11.4 The Business Plan

Learning objectives.

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

  • Describe the different purposes of a business plan
  • Describe and develop the components of a brief business plan
  • Describe and develop the components of a full business plan

Unlike the brief or lean formats introduced so far, the business plan is a formal document used for the long-range planning of a company’s operation. It typically includes background information, financial information, and a summary of the business. Investors nearly always request a formal business plan because it is an integral part of their evaluation of whether to invest in a company. Although nothing in business is permanent, a business plan typically has components that are more “set in stone” than a business model canvas , which is more commonly used as a first step in the planning process and throughout the early stages of a nascent business. A business plan is likely to describe the business and industry, market strategies, sales potential, and competitive analysis, as well as the company’s long-term goals and objectives. An in-depth formal business plan would follow at later stages after various iterations to business model canvases. The business plan usually projects financial data over a three-year period and is typically required by banks or other investors to secure funding. The business plan is a roadmap for the company to follow over multiple years.

Some entrepreneurs prefer to use the canvas process instead of the business plan, whereas others use a shorter version of the business plan, submitting it to investors after several iterations. There are also entrepreneurs who use the business plan earlier in the entrepreneurial process, either preceding or concurrently with a canvas. For instance, Chris Guillebeau has a one-page business plan template in his book The $100 Startup . 48 His version is basically an extension of a napkin sketch without the detail of a full business plan. As you progress, you can also consider a brief business plan (about two pages)—if you want to support a rapid business launch—and/or a standard business plan.

As with many aspects of entrepreneurship, there are no clear hard and fast rules to achieving entrepreneurial success. You may encounter different people who want different things (canvas, summary, full business plan), and you also have flexibility in following whatever tool works best for you. Like the canvas, the various versions of the business plan are tools that will aid you in your entrepreneurial endeavor.

Business Plan Overview

Most business plans have several distinct sections ( Figure 11.16 ). The business plan can range from a few pages to twenty-five pages or more, depending on the purpose and the intended audience. For our discussion, we’ll describe a brief business plan and a standard business plan. If you are able to successfully design a business model canvas, then you will have the structure for developing a clear business plan that you can submit for financial consideration.

Both types of business plans aim at providing a picture and roadmap to follow from conception to creation. If you opt for the brief business plan, you will focus primarily on articulating a big-picture overview of your business concept.

The full business plan is aimed at executing the vision concept, dealing with the proverbial devil in the details. Developing a full business plan will assist those of you who need a more detailed and structured roadmap, or those of you with little to no background in business. The business planning process includes the business model, a feasibility analysis, and a full business plan, which we will discuss later in this section. Next, we explore how a business plan can meet several different needs.

Purposes of a Business Plan

A business plan can serve many different purposes—some internal, others external. As we discussed previously, you can use a business plan as an internal early planning device, an extension of a napkin sketch, and as a follow-up to one of the canvas tools. A business plan can be an organizational roadmap , that is, an internal planning tool and working plan that you can apply to your business in order to reach your desired goals over the course of several years. The business plan should be written by the owners of the venture, since it forces a firsthand examination of the business operations and allows them to focus on areas that need improvement.

Refer to the business venture throughout the document. Generally speaking, a business plan should not be written in the first person.

A major external purpose for the business plan is as an investment tool that outlines financial projections, becoming a document designed to attract investors. In many instances, a business plan can complement a formal investor’s pitch. In this context, the business plan is a presentation plan, intended for an outside audience that may or may not be familiar with your industry, your business, and your competitors.

You can also use your business plan as a contingency plan by outlining some “what-if” scenarios and exploring how you might respond if these scenarios unfold. Pretty Young Professional launched in November 2010 as an online resource to guide an emerging generation of female leaders. The site focused on recent female college graduates and current students searching for professional roles and those in their first professional roles. It was founded by four friends who were coworkers at the global consultancy firm McKinsey. But after positions and equity were decided among them, fundamental differences of opinion about the direction of the business emerged between two factions, according to the cofounder and former CEO Kathryn Minshew . “I think, naively, we assumed that if we kicked the can down the road on some of those things, we’d be able to sort them out,” Minshew said. Minshew went on to found a different professional site, The Muse , and took much of the editorial team of Pretty Young Professional with her. 49 Whereas greater planning potentially could have prevented the early demise of Pretty Young Professional, a change in planning led to overnight success for Joshua Esnard and The Cut Buddy team. Esnard invented and patented the plastic hair template that he was selling online out of his Fort Lauderdale garage while working a full-time job at Broward College and running a side business. Esnard had hundreds of boxes of Cut Buddies sitting in his home when he changed his marketing plan to enlist companies specializing in making videos go viral. It worked so well that a promotional video for the product garnered 8 million views in hours. The Cut Buddy sold over 4,000 products in a few hours when Esnard only had hundreds remaining. Demand greatly exceeded his supply, so Esnard had to scramble to increase manufacturing and offered customers two-for-one deals to make up for delays. This led to selling 55,000 units, generating $700,000 in sales in 2017. 50 After appearing on Shark Tank and landing a deal with Daymond John that gave the “shark” a 20-percent equity stake in return for $300,000, The Cut Buddy has added new distribution channels to include retail sales along with online commerce. Changing one aspect of a business plan—the marketing plan—yielded success for The Cut Buddy.

Link to Learning

Watch this video of Cut Buddy’s founder, Joshua Esnard, telling his company’s story to learn more.

If you opt for the brief business plan, you will focus primarily on articulating a big-picture overview of your business concept. This version is used to interest potential investors, employees, and other stakeholders, and will include a financial summary “box,” but it must have a disclaimer, and the founder/entrepreneur may need to have the people who receive it sign a nondisclosure agreement (NDA) . The full business plan is aimed at executing the vision concept, providing supporting details, and would be required by financial institutions and others as they formally become stakeholders in the venture. Both are aimed at providing a picture and roadmap to go from conception to creation.

Types of Business Plans

The brief business plan is similar to an extended executive summary from the full business plan. This concise document provides a broad overview of your entrepreneurial concept, your team members, how and why you will execute on your plans, and why you are the ones to do so. You can think of a brief business plan as a scene setter or—since we began this chapter with a film reference—as a trailer to the full movie. The brief business plan is the commercial equivalent to a trailer for Field of Dreams , whereas the full plan is the full-length movie equivalent.

Brief Business Plan or Executive Summary

As the name implies, the brief business plan or executive summary summarizes key elements of the entire business plan, such as the business concept, financial features, and current business position. The executive summary version of the business plan is your opportunity to broadly articulate the overall concept and vision of the company for yourself, for prospective investors, and for current and future employees.

A typical executive summary is generally no longer than a page, but because the brief business plan is essentially an extended executive summary, the executive summary section is vital. This is the “ask” to an investor. You should begin by clearly stating what you are asking for in the summary.

In the business concept phase, you’ll describe the business, its product, and its markets. Describe the customer segment it serves and why your company will hold a competitive advantage. This section may align roughly with the customer segments and value-proposition segments of a canvas.

