MitID (My ID) is a digital access tool that Danes use to enter several different private and public digital services, from bank accounts to mail from their municipality or the state. MitID is a part of many Danish citizens’ everyday lives because the public sector in Denmark is digitalized in many areas. In recent decades, digitalization has changed how governments and people interact and has demonstrated the potential to change the core functions of public sectors and delivery of public policies and services [ 2 ]. When public sectors worldwide become increasingly digitalized, this transformation extends to the public health sectors as well, and some studies argue that we are moving toward a “digital public health era” that is already impacting the health systems and will fundamentally change the future of health systems [ 3 ]. While health systems are becoming more digitalized, it is important that both patients and digitalized systems adapt to changes in accordance with each other. Digital practices of people can be understood as what people do with and through digital technologies and how people relate to technology [ 4 ]. Therefore, it is relevant to investigate digital practices and how patients perceive and experience their own use of digital tools and services, especially in relation to existing digital health services. In our study, we highlight a broad perspective on experiences with digital practices and particularly add insight into the challenges with digital practices faced by patients who have acute or chronic illness, with some of them also experiencing physical, communicative, or cognitive difficulties.

An international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development report indicates that countries are digitalized to different extents and in different ways; however, this does not mean that countries do not share common challenges and insights into the implementation of digital services [ 2 ].

In its global Digital Government Index, Denmark is presented as one of the leading countries when it comes to public digitalization [ 2 ]. Recent statistics indicate that approximately 97% of Danish families have access to the internet at home [ 5 ]. The Danish health sector already offers many different digital services, including web-based delivery of medicine, e-consultations, patient-related outcome questionnaires, and seeking one’s own health journal or getting test results through; “Sundhed” [ 6 ] (the national health portal) and “Sundhedsjournalen” (the electronic patient record); or the apps “Medicinkortet” (the shared medication record), “Minlæge” (My Doctor, consisting of, eg, communication with the general practitioner), or “MinSP” (My Health Platform, consisting of, eg, communication with health care staff in hospitals) [ 6 - 8 ].

The Danish Digital Health Strategy from 2018 aims to create a coherent and user-friendly digital public sector for everyone [ 9 ], but statistics indicate that certain groups in society are not as digitalized as others. In particular, the older population uses digital services the least, with 5% of people aged 65 to 75 years and 18% of those aged 75 to 89 years having never used the internet in 2020 [ 5 ]. In parts of the literature, it has been problematized how the digitalization of the welfare state is related to the marginalization of older citizens who are socially disadvantaged [ 10 ]. However, statistics also indicate that the probability of using digital tools increases significantly as a person’s experience of using digital tools increases, regardless of their age or education level [ 5 ].

Understanding the digital practices of patients is important because they can use digital tools to engage with the health system and follow their own health course. Researching experiences with digital practices can be a way to better understand potential possibilities and barriers when patients use digital health services. With patients becoming more involved in their own health course and treatment, the importance of patients’ health literacy is being increasingly recognized [ 11 ]. The World Health Organization defines health literacy as the “achievement of a level of knowledge, personal skills and confidence to take action to improve personal and community health by changing personal lifestyles and living conditions” [ 12 ]. Furthermore, health literacy can be described as “a person’s knowledge and competencies to meet complex demands of health in modern society, ” and it is viewed as a critical step toward patient empowerment [ 11 , 12 ]. In a digitalized health care system, this also includes the knowledge, capabilities, and resources that individuals require to use and benefit from eHealth services, that is, “digital health literacy (eHealth literacy)” [ 13 ]. An eHealth literacy framework created by Norgaard et al [ 13 ] identified that different aspects, for example, the ability to process information and actively engage with digital services, can be viewed as important facets of digital health literacy. This argument is supported by studies that demonstrate how patients with cognitive and communicative challenges experience barriers to the use of digital tools and require different approaches in the design of digital solutions in the health sector [ 14 , 15 ]. Access to digital services and digital literacy is becoming increasingly important determinants of health, as people with digital literacy and access to digital services can facilitate improvement of health and involvement in their own health course [ 16 ].

