Understanding Continuous Assessment in Education

Learn about Continuous Assessment in this educational glossary entry.

Continuous assessment is a method of evaluating students' learning progress and achievements throughout a course or academic year. Unlike traditional assessments that rely heavily on final exams or standardized tests, continuous assessment involves ongoing evaluation through various means such as quizzes, projects, presentations, and homework assignments.

Continuous assessment aims to provide a more holistic view of students' performance by taking into account their progress over time rather than relying solely on a single assessment event. This approach allows educators to identify students' strengths and weaknesses early on, provide timely feedback, and tailor instruction to meet individual learning needs.

Key Features of Continuous Assessment

  • Regular Feedback: Continuous assessment involves providing students with regular feedback on their performance, allowing them to track their progress and identify areas for improvement.
  • Multiple Assessment Methods: Educators use a variety of assessment methods such as quizzes, tests, projects, and group activities to evaluate students' understanding of the material.
  • Formative Assessment: Continuous assessment often includes formative assessments that help guide instruction and support student learning throughout the course.
  • Individualized Learning: By assessing students continuously, educators can better understand each student's learning style and adjust teaching strategies to meet their unique needs.
  • Focus on Growth: Continuous assessment emphasizes growth and improvement over time, encouraging students to set goals and work towards achieving them.

Benefits of Continuous Assessment

Continuous assessment offers several benefits for both students and educators:

  • Early Intervention: By monitoring students' progress continuously, educators can identify learning gaps early and provide targeted support to help students succeed.
  • Enhanced Learning Outcomes: Continuous assessment encourages active engagement in the learning process, leading to improved understanding and retention of the material.
  • Personalized Instruction: Educators can use continuous assessment data to tailor instruction to meet individual student needs, promoting a more personalized learning experience.
  • Motivation and Engagement: Regular feedback and opportunities for improvement motivate students to stay engaged and take ownership of their learning.
  • Comprehensive Evaluation: Continuous assessment provides a more comprehensive view of students' learning abilities and achievements compared to traditional assessments.

Challenges of Continuous Assessment

While continuous assessment offers many advantages, it also presents some challenges that educators need to consider:

  • Time-Intensive: Implementing continuous assessment requires consistent monitoring, feedback, and data analysis, which can be time-consuming for educators.
  • Standardization: Ensuring consistency and fairness in evaluating students' performance across different assessments can be challenging in continuous assessment.
  • Assessment Overload: Too many assessments can overwhelm students and detract from the learning experience if not carefully planned and balanced.
  • Subjectivity: Continuous assessment may involve subjective judgments, particularly in qualitative assessments such as projects and presentations.
  • Resource Constraints: Schools may face limitations in terms of resources, technology, and training needed to effectively implement continuous assessment practices.

Best Practices for Implementing Continuous Assessment

To maximize the benefits of continuous assessment and address its challenges, educators can follow these best practices:

  • Set Clear Learning Objectives: Align assessments with clear learning objectives to ensure that they effectively measure student progress.
  • Diversify Assessment Methods: Use a variety of assessment methods to capture different aspects of student learning and provide a more comprehensive evaluation.
  • Provide Timely Feedback: Offer regular and constructive feedback to students to guide their learning and help them improve.
  • Involve Students in the Assessment Process: Encourage students to self-assess, reflect on their learning, and set goals for improvement.
  • Use Technology Wisely: Leverage educational technology tools to streamline assessment processes, track student progress, and analyze data effectively.

Continuous assessment is a valuable approach to evaluating student learning that offers a more nuanced and comprehensive view of students' progress over time. By incorporating regular feedback, diverse assessment methods, and personalized instruction, educators can support student growth and enhance learning outcomes. While challenges exist in implementing continuous assessment, following best practices and leveraging technology can help educators overcome these obstacles and create a more engaging and effective learning environment.

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Importance of Continuous Assessment | Benefits & Implementation

  • Gianpiero Rusconi
  • Last Updated: 7 May, 2024

Continuous assessment plays a crucial role in improving performance and development. They motivate students and trainees to make immediate improvements by offering real-time feedback while fostering a culture of continuous improvement.

Summative assessment methods, however, don’t provide a complete picture of a learner’s progress. Continuous assessments are important in the learning process as they can gauge an individual’s comprehension of course material more accurately.

What is Continuous Assessment (CA)?

Continuous Assessment (CA), also referred to as Ongoing Assessment, is the evaluation and analysis of an individual’s learning performance over a given course. Unlike one-time assessments, continuous assessment focuses on fostering improvement throughout the learning process with consistent feedback and guided learning.

The term ‘formative assessments’ is often used synonymously with continuous assessments but while ongoing assessments may include the use of formative assessment, they are not interchangeable. Formative assessment puts a strong emphasis on the assessment results. It is only one aspect of continuous assessment.

By integrating continuous feedback into the learning process, CA encourages students to hone their critical analysis and problem-solving skills. This ongoing feedback mechanism ensures that learning gaps are identified and addressed promptly, leading to a more comprehensive understanding of the subject matter.

person completing continuous assessment test

The Importance of Continuous Assessment in the Learning Process

According to the characteristics of continuous assessments , CA should be comprehensive, cumulative, systematic, and guidance-oriented. These collectively highlight its importance in learning.

Guidance-oriented

CA is consistent in providing feedback to students, which helps them identify any learning gaps they might have. Instructors, too, can support their students with diverse learning styles that cater to the different preferences of learners.

Encourages Growth

CA focuses on growth for both students and teachers. Continuous assessments are meant to refine learners’ skills over time, so they provide feedback through continuous and comprehensive evaluation. This measures a student’s learning progress, encouraging improvement throughout the course.

Evaluates Individual Progress

CA is characterised as systematic as it is able to track progress throughout the course. The approach enables teachers to assess the individual progress of their students and adjust their teaching methods accordingly.

Advantages of Continuous Assessment in the Workplace

In the workplace, organisations can apply the same principles of continuous evaluation for professional development.

Here’s how implementing CA processes can be beneficial to an organisation:

Creates Consistency

Assessment enables consistency and CA helps establish a stable and reliable evaluation process. This way, organisations can measure whether their training programmes are effective by properly evaluating the skills and abilities of their employees, cross-referencing with standard criteria.

  • Routine Evaluation : CA involves regular checks to provide learners with feedback on their performance. This can be handled with popular tools like skill matrices to see where there are gaps.
  • Fair Comparison : Consistent evaluations measure individual progress throughout a course. This enables instructors to assess the effectiveness of their teaching methods and to guide their learners towards improving their performance.
  • Reduced Bias : Consistent evaluations facilitate the improvement of each learner, which reduces biases that might occur with one-time, high-stakes examinations. By fostering a learning environment that encourages self-improvement, CA effectively mitigates the risks of biased evaluations.

Increases Knowledge Retention and Transfer

CA is important in the workplace as it encourages learning transfer. It focuses on improving worker performance in real-world applications so employees can be ready to do their jobs properly and efficiently. Workers can recall company standards and safety practices from training, which is crucial for high-hazard industries.

Improves Quality in Work Performance

Through regular and constructive feedback, organisations can promptly address any areas of concern. Organisations can use the results of continuous assessments to design their training programs to develop the skills they need in the workplace.

Identifies Learning Gaps

Continuous and comprehensive assessments can help organisations identify learning gaps during training as they encourage workers to address any skill gaps or knowledge they might have missed from the course.

Employee Engagement

Continuous Assessment fosters a sense of involvement and value among employees. As they receive consistent feedback, employees feel their growth and contributions are recognised. This ongoing dialogue between the employee and the organisation enhances commitment, motivation, and overall engagement with their roles and tasks.

