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Special Duty Assignments

Performing Special Duty assignments is not only career enhancing, but also gives self-satisfaction while serving Soldiers. The following PDF explains some of the Special Duty assignments available for Soldiers.

Full PDF found here: SPECIAL DUTY ASSIGNMENTS

**Special assignments include special management command and joint, HQDA, and HRC assignments that have special missions and require personnel with specific qualifications. Soldiers assigned to these positions will be stabilized for a period of 36 months. However, HRC may reassign Soldiers with less than 36 months in accordance with paragraph 3– 8 a (10). This section establishes policies for assignments to the following agencies:

a.  International and OCONUS Joint headquarters, U.S. military missions, military assistance advisory groups, Joint U.S. military advisory groups, and similar activities. b.  The U.S. Central Command. c.  Headquarters, Department of the Army and HRC. d.  The U.S. Disciplinary Barracks. e.  The U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command. f.  Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence and field activities. g.  Defense Courier Service. h.  The U.S. Criminal Investigation Command. i.  The U.S. Transportation Command. j.  The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). k.  The U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, U.S. Army War College, and U.S. Army Officer Candidate School. l.  Joint communications support element. m.  U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC).

**All personnel actions pertaining to nominative assignments are processed by HRC (AHRC–EPD). The normal tour of duty for these assignments is 3 to 4 years, unless otherwise specified by the individual agency. Soldiers assigned to these agencies are contact replacements requested by the appropriate agency approximately 9 to 12 months in advance of the incumbent’s scheduled rotation date. Stringent screening processes exist to ensure that only the most highly qualified Soldiers are selected for nominative posi- tions at the following agencies:

a.  Office, Secretary of Defense. b.  Joint Staff. c.  Defense Commissary Agency. d.  Defense Finance and Accounting Service.  e.  Defense Information Systems Agency. f.  Defense Nuclear Agency. g.  Defense Logistics Agency. h.  Defense Intelligence Agency. i.  Defense Mapping Agency. j.  On-Site Inspection Agency. k.  Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences. l.  U.S. Delegation NATO Military Committee. m.  Immediate Offices-Office, Secretary of the Army. n.  Office, Army Chief of Staff. o.  Military Personnel Exchange Program (AR 614–10). p.  Offices of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army.

**Special Operations Forces (SOF) assignments require Soldiers able to excel in the performance of their duties in highly complex and dynamic environments throughout the full spectrum of modern warfare and peacetime missions. The nature of SOF missions requires a high state of readiness, therefore, Soldiers will be assigned on a priority basis. Stringent screen- ing processes exist to ensure that only the highest quality Soldiers are accepted and assigned. Soldiers who desire to apply for duty or assignment may do so without regard to current assignment. Only fully qualified Soldiers will be accepted for duty in the following assignments:

a.  Special Forces positions. b.  Civil Affairs positions. c.  Psychological operations positions. d.  U.S. Army Special Operations Command Operational Support and/or Force Sustainment positions.  e.  75th Ranger Regiment positions. f.  Special mission units’ positions. g.  160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment positions. h.  U.S. Special Operations Command positions.

Reference for above can be found in: AR 614-200

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  • General Military Questions

Military TDY: Temporary Duty Assignment Explained

military tdy

The U.S. Armed Forces issue different types of military travel orders to personnel.

Your military travel orders pertain to changes in your duty location and the duration, and may also impact your military pay.

Military TDY (Temporary Duty) is one common type of military travel order .

Get all your questions answered about Temporary Duty (TDY) status and what you can expect to experience with this type of order.

Related Article – Military Child Care: 8 Great Options

Table of Contents

What is TDY?

temporary duty assignment

The U.S. Military has three primary types of military travel orders:

  • Permanent Change of Station (PCS)
  • Temporary Duty (TDY)
  • Deployments Orders

It is important to keep in mind that the three types of military assignment orders are not the same and each has its own characteristics.

Your military orders may affect how long you serve at the post, the specific location, and special duty pay.

Temporary Duty (TDY) is defined by the Department of Defense as:

Duty at one or more locations, away from the permanent duty station (PDS), under an order, providing for further assignment or pending further assignment, to return to the old PDS or to proceed to a new PDS.