The need for a better understanding of eHealth literacy and patients’ capabilities to meet public digital services’ demands as well as engage in their own health calls for a deeper investigation into digital practices and the use of digital tools and services from the perspective of patients with varying digital capabilities. Important focus areas to better understand digital practices and related challenges have already been highlighted in various studies. They indicate that social support, assessment of value in digital services, and systemic assessment of digital capabilities are important in the use and implementation of digital tools, and they call for better insight into complex experiences with digital services [ 13 , 17 , 18 ]. Therefore, we aimed to examine digital practices and experiences with public digital health services and digital tools from the perspective of patients, addressing the following research questions: how do patients use digital services and digital tools, and how do they experience them?

We aimed to investigate digital practices and experiences with digital health services and digital tools; therefore, we used a qualitative design and adopted a hermeneutic approach as the point of departure, which means including preexisting knowledge of digital practices but also providing room for new comprehension [ 19 ]. Our interpretive approach is underpinned by the philosophical hermeneutic approach by Gadamer et al [ 19 ], in which they described the interpretation process as a “hermeneutic circle,” where the researcher enters the interpretation process with an open mind and historical awareness of a phenomenon (preknowledge). We conducted semistructured interviews using an interview guide. This study followed the COREQ (Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research) checklist [ 20 ].

Setting and Participants

To gain a broad understanding of experiences with public digital health services, a purposive sampling strategy was used. All 31 participants were hospitalized or formerly hospitalized patients in a large neurological department in the capital of Denmark ( Table 1 ). We assessed whether including patients from the neurological field would give us a broad insight into the experiences of digital practices from different perspectives. The department consisted of, among others, 8 inpatient units covering, for example, acute neurology and stroke units, from which the patients were recruited. Patients admitted to a neurological department can have both acute and transient neurological diseases, such as infections in the brain, stroke, or blood clot in the brain from which they can recover completely or have persistent physical and mental difficulties, or experience chronic neurological and progressive disorders such as Parkinson disease and dementia. Some patients hospitalized in neurological care will have communicative and cognitive difficulties because of their neurological disorders. Nursing staff from the respective units helped the researchers (CGJ, FGJ, and MIL) identify patients who differed in terms of gender, age, and severity of neurological illness. Some patients (6/31, 19%) had language difficulties; however, a speech therapist assessed them as suitable participants. We excluded patients with severe cognitive difficulties and those who were not able to speak the Danish language. Including patients from the field of neurology provided an opportunity to study the experience of digital health practice from various perspectives. Hence, the sampling strategy enabled the identification and selection of information-rich participants relevant to this study [ 21 ], which is the aim of qualitative research. The participants were invited to participate by either the first (CGJ) or last author (MIL), and all invited participants (31/31, 100%) chose to participate.

All 31 participants were aged between 40 to 99 years, with an average age of 71.75 years ( Table 1 ). Out of the 31 participants, 10 (32%) had physical disabilities or had cognitive or communicative difficulties due to sequela in relation to neurological illness or other physical conditions.

Data Collection

The 31 patient interviews were conducted over a 2-month period between September and November 2022. Of the 31 patients, 20 (65%) were interviewed face-to-face at the hospital in their patient room upon admission and 11 (35%) were interviewed on the phone after being discharged. The interviews had a mean length of 20.48 minutes.

We developed a semistructured interview guide ( Table 2 ). The interview questions were developed based on the research aim, findings from our preliminary covering of literature in the field presented in the Introduction section, and identified gaps that we needed to elaborate on to be able to answer our research question [ 22 ]. The semistructured interview guide was designed to support the development of a trusting relationship and ensure the relevance of the interviews’ content [ 22 ]. The questions served as a prompt for the participants and were further supported by questions such as “please tell me more” and “please elaborate” throughout the interview, both to heighten the level of detail and to verify our understanding of the issues at play. If the participant had cognitive or communicative difficulties, communication was supported using a method called Supported Communication for Adults with Aphasia [ 23 ] during the interview.

The interviews were performed by all authors (CGJ, FGJ, and MIL individually), who were skilled in conducting interviews and qualitative research. The interviewers are not part of daily clinical practice but are employed in the department of neurology from where the patients were recruited. All interviews were audio recorded and subsequently transcribed verbatim by all 3 authors individually.

a PRO: patient-related outcome.