Next, highlight the important financial features, including sales, profits, cash flows, and return on investment. Like the financial portion of a feasibility analysis, the financial analysis component of a business plan may typically include items like a twelve-month profit and loss projection, a three- or four-year profit and loss projection, a cash-flow projection, a projected balance sheet, and a breakeven calculation. You can explore a feasibility study and financial projections in more depth in the formal business plan. Here, you want to focus on the big picture of your numbers and what they mean.

The current business position section can furnish relevant information about you and your team members and the company at large. This is your opportunity to tell the story of how you formed the company, to describe its legal status (form of operation), and to list the principal players. In one part of the extended executive summary, you can cover your reasons for starting the business: Here is an opportunity to clearly define the needs you think you can meet and perhaps get into the pains and gains of customers. You also can provide a summary of the overall strategic direction in which you intend to take the company. Describe the company’s mission, vision, goals and objectives, overall business model, and value proposition.

Rice University’s Student Business Plan Competition, one of the largest and overall best-regarded graduate school business-plan competitions (see Telling Your Entrepreneurial Story and Pitching the Idea ), requires an executive summary of up to five pages to apply. 51 , 52 Its suggested sections are shown in Table 11.2 .

Are You Ready?

Create a brief business plan.

Fill out a canvas of your choosing for a well-known startup: Uber, Netflix, Dropbox, Etsy, Airbnb, Bird/Lime, Warby Parker, or any of the companies featured throughout this chapter or one of your choice. Then create a brief business plan for that business. See if you can find a version of the company’s actual executive summary, business plan, or canvas. Compare and contrast your vision with what the company has articulated.

  • These companies are well established but is there a component of what you charted that you would advise the company to change to ensure future viability?
  • Map out a contingency plan for a “what-if” scenario if one key aspect of the company or the environment it operates in were drastically is altered?

Full Business Plan

Even full business plans can vary in length, scale, and scope. Rice University sets a ten-page cap on business plans submitted for the full competition. The IndUS Entrepreneurs , one of the largest global networks of entrepreneurs, also holds business plan competitions for students through its Tie Young Entrepreneurs program. In contrast, business plans submitted for that competition can usually be up to twenty-five pages. These are just two examples. Some components may differ slightly; common elements are typically found in a formal business plan outline. The next section will provide sample components of a full business plan for a fictional business.

Executive Summary

The executive summary should provide an overview of your business with key points and issues. Because the summary is intended to summarize the entire document, it is most helpful to write this section last, even though it comes first in sequence. The writing in this section should be especially concise. Readers should be able to understand your needs and capabilities at first glance. The section should tell the reader what you want and your “ask” should be explicitly stated in the summary.

Describe your business, its product or service, and the intended customers. Explain what will be sold, who it will be sold to, and what competitive advantages the business has. Table 11.3 shows a sample executive summary for the fictional company La Vida Lola.

Business Description

This section describes the industry, your product, and the business and success factors. It should provide a current outlook as well as future trends and developments. You also should address your company’s mission, vision, goals, and objectives. Summarize your overall strategic direction, your reasons for starting the business, a description of your products and services, your business model, and your company’s value proposition. Consider including the Standard Industrial Classification/North American Industry Classification System (SIC/NAICS) code to specify the industry and insure correct identification. The industry extends beyond where the business is located and operates, and should include national and global dynamics. Table 11.4 shows a sample business description for La Vida Lola.

Industry Analysis and Market Strategies

Here you should define your market in terms of size, structure, growth prospects, trends, and sales potential. You’ll want to include your TAM and forecast the SAM . (Both these terms are discussed in Conducting a Feasibility Analysis .) This is a place to address market segmentation strategies by geography, customer attributes, or product orientation. Describe your positioning relative to your competitors’ in terms of pricing, distribution, promotion plan, and sales potential. Table 11.5 shows an example industry analysis and market strategy for La Vida Lola.

Competitive Analysis

The competitive analysis is a statement of the business strategy as it relates to the competition. You want to be able to identify who are your major competitors and assess what are their market shares, markets served, strategies employed, and expected response to entry? You likely want to conduct a classic SWOT analysis (Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats) and complete a competitive-strength grid or competitive matrix. Outline your company’s competitive strengths relative to those of the competition in regard to product, distribution, pricing, promotion, and advertising. What are your company’s competitive advantages and their likely impacts on its success? The key is to construct it properly for the relevant features/benefits (by weight, according to customers) and how the startup compares to incumbents. The competitive matrix should show clearly how and why the startup has a clear (if not currently measurable) competitive advantage. Some common features in the example include price, benefits, quality, type of features, locations, and distribution/sales. Sample templates are shown in Figure 11.17 and Figure 11.18 . A competitive analysis helps you create a marketing strategy that will identify assets or skills that your competitors are lacking so you can plan to fill those gaps, giving you a distinct competitive advantage. When creating a competitor analysis, it is important to focus on the key features and elements that matter to customers, rather than focusing too heavily on the entrepreneur’s idea and desires.

Operations and Management Plan

In this section, outline how you will manage your company. Describe its organizational structure. Here you can address the form of ownership and, if warranted, include an organizational chart/structure. Highlight the backgrounds, experiences, qualifications, areas of expertise, and roles of members of the management team. This is also the place to mention any other stakeholders, such as a board of directors or advisory board(s), and their relevant relationship to the founder, experience and value to help make the venture successful, and professional service firms providing management support, such as accounting services and legal counsel.

Table 11.6 shows a sample operations and management plan for La Vida Lola.

Marketing Plan

Here you should outline and describe an effective overall marketing strategy for your venture, providing details regarding pricing, promotion, advertising, distribution, media usage, public relations, and a digital presence. Fully describe your sales management plan and the composition of your sales force, along with a comprehensive and detailed budget for the marketing plan. Table 11.7 shows a sample marketing plan for La Vida Lola.

Financial Plan

A financial plan seeks to forecast revenue and expenses; project a financial narrative; and estimate project costs, valuations, and cash flow projections. This section should present an accurate, realistic, and achievable financial plan for your venture (see Entrepreneurial Finance and Accounting for detailed discussions about conducting these projections). Include sales forecasts and income projections, pro forma financial statements ( Building the Entrepreneurial Dream Team , a breakeven analysis, and a capital budget. Identify your possible sources of financing (discussed in Conducting a Feasibility Analysis ). Figure 11.19 shows a template of cash-flow needs for La Vida Lola.

Entrepreneur In Action

Laughing man coffee.

Hugh Jackman ( Figure 11.20 ) may best be known for portraying a comic-book superhero who used his mutant abilities to protect the world from villains. But the Wolverine actor is also working to make the planet a better place for real, not through adamantium claws but through social entrepreneurship.

A love of java jolted Jackman into action in 2009, when he traveled to Ethiopia with a Christian humanitarian group to shoot a documentary about the impact of fair-trade certification on coffee growers there. He decided to launch a business and follow in the footsteps of the late Paul Newman, another famous actor turned philanthropist via food ventures.

Jackman launched Laughing Man Coffee two years later; he sold the line to Keurig in 2015. One Laughing Man Coffee café in New York continues to operate independently, investing its proceeds into charitable programs that support better housing, health, and educational initiatives within fair-trade farming communities. 55 Although the New York location is the only café, the coffee brand is still distributed, with Keurig donating an undisclosed portion of Laughing Man proceeds to those causes (whereas Jackman donates all his profits). The company initially donated its profits to World Vision, the Christian humanitarian group Jackman accompanied in 2009. In 2017, it created the Laughing Man Foundation to be more active with its money management and distribution.