Adaptability

The dynamic nature of Continuous Assessment allows organisations to be agile. By constantly evaluating employee performance and understanding their learning curves, training methods can be swiftly adjusted. This ensures that learning interventions remain relevant, timely, and aligned with both organisational goals and employee needs.

results of a performance appraisal assessment

Best Practices to Implement Continuous Assessment in the Workplace

1. clearly defined goals and metrics.

What is the end goal of implementing the training programme? What are the skills your organisation aims to develop in your workforce? These are among the questions you need to address when defining clear objectives of your training programme. These will also help you establish criteria to evaluate your learners’ individual progress.

2. Variety of Assessment Methods

Using a variety of assessment styles would help evaluate learners better as it tests their knowledge in different forms. Utilise a mix of written, oral, and interactive assessment styles for more accurate evaluations.

Read more on How to Use Technology to Create and Conduct Stand Out Online Assessments

3. Personalised Approach

Individuals vary in learning styles and the same goes for assessments. Tailoring assessments to each worker’s preferences will provide the best picture of their progress.

Leveraging Technology for Continuous Assessment

Modern assessment frameworks now include the use of technology and software to aid in student assessment. These platforms can assist evaluators in maintaining unbiased continuous assessments, which shows a better understanding of a learner’s progress throughout the course.

Some ways to leverage technology include:

Using Interactive Learning Management Systems (LMS)

LMS, short for Learning Management Systems, are continuously evolving as the need for educational and training material shifts. Interactive LMS platforms facilitate better learning through engaging content like sketchpads and discussion boards.

Utilising VR Technology in Assessments

Virtual Reality (VR) is now used in workplace assessments as it enables workers to apply their knowledge in a practical setting without the consequences of making mistakes. Utilising VR tech helps to gauge their readiness for the role.

Read more on How Technology is Changing On the Job Training .

Understanding Continuous Assessment for Business Growth

As with every organisation, your goal is to have continuous improvement in your workplace. One of the best ways to achieve this is through continuous assessment. Organisations can deploy ongoing assessments to not only evaluate the skills and knowledge of their workers but to reinforce improvements as well.

Go paperless with your continuous assessments and keep improving your trainees’ performance. Get in touch with us at Cloud Assess and book a free demo today.

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what is continuous assignment in education

What Are Endpoint Assessments? Apprenticeship Guide & Tips

8 holistic assessment examples & how to implement them, what is the ebbinghaus forgetting curve & how to boost memory.

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Does continuous assessment in higher education support student learning?

  • Published: 24 January 2012
  • Volume 64 , pages 489–502, ( 2012 )

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what is continuous assignment in education

  • Rosario Hernández 1  

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A distinction is often made in the literature about “assessment of learning” and “assessment for learning” attributing a formative function to the latter while the former takes a summative function. While there may be disagreements among researchers and educators about such categorical distinctions there is consensus that both types of assessment are often used concurrently in higher education institutions. A question that often arises when formative and summative assessment practices are used in continuous assessment is the extent to which student learning can be facilitated through feedback. The views and perceptions of students and academics from a discipline in the Humanities across seven higher education institutions were sought to examine the above question. A postal survey was completed by academics, along with a survey administered to a sample of undergraduate students and a semi-structured interview was conducted with key academics in each of the seven institutions. This comparative study highlights issues that concern both groups about the extent to which continuous assessment practices facilitate student learning and the challenges faced. The findings illustrate the need to consider more effective and efficient ways in which feedback can be better used to facilitate student learning.

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Acknowledgments

This study was part of a wider PhD research project on practices and perceptions of assessment in undergraduate Hispanic Studies Programmes at Universities in the Republic of Ireland. I would like to thank Dr. Patricia Kieran for her assistance in preparing the graphs for this publication.

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CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT IN EDUCATION: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS

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The National Policy on Education (FRN, 1981) introduced some innovations into the Nigerian educational system. The system, often referred to as the 6-3-3-4 system, came in with a new assessment procedure. It introduced the concept of Continuous Assessment (C.A) in place of the one inherited at independence often referred to as the one-shot kind of evaluation (Denga, 1987 and Okon 1984, cited in Kukwi, 2003). Thus a critical look at the National Policy on Education (FRN, 1995) reveals importance attached to Continuous Assessment. The single shot system was found to have a series of shortcomings. It was observed that, the “one-shot” type was summative in nature, anxiety provoking and teachers taught exclusively for examination (WAEC, 1989, cited in Kukwi, 2003). Various kinds of examination malpractices were also related to the system, since the single examination was the sole determinant of the candidates‟ future. Consequently, the temptation to ensure success by any means was very high (Federal Ministry of Education 1995, cited in Kukwi, 2003). Furthermore it lacked formative evaluation and place high premium on certificate (Ikejani, 1999) and was responsible for the disproportionate school dropouts.

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The focus of this paper is Continuous Assessment in Nigeria; issues and challenges. The paper examines the meaning of continuous assessment, characteristics of continuous assessment, rational for adopting continuous assessment, implementing continuous assessment within school, phases of data collection in continuous assessment. It goes further to highlight keeping and reporting continuous assessment records, characteristics of a good continuous assessment records, implementation problems of continuous assessment, problems of assessing the non-cognitive Domain and the advantages of continuous assessment. Some of the challenges of continuous assessment include; as teachers assessment their own students, one cannot guarantee that the standards are the same across schools. That is so because the assessment instruments may focus on different topics and grading, there is shortage of assessment instruments and many teachers lack the skill of instrument construction, because the scores obtained in different assessments have to be combined, a problem arises as these scores may not be based on the same scale and it is poorly implemented because of the absence of proper monitoring programme among others. In conclusion, continuous assessment if well implemented will go a long was to minimizing the tendency and temptation to ensure success by all means orchestrated by the single final examination.

HENRY OWUSU

The study assessed the usage of effective Continuous Assessment Techniques in reducing examination malpractices in Nigerian schools rather than the use of one shot examination in Ilesa East Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria. The population for the study were teachers (in training and service.) The purposive sampling techniques were used to select the schools and the stratified random samplings were used to select the samples. The samples included 200 participants, consisting 100 males and 100 females Year II students-teacher in training from Osun state College of Education Ilesa and teachers in service in secondary schools. The study used descriptive survey design. The instruments used were Students' Questionnaire on Effective Continuous Assessment Techniques (SQECAT) and the Secondary School Teachers Questionnaire on Effective Continuous Assessment Techniques (SSTQECAT). Two research hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. The hypotheses were tested using simple percentage and independent T-test statistical techniques. The results of the analysis showed that there is a significant difference in students' and teachers' adoption of Continuous Assessment (CA) as an alternative effective technique in reducing examination malpractices in Nigerian schools. On the basis of the results it was recommended among others that it would be better to adopt the effective and proper implementation of the techniques of Continuous Assessment in Schools as an alternative to one shot examination in Nigerian Schools which would help in reducing examination malpractices, make students work harder and make teachers become more innovative

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Designing Assignments for Learning

The rapid shift to remote teaching and learning meant that many instructors reimagined their assessment practices. Whether adapting existing assignments or creatively designing new opportunities for their students to learn, instructors focused on helping students make meaning and demonstrate their learning outside of the traditional, face-to-face classroom setting. This resource distills the elements of assignment design that are important to carry forward as we continue to seek better ways of assessing learning and build on our innovative assignment designs.

On this page:

Rethinking traditional tests, quizzes, and exams.

  • Examples from the Columbia University Classroom
  • Tips for Designing Assignments for Learning

Reflect On Your Assignment Design

Connect with the ctl.