Data Analysis

The text from each transcribed interview was analyzed using manifest content analysis, as described by Graneheim and Lundman [ 24 ]. Content analysis is a method of analyzing written, verbal, and visual communication in a systematic way [ 25 ]. Qualitative content analysis is a structured but nonlinear process that requires researchers to move back and forth between the original text and parts of the text during the analysis. Manifest analysis is the descriptive level at which the surface structure of the text central to the phenomenon and the research question is described. The analysis was conducted as a collaborative effort between the first (CGJ) and last authors (MIL); hence, in this inductive circular process, to achieve consistency in the interpretation of the text, there was continued discussion and reflection between the researchers. The transcriptions were initially read several times to gain a sense of the whole context, and we analyzed each interview. The text was initially divided into domains that reflected the lowest degree of interpretation, as a rough structure was created in which the text had a specific area in common. The structure roughly reflected the interview guide’s themes, as guided by Graneheim and Lundman [ 24 ]. Thereafter, the text was divided into meaning units, condensed into text-near descriptions, and then abstracted and labeled further with codes. The codes were categorized based on similarities and differences. During this process, we discussed the findings to reach a consensus on the content, resulting in the final 4 categories presented in this paper.

Ethical Considerations

The interviewees received oral and written information about the study and its voluntary nature before the interviews. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Participants were able to opt of the study at any time. Data were anonymized and stored electronically on locked and secured servers. The Ethics Committee of the Capitol Region in Denmark was contacted before the start of the study. This study was registered and approved by the ethics committee and registered under the Danish Data Protection Agency (number P2021-839). Furthermore, the ethical principles of the Declaration of Helsinki were followed for this study.

The analysis provided insights into 4 different categories regarding digital practices and experiences of using digital tools and services in health care systems: social resources as a digital lifeline, possessing the necessary capabilities, big feelings as facilitators or barriers, and life without digital tools.

Social Resources as a Digital Lifeline

Throughout the analysis, it became evident that access to both material and social resources was of great importance when using digital tools. Most participants already possessed and had easy access to a computer, smartphone, or tablet. The few participants who did not own the necessary digital tools told us that they did not have the skills needed to use these tools. For these participants, the lack of material resources was tied particularly to a lack of knowledge and know-how, as they expressed that they would not know where to start after buying a computer—how to set it up, connect it to the internet, and use its many systems.

However, possessing the necessary material resources did not mean that the participants possessed the knowledge and skill to use digital tools. Furthermore, access to material resources was also a question of having access to assistance when needed. Some participants who had access to a computer, smartphone, and tablet and knew how to use these tools still had to obtain help when setting up hardware, updating software, or getting a new device. These participants were confident in their own ability to use digital devices but also relied on family, friends, and neighbors in their everyday use of these tools. Certain participants were explicitly aware of their own use of social resources when expressing their thoughts on digital services in health care systems:

I think it is a blessing and a curse. I think it is both. I would say that if I did not have someone around me in my family who was almost born into the digital world, then I think I would be in trouble. But I feel sorry for those who do not have that opportunity, and I know quite a few who do not. They get upset, and it’s really frustrating. [Woman, age 82 years]

The participants’ use of social resources indicates that learning skills and using digital tools are not solely individual tasks but rather continuously involve engagement with other people, particularly whenever a new unforeseen problem arises or when the participants want a deeper understanding of the tools they are using:

If tomorrow I have to get a new ipad...and it was like that when I got this one, then I had to get XXX to come and help me move stuff and he was sweet to help with all the practical stuff. I think I would have cursed a couple of times (if he hadn’t been there), but he is always helpful, but at the same time he is also pedagogic so I hope that next time he showed me something I will be able to do it. [Man, age 71 years]

For some participants, obtaining assistance from a more experienced family member was experienced as an opportunity to learn, whereas for other participants, their use of public digital services was even tied directly to assistance from a spouse or family member:

My wife, she has access to mine, so if something comes up, she can just go in and read, and we can talk about it afterwards what (it is). [Man, age 85 years]

The participants used social resources to navigate digital systems and understand and interpret communication from the health care system through digital devices. Another example of this was the participants who needed assistance to find, answer, and understand questionnaires from the health care department. Furthermore, social resources were viewed as a support system that made participants feel more comfortable and safer when operating digital tools. The social resources were particularly important when overcoming unforeseen and new challenges and when learning new skills related to the use of digital tools. Participants with physical, cognitive, and communicative challenges also explained how social resources were of great importance in their ability to use digital tools.