  • You be the entrepreneur. If you were Jackman, would you have sold the company to Keurig? Why or why not?
  • Would you have started the Laughing Man Foundation?
  • What else can Jackman do to aid fair-trade practices for coffee growers?

What Can You Do?

Textbooks for change.

Founded in 2014, Textbooks for Change uses a cross-compensation model, in which one customer segment pays for a product or service, and the profit from that revenue is used to provide the same product or service to another, underserved segment. Textbooks for Change partners with student organizations to collect used college textbooks, some of which are re-sold while others are donated to students in need at underserved universities across the globe. The organization has reused or recycled 250,000 textbooks, providing 220,000 students with access through seven campus partners in East Africa. This B-corp social enterprise tackles a problem and offers a solution that is directly relevant to college students like yourself. Have you observed a problem on your college campus or other campuses that is not being served properly? Could it result in a social enterprise?

Work It Out

Franchisee set out.

A franchisee of East Coast Wings, a chain with dozens of restaurants in the United States, has decided to part ways with the chain. The new store will feature the same basic sports-bar-and-restaurant concept and serve the same basic foods: chicken wings, burgers, sandwiches, and the like. The new restaurant can’t rely on the same distributors and suppliers. A new business plan is needed.

  • What steps should the new restaurant take to create a new business plan?
  • Should it attempt to serve the same customers? Why or why not?

This New York Times video, “An Unlikely Business Plan,” describes entrepreneurial resurgence in Detroit, Michigan.

  • 48 Chris Guillebeau. The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future . New York: Crown Business/Random House, 2012.
  • 49 Jonathan Chan. “What These 4 Startup Case Studies Can Teach You about Failure.” Foundr.com . July 12, 2015. https://foundr.com/4-startup-case-studies-failure/
  • 50 Amy Feldman. “Inventor of the Cut Buddy Paid YouTubers to Spark Sales. He Wasn’t Ready for a Video to Go Viral.” Forbes. February 15, 2017. https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestreptalks/2017/02/15/inventor-of-the-cut-buddy-paid-youtubers-to-spark-sales-he-wasnt-ready-for-a-video-to-go-viral/#3eb540ce798a
  • 51 Jennifer Post. “National Business Plan Competitions for Entrepreneurs.” Business News Daily . August 30, 2018. https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/6902-business-plan-competitions-entrepreneurs.html
  • 52 “Rice Business Plan Competition, Eligibility Criteria and How to Apply.” Rice Business Plan Competition . March 2020. https://rbpc.rice.edu/sites/g/files/bxs806/f/2020%20RBPC%20Eligibility%20Criteria%20and%20How%20to%20Apply_23Oct19.pdf
  • 53 “Rice Business Plan Competition, Eligibility Criteria and How to Apply.” Rice Business Plan Competition. March 2020. https://rbpc.rice.edu/sites/g/files/bxs806/f/2020%20RBPC%20Eligibility%20Criteria%20and%20How%20to%20Apply_23Oct19.pdf; Based on 2019 RBPC Competition Rules and Format April 4–6, 2019. https://rbpc.rice.edu/sites/g/files/bxs806/f/2019-RBPC-Competition-Rules%20-Format.pdf
  • 54 Foodstart. http://foodstart.com
  • 55 “Hugh Jackman Journey to Starting a Social Enterprise Coffee Company.” Giving Compass. April 8, 2018. https://givingcompass.org/article/hugh-jackman-journey-to-starting-a-social-enterprise-coffee-company/

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

This book may not be used in the training of large language models or otherwise be ingested into large language models or generative AI offerings without OpenStax's permission.

Want to cite, share, or modify this book? This book uses the Creative Commons Attribution License and you must attribute OpenStax.

Access for free at https://openstax.org/books/entrepreneurship/pages/1-introduction
  • Authors: Michael Laverty, Chris Littel
  • Publisher/website: OpenStax
  • Book title: Entrepreneurship
  • Publication date: Jan 16, 2020
  • Location: Houston, Texas
  • Book URL: https://openstax.org/books/entrepreneurship/pages/1-introduction
  • Section URL: https://openstax.org/books/entrepreneurship/pages/11-4-the-business-plan

© Jan 4, 2024 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License . The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.

  • Search Search Please fill out this field.
  • Building Your Business
  • Becoming an Owner
  • Business Plans

Simple Business Plan Template for Entrepreneurs

Follow This Business Plan Outline to Write Your Own

Susan Ward wrote about small businesses for The Balance for 18 years. She has run an IT consulting firm and designed and presented courses on how to promote small businesses.

entrepreneur business plan project

Pros and Cons of Using a Business Plan Template

Do i need a simple or detailed business plan, how to use this business plan template, table of contents, section 1: executive summary, section 2: business/industry overview.

  • Section 3: Market Analysis and Competition

Section 4: Sales and Marketing Plan

Section 5: ownership and management plan, section 6: operating plan, section 7: financial plan.

  • Section 8: Appendices and Exhibits

Ariel Skelley / Getty Images

Think you have a great idea for a business? The best way to find out whether your idea is feasible is to create a business plan .

A solid, well-researched business plan provides a practical overview of your vision. It can be used to ground your ideas into workable actions and to help pitch your idea to financial institutions or potential investors when looking for funding.

The standard business plan consists of a single document divided into several sections for distinct elements, such as a description of the organization, market research, competitive analysis, sales strategies, capital and labor requirements, and financial data. Your plan may include more or fewer sections to best represent your business.

The template presented here will get you well on your way toward your simple business plan.

Ready-made layouts

Free downloads

Generic, not customized

No financial guidance

Additional skills needed

  • Ready-made layouts : Templates offer general guidance about what information is needed and how to organize it, so you’re not stuck looking at a blank page when getting started. Especially detailed templates may offer instructions or helpful text prompts along the way.
  • Variations : If you know what type of business plan you need—traditional, lean, industry-specific—chances are you can find a specialized template.
  • Free downloads : There are many free business plan templates available online, which can be useful for comparing formats and features, or refining your own.
  • Generic, not customized : Templates typically contain just the basics, and there will still be a lot of work involved to tailor the template to your business. For instance, you'll have to reformat, refine copy, and populate tables.
  • No financial guidance : You’ll need enough industry knowledge to apply financial models to your specific business, and the math skills to generate formulas and calculate figures.
  • Additional skills needed : Some degree of tech savvy is required to integrate charts and graphs, merge data from spreadsheets, and keep it all up-to-date.

A corporate business plan for a large organization can be hundreds of pages long. However, for a small business, it's best to keep the plan short and concise, especially if you're submitting it to bankers or investors . Around 35 to 50 pages should be sufficient, and more allowed for extras, such as photos of products, equipment, logos, or business premises or site plans.  Your audience will likely prefer solid research and analysis over long, wordy descriptions.

An entrepreneur who creates a business plan is nearly twice as likely to secure financing and grow their business compared with those who do not have a plan.