Military branches under the U.S. Armed Forces have different references for Military TDY, like TAD (temporary additional duty) or TCS (temporary change of station).

However, they all mean basically the same thing that your military orders are temporary.

The primary difference between Military TDY and other orders is that it grants authorization for a service member to perform work away from the permanent duty station.

The Department of Defense requires the label Military TDY (or one of its variants) to approve travel pay, per diem, and coverage of other expenses to assist the soldier.

Since the assignment is temporary, the service member can expect a shorter stay than a permanent station assignment, however, the length of the orders may vary.

The individual details of TDY orders are fleshed out with each commitment.

The specifics of your Military TDY outline expected duration, amount of travel pay, coverage of expenses, housing and food support, transportation, and other forms of assistance.

How long is a TDY?

Military TDY is temporary for military orders, so the length is generally not longer than 180 days.

Temporary duty orders may range anywhere from a few days to a half year.

Long-term TDY is any orders which specify longer than 30 days.

TDY per diem rates depend on the location you have orders for. It will also include reimbursement for lodging, meals, and incidentals. 

Use this calculator to determine how much you can expect to receive. 

Military TDY is a stark contrast from Permanent Duty Assignments and Deployments, which have commitments of several months or years.

The Department of Defense authorizes TDY through Joint Travel Regulations.

Related Article – 10 Benefits Of Being A Military Wife (and 5 not-so good things)

Is TDY considered a deployment?

tcs order

Technically there is a difference between a temporary duty assignment (TDY) and Deployment, even though they are both military orders.

Deployments are similar to military TDY, except that the service member is assigned to a specific operation.

Therefore, deployments usually reference combat operations that take place overseas.

When most civilians think of military orders, they commonly associate everything with being deployed, though that’s not always the case based on the actual military definition.

Deployment refers to assigning military personnel from a home station to somewhere outside the continental United States.

Mobilizations are also classified as deployments under the Department of Defense guidelines.

How does a TDY differ from a deployment?

The biggest difference between deployments and temporary duty assignments is the length of the orders.

Military TDY is short-term, with even longer stints requiring less than a half year of commitment.

On the other hand, deployments are typically longer and involve assignments outside the United States.

Additionally, deployments involve assignments to specific operations and usually in combat situations.

However, both types of military orders have similarities.

For example, military personnel must leave their home station for a different location under each type of order.

Military TDY is not always as serious as deployments.

For instance, a temporary duty assignment could mean nothing more than attending school, conferences, or a military-sponsored event.

Or it could pertain to a regular part of military duty where frequent travel is mandatory and the service member hopes to receive some form of compensation for their travel exs.

There are cases where military personnel earn TDY status even when working in the same geographic area as the home base to justify lodging and meal expenses associated with the duty.

Soldiers also rely on military TDY for house hunting and other searches when considering a new permanent change of station or out-processing from military service.

Can I go with my husband/wife on a TDY?

tdy army

One of the many perks of temporary duty assignments is that you can occasionally bring along the family.

The same is not true of deployments where it would put your spouse or other family members in danger.

If given the chance to bring along a spouse for your temporary duty assignment, you should welcome the opportunity, but keep in mind that pier diem rates are only calculated for the service member.

Military personnel often spend months away from family and friends, so having a unique opportunity like this to spend with a loved one is rare and special.

MilitaryShoppers.com put together a great resource on the topic.

It explains the pros and cons of tagging along with a significant other while he or she is on TDY.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that while you can live with your spouse while on temporary duty assignment, his or her time is still limited and it might drain your budget quickly.

Other than that, it’s an enticing opportunity to catch up after potentially months of separation.

Related Article – Military Star Card Review: Worth Signing Up For?

Will I get paid extra during a TDY?

Despite having to leave your home station, there is nothing more rewarding than a little extra pay in freedom.

It is exactly what temporary duty assignments provide to service members.

In fact, the reason that military personnel may request or seek TDY is the opportunity to put more in their wallet.

Military TDY usually grants per diem pay, which helps cover lodging, meals, and incidental expenses.

You get a set per diem pay regardless of what you actually spend each day on daily expenses.

As a result, if you budget accordingly, you can earn extra cash by pocketing whatever per diem you don’t spend on daily living expenses.