Possessing the Necessary Capabilities

The findings indicated that possessing the desire and knowing how to use digital tools are not always enough to engage with digital services successfully. Different health issues can carry consequences for motor skills and mobility. Some of these consequences were visibly affecting how our participants interacted with digital devices, and these challenges were somewhat easy to discover. However, our participants revealed hidden challenges that posed difficulties. In some specific cases, cognitive and communicative inabilities can make it difficult to use digital tools, and this might not always be clear until the individual tries to use a device’s more complex functions. An example of this is that some participants found it easy to turn on a computer and use it to write but difficult to go through security measures on digital services or interpret and understand digital language. Remembering passwords and logging on to systems created challenges, particularly for those experiencing health issues that directly affect memory and cognitive abilities, who expressed concerns about what they were able to do through digital tools:

I think it is very challenging because I would like to use it how I used to before my stroke; (I) wish that everything (digital skills) was transferred, but it just isn’t. [Man, age 80 years]

Despite these challenges, the participants demonstrated great interest in using digital tools, particularly regarding health care services and their own well-being. However, sometimes, the challenges that they experienced could not be conquered merely by motivation and good intentions. Another aspect of these challenges was the amount of extra time and energy that the participants had to spend on digital services. A patient diagnosed with Parkinson disease described how her symptoms created challenges that changed her digital practices:

Well it could for example be something like following a line in the device. And right now it is very limited what I can do with this (iPhone). Now I am almost only using it as a phone, and that is a little sad because I also like to text and stuff, but I also find that difficult (...) I think it is difficult to get an overview. [Woman, age 62 years]

Some participants said that after they were discharged from the hospital, they did not use the computer anymore because it was too difficult and too exhausting , which contributed to them giving up . Using digital tools already demanded a certain amount of concentration and awareness, and some diseases and health conditions affected these abilities further.

Big Feelings as Facilitators or Barriers

The findings revealed a wide range of digital practices in which digital tools were used as a communication device, as an entertainment device, and as a practical and informative tool for ordering medicine, booking consultations, asking health-related questions, or receiving email from public institutions. Despite these different digital practices, repeating patterns and arguments appeared when the participants were asked why they learned to use digital tools or wanted to improve their skills. A repeating argument was that they wanted to “follow the times, ” or as a participant who was still not satisfied with her digital skills stated:

We should not go against the future. [Woman, age 89 years]

The participants expressed a positive view of the technological developments and possibilities that digital devices offered, and they wanted to improve their knowledge and skills related to digital practice. For some participants, this was challenging, and they expressed frustration over how technological developments “moved too fast ,” but some participants interpreted these challenges as a way to “keep their mind sharp. ”

Another recurring pattern was that the participants expressed great interest in using digital services related to the health care system and other public institutions. The importance of being able to navigate digital services was explicitly clear when talking about finding test answers, written electronic messages, and questionnaires from the hospital or other public institutions. Keeping up with developments, communicating with public institutions, and taking an interest in their own health and well-being were described as good reasons to learn to use digital tools.

However, other aspects also affected these learning facilitators. Some participants felt alienated while using digital tools and described the practice as something related to feelings of anxiety, fear, and stupidity as well as something that demanded “a certain amount of courage. ” Some participants felt frustrated with the digital challenges they experienced, especially when the challenges were difficult to overcome because of their physical conditions:

I get sad because of it (digital challenges) and I get very frustrated and it takes a lot of time because I have difficulty seeing when I look away from the computer and have to turn back again to find out where I was and continue there (...) It pains me that I have to use so much time on it. [Man, age 71 years]

Fear of making mistakes, particularly when communicating with public institutions, for example, the health care system, was a common pattern. Another pattern was the fear of misinterpreting the sender and the need to ensure that the written electronic messages were actually from the described sender. Some participants felt that they were forced to learn about digital tools because they cared a lot about the services. Furthermore, fears of digital services replacing human interaction were a recurring concern among the participants. Despite these initial and recurring feelings, some participants learned how to navigate the digital services that they deemed relevant. Another recurring pattern in this learning process was repetition, the practice of digital skills, and consistent assistance from other people. One participant expressed the need to use the services often to remember the necessary skills:

Now I can figure it out because now I’ve had it shown 10 times. But then three months still pass... and then I think...how was it now? Then I get sweat on my forehead (feel nervous) and think; I’m not an idiot. [Woman, age 82 years]

For some participants, learning how to use digital tools demanded time and patience, as challenges had to be overcome more than once because they reappeared until the use of digital tools was more automatized into their everyday lives. Using digital tools and health services was viewed as easier and less stressful when part of everyday routines.