  • Resources and References

what is continuous assignment in education

Cite this resource: Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning (2021). Designing Assignments for Learning. Columbia University. Retrieved [today’s date] from https://ctl.columbia.edu/resources-and-technology/teaching-with-technology/teaching-online/designing-assignments/

Traditional assessments tend to reveal whether students can recognize, recall, or replicate what was learned out of context, and tend to focus on students providing correct responses (Wiggins, 1990). In contrast, authentic assignments, which are course assessments, engage students in higher order thinking, as they grapple with real or simulated challenges that help them prepare for their professional lives, and draw on the course knowledge learned and the skills acquired to create justifiable answers, performances or products (Wiggins, 1990). An authentic assessment provides opportunities for students to practice, consult resources, learn from feedback, and refine their performances and products accordingly (Wiggins 1990, 1998, 2014). 

Authentic assignments ask students to “do” the subject with an audience in mind and apply their learning in a new situation. Examples of authentic assignments include asking students to: 

  • Write for a real audience (e.g., a memo, a policy brief, letter to the editor, a grant proposal, reports, building a website) and/or publication;
  • Solve problem sets that have real world application; 
  • Design projects that address a real world problem; 
  • Engage in a community-partnered research project;
  • Create an exhibit, performance, or conference presentation ;
  • Compile and reflect on their work through a portfolio/e-portfolio.

Noteworthy elements of authentic designs are that instructors scaffold the assignment, and play an active role in preparing students for the tasks assigned, while students are intentionally asked to reflect on the process and product of their work thus building their metacognitive skills (Herrington and Oliver, 2000; Ashford-Rowe, Herrington and Brown, 2013; Frey, Schmitt, and Allen, 2012). 

It’s worth noting here that authentic assessments can initially be time consuming to design, implement, and grade. They are critiqued for being challenging to use across course contexts and for grading reliability issues (Maclellan, 2004). Despite these challenges, authentic assessments are recognized as beneficial to student learning (Svinicki, 2004) as they are learner-centered (Weimer, 2013), promote academic integrity (McLaughlin, L. and Ricevuto, 2021; Sotiriadou et al., 2019; Schroeder, 2021) and motivate students to learn (Ambrose et al., 2010). The Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning is always available to consult with faculty who are considering authentic assessment designs and to discuss challenges and affordances.   

Examples from the Columbia University Classroom 

Columbia instructors have experimented with alternative ways of assessing student learning from oral exams to technology-enhanced assignments. Below are a few examples of authentic assignments in various teaching contexts across Columbia University. 

  • E-portfolios: Statia Cook shares her experiences with an ePorfolio assignment in her co-taught Frontiers of Science course (a submission to the Voices of Hybrid and Online Teaching and Learning initiative); CUIMC use of ePortfolios ;
  • Case studies: Columbia instructors have engaged their students in authentic ways through case studies drawing on the Case Consortium at Columbia University. Read and watch a faculty spotlight to learn how Professor Mary Ann Price uses the case method to place pre-med students in real-life scenarios;
  • Simulations: students at CUIMC engage in simulations to develop their professional skills in The Mary & Michael Jaharis Simulation Center in the Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Helene Fuld Health Trust Simulation Center in the Columbia School of Nursing; 
  • Experiential learning: instructors have drawn on New York City as a learning laboratory such as Barnard’s NYC as Lab webpage which highlights courses that engage students in NYC;
  • Design projects that address real world problems: Yevgeniy Yesilevskiy on the Engineering design projects completed using lab kits during remote learning. Watch Dr. Yesilevskiy talk about his teaching and read the Columbia News article . 
  • Writing assignments: Lia Marshall and her teaching associate Aparna Balasundaram reflect on their “non-disposable or renewable assignments” to prepare social work students for their professional lives as they write for a real audience; and Hannah Weaver spoke about a sandbox assignment used in her Core Literature Humanities course at the 2021 Celebration of Teaching and Learning Symposium . Watch Dr. Weaver share her experiences.  

​Tips for Designing Assignments for Learning

While designing an effective authentic assignment may seem like a daunting task, the following tips can be used as a starting point. See the Resources section for frameworks and tools that may be useful in this effort.  

Align the assignment with your course learning objectives 

Identify the kind of thinking that is important in your course, the knowledge students will apply, and the skills they will practice using through the assignment. What kind of thinking will students be asked to do for the assignment? What will students learn by completing this assignment? How will the assignment help students achieve the desired course learning outcomes? For more information on course learning objectives, see the CTL’s Course Design Essentials self-paced course and watch the video on Articulating Learning Objectives .  

Identify an authentic meaning-making task

For meaning-making to occur, students need to understand the relevance of the assignment to the course and beyond (Ambrose et al., 2010). To Bean (2011) a “meaning-making” or “meaning-constructing” task has two dimensions: 1) it presents students with an authentic disciplinary problem or asks students to formulate their own problems, both of which engage them in active critical thinking, and 2) the problem is placed in “a context that gives students a role or purpose, a targeted audience, and a genre.” (Bean, 2011: 97-98). 

An authentic task gives students a realistic challenge to grapple with, a role to take on that allows them to “rehearse for the complex ambiguities” of life, provides resources and supports to draw on, and requires students to justify their work and the process they used to inform their solution (Wiggins, 1990). Note that if students find an assignment interesting or relevant, they will see value in completing it. 

Consider the kind of activities in the real world that use the knowledge and skills that are the focus of your course. How is this knowledge and these skills applied to answer real-world questions to solve real-world problems? (Herrington et al., 2010: 22). What do professionals or academics in your discipline do on a regular basis? What does it mean to think like a biologist, statistician, historian, social scientist? How might your assignment ask students to draw on current events, issues, or problems that relate to the course and are of interest to them? How might your assignment tap into student motivation and engage them in the kinds of thinking they can apply to better understand the world around them? (Ambrose et al., 2010). 

Determine the evaluation criteria and create a rubric

To ensure equitable and consistent grading of assignments across students, make transparent the criteria you will use to evaluate student work. The criteria should focus on the knowledge and skills that are central to the assignment. Build on the criteria identified, create a rubric that makes explicit the expectations of deliverables and share this rubric with your students so they can use it as they work on the assignment. For more information on rubrics, see the CTL’s resource Incorporating Rubrics into Your Grading and Feedback Practices , and explore the Association of American Colleges & Universities VALUE Rubrics (Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education). 

Build in metacognition

Ask students to reflect on what and how they learned from the assignment. Help students uncover personal relevance of the assignment, find intrinsic value in their work, and deepen their motivation by asking them to reflect on their process and their assignment deliverable. Sample prompts might include: what did you learn from this assignment? How might you draw on the knowledge and skills you used on this assignment in the future? See Ambrose et al., 2010 for more strategies that support motivation and the CTL’s resource on Metacognition ). 

Provide students with opportunities to practice

Design your assignment to be a learning experience and prepare students for success on the assignment. If students can reasonably expect to be successful on an assignment when they put in the required effort ,with the support and guidance of the instructor, they are more likely to engage in the behaviors necessary for learning (Ambrose et al., 2010). Ensure student success by actively teaching the knowledge and skills of the course (e.g., how to problem solve, how to write for a particular audience), modeling the desired thinking, and creating learning activities that build up to a graded assignment. Provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills they will need for the assignment, whether through low-stakes in-class activities or homework activities that include opportunities to receive and incorporate formative feedback. For more information on providing feedback, see the CTL resource Feedback for Learning . 