What kind of accommodations can I expect during a TDY?

deployment orders

The accommodations of temporary duty assignments are nothing to brag about yet offer incentives that most military personnel don’t get to enjoy.

For example, the potential opportunity to take your significant other along with you when TDY is a major advantage for some.

Military personnel may get the opportunity to stay at furnished apartments or long-term stay hotels.

Long-term stays help save you money on your per diem since you can cook your own meals as opposed to dining out all of the time.

Furnished apartments may also include laundry and other housing services to save even more money.

Service members on TDY may also request a cash advance of 60-80% of the total value.

It helps cover move-in costs as opposed to spending out of their own pocket.

Some military organizations deem anything over 30 consecutive calendar days. 

For this reason, it allows partial reimbursement of living expenses prior to concluding the assignment.

Military TDY, or temporary duty assignments, refer to relatively short-term military travel orders away from a home station.

Temporary duty assignments range from a couple of days to under six months.

Military TDY is a good thing for soldiers despite the travel arrangements, as it helps cover lodging, food, and transportation regarding the orders.

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Areas of Special Emphasis

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NCOER Duty Descriptions

Below are duty descriptions by MOS or position or additional duty. If you don't see a page for your MOS or additional duty, enter it in the form at the bottom of this page and a page will be made for it within a couple of days.

  • 00F MOS Immaterial, National Guard
  • 00G MOS Immaterial, Reserve
  • 09L Interpreter/Translator
  • CMF 11 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 12 Duty Descriptions
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  • CMF 17 Duty Descriptions
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  • CMF 27 Duty Descriptions
  • 29E Electronic Warfare Specialist
  • CMF 31 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 35 Duty Descriptions
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  • CMF 38 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 42 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 46 Duty Descriptions
  • 51C Contracting NCO
  • 52D (Now 91D) Power Generation
  • CMF 56 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 63 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 66 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 68 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 70 Duty Descriptions
  • 74D Chemical Operations Specialist
  • 75D Personnel Records Specialist
  • CMF 79 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 88 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 89 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 91 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 92 Duty Descriptions
  • CMF 94 Duty Descriptions
  • 96B (now 35F) Intelligence Analyst
  • 96D (now 35G) Imagery Analyst

Additional duty

  • Ammunition NCO/Manager
  • Arms Room NCO
  • Assistant Operations NCO
  • Aviation Element
  • Aviation Platoon Sergeant
  • Barracks Management NCO
  • Battalion Maintenance officer
  • Building Manager/Facility Management
  • Casualty Affairs Office
  • Clinical Flight Coordinator
  • Combatives Advisor
  • Command Language Program Manager
  • Command Post
  • Command Sergeant Major (CSM)
  • COMSEC Custodian
  • Current Operations NCO
  • Defense Travel System (DTS)
  • Deployment NCOIC
  • Detachment Sergeant
  • Drill Sergeant
  • Enlisted Aide
  • Entry Control Point (ECP)
  • Equal Opportunity Advisor
  • Escort, Security
  • Executive Officer (XO)
  • Executive Operations NCO
  • Family Readiness Liaison
  • Fire Team Leader
  • First Sergeant
  • Force Protection NCO
  • Forward Observer
  • Future Operations (FUOPS)
  • Honor Guard
  • Information Management Office (IMO)
  • Inspector/IG
  • International Military Student Officer (IMSO)
  • Instructor/Writer
  • Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC)
  • Knowledge Manager
  • Liaison Noncommissioned Officer (LNO)
  • Mail Clerk/NCOIC
  • Material Management NCO
  • Medical Readiness NCO
  • Military Financial Advisor
  • Motor Sergeant
  • NCOIC Duty Description
  • Observer Controller Trainer (OC/T)
  • Operations NCO
  • Orderly Room NCO
  • Physical Security Officer (PSO)
  • Plans Officer
  • Platoon Sergeant
  • Property Book Officer (PBO)
  • Protocol Officer
  • Provost Marshals Office
  • Quality Control
  • Range Operations
  • Readiness NCO
  • Rear Detachment NCOIC/1SG/SGM
  • Rear Detachment Sergeant
  • Rear Detachment Platoon Sergeant
  • Rear Detachment Shift Leader
  • Recruiter Duty Descriptions
  • RSP Training NCO
  • S-3 Duty Descriptions
  • S-4 Duty Descriptions
  • SAMS-E Operator
  • Schools and Defense Travel System (DTS) NCO
  • Senior Leader Course (SLC)
  • Senior Mechanic
  • Senior Supply NCO
  • Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC)
  • Small Group Leader
  • Soldier Recovery Unit (SRU)
  • Sponsorship Program NCO
  • Squad Leader
  • Staff Duty NCO
  • Subsistence NCO
  • Survey Administrator
  • Targeting NCO
  • Team Leader
  • Technical Inspector
  • Test Control Officer
  • Training NCO
  • Unit Administrator
  • Unit Armorer
  • Unit Movement Officer
  • Unit Prevention Leader (UPL)
  • Unit RESET Planner
  • Unit Supply Sergeant
  • Victim Advocate
  • Voting Assistance Officer (VAO)
  • Warehouse Manager
  • Misc Duty Descriptions