Life Without Digital Tools: Not a Free Choice

Even though some participants used digital tools daily, other participants expressed that it was “too late for them.” These participants did not view it as a free choice but as something they had to accept that they could not do. They wished that they could have learned it earlier in life but did not view it as a possibility in the future. Furthermore, they saw potential in digital services, including digital health care services, but they did not know exactly what services they were missing out on. Despite this lack of knowledge, they still felt sad about the position they were in. One participant expressed what she thought regarding the use of digital tools in public institutions:

Well, I feel alright about it, but it is very, very difficult for those of us who do not have it. Sometimes you can feel left out—outside of society. And when you do not have one of those (computers)...A reference is always made to w and w (www.) and then you can read on. But you cannot do that. [Woman, age 94 years]

The feeling of being left out of society was consistent among the participants who did not use digital tools. To them, digital systems seemed to provide unfair treatment based on something outside of their own power. Participants who were heavily affected by their medical conditions and could not use digital services also felt left out because they saw the advantages of using digital tools. Furthermore, a participant described the feelings connected to the use of digital tools in public institutions:

It is more annoying that it does not seem to work out in my favour. [Woman, age 62 years]

These statements indicated that it is possible for individuals to want to use digital tools and simultaneously find them too challenging. These participants were aware that there are consequences of not using digital tools, and that saddens them, as they feel like they are not receiving the same treatment as other people in society and the health care system.

Principal Findings

The insights from our findings demonstrated that our participants had different digital practices and different experiences with digital tools and services; however, the analysis also highlighted patterns related to how digital services and tools were used. Specific conditions were important for the possibility of digital practice, including having access to social resources; possessing the necessary capabilities; and feeling motivated, secure, and comfortable . These prerequisites were necessary to have positive experiences using digital tools in the health care system, although some participants who lived up to these prerequisites were still skeptical toward digital solutions. Others who did not live up to these prerequisites experienced challenges and even though they were aware of opportunities, this awareness made them feel left out. A few participants even viewed the digital tools as a threat to their participation in society. This supports the notion of Norgaard et al [ 13 ] that the attention paid to digital capability demands from eHealth systems is very important. Furthermore, our findings supported the argument of Hjeltholt and Papazu [ 17 ] that it is important to better understand experiences related to digital services. In our study, we accommodate this request and bring forth a broad perspective on experiences with digital practices; we particularly add insight into the challenges with digital practices for patients who also have acute or chronic illness, with some of them also experiencing physical, communicative, and cognitive difficulties. To our knowledge, there is limited existing literature focusing on digital practices that do not have a limited scope, for example, a focus on perspectives on eHealth literacy in the use of apps [ 26 ] or intervention studies with a focus on experiences with digital solutions, for example, telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic [ 27 ]. As mentioned by Hjeltholt et al [ 10 ], certain citizens are dependent on their own social networks in the process of using and learning digital tools. Rasi et al [ 28 ] and Airola et al [ 29 ] argued that digital health literacy is situated and should include the capabilities of the individual’s social network. Our findings support these arguments that access to social resources is an important condition; however, the findings also highlight that these resources can be particularly crucial in the use of digital health services, for example, when interpreting and understanding digital and written electronic messages related to one’s own health course or when dealing with physical, cognitive, and communicative disadvantages. Therefore, we argue that the awareness of the disadvantages is important if we want to understand patients’ digital capabilities, and the inclusion of the next of kin can be evident in unveiling challenges that are unknown and not easily visible or when trying to reach patients with digital challenges through digital means.

Studies by Kayser et al [ 30 ] and Kanoe et al [ 31 ] indicated that patients’ abilities to interpret and understand digital health–related services and their benefits are important for the successful implementation of eHealth services—an argument that our findings support. Health literacy in both digital and physical contexts is important if we want to understand how to better design and implement services. Our participants’ statements support the argument that communication through digital means cannot be viewed as similar to face-to-face communication and that an emphasis on digital health literacy demonstrates how health systems are demanding different capabilities from the patients [ 13 ]. We argue that it is important to communicate the purposes of digital services so that both the patient and their next of kin know why they participate and how it can benefit them. Therefore, it is important to make it as clear as possible that digital health services can benefit the patient and that these services are developed to support information, communication, and dialogue between patients and health professionals. However, our findings suggest that even after interpreting and understanding the purposes of digital health services, some patients may still experience challenges when using digital tools.