Communicate about the assignment 

Share the purpose, task, audience, expectations, and criteria for the assignment. Students may have expectations about assessments and how they will be graded that is informed by their prior experiences completing high-stakes assessments, so be transparent. Tell your students why you are asking them to do this assignment, what skills they will be using, how it aligns with the course learning outcomes, and why it is relevant to their learning and their professional lives (i.e., how practitioners / professionals use the knowledge and skills in your course in real world contexts and for what purposes). Finally, verify that students understand what they need to do to complete the assignment. This can be done by asking students to respond to poll questions about different parts of the assignment, a “scavenger hunt” of the assignment instructions–giving students questions to answer about the assignment and having them work in small groups to answer the questions, or by having students share back what they think is expected of them.

Plan to iterate and to keep the focus on learning 

Draw on multiple sources of data to help make decisions about what changes are needed to the assignment, the assignment instructions, and/or rubric to ensure that it contributes to student learning. Explore assignment performance data. As Deandra Little reminds us: “a really good assignment, which is a really good assessment, also teaches you something or tells the instructor something. As much as it tells you what students are learning, it’s also telling you what they aren’t learning.” ( Teaching in Higher Ed podcast episode 337 ). Assignment bottlenecks–where students get stuck or struggle–can be good indicators that students need further support or opportunities to practice prior to completing an assignment. This awareness can inform teaching decisions. 

Triangulate the performance data by collecting student feedback, and noting your own reflections about what worked well and what did not. Revise the assignment instructions, rubric, and teaching practices accordingly. Consider how you might better align your assignment with your course objectives and/or provide more opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that they will rely on for the assignment. Additionally, keep in mind societal, disciplinary, and technological changes as you tweak your assignments for future use. 

Now is a great time to reflect on your practices and experiences with assignment design and think critically about your approach. Take a closer look at an existing assignment. Questions to consider include: What is this assignment meant to do? What purpose does it serve? Why do you ask students to do this assignment? How are they prepared to complete the assignment? Does the assignment assess the kind of learning that you really want? What would help students learn from this assignment? 

Using the tips in the previous section: How can the assignment be tweaked to be more authentic and meaningful to students? 

As you plan forward for post-pandemic teaching and reflect on your practices and reimagine your course design, you may find the following CTL resources helpful: Reflecting On Your Experiences with Remote Teaching , Transition to In-Person Teaching , and Course Design Support .

The Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) is here to help!

For assistance with assignment design, rubric design, or any other teaching and learning need, please request a consultation by emailing [email protected]

Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TILT) framework for assignments. The TILT Examples and Resources page ( https://tilthighered.com/tiltexamplesandresources ) includes example assignments from across disciplines, as well as a transparent assignment template and a checklist for designing transparent assignments . Each emphasizes the importance of articulating to students the purpose of the assignment or activity, the what and how of the task, and specifying the criteria that will be used to assess students. 

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) offers VALUE ADD (Assignment Design and Diagnostic) tools ( https://www.aacu.org/value-add-tools ) to help with the creation of clear and effective assignments that align with the desired learning outcomes and associated VALUE rubrics (Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education). VALUE ADD encourages instructors to explicitly state assignment information such as the purpose of the assignment, what skills students will be using, how it aligns with course learning outcomes, the assignment type, the audience and context for the assignment, clear evaluation criteria, desired formatting, and expectations for completion whether individual or in a group.

Villarroel et al. (2017) propose a blueprint for building authentic assessments which includes four steps: 1) consider the workplace context, 2) design the authentic assessment; 3) learn and apply standards for judgement; and 4) give feedback. 

References 

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., & DiPietro, M. (2010). Chapter 3: What Factors Motivate Students to Learn? In How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching . Jossey-Bass. 

Ashford-Rowe, K., Herrington, J., and Brown, C. (2013). Establishing the critical elements that determine authentic assessment. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education. 39(2), 205-222, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2013.819566 .  

Bean, J.C. (2011). Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom . Second Edition. Jossey-Bass. 

Frey, B. B, Schmitt, V. L., and Allen, J. P. (2012). Defining Authentic Classroom Assessment. Practical Assessment, Research, and Evaluation. 17(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.7275/sxbs-0829  

Herrington, J., Reeves, T. C., and Oliver, R. (2010). A Guide to Authentic e-Learning . Routledge. 

Herrington, J. and Oliver, R. (2000). An instructional design framework for authentic learning environments. Educational Technology Research and Development, 48(3), 23-48. 

Litchfield, B. C. and Dempsey, J. V. (2015). Authentic Assessment of Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes. New Directions for Teaching and Learning. 142 (Summer 2015), 65-80. 

Maclellan, E. (2004). How convincing is alternative assessment for use in higher education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education. 29(3), June 2004. DOI: 10.1080/0260293042000188267

McLaughlin, L. and Ricevuto, J. (2021). Assessments in a Virtual Environment: You Won’t Need that Lockdown Browser! Faculty Focus. June 2, 2021. 

Mueller, J. (2005). The Authentic Assessment Toolbox: Enhancing Student Learning through Online Faculty Development . MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching. 1(1). July 2005. Mueller’s Authentic Assessment Toolbox is available online. 

Schroeder, R. (2021). Vaccinate Against Cheating With Authentic Assessment . Inside Higher Ed. (February 26, 2021).  

Sotiriadou, P., Logan, D., Daly, A., and Guest, R. (2019). The role of authentic assessment to preserve academic integrity and promote skills development and employability. Studies in Higher Education. 45(111), 2132-2148. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1582015    

Stachowiak, B. (Host). (November 25, 2020). Authentic Assignments with Deandra Little. (Episode 337). In Teaching in Higher Ed . https://teachinginhighered.com/podcast/authentic-assignments/  

Svinicki, M. D. (2004). Authentic Assessment: Testing in Reality. New Directions for Teaching and Learning. 100 (Winter 2004): 23-29. 

Villarroel, V., Bloxham, S, Bruna, D., Bruna, C., and Herrera-Seda, C. (2017). Authentic assessment: creating a blueprint for course design. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education. 43(5), 840-854. https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2017.1412396    

Weimer, M. (2013). Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice . Second Edition. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. 

Wiggins, G. (2014). Authenticity in assessment, (re-)defined and explained. Retrieved from https://grantwiggins.wordpress.com/2014/01/26/authenticity-in-assessment-re-defined-and-explained/

Wiggins, G. (1998). Teaching to the (Authentic) Test. Educational Leadership . April 1989. 41-47. 

Wiggins, Grant (1990). The Case for Authentic Assessment . Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation , 2(2). 

Wondering how AI tools might play a role in your course assignments?

See the CTL’s resource “Considerations for AI Tools in the Classroom.”

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Celebrating 150 years of Harvard Summer School. Learn about our history.

Why Celebrating Small Wins Matters

Keep up your momentum by acknowledging and rewarding yourself for each step forward.

Melissa Russell

Many of us tend to celebrate life’s big wins: graduation, marriage, a first big job, or buying our first home. But accomplishing big projects successfully requires many small steps along the way.

It can be difficult to see the bigger picture when you’re working toward a long-term goal. Recognizing small wins along the way is not only an important part of making progress, but can also help keep you motivated.

We don’t always celebrate those small steps as the wins they are, but they are necessary to keep the big wins coming. So, how do we celebrate our small wins?

What Is a “Small Win?”

There is a 5th-century Chinese proverb, “A journey of 1,000 miles starts with a single step.” There’s a reason that has stood the test of time! A journey of 1,000 miles can feel so overwhelming that you may never begin it.

A small step is a win because it creates momentum that will propel you toward your bigger goals. Breaking projects into small steps can also reduce fear, clarify direction, and increase the probability of future success.