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DA PAM 623-3, Evaluation Reporting System

3-6. Part III, Duty Description

This information is written by the rater and verified with the rated NCO. Refer to DA PAM 623-3, Evaluation Reporting System, table 3-3 for duty description evaluation instructions. The duty description:

Is an outline of the normal requirements of the specific duty position. Should show type of work required rather than frequently changing tasks. Is essential to performance counseling and evaluation. It is used during the first counseling session to tell the rated NCO what the duties are and what needs to be emphasized. May be updated during the rating period. Is used at the end of the rating period to record what was important about the duties.

NCOER Part : IIIc: Daily Duties and Scope

These must include a series of phrases, starting with verbs/action words and separated by semicolons and ending in a period. This block should address the most important routine duties and responsibilities. Ideally, this should include the number of people supervised, equipment, facilities, and dollars involved and any other routine duties and responsibilities.

Readiness NCO or training NCO. For ARNGUS AGR Soldiers assigned as readiness NCO or training NCO, enter both the NCO's TOE or TDA assignment and the full-time support titles such as Chief or Firing Battery/Readiness NCO. Include a mix of both the position duties and the full-time support duties in Part IIIc, d, and e.

NCOER Part : IIId: Areas of Special Emphasis

Enter areas of special emphasis/appointed duties. These must include a list of tasks/duties separated by semicolons and ending with a period. This block is the most likely to change during the rating period. It should include the most important items that applied at any time during the rating period. ARNGUS AGR Soldiers assigned as readiness NCO or training NCO, enter both the NCO's TOE or TDA assignment and the full-time support titles such as Chief or Firing Battery/Readiness NCO. Include a mix of both the position duties and the full-time support duties in Part IIIc, d, and e.

NCOER Part : IIIe: Appointed Duties

Include duties appointed that are not normally included in the duty description. For ARNGUS AGR Soldiers assigned as Readiness NCO or Training NCO, enter both the NCO's TOE or TDA assignment and the full-time support titles such as Chief or Firing Battery/Readiness NCO. Include a mix of both the position duties and the full-time support duties in Part III, d, and e.

NCOER Part : IIIf: Counseling Dates

Enter the actual dates of the counseling obtained from the DA Form 2166-8-1 (YYYYMMDD). When counseling dates are omitted, the senior rater will enter a statement in part Ve, explaining why counseling was not accomplished. The absence of counseling will not be used as the sole basis for an appeal. However, the lack of counseling may be used to help support other claims made in an appeal.

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Temporary Duty Assignments – Understanding Your Pay & Benefits While on TDY Orders

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TDY is the three-letter acronym that often leaves servicemembers and families confused. Get to know the various types of Temporary Duty Assignment (TDY) or Temporary Assignment Duty (TAD) to keep your finances and sanity from teetering into the red when you are on TDY orders.

Fully  understanding your military assignments and benefits is the benchmark of a seasoned servicemember. Pay increases or decreases, what per diem covers, and whether or not family members could or should accompany are all factors to fully grasp before going TDY.

Understanding TDY Orders

Three Types of Military Orders

There are three primary types of military orders:

  • Permanent Change of Station (PCS)
  • Temporary Duty Assignment (TDY)

Of the three, TDY orders are likely the most complex, as they can be issued as an add-on to additional orders like a PCS. In addition to complexity, TDY orders also offer the most flexibility for servicemembers and their dependents to determine how they will handle assignments, placing them in a location anywhere from just a few days to six months.