Therefore, it is important to understand how and why patients learn digital skills, particularly because both experience with digital devices and estimation of the value of digital tools have been highlighted as key factors for digital practices [ 5 , 18 ]. Our findings indicate that a combination of these factors is important, as recognizing the value of digital tools was not enough to facilitate the necessary learning process for some of our participants. Instead, our participants described the use of digital tools as complex and continuous processes in which automation of skills, assistance from others, and time to relearn forgotten knowledge were necessary and important facilitators for learning and understanding digital tools as well as becoming more comfortable and confident in the use of digital health services. This was particularly important, as it was more encouraging for our participants to learn digital tools when they felt secure, instead of feeling afraid and anxious, a point that Bailey et al [ 18 ] also highlighted. The value of digital solutions and the will to learn were greater when challenges were viewed as something to overcome and learn from instead of something that created a feeling of being stupid. This calls for attention on how to simplify and explain digital tools and services so that users do not feel alienated. Our findings also support the argument that digital health literacy should take into account emotional well-being related to digital practice [ 32 ].

The various perspectives that our participants provided regarding the use of digital tools in the health care system indicate that patients are affected by the use of digital health services and their own capabilities to use digital tools. Murray et al [ 33 ] argued that the use of digital tools in health sectors has the potential to improve health and health delivery by improving efficacy, efficiency, accessibility, safety, and personalization, and our participants also highlighted these positive aspects. However, different studies found that some patients, particularly older adults considered socially vulnerable, have lower digital health literacy [ 10 , 34 , 35 ], which is an important determinant of health and may widen disparities and inequity in health care [ 16 ]. Studies on older adult populations’ adaptation to information and communication technology show that engaging with this technology can be limited by the usability of technology, feelings of anxiety and concern, self-perception of technology use, and the need for assistance and inclusive design [ 36 ]. Our participants’ experiences with digital practices support the importance of these focus areas, especially when primarily older patients are admitted to hospitals. Furthermore, our findings indicate that some older patients who used to view themselves as being engaged in their own health care felt more distanced from the health care system because of digital services, and some who did not have the capabilities to use digital tools felt that they were treated differently compared to the rest of society. They did not necessarily view themselves as vulnerable but felt vulnerable in the specific experience of trying to use digital services because they wished that they were more capable. Moreover, this was the case for patients with physical and cognitive difficulties, as they were not necessarily aware of the challenges before experiencing them. Drawing on the phenomenological and feministic approach by Ahmed [ 37 ], these challenges that make patients feel vulnerable are not necessarily visible to others but can instead be viewed as invisible institutional “walls” that do not present themselves before the patient runs into them. Some participants had to experience how their physical, cognitive, or communicative difficulties affected their digital practice to realize that they were not as digitally capable as they once were or as others in society. Furthermore, viewed from this perspective, our findings could be used to argue that digital capabilities should be viewed as a privilege tied to users’ physical bodies and that digital services in the health care system are indirectly making patients without this privilege vulnerable. This calls for more attention to the inequities that digital tools and services create in health care systems and awareness that those who do not use digital tools are not necessarily indifferent about the consequences. Particularly, in a context such as the Danish one, in which the digital strategy is to create an intertwined and user-friendly public digital sector for everyone, it needs to be understood that patients have different digital capabilities and needs. Although some have not yet had a challenging experience that made them feel vulnerable, others are very aware that they receive different treatment and feel that they are on their own or that the rest of the society does not care about them. Inequities in digital health care, such as these, can and should be mitigated or prevented, and our investigation into the experiences with digital practices can help to show that we are creating standards and infrastructures that deliberately exclude the perspectives of those who are most in need of the services offered by the digital health care system [ 8 ]. Therefore, our findings support the notions that flexibility is important in the implementation of universal public digital services [ 17 ]; that it is important to adjust systems in accordance with patients’ eHealth literacy and not only improve the capabilities of individuals [ 38 ]; and that the development and improvement of digital health literacy are not solely an individual responsibility but are also tied to ways in which institutions organize, design, and implement digital tools and services [ 39 ].