The business plan template below is divided into sections as described in the table of contents. Each section can be copied into a document of your own; you may need to add or delete sections or make adjustments to fit your specific needs.

Once complete, be sure to format it attractively and get it professionally printed and bound. You want your business plan to convey the best possible impression. Make it engaging, something people will to want to pick up and peruse.

Enter your business information, including the legal name and address. If you already have a business logo, you can add it at the top or bottom of the title page.

  • Business Plan for "Business Name"
  • Business address
  • Website URL

If you're addressing it to a company or individual, include:

  • Presented to "Name"
  • At "Company"
  • Executive Summary................................................Page #
  • Business/Industry Overview.................................Page #
  • Market Analysis and Competition.........................Page #
  • Sales and Marketing Plan.......................................Page #
  • Ownership and Management Plan.......................Page #
  • Operating Plan..........................................................Page #
  • Financial Plan............................................................Page #
  • Appendices and Exhibits........................................Page #

The  executive summary introduces the plan, but it is written last. It provides a concise and optimistic overview of your business and should capture the reader's attention and create a desire to learn more. The executive summary should be no more than two pages long, with highlights or brief summaries of other sections of the plan.

  • Describe your  mission —what is the need for your new business? Sell your vision.
  • Introduce your company briefly, sticking to vital details such as size, location, management, and ownership.
  • Describe your main product(s) and/or service(s).
  • Identify the customer base you plan to target and how your business will serve those customers.
  • Summarize the competition and how you will get market share. What is your competitive advantage?
  • Outline your financial projections for the first few years of operation.
  • State your startup financing requirements.

This section provides an overview of the industry and explains in detail what makes your business stand out.

  • Describe the overall nature of the industry, including sales and other statistics. Note trends and demographics, as well as economic, cultural, and governmental influences.
  • Explain your business and how it fits into the industry.
  • Mention the existing competition, which you'll expand upon in the following section.
  • Identify what area(s) of the market you will target and what unique, improved, or lower-cost products and/or services you will offer.

Many business plans cover their products/services in a standalone section to add more detail or emphasize unique aspects.

Section 3: Market Analysis and Competition

This section focuses on the competitive factor of your business and justifies it with financial models and statistics. You need to demonstrate that you have thoroughly analyzed the target market, assessed the competition, and concluded that there is enough demand for your products/services to make your business viable.

  • Define the target market(s) for your products/services in your geographic locale.
  • Explain the need for your products/services.
  • Estimate the overall size of the market and the units of your products/services that the target market might buy. Include forecasts of potential repeat-purchase volume and how the market might be affected by economic or demographic changes.
  • Estimate the volume and value of your sales in comparison with any existing competitors. Highlight any key strengths over the competition in easily digestible charts and tables.
  • Describe any helpful barriers to entry that may protect your business from competition, such as access to capital, technology, regulations, employee skill sets, or location.  

You may opt to split the target market description and competitive analysis into two separate sections, if either (or both) portray your business especially favorably.

Here's where you dive into profits, giving detailed strategic view of how you intend to entice customers to buy your products and/or services, including advertising or promotion, pricing, sales, distribution, and post-sales support.

Product or Service Offerings

If your products and/or services don't take up a standalone section earlier in the plan, here is where you can answer the question: What is your unique selling proposition? Describe your products and/or services, how they benefit the customer and what sets them apart from competitor offerings.

Pricing Strategy

How will you price your products/services? Pricing must be low enough to attract customers, yet high enough to cover costs and generate a profit. You can base pricing decisions on a number of financial models, such as markup from cost or value to the buyer, or in comparison with similar products and/or services in the marketplace.  

Sales and Distribution

For products, describe how you plan to distribute to the customer. Will you be selling wholesale or retail? What type of packaging will be required? How will products be shipped? If you offer a service, how will it be delivered to the customer? What methods will be used for payment?

Advertising and Promotion

List the various forms of media you will use to get your message to customers (e.g., website, email, social media, or newspapers). Will you use sales promotional methods such as free samples and product demonstrations? What about product launches and trade shows? Don't forget more everyday marketing materials such as business cards, flyers, or brochures. Include an approximate budget.

This section describes the legal structure, ownership, and (if applicable) management and staffing requirements of your business.

  • Ownership structure : Describe the legal structure of your company (e.g., corporation, partnership, LLC, or  sole proprietorship ). List ownership percentages, if applicable. If the business is a sole proprietorship, this is the only section required.
  • Management team : Describe managers and their roles, key employee positions, and how each will be compensated. Include brief résumés.
  • External resources and services : List any external professional resources required, such as accountants, lawyers, or consultants.
  • Human resources : List the type and number of employees or contractors you will need, and estimate the salary and benefit costs of each.
  • Advisory board : Include an advisory board as a supplemental management resource, if applicable.

The operating plan outlines the physical requirements of your business, such as office, warehouse, or retail space; equipment; supplies; or labor. This section will vary greatly by industry; a large manufacturer, for instance, should provide full details about supply chain or specialty equipment, while a therapist's office can get by with a much shorter list.

If your business is a small operation (like a one-person, home-based consulting firm), you might choose to eliminate the operating plan section altogether and include the operating essentials in the business overview.

  • Development : Explain what you have done to date to identify possible locations, sources of equipment, supply chains, and other relevant relationships. Describe your production workflow.
  • Production : For manufacturing, explain how long it takes to produce a unit and when you'll be ready to start production. Include factors that may affect the time frame of production and how you'll deal with potential problems, such as rush orders.
  • Facilities : Describe the physical location of the business. Include geographical or building requirements; square footage estimates (with room for expansion if expected); mortgage or leasing costs; and estimates of maintenance, utilities, and related  overhead costs . Include zoning approvals and other permissions that are necessary in order to operate.
  • Staffing : Outline expected staffing needs and the main duties of staff members, especially the key employees. Describe how the employees will be sourced and the employment relationship (i.e., contract, full-time, part-time) as well as any training needs and how these will be provided.
  • Equipment : Include a list of any specialized equipment needed, along with cost, whether it will be leased or purchased, and sources.
  • Supplies : If your business is, for example, manufacturing, retail, or food services, include a description of the materials needed, reliable sources, major suppliers, and how you will manage inventory.

The financial plan is the most important section for lenders or investors. The goal is to demonstrate that your business will grow and be profitable. To do this, you will need to create realistic predictions or forecasts.

To avoid inflated expectations, a prudent financial plan underestimates revenues and overestimates expenses.

  • Income statements : The income statement displays projected revenues, expenses, and profit. Do this on a monthly basis for at least the first year for a startup business.
  • Cash-flow projections : The cash-flow projection shows your monthly anticipated cash revenues and disbursements for expenses. To be considered a good credit risk, it is important to demonstrate that you can manage your cash flow.
  • Balance sheet : The  balance sheet  is a snapshot summary of the assets, liabilities, and equity of your business at a particular point in time. For a startup, this would be on the day the business opens.
  • Breakeven analysis : Including a breakeven analysis will demonstrate to lenders or investors what level of sales you need to achieve to make a profit.

Section 8: Appendices and Exhibits

The appendices and exhibits section contains any detailed information needed to support other sections of the plan.  