There are likely dozens of situations where TDY may be issued. Some examples include additional schooling, career specialties that require frequent travel, or completing special assignments for the military. In nature, the assignments are meant to be short in duration and non-permanent.

Financial Considerations of TDY Orders

The financial characteristics of TDY are perhaps the most important piece to understand. Consider TDY orders to be similar to travel for professional civilian jobs (like conferences). The organization, in this case, the military, will authorize a certain dollar amount per day called “per diem” for everyday expenses such as food, lodging, and transportation. Essentially, additional TDY pay on top of your regular pay is an additional fixed budget given to you per day. It is the servicemember’s responsibility to budget adequately.

You may be eligible for per diem even if you are temporarily assigned in the same state as your current duty station depending on the situation.

While on assignment, it is critical to keep the following receipts so you can have them validated for reimbursement upon return.

  • Meal receipts
  • Taxi/Uber/shuttle expenses
  • Any travel costs like flights, subway, etc.
  • Daily mileage totals (if you are traveling in your own vehicle)
  • Incidental expenses or any unexpected costs directly related to daily operations

According to the Department of Defense , “A Service member ordered to a U.S. installation must use adequate and available Government quarters.” This means that if lodging is available, you will likely be required to stay in military housing, such as the barracks, or in installation hotels or accommodations. While exceptions to policy (ETP) do happen, it is largely dependent on a host of factors.

Exceptions to Policy (ETP)

Let’s say, for example, that following his commission , a soldier receives TDY orders to Basic Officer Leaders Course (BOLC) which requires a six-month stay. The soldier has a family and would prefer they accompany him to the training and he requests to stay in off-installation accommodations for the duration of the training course.

While it is not guaranteed, this is a strong case for ETP to be considered. Off installation accommodations would offer greater flexibility to find budget-friendly options within per diem that also include benefits such as on-site laundry and kitchenettes.

When overages or excessive fees are incurred or circumstances constitute an exception to policy, the Authorizing Official (AO) will need to pre-approve the charges before they will be reimbursed. You may not be reimbursed if you are not given pre-authorization, so it is essential to communicate prior to making decisions that will incur costs.

Per Diem – What is Covered on TDY Orders?

Knowing what is not covered in per diem is just as important as knowing what is.

The military will not cover alcohol purchases in stores or in restaurant establishments. If a servicemember chooses to consume alcohol with their meal, a separate receipt would likely be the best choice, additionally, any charges will be the full responsibility of the individual. Additionally, when deciding to consume alcohol, a full understanding of what hours are considered on and off duty is the responsibility of the servicemember.

Family Separation Allowance (FSA) is an additional benefit offered to servicemembers when they are on assignment away from their family greater than 30 days. It is important to note that if a servicemember’s family accompanies the active duty member for the entire duration of the TDY, FSA would not be considered. However, FSA benefits do apply when dependents visit the servicemember for less than 30 consecutive days.

The eligibility for FSA may be extended to National Guard and wounded warriors, depending on the type, length, and restrictions of the TDY assignment.

Meal rates are based upon location, just like in the civilian world. Speaking with the Authorizing Official (AO) before going TDY to get a precise dollar amount for per diem is highly recommended. A portion, but not always the full amount of gratuity is also included in travel-related expenses.

An often-forgotten component of TDY rates includes factoring in “included” meals provided by the conference or government in your stay. If two out of three meals will be provided, rates may be reduced per day as well as any additional meals. Religious or dietary requirements are an exception to the policy if the traveler meets all requirements. All servicemembers should speak with their local Authorizing Official, command, and financial office to ensure they are fully up to speed.

Going TDY can provide an interesting change of pace and has the potential to put some extra cash in your pocket depending on your budget and personal preferences. If you are someone who likes to cook for yourself in a kitchenette you can save some money. But if you are expected to attend formal functions, eating out often, TDY can get expensive. With a little planning, your TDY experience can be a good one.

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Samantha Peterson

Samantha Peterson is a regular contributor for military publications such as The Military Wallet, Military Families Magazine, We Are The Mighty and more. She feels passionately about telling compelling stories and crafting captivating narratives. Living life one PCS at a time, she’s travel schooling her children while tackling careers in the nonprofit and environmental sector all as military life allows.