What are small wins? If you are trying to improve your health, getting up a little earlier to take a walk is a small win. Going to the gym after school or work is a small win. Choosing a nutritious option at a restaurant is a small win. Each of these achievements brings you a little closer to your long-term goal. While small wins might not feel like much at the time, with consistency and persistence, they will lead you toward a larger, more ambitious accomplishment. They are worthy of celebration because small wins are building blocks for future success.

What Are the Benefits of Celebrating “Small” Accomplishments?

Celebrating small wins can boost your mood and improve confidence in your accomplishments, keeping you motivated as you pursue a larger goal. It helps you form good habits, like healthful eating or consistent study habits, and proves you can take on challenges.

Setbacks in life are common , especially when dealing with complex problems, so celebrating the small wins will help you see that long-term achievement doesn’t always happen in a linear way. If you suffer a setback but can acknowledge even a small advance, that can be enough to keep you on track.

By celebrating small wins, you can hone skills such as maintaining focus, goal setting , prioritizing, and organizing, which can lead to greater self-confidence and self-esteem . Celebrating each small step creates a sense of purpose as you navigate life’s challenges, whether big or small.  Leveraging quick wins can also inspire and motivate others . If you are working on a project as part of a team, celebrating these milestones can create a culture of encouragement and help prevent burnout.

How Can You Recognize Achieving a Small Win?

You can recognize small wins in multiple ways. If you spent an hour filling out a summer program application, reward yourself! There is no one “best” way to acknowledge smaller steps along the way to larger goals, but here are a few ideas:

  • Track progress for a mental boost in a journal, spreadsheet, or app. Crossing items off the list is often a reward unto itself! 
  • Treat yourself with a small reward, even if it is just a 5 minute break to get some fresh air.
  • Share your win with friends, family, or colleagues.
  • Have both a short- and long-term plan toward larger goals, such as setting smaller milestones along the way.
  • Aim for progress, not perfection.

If you are working as part of a team, acknowledgment during a meeting shares group success with all the team members. Recognition can also be more formalized, such as a post on social media, sharing your success with a wider audience.

How Can You Achieve Greater Success?

One way to stay on track is to establish SMART goals . SMART is an acronym for effective steps to set and achieve goals, and can help you practice goal setting :

  • Specific: Make sure goals are clear and well-defined.
  • Measurable: You should define what you consider completion, so you’re not chasing a never-ending goal.
  • Attainable: Set a goal that is challenging but reasonably within reach.
  • Realistic: Consider resources available and time constraints as you set reasonable, attainable goals.
  • Time-bound: If a goal has a date attached, you are more likely to achieve it. If it is a big goal, break it down into those small wins to help you stay on track as you move toward that ultimate prize. 

Here are a few other ways to keep the momentum going:

  • Learn from the steps along the way — what did the small wins teach you?
  • Have fun — it is much easier to reach your goal when you are enjoying the journey! 
  • Think positively and seek support if you are feeling discouraged. 
  • Change your perspective — turn a challenging situation into a better one by refocusing.
  • Take away distractions — turn off your phone and put it in another room! Same for the computer and/or TV.

Most importantly, keep learning! Whether you are in high school or college, Harvard Summer School has courses that can help you build valuable skills such as programming, communication, and public speaking and propel you toward accomplishing your goals.

If you are a highly motivated and passionate learner who enjoys being challenged, you may find success through Harvard Summer School. Programs help students develop a wide variety of skills, including time management, building connections, and others that will help smooth the transition to college and work life.

Registering definitely counts as a small win!

Accomplish your goals with Harvard’s summer programs for high school students

About the Author

Melissa Russell is an award-winning journalist and editor living in the Boston area. She has written for many news outlets as well as for websites, trade publications and other platforms.

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Graduates Transforming Law Enforcement

what is continuous assignment in education

Beverly Hills Police Department officers, Lieutenant Jesse Perez and Captain Giovanni Trejo, returned to the classroom during the pandemic to reshape the future of law enforcement.

Trejo researched organizational change in law enforcement at the top ranks, while Trejo focused on drone technology in policing — both a reflection of their unwavering commitment to excellence and the communities they serve. The pair recently earned education doctoral degrees in organizational leadership.

Captain Trejo’s academic journey began in 2020 during the unprecedented challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Reflecting on his experience, Trejo said the program was challenging with virtual learning and intense weekend Zoom sessions, testing his patience and determination at times.

“Two things that helped me get through the program were my love and appreciation for law enforcement. Our communities deserve the best. Anything below the mark of excellence is simply a disservice to them. That mark of excellence was my target when I embarked on this venture. Commitment to public service propelled me and got me to where I am today.”

Trejo’s dissertation was on “Organizational Change in Law Enforcement: Exploring the Use of Change Management Practices of Police Executives Adopting Less Traditional Patrol Procedures.” While he looked at police chiefs and how they connected to the community, he hopes all officers can find inspiration in building bridges and meaningful dialogue.

Perez, a patrol lieutenant watch commander and SWAT/CNT commander, used his 21 years of experience and hands-on work to delve into the transformative potential of drone technology in modern policing. His doctoral research is titled “Law Enforcement and Advanced Drone Technology: A Comprehensive Inside Look at the Use and Implementation of Law Enforcement Drone Technology and Its Effect on Officer Safety, Police Culture, and Public Perception.”

The study offers invaluable insights as law enforcement faces challenges such as losing confidence in government institutions, recruitment and retention issues, community trust, legal changes, and technological advancements. He emphasizes that technology, when used legally, ethically, and morally, can be a significant ‘force multiplier’ in 21st-century policing. He advocates for the responsible use of drone technology to enhance officer safety, gather intelligence, reconstruct crime scenes, search for missing persons, and support SWAT operations. Lieutenant Perez’s vision includes integrating drone technology in partnership with the community to promote transparency, accountability, and legitimacy in law enforcement. His work highlights the importance of using technology as a tool to assist law enforcement, not as a replacement for police personnel.

The officers’ achievement and work garnered recognition from Beverly Hills Police Chief Mark G. Stainbrook and the local paper.

Congratulations Captain Trejo and Lieutenant Perez!

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School of Continuing Education – Administrative Assistant II – Search and Screen Committee, 05/31/2024

School of Continuing Education – Administrative Assistant II – Search and Screen Committee See Microsoft Teams Link Below, 11:00 am Purpose of Meeting: Microsoft Teams Link to join the meeting now Meeting ID: 291 639 682 103 Passcode: UMWF7D ________________________________________ Dial in by phone +1 414-253-8850,,478601703# United States, Milwaukee Find a local number Phone conference ID: 478 601 703#

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what is continuous assignment in education

what is continuous assignment in education

Rep. Stefanik files misconduct complaint against Judge Juan Merchan over ‘random’ assignment to Trump’s NYC trial

R ep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY) filed a misconduct complaint Tuesday against the judge overseeing Donald Trump’s Manhattan hush money trial, alleging that his selection to handle the former president’s case — and others involving his allies — is “not random at all.” 

The House Republican Conference chairwoman’s complaint with the inspector general of the New York State Unified Court System called for an investigation into Justice Juan Merchan “to determine whether the required random selection process was in fact followed.” 

“The potential misconduct pertains to the repeated assignment of Acting Justice Juan Merchan, a Democrat Party donor, to criminal cases related to President Donald J. Trump and his allies,” Stefanik wrote.

“Acting Justice Merchan currently presides over the criminal case against President Trump brought by Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg,” she said.

“Acting Justice Merchan also presided over the criminal trial against the Trump Organization and will be presiding over the criminal trial of Steve Bannon, a senior advisor in President Trump’s White House and a prominent advocate for President Trump,” Stefanik continued, noting that there were at least two dozen sitting justices eligible to oversee the cases but Merchan – an acting jurist – was selected for all three related to the presumptive 2024 GOP nominee for president and his allies. 