Possible Appendix or Exhibit items include:

  • Credit histories for the business owners
  • Detailed market research and analysis of competitors
  • Résumés of the owners and key employees
  • Diagrams and/or research about your products and/or services
  • Site, building, or office plans
  • Copies of mortgage documents or equipment leases (or quotes)
  • Marketing brochures and other materials
  • References from business colleagues
  • Links to your business website
  • Any other material that may impress potential lenders or investors

SCORE. " Business Plan Template for a Startup Business ." Accessed April 28, 2021.

U.S. Small Business Administration. " Write your business plan ." Accessed April 28, 2021.

U.S. Small Business Administration. " SBA Recommended Business Plans and Length ." Accessed April 28, 2021.

Bplans. " Why Plan Your Business? Look at This Data ." Accessed April 28, 2021.

Marketing MO. " Pricing Strategy ." Accessed April 28, 2021.

Incorporate.com. " Write a Business Plan, a Step-by-Step Guide ." Accessed April 29, 2021.

Startup Nation. " The Five Costs You're Most Likely to Underestimate in Your Business Plan ." Accessed April 28, 2021.

550+ Business Plan Examples to Launch Your Business

550+ Free Sample Business Plans

Need help writing your business plan? Explore over 550 industry-specific business plan examples for inspiration.

Find your business plan example

Accounting, Insurance & Compliance

Accounting, Insurance & Compliance Business Plans

  • View All 25

Children & Pets

Children & Pets Business Plans

  • Children's Education & Recreation
  • View All 33

Cleaning, Repairs & Maintenance

Cleaning, Repairs & Maintenance Business Plans

  • Auto Detail & Repair
  • Cleaning Products
  • View All 39

Clothing & Fashion Brand

Clothing & Fashion Brand Business Plans

  • Clothing & Fashion Design
  • View All 26

Construction, Architecture & Engineering

Construction, Architecture & Engineering Business Plans

  • Architecture
  • Construction
  • View All 46

Consulting, Advertising & Marketing

Consulting, Advertising & Marketing Business Plans

  • Advertising
  • View All 54

Education

Education Business Plans

  • Education Consulting
  • Education Products

Business plan template: There's an easier way to get your business plan done.

Entertainment & Recreation

Entertainment & Recreation Business Plans

  • Entertainment
  • Film & Television
  • View All 60

Events

Events Business Plans

  • Event Planning
  • View All 17

Farm & Agriculture

Farm & Agriculture Business Plans

  • Agri-tourism
  • Agriculture Consulting
  • View All 16

Finance & Investing

Finance & Investing Business Plans

  • Financial Planning
  • View All 10

Fine Art & Crafts

Fine Art & Crafts Business Plans

Fitness & Beauty

Fitness & Beauty Business Plans

  • Salon & Spa
  • View All 36

Food and Beverage

Food and Beverage Business Plans

  • Bar & Brewery
  • View All 77

Hotel & Lodging

Hotel & Lodging Business Plans

  • Bed and Breakfast

entrepreneur business plan project

IT, Staffing & Customer Service Business Plans

  • Administrative Services
  • Customer Service
  • View All 22

Manufacturing & Wholesale

Manufacturing & Wholesale Business Plans

  • Cleaning & Cosmetics Manufacturing
  • View All 68

Medical & Health

Medical & Health Business Plans

  • Dental Practice
  • Health Administration
  • View All 41

Nonprofit

Nonprofit Business Plans

  • Co-op Nonprofit
  • Food & Housing Nonprofit
  • View All 13

Real Estate & Rentals

Real Estate & Rentals Business Plans

  • Equipment Rental

Retail & Ecommerce

Retail & Ecommerce Business Plans

  • Car Dealership
  • View All 116

Technology

Technology Business Plans

  • Apps & Software
  • Communication Technology

Transportation, Travel & Logistics

Transportation, Travel & Logistics Business Plans

  • Airline, Taxi & Shuttle
  • View All 62

View all sample business plans

Example business plan format

Before you start exploring our library of business plan examples, it's worth taking the time to understand the traditional business plan format . You'll find that the plans in this library and most investor-approved business plans will include the following sections:

Executive summary

The executive summary is an overview of your business and your plans. It comes first in your plan and is ideally only one to two pages. You should also plan to write this section last after you've written your full business plan.

Your executive summary should include a summary of the problem you are solving, a description of your product or service, an overview of your target market, a brief description of your team, a summary of your financials, and your funding requirements (if you are raising money).

Products & services

The products & services chapter of your business plan is where the real meat of your plan lives. It includes information about the problem that you're solving, your solution, and any traction that proves that it truly meets the need you identified.

This is your chance to explain why you're in business and that people care about what you offer. It needs to go beyond a simple product or service description and get to the heart of why your business works and benefits your customers.

Market analysis

Conducting a market analysis ensures that you fully understand the market that you're entering and who you'll be selling to. This section is where you will showcase all of the information about your potential customers. You'll cover your target market as well as information about the growth of your market and your industry. Focus on outlining why the market you're entering is viable and creating a realistic persona for your ideal customer base.

Competition

Part of defining your opportunity is determining what your competitive advantage may be. To do this effectively you need to get to know your competitors just as well as your target customers. Every business will have competition, if you don't then you're either in a very young industry or there's a good reason no one is pursuing this specific venture.

To succeed, you want to be sure you know who your competitors are, how they operate, necessary financial benchmarks, and how you're business will be positioned. Start by identifying who your competitors are or will be during your market research. Then leverage competitive analysis tools like the competitive matrix and positioning map to solidify where your business stands in relation to the competition.

Marketing & sales

The marketing and sales plan section of your business plan details how you plan to reach your target market segments. You'll address how you plan on selling to those target markets, what your pricing plan is, and what types of activities and partnerships you need to make your business a success.

The operations section covers the day-to-day workflows for your business to deliver your product or service. What's included here fully depends on the type of business. Typically you can expect to add details on your business location, sourcing and fulfillment, use of technology, and any partnerships or agreements that are in place.

Milestones & metrics

The milestones section is where you lay out strategic milestones to reach your business goals.

A good milestone clearly lays out the parameters of the task at hand and sets expectations for its execution. You'll want to include a description of the task, a proposed due date, who is responsible, and eventually a budget that's attached. You don't need extensive project planning in this section, just key milestones that you want to hit and when you plan to hit them.

You should also discuss key metrics, which are the numbers you will track to determine your success. Some common data points worth tracking include conversion rates, customer acquisition costs, profit, etc.

Company & team

Use this section to describe your current team and who you need to hire. If you intend to pursue funding, you'll need to highlight the relevant experience of your team members. Basically, this is where you prove that this is the right team to successfully start and grow the business. You will also need to provide a quick overview of your legal structure and history if you're already up and running.

Financial projections

Your financial plan should include a sales and revenue forecast, profit and loss statement, cash flow statement, and a balance sheet. You may not have established financials of any kind at this stage. Not to worry, rather than getting all of the details ironed out, focus on making projections and strategic forecasts for your business. You can always update your financial statements as you begin operations and start bringing in actual accounting data.