Limitations

This qualitative study provided novel insights into the experiences with public digital health services from the perspective of patients in the Danish context, enabling a deeper understanding of how digital health services and digital tools are experienced and used. This helps build a solid foundation for future interventions aimed at digital health literacy and digital health interventions. However, this study has some limitations. First, the study was conducted in a country where digitalization is progressing quickly, and people, therefore, are accustomed to this pace. Therefore, readers must be aware of this. Second, the study included patients with different neurological conditions; some of their digital challenges were caused or worsened by these neurological conditions and are, therefore, not applicable to all patients in the health system. However, the findings provided insights into the patients’ digital practices before their conditions and other challenges not connected to neurological conditions shared by patients. Third, the study was broad, and although a large number of informants was included, from a qualitative research perspective, we would recommend additional research in this field to develop interventions that target digital health literacy and the use of digital health services.

Conclusions

Experiences with digital tools and digital health services are complex and multifaceted. The advantages in communication, finding information, or navigating through one’s own health course work as facilitators for engaging with digital tools and digital health services. However, this is not enough on its own. Furthermore, feeling secure and motivated and having time to relearn and practice skills are important facilitators. Engagement in digital practices for the examined population requires access to continuous assistance from their social network. If patients do not meet requirements, digital health services can be experienced as exclusionary and a source of concern. Physical, cognitive, and communicative difficulties might make it impossible to use digital tools or create more challenges that require assistance. Digitalization of the health care system means that patients do not have the choice to opt out of using digital services without having consequences, resulting in them receiving a different treatment than others. To ensure digitalization does not create inequities in health, it is necessary for developers and the health institutions that create, design, and implement digital services to be aware of differences in digital health literacy and to focus on simplifying communication with patients and next of kin through and about digital services. It is important to focus on helping individuals meet the necessary conditions and finding flexible solutions for those who do not have the same privileges as others if the public digital sector is to work for everyone.

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank all the people who gave their time to be interviewed for the study, the clinical nurse specialists who facilitated interviewing patients, and the other nurses on shift who assisted in recruiting participants.

Conflicts of Interest

None declared.

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Abbreviations

Edited by A Mavragani; submitted 14.03.23; peer-reviewed by G Myreteg, J Eriksen, M Siermann; comments to author 18.09.23; revised version received 09.10.23; accepted 27.02.24; published 11.04.24.

©Christian Gybel Jensen, Frederik Gybel Jensen, Mia Ingerslev Loft. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (https://www.jmir.org), 11.04.2024.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.

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A paper authored by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory studies the success of the Energy Materials Network Data Hub—a secure, customizable scientific data sharing platform. Initiated in 2016 and now representing seven EMN consortia, including HydroGEN, the EMN Data Hubs function as customizable virtual laboratories to accelerate research breakthroughs on even the toughest materials challenges in the energy sector. They accomplish this by providing a common infrastructure that teams can use to share and leverage resources—saving time and money in the process. The paper, published in the International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications , outlines the specifics on implementing, operating, and collaborating using EMN’s Data Hub platform.

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Clinical Benefit and Regulatory Outcomes of Cancer Drugs Receiving Accelerated Approval

  • 1 Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law, Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Original Investigation Therapeutic Value of Drugs Granted Accelerated Approval or Conditional Marketing Authorization Kerstin N. Vokinger, MD, JD, PhD, LLM; Aaron S. Kesselheim, MD, JD, MPH; Camille E. G. Glaus, BSc, JD, LLM; Thomas J. Hwang, MD JAMA Health Forum
  • Research Letter Exposure to Cancer Drugs Without Confirmed Benefit After FDA Accelerated Approval Ravi B. Parikh, MD, MPP; Rebecca A. Hubbard, PhD; Erkuan Wang, MA; Trevor J. Royce, MD, MPH; Aaron B. Cohen, MD, MSCE; Amy S. Clark, MD, MSCE; Ronac Mamtani, MD, MSCE JAMA Oncology
  • Research Letter Time to Confirmatory Study Initiation After Accelerated Approval of Drugs in the US Shelley A. Jazowski, PhD, MPH; Avi U. Vaidya, MPH; Julie M. Donohue, PhD; Stacie B. Dusetzina, PhD; Rachel E. Sachs, JD, MPH JAMA Internal Medicine
  • Original Investigation NCCN Recommendations of Cancer Drugs Edward R. Scheffer Cliff, MBBS, MPH; Rachel S. Rome, MD; Aaron S. Kesselheim, MD, JD, MPH; Benjamin N. Rome, MD, MPH JAMA Network Open

Question   What is the clinical benefit of cancer drugs granted accelerated approval, and on what basis are they converted to regular approval?