“If justices were indeed being randomly assigned in the Criminal Term, the probability of two specific criminal cases being assigned to the same justice is quite low, and the probability of three specific criminal cases being assigned to the same justice is infinitesimally small. And yet, we see Acting Justice Merchan on all three cases,” Stefanik argued.

The congresswoman also highlighted the judge’s political donations, for which he was cleared of misconduct last July by the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct. 

Merchan contributed $15 earmarked for the “Biden for President” campaign on July 26, 2020, and then the following day made $10 contributions to the Progressive Turnout Project and Stop Republicans each, Federal Election Commission records show

The donations were made through ActBlue, the Democratic Party’s preferred online fundraising platform. 

The Progressive Turnout Project’s stated mission is to “rally Democrats to vote,” according to the group’s website. 

Stop Republicans is a subsidiary of the Progressive Turnout Project and describes itself as “a grassroots-funded effort dedicated to resisting the Republican Party and Donald Trump’s radical right-wing legacy.”

The judge’s daughter, Loren Merchan, is more involved in Democratic politics – through her work as head of the consulting firm Authentic Campaigns — and Stefanik argued in her missive that Loren Merchan’s “firm stands to profit greatly if Donald Trump is convicted.” 

“One cannot help but suspect that the ‘random selection’ at work in the assignment of Acting Justice Merchan, a Democrat Party donor, to these cases involving prominent Republicans, is in fact not random at all,” the New York Republican lawmaker wrote. 

Stefanik demanded an investigation into the “anomaly” and asked that anyone found to be involved in any sort of “scheme” to get Merchan on the three cases face discipline. 

Rep. Stefanik files misconduct complaint against Judge Juan Merchan over ‘random’ assignment to Trump’s NYC trial

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Continuous assessment

Continuous assessment means assessing aspects of learners' language throughout their course and then producing a final evaluation result from these assessments.

Students in Vietnam working together

It can be compared with a final or summative assessment, which only assesses the learner at the end of the course. Continuous assessment often provides a more accurate and complete picture of the learner's level and has a positive impact on learning.

Example The learners are giving mini-presentations on their favourite films as a follow-up activity after reading about the history of cinema. The teacher evaluates their presentations and uses the results as part of their final result.

In the classroom Continuous assessment can be made more relevant and motivating by asking the learners to decide which assignments and tasks will be assessed during the course.

Further links:

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/assessment

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/testing-assessment

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/ongoing-assessment-fun-not-fear

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what is continuous assignment in education

PURSUE YOUR GREATNESS

Our goal is to help you achieve yours.

We pride ourselves in providing every Airman with unsurpassed educational opportunities so they can become the best versions of themselves. We invest time and resources to fuel innovation and help you reach your highest potential.

Enlisted Airmen have a wide range of educational and professional opportunities to take advantage of.

Education Programs

01 enlisted college loan repayment program (eclrp).

The ECLRP allows Active Duty Airman to earn 33 ⅓ percent (a maximum of $21,664.50) of their unpaid principal loan balance each year for three years. Loan repayment will be made after each successful year of service, beginning on the date of enlistment.

02 PROFESSIONAL OFFICER COURSE-EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM (POC-ERP)

Active Duty Airmen can take advantage of the POC-ERP to enter Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC). Those who are selected will become full-time students at a participating college to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Upon graduation and completion of the two-year program, participants will be commissioned as Second Lieutenants and returned to Active Duty for at least four years.

03 THE LEAD PROGRAM

The LEAD program is an ongoing effort to give our best and brightest Airmen the opportunity to earn a college degree at the Air Force Academy and Academy Prep School. Unit and wing commanders nominate Airmen to fill the 170 available appointments each year.

04 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF THE AIR FORCE

When you join the Air Force with a high school diploma or GED, you automatically begin earning credits toward an associate degree in applied science so you can advance in your career while expanding your education.

Scolarship and Loans

01 scholarships for outstanding airmen to rotc (soar).

Enlisted Airmen who strive to attend or complete college may apply to the SOAR program. Up to 50 people can be nominated for two- to four-year ROTC scholarships that cover most tuition and all fees. Those who are accepted will temporarily separate from the Air Force while completing their degree and rejoin upon graduation.

02 THE AIRMAN SCHOLARSHIP AND COMMISSIONS PROGRAM (ASCP)

This program gives Active Duty, enlisted Airmen the opportunity to earn a commission while completing their bachelor’s degree. Those selected temporarily separate from Active Duty Air Force to join ROTC and become a full-time student at a participating college. Participants receive tuition and fees scholarships for up to $15,000 per year and a textbook allowance of $600 per year.

03 THE AIR FORCE TUITION ASSISTANCE (TA)

This program is designed to help Active Duty personnel pursue voluntary, off-duty educational opportunities. Currently, the program pays 100 percent (up to $250 per semester hour or equivalent) of the cost of college tuition with a limit of $4,500 per fiscal year.

There are a few paths you can take to become an Officer in the Air Force and many educational and professional benefits to explore from there.

Education programs

01 air force rotc.

Air Force ROTC is a scholarship program available at nearly 1,000 colleges and universities across the country. The program can help you study at the college of your choice while earning money for school and preparing to be an Officer in the Air Force after graduation. For the most up-to-date information, visit the official Air Force ROTC website.

02 THE AIR FORCE academy

The prestigious Air Force Academy is a university that offers world-class education, leadership training and cost-free tuition in exchange for your commitment to serve in the Air Force or Space Force. For the most complete information on how to prepare and apply, visit the Academy Admissions website .

03 officer training school

Civilians and prior-service Airmen with college degrees can take part in this nine-week program to become an Officer in the Air Force. You’ll be challenged physically and mentally while gaining the skills needed to be a leader in the Air Force. Learn more on the Officer Training School page.

04 AFIT’S AIR FORCE GRADUATE SCHOOL FOR ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT

AFIT’s Air Force Graduate School for Engineering and Management is among the nation’s top engineering schools and enables officers to earn a master’s degree or Ph.D. in one of more than 20 areas of specialization.

05 AFIT CENTER FOR CYBERSPACE RESEARCH (CCR)

Helping train and equip warriors of the future for the cyber domain, this program conducts defense-focused research at the graduate level. This forward-looking center responds to the changing educational and research needs of the Air Force, the Department of Defense and the federal government.

06 AFIT’S CIVILIAN INSTITUTION PROGRAM

AFIT’s Civilian Institution program enables officers to pursue specializations not available at AFIT by attending one of more than 400 world-renowned universities, research centers, hospitals and industrial organizations.

07 SQUADRON OFFICER SCHOOL (SOS)

Officers can step out of their current specialty and focus on becoming a more effective leader through this program. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the Air Force’s core values and strengthen their leadership skills through classes and field exercises, experiencing firsthand how their skills as a leader directly influence the success of an entire group of Airmen.

08 THE AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (AFit)

The Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) allows Air Force Officers to pursue graduate studies as a full-time active duty assignment. Located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, AFIT is a world leader in defense technological education, research and consultation and is the Air Force’s graduate school of engineering and management as well as its institution for professional continuing education.

01 THE RESIDENCY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Medical and dental professionals can complete their residency without financial worry through the Residency Financial Assistance program. Those selected will receive more than $45,000 for every year they participate in the program as well as a stipend of over $2,000 per month to cover living expenses. Upon completion of residency, participants complete one year of service in the Air Force for each year of participation, plus one extra year. Contact your health professions recruiter for qualification and benefit information.