Now, if you intend to pitch to investors or submit a loan application, you'll also need a "use of funds" report in this section. This outlines how you intend to leverage any funding for your business and how much you're looking to acquire. Like the rest of your financials, this can always be updated later on.

The appendix isn't a required element of your business plan. However, it is a useful place to add any charts, tables, definitions, legal notes, or other critical information that supports your plan. These are often lengthier or out-of-place information that simply didn't work naturally into the structure of your plan. You'll notice that in these business plan examples, the appendix mainly includes extended financial statements.

Types of business plans explained

While all business plans cover similar categories, the style and function fully depend on how you intend to use your plan. To get the most out of your plan, it's best to find a format that suits your needs. Here are a few common business plan types worth considering.

Traditional business plan

The tried-and-true traditional business plan is a formal document meant to be used for external purposes. Typically this is the type of plan you'll need when applying for funding or pitching to investors. It can also be used when training or hiring employees, working with vendors, or in any other situation where the full details of your business must be understood by another individual.

Business model canvas

The business model canvas is a one-page template designed to demystify the business planning process. It removes the need for a traditional, copy-heavy business plan, in favor of a single-page outline that can help you and outside parties better explore your business idea.

The structure ditches a linear format in favor of a cell-based template. It encourages you to build connections between every element of your business. It's faster to write out and update, and much easier for you, your team, and anyone else to visualize your business operations.

One-page business plan

The true middle ground between the business model canvas and a traditional business plan is the one-page business plan . This format is a simplified version of the traditional plan that focuses on the core aspects of your business.

By starting with a one-page plan , you give yourself a minimal document to build from. You'll typically stick with bullet points and single sentences making it much easier to elaborate or expand sections into a longer-form business plan.

Growth planning

Growth planning is more than a specific type of business plan. It's a methodology. It takes the simplicity and styling of the one-page business plan and turns it into a process for you to continuously plan, forecast, review, and refine based on your performance.

It holds all of the benefits of the single-page plan, including the potential to complete it in as little as 27 minutes . However, it's even easier to convert into a more detailed plan thanks to how heavily it's tied to your financials. The overall goal of growth planning isn't to just produce documents that you use once and shelve. Instead, the growth planning process helps you build a healthier company that thrives in times of growth and remain stable through times of crisis.

It's faster, keeps your plan concise, and ensures that your plan is always up-to-date.

Download a free sample business plan template

Ready to start writing your own plan but aren't sure where to start? Download our free business plan template that's been updated for 2024.

This simple, modern, investor-approved business plan template is designed to make planning easy. It's a proven format that has helped over 1 million businesses write business plans for bank loans, funding pitches, business expansion, and even business sales. It includes additional instructions for how to write each section and is formatted to be SBA-lender approved. All you need to do is fill in the blanks.

How to use an example business plan to help you write your own

Wistia video thumbnail for video id e929pxw2b2

How do you know what elements need to be included in your business plan, especially if you've never written one before? Looking at examples can help you visualize what a full, traditional plan looks like, so you know what you're aiming for before you get started. Here's how to get the most out of a sample business plan.

Choose a business plan example from a similar type of company

You don't need to find an example business plan that's an exact fit for your business. Your business location, target market, and even your particular product or service may not match up exactly with the plans in our gallery. But, you don't need an exact match for it to be helpful. Instead, look for a plan that's related to the type of business you're starting.

For example, if you want to start a vegetarian restaurant, a plan for a steakhouse can be a great match. While the specifics of your actual startup will differ, the elements you'd want to include in your restaurant's business plan are likely to be very similar.

Use a business plan example as a guide

Every startup and small business is unique, so you'll want to avoid copying an example business plan word for word. It just won't be as helpful, since each business is unique. You want your plan to be a useful tool for starting a business —and getting funding if you need it.

One of the key benefits of writing a business plan is simply going through the process. When you sit down to write, you'll naturally think through important pieces, like your startup costs, your target market , and any market analysis or research you'll need to do to be successful.

You'll also look at where you stand among your competition (and everyone has competition), and lay out your goals and the milestones you'll need to meet. Looking at an example business plan's financials section can be helpful because you can see what should be included, but take them with a grain of salt. Don't assume that financial projections for a sample company will fit your own small business.

If you're looking for more resources to help you get started, our business planning guide is a good place to start. You can also download our free business plan template .

Think of business planning as a process, instead of a document

Think about business planning as something you do often , rather than a document you create once and never look at again. If you take the time to write a plan that really fits your own company, it will be a better, more useful tool to grow your business. It should also make it easier to share your vision and strategy so everyone on your team is on the same page.

Adjust your plan regularly to use it as a business management tool

Keep in mind that businesses that use their plan as a management tool to help run their business grow 30 percent faster than those businesses that don't. For that to be true for your company, you'll think of a part of your business planning process as tracking your actual results against your financial forecast on a regular basis.

If things are going well, your plan will help you think about how you can re-invest in your business. If you find that you're not meeting goals, you might need to adjust your budgets or your sales forecast. Either way, tracking your progress compared to your plan can help you adjust quickly when you identify challenges and opportunities—it's one of the most powerful things you can do to grow your business.

Prepare to pitch your business

If you're planning to pitch your business to investors or seek out any funding, you'll need a pitch deck to accompany your business plan. A pitch deck is designed to inform people about your business. You want your pitch deck to be short and easy to follow, so it's best to keep your presentation under 20 slides.

Your pitch deck and pitch presentation are likely some of the first things that an investor will see to learn more about your company. So, you need to be informative and pique their interest. Luckily, just like you can leverage an example business plan template to write your plan, we also have a gallery of over 50 pitch decks for you to reference.

With this gallery, you have the option to view specific industry pitches or get inspired by real-world pitch deck examples.

Ready to get started?

Now that you know how to use an example business plan to help you write a plan for your business, it's time to find the right one.

Use the search bar below to get started and find the right match for your business idea.

LivePlan logo

Tax Season Savings

Get 40% off LivePlan

The #1 rated business plan software

LivePlan pitch example

Discover the world’s #1 plan building software

entrepreneur business plan project

  • Search Search Please fill out this field.

What Is a Business Plan?

Understanding business plans, how to write a business plan, common elements of a business plan, how often should a business plan be updated, the bottom line, business plan: what it is, what's included, and how to write one.

Adam Hayes, Ph.D., CFA, is a financial writer with 15+ years Wall Street experience as a derivatives trader. Besides his extensive derivative trading expertise, Adam is an expert in economics and behavioral finance. Adam received his master's in economics from The New School for Social Research and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in sociology. He is a CFA charterholder as well as holding FINRA Series 7, 55 & 63 licenses. He currently researches and teaches economic sociology and the social studies of finance at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

entrepreneur business plan project

A business plan is a document that details a company's goals and how it intends to achieve them. Business plans can be of benefit to both startups and well-established companies. For startups, a business plan can be essential for winning over potential lenders and investors. Established businesses can find one useful for staying on track and not losing sight of their goals. This article explains what an effective business plan needs to include and how to write one.

Key Takeaways

  • A business plan is a document describing a company's business activities and how it plans to achieve its goals.
  • Startup companies use business plans to get off the ground and attract outside investors.
  • For established companies, a business plan can help keep the executive team focused on and working toward the company's short- and long-term objectives.
  • There is no single format that a business plan must follow, but there are certain key elements that most companies will want to include.