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General Officer Assignments

The Chief of Staff of the Army announces the following officer assignments:

Maj. Gen. Kimberly M. Colloton, deputy commanding general for Military and International Operations, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C., to deputy chief of engineers, Office of the Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army; and deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. Lance G. Curtis, deputy chief of staff, G-4, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to commanding general, Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois.

Maj. Gen. Christopher L. Eubank, commanding general, U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command, Fort Huachuca, Arizona, to chief of staff, U.S. Strategic Command, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska.

Maj. Gen. Clair A. Gill, deputy director for Regional Operations and Force Management, J-3, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence and Fort Novosel, Fort Novosel, Alabama.

Maj. Gen. Gavin A. Lawrence, commanding general, Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, to deputy chief of staff for Logistics and Operations, U.S. Army Materiel Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Maj. Gen. Kevin C. Leahy, commander, Special Operations Command Central, U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, to commander, Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Inherent Resolve, Iraq.

Maj. Gen. Michael C. McCurry II, commanding general, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence and Fort Novosel, Fort Novosel, Alabama, to chief of staff, U.S. Army Futures Command, Austin, Texas.

Brig. Gen. Stephanie R. Ahern, director of Concepts, Futures and Concepts Center, U.S. Army Futures Command, Adelphi, Maryland, to commandant, U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania.

Brig. Gen. Sarah K. Albrycht, commandant, U.S. Army Military Police School, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, to provost marshal general, U.S. Army, and commanding general, Army Corrections Command, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Guillaume N. Beaurpere, commanding general, U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to chief of staff, U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

Brig. Gen. Chad C. Chalfont, deputy commanding general (Maneuver), 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Cavazos, Texas, to commandant, U.S. Army Armor School, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Moore, Georgia.

Brig. Gen. Kendall J. Clarke, deputy commanding general (Operations), 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, New York, to director of Concepts, Futures and Concepts Center, U.S. Army Futures Command, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.

Brig. Gen. Jasper Jeffers III, deputy director for Special Operations and Counter-Terrorism, J-3, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C., to commander, Special Operations Command Central, U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

Brig. Gen. Shane P. Morgan, commandant, U.S. Army Field Artillery School, U.S. Army Fires Center of Excellence, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, to deputy director for Regional Operations and Force Management, J-3, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Jason B. Nicholson, commanding general, U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, to director, Strategy, Plans and Policy, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Michael J. Simmering, commandant, U.S. Army Armor School, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Moore, Georgia, to commanding general, First Army Division East, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Brig. Gen. Brian D. Vile, commandant, U.S. Army Cyber Warfare School and Chief of Cyber, Fort Eisenhower, Georgia, to deputy director, Future Operations, J-3, U.S. Cyber Command, Fort Meade, Maryland.

Brig. Gen. Scott D. Wilkinson, commanding general, U.S. Army Special Operations Aviation Command; and deputy commanding general-Futures, U.S. Special Operations Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to chief, Legislative Liaison, Office of the Secretary of the Army, Washington, D.C.

Col. (Promotable) Jeremy A. Bartel, chief of staff, U.S. Army Central, Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, to commander, Special Operations Joint Task Force-Central, Operation Enduring Sentinel, Qatar.

Col. (Promotable) James T. Blejski Jr., assistant chief of staff, G-3, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, to director of intelligence, J-2, U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

Col. (Promotable) Robert G. Born, deputy commander (Support), 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Cavazos, Texas, to deputy commander (Maneuver), 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Cavazos, Texas.

Col. (Promotable) Kirk E. Brinker, deputy commander (Support), 1st Special Forces Command (Airborne), Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to deputy commander, U.S. Army Special Operations Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina.

Col. (Promotable) Kevin S. Chaney, project manager, Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft, Program Executive Office Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, to deputy, Program Executive Office, Command, Control and Communication (Tactical), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

Col. (Promotable) Kenneth C. Cole, deputy commander (Support), 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Kentucky, to deputy commander, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence, Fort Rucker, Alabama.

Col. (Promotable) Ronald L. Franklin Jr., NATO Branch Chief, J-5, U.S. European Command, Germany, to senior defense official and defense attaché, U.S. Defense Attaché Office, Russia.