02 THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

Students who wish to pursue a healthcare career can earn financial assistance through the Health Professions Scholarship Program. This scholarship covers all tuition and required fees, including textbooks, small equipment and supplies as well as a monthly allowance for living expenses. Studies funded include one- and two-year programs for Biomedical Science Corps specialties (pharmacists, optometrists, clinical psychologists and public health officers), two- and three-year programs for Nurse Corps specialties and three- and four-year programs for Medical Corps and Dental Corps.

A career in healthcare can be expensive, but the Air Force provides a variety of scholarships and training programs to help you not only achieve your goals but advance them too.

01 THE ALLIED HEALTH INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

The Allied Health Internship Program offers several internship opportunities at Air Force medical facilities. The program allows participants to become interns in practice areas such as Clinical Psychology, Audiology, Clinical Social Worker, Dietetic and more. Contact your health professions recruiter for qualification and benefit information.

02 THE AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (AFIT)

The Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) allows Air Force Officers to pursue graduate studies as a full-time, active-duty assignment. Located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, AFIT is a world leader in defense technological education, research and consultation and is the Air Force’s graduate school of engineering and management as well as its institution for professional continuing education.

03 THE PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT TRAINING PROGRAM

Physician Assistants are an in-demand and highly respected career within the Air Force. Active Duty Airmen can apply to the Physician Assistant Training program. The qualified individuals accepted into the program will receive the advanced training they need to provide expert medical care to military personnel and their families.

04 HEALTHCARE CONTINUING EDUCATION (HCE)

Healthcare Continuing Education (HCE) is critical to the success of the Air Force mission. We support healthcare career development with mentorship opportunities and humanitarian missions around the world through funding and scheduling that allows for continuing study. Specific education and training opportunities are available for physicians, nurses and dentists.

05 THE NURSE ENLISTED COMMISSIONING PROGRAM (NECP)

The program offers Active Duty Airmen an opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree in nursing to eventually become a Nurse in the Air Force. Participating students remain on Active Duty and continue to receive an income while going to school full time at a college or university that participates in ROTC. Participants receive tuition help for up to $15,000 per year, as well as a textbook allowance of $600 per year.

Pursue and advance your law career with the support of scholarships and advanced training.

01 THE AIR FORCE JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL’S SCHOOL

JAGs seeking to expand their knowledge in different areas of practice, become more specialized in their field or earn Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credits are encouraged to participate in the Air Force Judge Advocate General’s School. The school offers classroom courses and monthly webcasts that cover a wide variety of advanced topics.

02 MILITARY EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT

JAGs have multiple Military Education Development opportunities available to them, including Squadron Officers College, Air Command and Staff College and Air War College.

03 OTHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

There are a variety of professional development opportunities available to JAGs, including submitting professional papers and articles to The Air Force Law Review or The Reporter (published by the Judge Advocate General’s Corps) or participating in programs by the National Institute for Trial Advocacy (NITA).

04 THE AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (AFIT)

01 the judge advocate student loan repayment program (ja-slrp).

This program enables eligible JAGs to apply for up to $65,000 toward student loan repayment. Payments are made directly to a qualified lender over a three-year period, beginning once you have completed your first year of service as a JAG officer.

02 THE MASTER OF LAWS (LL.M.) PROGRAMS

This is a tuition-free option for pursuing an advanced degree in specialties such as Government Contract Law, Environmental Law, Labor Law, Cyber Law, Air and Space Law or International Law. While obtaining an advanced degree, participants receive full tuition, fees and a book allowance from the Air Force while continuing to serve on Active Duty with full pay, allowances and other benefits. After completing the program, participants receive an assignment that utilizes their advanced legal education.

Pursue your higher calling with the Air Force’s support.

01 THE AIR FORCE RESERVE CHAPLAIN CORPS

The Air Force Reserve Chaplain Corps offers three avenues of service to the Air Force. The first enables ministry professionals to serve with a local reserve unit and train one weekend a month. The second commits you to serve 12 days on annual tour and 12 in a chapel on an Active Duty base. The final option is the Chaplain Candidate program tailored to students. All options come with the flexibility and benefits found in the Air Force Reserve.

02 THE CHAPLAIN CANDIDATE PROGRAM

Seminary and religious school students who are interested in Air Force service can apply to the Chaplain Candidate program. Candidates collaborate with an Air Force chapel team during summer tours of active duty. Upon graduation and obtaining an ecclesiastical endorsement, chaplain candidates are eligible for reappointment as a Chaplain in the Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard or Active Duty component.

03 THE CHAPLAIN LEAVE OF ABSENCE PROGRAM

The Chaplain Leave of Absence program enables authorized chaplain officers to take up to 15 days each year to attend a spiritual retreat, ecclesiastical conference or to consult with ecclesiastical superiors, such as meeting with your endorser.

TAKE YOUR SKILLS FARTHER

The advanced training and leadership skills you’ll gain in the Air Force will help you beyond your career as an Airman in whatever future goals you set. Whether you go on to pursue work in the civilian sector or would like to explore other ways to serve in the Air Force, your experience will make you a competitive candidate.

what is continuous assignment in education

YOUR HARD WORK WILL PAY OFF

  • THE AIR FORCE TUITION ASSISTANCE (TA) The Air Force Tuition Assistance (TA) program is designed to help active duty personnel pursue voluntary, off-duty educational opportunities. Currently, the program pays 100 percent (up to $250 per semester hour or equivalent) of the cost of college tuition with a limit of $4,500 per fiscal year. Courses and degree programs may be academic or technical and can be taken from two- or four-year institutions on base, off base or by correspondence.

Eligible, active duty Airmen can receive up to 36 months of benefits for education and training opportunities outside of the Air Force through the Post-9/11 GI Bill. These benefits may be used for undergraduate and graduate degree programs, vocational and technical training, tutorial assistance, books, supplies and monthly housing. Generally, benefits are payable for 15 years following release from active duty and may be transferred to spouses or dependent children.

A veteran benefit program, the Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) was created to assist military members in paying for college. Eligible, enlisted Airmen may receive up to 36 months of benefits for education and training opportunities outside of the Air Force. These benefits may be used for degree and certificate programs, flight training, apprenticeship or on-the-job training and correspondence courses. Generally, benefits are payable for 10 years following release from active duty.

QUESTIONS? WE HAVE ANSWERS.

Learn a trade.

The Air Force provides top training in hundreds of different careers. Build skills from scratch or strengthen ones you already have while earning incredible benefits. In addition to valuable skills, you can also earn an enlistment bonus of up to $55,000 across a wide range of careers.

what is continuous assignment in education

WAYS TO SERVE AND GROW IN YOUR FIELD

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PUT YOUR SKILLS TO WORK

what is continuous assignment in education

EARN MORE THAN A PAYCHECK

We’re ready for you.

Whether you have specific questions about how to join the Air Force, are seeking more information or are ready to apply, we’re here to help.

  • Find a Recruiter
  • 1-800-423-USAF

HEIGHT AND WEIGHT STANDARDS

COMMENTS

  1. Understanding Continuous Assessment in Education

    Continuous assessment is a method of evaluating students' learning progress and achievements throughout a course or academic year. Unlike traditional assessments that rely heavily on final exams or standardized tests, continuous assessment involves ongoing evaluation through various means such as quizzes, projects, presentations, and homework assignments.

  2. Continuous assessment

    Continuous assessment is a form of educational examination that evaluates a student's progress throughout a prescribed course. It is often used as an alternative to the final examination system. Proponents of continuous assessment argue that the approach allows tracking of progress and has a chance of offering students more support, guidance, and opportunities to improve during the course or ...

  3. PDF The Essence 1 of Continuous Assessment

    Continuous assessment is formative by nature. The key here is that the collection of data about students' understanding of concepts, and their practice of the processes and habits of mind of science happens while the students are engaged in learning. When these data are used by teachers to make decisions about next steps for a student or ...