Investopedia / Ryan Oakley

Any new business should have a business plan in place prior to beginning operations. In fact, banks and venture capital firms often want to see a business plan before they'll consider making a loan or providing capital to new businesses.

Even if a business isn't looking to raise additional money, a business plan can help it focus on its goals. A 2017 Harvard Business Review article reported that, "Entrepreneurs who write formal plans are 16% more likely to achieve viability than the otherwise identical nonplanning entrepreneurs."

Ideally, a business plan should be reviewed and updated periodically to reflect any goals that have been achieved or that may have changed. An established business that has decided to move in a new direction might create an entirely new business plan for itself.

There are numerous benefits to creating (and sticking to) a well-conceived business plan. These include being able to think through ideas before investing too much money in them and highlighting any potential obstacles to success. A company might also share its business plan with trusted outsiders to get their objective feedback. In addition, a business plan can help keep a company's executive team on the same page about strategic action items and priorities.

Business plans, even among competitors in the same industry, are rarely identical. However, they often have some of the same basic elements, as we describe below.

While it's a good idea to provide as much detail as necessary, it's also important that a business plan be concise enough to hold a reader's attention to the end.

While there are any number of templates that you can use to write a business plan, it's best to try to avoid producing a generic-looking one. Let your plan reflect the unique personality of your business.

Many business plans use some combination of the sections below, with varying levels of detail, depending on the company.

The length of a business plan can vary greatly from business to business. Regardless, it's best to fit the basic information into a 15- to 25-page document. Other crucial elements that take up a lot of space—such as applications for patents—can be referenced in the main document and attached as appendices.

These are some of the most common elements in many business plans:

  • Executive summary: This section introduces the company and includes its mission statement along with relevant information about the company's leadership, employees, operations, and locations.
  • Products and services: Here, the company should describe the products and services it offers or plans to introduce. That might include details on pricing, product lifespan, and unique benefits to the consumer. Other factors that could go into this section include production and manufacturing processes, any relevant patents the company may have, as well as proprietary technology . Information about research and development (R&D) can also be included here.
  • Market analysis: A company needs to have a good handle on the current state of its industry and the existing competition. This section should explain where the company fits in, what types of customers it plans to target, and how easy or difficult it may be to take market share from incumbents.
  • Marketing strategy: This section can describe how the company plans to attract and keep customers, including any anticipated advertising and marketing campaigns. It should also describe the distribution channel or channels it will use to get its products or services to consumers.
  • Financial plans and projections: Established businesses can include financial statements, balance sheets, and other relevant financial information. New businesses can provide financial targets and estimates for the first few years. Your plan might also include any funding requests you're making.

The best business plans aren't generic ones created from easily accessed templates. A company should aim to entice readers with a plan that demonstrates its uniqueness and potential for success.

2 Types of Business Plans

Business plans can take many forms, but they are sometimes divided into two basic categories: traditional and lean startup. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) , the traditional business plan is the more common of the two.

  • Traditional business plans : These plans tend to be much longer than lean startup plans and contain considerably more detail. As a result they require more work on the part of the business, but they can also be more persuasive (and reassuring) to potential investors.
  • Lean startup business plans : These use an abbreviated structure that highlights key elements. These business plans are short—as short as one page—and provide only the most basic detail. If a company wants to use this kind of plan, it should be prepared to provide more detail if an investor or a lender requests it.

Why Do Business Plans Fail?

A business plan is not a surefire recipe for success. The plan may have been unrealistic in its assumptions and projections to begin with. Markets and the overall economy might change in ways that couldn't have been foreseen. A competitor might introduce a revolutionary new product or service. All of this calls for building some flexibility into your plan, so you can pivot to a new course if needed.

How frequently a business plan needs to be revised will depend on the nature of the business. A well-established business might want to review its plan once a year and make changes if necessary. A new or fast-growing business in a fiercely competitive market might want to revise it more often, such as quarterly.

What Does a Lean Startup Business Plan Include?

The lean startup business plan is an option when a company prefers to give a quick explanation of its business. For example, a brand-new company may feel that it doesn't have a lot of information to provide yet.

Sections can include: a value proposition ; the company's major activities and advantages; resources such as staff, intellectual property, and capital; a list of partnerships; customer segments; and revenue sources.

A business plan can be useful to companies of all kinds. But as a company grows and the world around it changes, so too should its business plan. So don't think of your business plan as carved in granite but as a living document designed to evolve with your business.

Harvard Business Review. " Research: Writing a Business Plan Makes Your Startup More Likely to Succeed ."

U.S. Small Business Administration. " Write Your Business Plan ."

  • How to Start a Business: A Comprehensive Guide and Essential Steps 1 of 25
  • How to Do Market Research, Types, and Example 2 of 25
  • Marketing Strategy: What It Is, How It Works, and How to Create One 3 of 25
  • Marketing in Business: Strategies and Types Explained 4 of 25
  • What Is a Marketing Plan? Types and How to Write One 5 of 25
  • Business Development: Definition, Strategies, Steps & Skills 6 of 25
  • Business Plan: What It Is, What's Included, and How to Write One 7 of 25
  • Small Business Development Center (SBDC): Meaning, Types, Impact 8 of 25
  • How to Write a Business Plan for a Loan 9 of 25
  • Business Startup Costs: It’s in the Details 10 of 25
  • Startup Capital Definition, Types, and Risks 11 of 25
  • Bootstrapping Definition, Strategies, and Pros/Cons 12 of 25
  • Crowdfunding: What It Is, How It Works, and Popular Websites 13 of 25
  • Starting a Business with No Money: How to Begin 14 of 25
  • A Comprehensive Guide to Establishing Business Credit 15 of 25
  • Equity Financing: What It Is, How It Works, Pros and Cons 16 of 25
  • Best Startup Business Loans 17 of 25
  • Sole Proprietorship: What It Is, Pros and Cons, and Differences From an LLC 18 of 25
  • Partnership: Definition, How It Works, Taxation, and Types 19 of 25
  • What Is an LLC? Limited Liability Company Structure and Benefits Defined 20 of 25
  • Corporation: What It Is and How to Form One 21 of 25
  • Starting a Small Business: Your Complete How-to Guide 22 of 25
  • Starting an Online Business: A Step-by-Step Guide 23 of 25
  • How to Start Your Own Bookkeeping Business: Essential Tips 24 of 25
  • How to Start a Successful Dropshipping Business: A Comprehensive Guide 25 of 25

entrepreneur business plan project

  • Terms of Service
  • Editorial Policy
  • Privacy Policy
  • Your Privacy Choices

Library homepage

  • school Campus Bookshelves
  • menu_book Bookshelves
  • perm_media Learning Objects
  • login Login
  • how_to_reg Request Instructor Account
  • hub Instructor Commons
  • Download Page (PDF)
  • Download Full Book (PDF)
  • Periodic Table
  • Physics Constants
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Reference & Cite
  • Tools expand_more
  • Readability

selected template will load here

This action is not available.