Col. (Promotable) Rogelio J. Garcia, deputy commander (Support), 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, to commandant of cadets, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York.

Col. (Promotable) Peter C. Glass, deputy director/chief of staff, Futures and Concepts Center, U.S. Army Futures Command, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, to deputy commander (Support), 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Cavazos, Texas.

Col. (Promotable) Joseph C. Goetz II, commandant, U.S. Army Engineer School, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, to commander, Pacific Ocean Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

Col. (Promotable) Phillip J. Kiniery III, deputy commander (Operations), 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Kentucky, to commandant, U.S. Army Infantry School, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence; and director, Future Soldier Lethality Cross Functional Team, Army Futures Command, Fort Moore, Georgia.

Col. (Promotable) Paul T. Krattiger, deputy commander (Support), 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas, to deputy commander (Operations), 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Col. (Promotable) Matthew J. Lennox, deputy commander, Cyber National Mission Force, U.S. Cyber Command, Fort Meade, Maryland, to deputy commander, Joint Force Headquarters-Cyber, U.S. Army Cyber Command, Fort Eisenhower, Georgia.

Col. (Promotable) Robert J. Mikesh Jr., project manager, Integrated Personnel and Pay System–Army, Program Executive Office Enterprise Information Systems, Arlington, Virginia, to deputy program executive officer, Enterprise Information Systems, Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

Col. (Promotable) Jin H. Pak, commandant, U.S. Army Quartermaster School, U.S. Army Sustainment Center of Excellence, Fort Gregg-Adams, Virginia, to commander, 19th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, Eighth Army, Republic of Korea.

Col. (Promotable) Allen J. Pepper, senior defense official and defense attaché, U.S. Defense Attaché Office, Iraq, to commander, U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Col. (Promotable) Brendan C. Raymond, director of integration, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to deputy commander (Support), 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colorado.

Col. (Promotable) Adam D. Smith, deputy commander for operations, U.S. Army Recruiting Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky, to The Adjutant General of the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Human Resources Command; commander, U.S. Army Physical Disability Agency; and executive director, Military Postal Service Agency, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Col. (Promotable) Kevin J. Williams, chief of staff, Joint Task Force–Red Hill, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, Honolulu, Hawaii, to deputy commander (Operations), 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

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New Cold-Assignment Incentive Pay Coming for Airmen and Guardians at 7 Bases

Members of the 3rd Wing and 90th Fighter Generation Squadron conduct a missing man formation flyover in remembrance of Staff Sgt. Charles A. Crumlett at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

In a move aimed at incentivizing airmen and Guardians stationed in the remotest and coldest parts of the country, the Department of the Air Force has finally approved cold weather pay for troops at seven bases.

As of April 1, airmen and Guardians stationed at U.S. bases where temperatures sometimes drop 20 degrees below zero will earn the new lump-sum payment if they agree to serve at least a yearlong tour.

Locations that qualify for the incentive include North Dakota's Cavalier Space Force Station and Minot and Grand Forks Air Force Bases ; Alaska's Clear Space Force Station, Eielson Air Force Base and Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson ; and Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana.

Read Next : Army Eyes Dramatic Cuts to Key Education Benefits for Soldiers

The announcement comes more than a year after passage of the 2023 National Defense Authorization Act, which included a provision for the services to provide an Arctic incentive pay.

A defense official told Military.com in January that the military's existing programs already compensate service members serving in those areas well enough, but the Department of the Air Force went ahead with its own program.

"Airmen and Guardians living in extremely cold conditions faced unique out-of-pocket costs," Alex Wagner, assistant secretary of the Air Force for manpower and reserve affairs, said in a statement to Military.com. "In addition to the assignment and retention benefits of the pay, it also comes down to making sure we do our best to take care of our service members and their families stationed at these critical installations."

Similar to the Army 's existing Remote and Austere Conditions Assignment Incentive Pay, the Air Force's new Cold Weather Incentive pay program "intends to ease the financial burden of purchasing certain cold weather essentials" like jackets and other Arctic-protective clothes, season-appropriate tires, engine block heaters and emergency roadside kits, the service told Military.com.