  4. (PDF) Continuous Assessment: Concept and Techniques

    Continuous assessment data must therefore be carefully kept on permanent record of each student to establish a cumulative record of the student's educational development and to make it possible ...

  5. Importance of Continuous Assessment

    Continuous assessment plays a crucial role in improving performance and development. They motivate students and trainees to make immediate improvements by offering real-time feedback while fostering a culture of continuous improvement. Summative assessment methods, however, don't provide a complete picture of a learner's progress.

  6. PDF GUIDELINES FOR CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT

    Continuous assessment is an alternative to the traditional assessment model that operates in many university contexts (i.e. assessment tasks contribute to a semester/ year mark and then students take a final end-of-semester or end-of-year examination).

  7. Continuous assessment

    Continuous assessment means assessing aspects of learners' language throughout their course and then producing a final evaluation result from these assessments. It can be compared with a final or summative assessment, which only assesses the learner at the end of the course. Continuous assessment often provides a more accurate and complete ...

  8. Continuous assessment

    We distinguish six forms of continuous assessment: Participation. The assessment of such aspects as effort, enthusiasm, showing initiative, asking/answering questions, participation during discussions, submission of assignments, participation during exercises or practicals. Knowledge and skills. Determining whether students have mastered the ...

  9. PDF Effective Implementation of Continuous Assessment in Schools for

    One of the distinctive features of the new national policy on education is its emphasis on continuous assessment. Educational research however, also, ensures that relevant data are generated for decision-making in ... patterns of continuous assessment e.g. tests, assignment, debates and so on. 3. Continuous assessment must be spaced, which ...

  10. Does continuous assessment in higher education support ...

    A distinction is often made in the literature about "assessment of learning" and "assessment for learning" attributing a formative function to the latter while the former takes a summative function. While there may be disagreements among researchers and educators about such categorical distinctions there is consensus that both types of assessment are often used concurrently in higher ...

  11. PDF CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT: SCOPE AND RELEVANCE Abstract

    Continuous assessment according to the Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (1985) can be defined as: A mechanism whereby the final grading of a student in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains of behavior takes account of all his performances during a given period of schooling.

  12. Full article: Explaining individual student success using continuous

    Continuous assessment in higher education can be used to improve student learning (e.g., Rezaei, Citation 2015) as well as student engagement (e.g., Holmes, Citation 2015). ... The three levels were written assignments, partial exam and mandatory homework assignments. The same four between-subject variables as in the previous analysis were ...

  13. CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT IN EDUCATION: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS

    The National Steering Committee on Continuous Assessment in Nigerian Schools regards continuous assessment as a method of ascertaining what a child gains from schooling in terms of knowledge, industry and character development, taking into account all his/her performances in tests, assignments, projects and other educational activities during a ...

  14. Full article: Continuous assessment fit for purpose? Analysing the

    Donald's advice is aligned with the advice given by the Council on Higher Education that assessment is "more authentic when it directly answers how well a student is able to perform tasks that are intentionally demanding and reflective of the real world in which such students will one day operate" (Council on Higher Education, Citation ...

  15. PDF The Practice of Continuous Assessment in Primary Schools: The Case of

    Developing harmonized continuous assessment policy or guideline is forwarded to the government as recommendation. 1. Introduction. Nowadays, in the world of education, continuous assessment has been recognized as an integral part of everyday classroom instruction and a key tool to ensure quality learning.

  16. (PDF) CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT 2019

    Continuous assessment entails careful keeping of records on the pupils, continuously and systematically. It takes into consideration the termly or periodic performances of students in assignments ...

  17. Full article: Is continuous assessment inclusive? An analysis of

    The role of assessment in higher education is complex, and it has been described as a central component of the student experience (Brown and Knight 1994). ... refers to including one or more assignments during the course in addition to (or instead of) the final examination (e.g. Day et al. Citation 2018a). The continuous assessments could be ...

  18. Assessing learning: continuous assessment versus final examinations

    In continuous assessment every assignment is handed back to the student once it has been marked. Assignments, when returned, form the basis of tutorials and thus serve a teaching and learning purpose. Feedback can be provided at a time when it is useful, students can learn from their mistakes or derive comfort from the knowledge that they are ...

  19. (PDF) QUALITY ASSURANCE IN CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT: A ...

    Whereas, Continuous Assessment is an innovative attempt to improve the quality of education, expand the domain of education standard and enhance education input-output process.

  20. PDF Building a Culture of Continuous Improvement

    Continuous improvement often requires simultaneous changes in two key areas: 1) content and process related to the innovation and 2) organizational shifts around learning and collaboration. Building capacity of key staff members to manage the change process is an integral aspect of continuous improvement.

  21. Designing Assignments for Learning

    Designing Assignments for Learning. The rapid shift to remote teaching and learning meant that many instructors reimagined their assessment practices. Whether adapting existing assignments or creatively designing new opportunities for their students to learn, instructors focused on helping students make meaning and demonstrate their learning ...

  22. Continuous Assignment

    continuous-assignment, SystemVerilog. Naveenkb May 16, 2019, 3:12pm 1. What is the difference between continuous assignment and procedural continuous assignment? Don't they both use 'assign' keyword to make assignment? dave_59 May 16, 2019, 4:18pm 2. In reply to Naveenkb:

  23. Why Celebrating Small Wins Matters

    Celebrating small wins can boost your mood and improve confidence in your accomplishments, keeping you motivated as you pursue a larger goal. It helps you form good habits, like healthful eating or consistent study habits, and proves you can take on challenges. Setbacks in life are common, especially when dealing with complex problems, so ...

  24. Graduates Transforming Law Enforcement

    Graduates Transforming Law Enforcement. Beverly Hills Police Department officers, Lieutenant Jesse Perez and Captain Giovanni Trejo, returned to the classroom during the pandemic to reshape the future of law enforcement. Trejo researched organizational change in law enforcement at the top ranks, while Trejo focused on drone technology in ...

  25. School of Continuing Education

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  26. Rep. Stefanik files misconduct complaint against Judge Juan ...

    Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY) filed a misconduct complaint Tuesday against the judge overseeing Donald Trump's Manhattan hush money trial, alleging that his selection to handle the former president ...

  27. Continuous assessment

    It can be compared with a final or summative assessment, which only assesses the learner at the end of the course. Continuous assessment often provides a more accurate and complete picture of the learner's level and has a positive impact on learning. Example The learners are giving mini-presentations on their favourite films as a follow-up activity after reading about the history of cinema.

  28. PDF Illinois APRN and FPA-APRN Continuing Education FAQs

    The Department has received many inquiries regarding continuing education and in particular the upcoming Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and Advanced Practice Registered Nurse - Full Practice Authority (FPA-APRN) license renewal by June 30, 2024. The questions and answers listed below will hopefully provide some clarification.

  29. Continuing Education

    The Air Force Tuition Assistance (TA) program is designed to help active duty personnel pursue voluntary, off-duty educational opportunities. Currently, the program pays 100 percent (up to $250 per semester hour or equivalent) of the cost of college tuition with a limit of $4,500 per fiscal year. Courses and degree programs may be academic or ...

  30. PDF Questions? For help enrolling, CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES contact the

    CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES CORONAL POLISHING CERTIFICATE COURSE: DNTA˜2000 PIT & FISSURE CERTIFICATE COURSE: DNTA˜2000 One Day Classes One Day Classes(choose from the dates below) 5/30/24, 6/12/24, 9/13/24, 10/11/24, or 11/15/24 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Cost: $500