Findings   In this cohort study of cancer drugs granted accelerated approval from 2013 to 2017, 41% (19/46) did not improve overall survival or quality of life in confirmatory trials after more than 5 years of follow-up, with results not yet available for another 15% (7/46). Among drugs converted to regular approval, 60% (29/48) of conversions relied on surrogate measures.

Meaning   Although accelerated approval can be useful, some cancer drugs do not end up demonstrating benefit in extending patients’ lives or improving their quality of life.

Importance   The US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) accelerated approval pathway allows approval of investigational drugs treating unmet medical needs based on changes to surrogate measures considered “reasonably likely” to predict clinical benefit. Postapproval clinical trials are then required to confirm whether these drugs offer clinical benefit.

Objective   To determine whether cancer drugs granted accelerated approval ultimately demonstrate clinical benefit and to evaluate the basis of conversion to regular approval.

Design, Setting, and Participants   In this cohort study, publicly available FDA data were used to identify cancer drugs granted accelerated approval from 2013 to 2023.

Main Outcomes and Measures   Demonstrated improvement in quality of life or overall survival in accelerated approvals with more than 5 years of follow-up, as well as confirmatory trial end points and time to conversion for drug-indication pairs converted to regular approval.

Results   A total of 129 cancer drug–indication pairs were granted accelerated approval from 2013 to 2023. Among 46 indications with more than 5 years of follow-up (approved 2013-2017), approximately two-thirds (29, 63%) were converted to regular approval, 10 (22%) were withdrawn, and 7 (15%) remained ongoing after a median of 6.3 years. Fewer than half (20/46, 43%) demonstrated a clinical benefit in confirmatory trials. Time to withdrawal decreased from 9.9 years to 3.6 years, and time to regular approval increased from 1.6 years to 3.6 years. Among 48 drug-indication pairs converted to regular approval, 19 (40%) were converted based on overall survival, 21 (44%) on progression-free survival, 5 (10%) on response rate plus duration of response, 2 (4%) on response rate, and 1 (2%) despite a negative confirmatory trial. Comparing accelerated and regular approval indications, 18 of 48 (38%) were unchanged, while 30 of 48 (63%) had different indications (eg, earlier line of therapy).

Conclusions and Relevance   Most cancer drugs granted accelerated approval did not demonstrate benefit in overall survival or quality of life within 5 years of accelerated approval. Patients should be clearly informed about the cancer drugs that use the accelerated approval pathway and do not end up showing benefits in patient-centered clinical outcomes.

Read More About

Liu ITT , Kesselheim AS , Cliff ERS. Clinical Benefit and Regulatory Outcomes of Cancer Drugs Receiving Accelerated Approval. JAMA. Published online April 07, 2024. doi:10.1001/jama.2024.2396

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Electrical Engineering and Systems Science > Image and Video Processing

Title: benchmarking the cell image segmentation models robustness under the microscope optical aberrations.

Abstract: Cell segmentation is essential in biomedical research for analyzing cellular morphology and behavior. Deep learning methods, particularly convolutional neural networks (CNNs), have revolutionized cell segmentation by extracting intricate features from images. However, the robustness of these methods under microscope optical aberrations remains a critical challenge. This study comprehensively evaluates the performance of cell instance segmentation models under simulated aberration conditions using the DynamicNuclearNet (DNN) and LIVECell datasets. Aberrations, including Astigmatism, Coma, Spherical, and Trefoil, were simulated using Zernike polynomial equations. Various segmentation models, such as Mask R-CNN with different network heads (FPN, C3) and backbones (ResNet, VGG19, SwinS), were trained and tested under aberrated conditions. Results indicate that FPN combined with SwinS demonstrates superior robustness in handling simple cell images affected by minor aberrations. Conversely, Cellpose2.0 proves effective for complex cell images under similar conditions. Our findings provide insights into selecting appropriate segmentation models based on cell morphology and aberration severity, enhancing the reliability of cell segmentation in biomedical applications. Further research is warranted to validate these methods with diverse aberration types and emerging segmentation models. Overall, this research aims to guide researchers in effectively utilizing cell segmentation models in the presence of minor optical aberrations.

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