The pay ranges from $500 to $5,000 depending on location and how many dependents an airman or Guardian has. Though the program is effective as of April 1, the first pay date is July 1. If a service member moves to one of the seven locations between April 1 and June 30, they will receive the benefit retroactively, the Air Force said.

"We want to ensure airmen, Guardians and their families have the resources needed to safely live and work in an extreme cold-weather environment," Wagner said in the statement.

Notably, two of the nation's nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile bases are on the list: Malmstrom in Montana and Minot in North Dakota.

The announcement of the payment comes as the service's Cold War-era facilities at ICBM bases are being sanitized and investigated for toxins that could lead to cancer. Military.com has reported that both of those bases found levels of polychlorinated biphenyls -- a known carcinogen -- above the Environmental Protection Agency's threshold of 10 micrograms per 100 square centimeters.

Editor's note: This story was corrected to say Cavalier Space Force Station, Minot Air Force Base and Grand Forks Air Force Base are located in North Dakota.

Related : New Arctic Pay for Troops Was Passed by Congress a Year Ago. But the Pentagon Waved It Off.

Thomas Novelly

Thomas Novelly Military.com

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Jacksonville challenge: Pay your employees up to 90 days while they're on military duty

duty assignment army

The city of Jacksonville just became one of the most supportive city governments in the nation for employees called into military service by committing to pay their city salaries for up to 90 days .

Jacksonville had been paying salaries for 30 days to its workers on military deployments. But after City Council member Rory Diamond returned from an eight-month Army tour in Saudi Arabia, he won support for longer coverage when he told council members about how others in his unit struggled to make ends meet.

The legislation, signed into law by Mayor Donna Deegan on Friday, also gives city employees eight hours of flex time per month they can use when their spouses are deployed.

"Jacksonville is a proud military town," Deegan said at the signing ceremony. "We can't say it enough."

Here's how the new benefit program will work.

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Does the city require private businesses to pay deployed employees?

No. The legislation to doesn't require private companies to provide continued paychecks while an employee is away from the job on military service. State and federal law doesn't put that requirement on private employers, either. Diamond, who is a captain in the U.S. Army and the Florida Army National Guard, said he hopes Jacksonville's model will spread to other cities and to businesses.

Diamond said when he was serving overseas, he heard others in their early 20s talking to their families and it became clear they were under financial strain. He said when he told them he would do something about it when he got back to Jacksonville, the response was along the lines of "oh yeah, there's a politician next to me in the tent" saying he would make some changes.

"We need to challenge every mayor in America to do the same," Diamond said at the bill-signing ceremony. "We need to challenge every big employer here in Jacksonville to do the same."

How much will it cost the city for salaries to deployed employees?

The cost will vary depending on how many employees are deployed at any given time, which in turn hinges on the extent of military missions taking place. If the extended period for salaries had been in place in 2023, the annual additional cost would have totaled about $400,000, according to the City Council Auditor's Office.

"So for a relatively small amount, we get a super-high impact, which is to retain employees who are in service and national guardsmen and women, but at the same time send a very strong message to the military community here that we care about them," Diamond told council members when his bill went through committees.

Why does the city use 90 days as the time for continued pay?

Diamond said the hardest time period financially is during the first three months of a deployment.

"That's critical because that's the time when you have the most expense for dealing with having families in different places," he said.

What type of deployment triggers the longer pay period?

City and JEA employees who take a military leave of absence for active, full-time duty of at least 30 days will continue to get their paychecks for 30 to 90 days, depending how long the leave of absence lasts. Employees who take other kinds of military leave will remain on the active payroll for up to 30 days after their departures.

How would spouses of deployed military members benefit?

City and JEA employees who have a dependent child or a disabled adult dependent child will get up to 40 hours of paid special leave each year if their spouses are ordered into military service for at least 30 days. The spouses would be able to use that flex-time to care for their families because they no longer would be able to split those responsibilities.

"We're trying to take some of that burden off them," Diamond said.

They will have eight hours of flex time each month, allowing them to take off work in one-hour increments to take care of their families. Diamond said that provision is the "first of its kind anywhere in any city in America."

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  25. New Cold-Assignment Incentive Pay Coming for Airmen and ...

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  26. Jacksonville extends pay for city workers on military deployment

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