Business LibreTexts

1.1: Chapter 1 – Developing a Business Plan

  • Last updated
  • Save as PDF
  • Page ID 21274

  • Lee A. Swanson
  • University of Saskatchewan

Learning Objectives

After completing this chapter, you will be able to

  • Describe the purposes for business planning
  • Describe common business planning principles
  • Explain common business plan development guidelines and tools
  • List and explain the elements of the business plan development process
  • Explain the purposes of each element of the business plan development process
  • Explain how applying the business plan development process can aid in developing a business plan that will meet entrepreneurs’ goals

This chapter describes the purposes, principles, and the general concepts and tools for business planning, and the process for developing a business plan.

Purposes for Developing Business Plans

Business plans are developed for both internal and external purposes. Internally, entrepreneurs develop business plans to help put the pieces of their business together. Externally, the most common purpose is to raise capital.

Internal Purposes

As the road map for a business’s development, the business plan

  • Defines the vision for the company
  • Establishes the company’s strategy
  • Describes how the strategy will be implemented
  • Provides a framework for analysis of key issues
  • Provides a plan for the development of the business
  • Helps the entrepreneur develop and measure critical success factors
  • Helps the entrepreneur to be realistic and test theories

External Purposes

The business plan provides the most complete source of information for valuation of the business. Thus, it is often the main method of describing a company to external audiences such as potential sources for financing and key personnel being recruited. It should assist outside parties to understand the current status of the company, its opportunities, and its needs for resources such as capital and personnel.

Business Plan Development Principles

Hindle and Mainprize (2006) suggested that business plan writers must strive to effectively communicate their expectations about the nature of an uncertain future and to project credibility. The liabilities of newness make communicating the expected future of new ventures much more difficult than for existing businesses. Consequently, business plan writers should adhere to five specific communication principles .

First, business plans must be written to meet the expectations of targeted readers in terms of what they need to know to support the proposed business. They should also lay out the milestones that investors or other targeted readers need to know. Finally, writers must clearly outline the opportunity , the context within the proposed venture will operate (internal and external environment), and the business model (Hindle & Mainprize, 2006).

There are also five business plan credibility principles that writers should consider. Business plan writers should build and establish their credibility by highlighting important and relevant information about the venture team . Writers need to elaborate on the plans they outline in their document so that targeted readers have the information they need to assess the plan’s credibility. To build and establish credibility, they must integrate scenarios to show that the entrepreneur has made realistic assumptions and has effectively anticipated what the future holds for their proposed venture. Writers need to provide comprehensive and realistic financial links between all relevant components of the plan. Finally, they must outline the deal , or the value that targeted readers should expect to derive from their involvement with the venture (Hindle & Mainprize, 2006).

General Guidelines for Developing Business Plans

Many businesses must have a business plan to achieve their goals. Using a standard format helps the reader understand that the you have thought everything through, and that the returns justify the risk. The following are some basic guidelines for business plan development.

As You Write Your Business Plan

1. If appropriate, include nice, catchy, professional graphics on your title page to make it appealing to targeted readers, but don’t go overboard.

2. Bind your document so readers can go through it easily without it falling apart. You might use a three-ring binder, coil binding, or a similar method. Make sure the binding method you use does not obscure the information next to where it is bound.

3. Make certain all of your pages are ordered and numbered correctly.

4. The usual business plan convention is to number all major sections and subsections within your plan using the format as follows:

1. First main heading

1.1 First subheading under the first main heading

1.1.1. First sub-subheading under the first subheading

2. Second main heading

2.1 First subheading under the second main heading

Use the styles and references features in Word to automatically number and format your section titles and to generate your table of contents. Be sure that the last thing you do before printing your document is update your automatic numbering and automatically generated tables. If you fail to do this, your numbering may be incorrect.

5. Prior to submitting your plan, be 100% certain each of the following requirements are met:

  • Everything must be completely integrated. The written part must say exactly the same thing as the financial part.
  • All financial statements must be completely linked and valid. Make sure all of your balance sheets balance.
  • Everything must be correct. There should be NO spelling, grammar, sentence structure, referencing, or calculation errors.
  • Your document must be well organized and formatted. The layout you choose should make the document easy to read and comprehend. All of your diagrams, charts, statements, and other additions should be easy to find and be located in the parts of the plan best suited to them.
  • In some cases it can strengthen your business plan to show some information in both text and table or figure formats. You should avoid unnecessary repetition , however, as it is usually unnecessary—and even damaging—to state the same thing more than once.
  • You should include all the information necessary for readers to understand everything in your document.
  • The terms you use in your plan should be clear and consistent. For example, the following statement in a business plan would leave a reader completely confused: “There is a shortage of 100,000 units with competitors currently producing 25,000. We can help fill this huge gap in demand with our capacity to produce 5,000 units.”

HSC Projects

Entrepreneurship Project Business Plan- CBSE Class 12

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Many people helped me through their support and guidance for the successful completion of this project.

First of all, I thank the Almighty God for his goodness and mercy in giving me the strength to complete this project.

I, at this moment, express my abundant and sincere gratitude to Mrs. SANILA MANOJ, Department of Commerce, Dr. GR PS, XTZ for her valuable guidance, constant encouragement, and creative suggestions rendered during this project.

I thank SISTER XTZ (Managing Trustee) Mrs. XYZ (Senior Principal) Mr. XYZ (Principal) for providing me with all facilities and also for the constant inspiration and encouragement for successful completion of this project.

I offer my deepest gratitude to my family members, whose prayers and blessings guided me for the successful completion of this project. I also owe my gratitude to my classmates, whose support was inevitable for the completion of the project.

INTRODUCTION

A business plan is a written description of the business further. That means a document that describes what plan to do and how to do it. Business plan com perform several tasks for those who write & read them. They are used by investment seeking entrepreneurs to convey their vision to potential investors. They may also be used by firms that are trying to attract key employees, the prospect for new business deals with suppliers, or simply to understand how to manage their companies cutter.

  • To provide clarity of thought & purpose.
  • To introduce the business models.
  • To present examples, step by step explanation of the business plan.
  • To define what the business plan is and who prepares it.
  • To understand the scope and the value of the business

NEED AND SIGNIFICANCE

  • It gives direction to the vision formulated by the entrepreneurs.
  • To monitor the progress after implementing business plans.
  • To persuade others to join the business.
  • To seek loans from financial institutions.
  • To identify the actual strength and weaknesses of the plan.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

“ELVAGO CANTINA” believes in its unique delivery to service as its policy is “Consumer is king’ It’s traditional, as well as members outlook gives you the feeling as if you are the members of its family.

Though we are now the love and taste in our foods will be abundant.

The location is just a half kilometer from the bus bay situated at the heart of Cobin city. It provides great facilities provided with first-class infrastructural facilities.

ABOUT THE COMPANY

“ELVAGO CANTINA’ is a first-class startup company with very good infrastructure. This company believes she is securing the society by organizing social activities such as entertainment programs for the Physically Challenged or differently-abled children.

It also has the policy to donate a part of income to various and all spread old age homes around the Rochi city also.

In the present situation, ‘ELVAGO’ consists of about too many employers overall.

There are about employees and so on the executive staff members. It is situated in the less bay in Vytilla in the heart of Kochi City.

ELVAGO CANTINA

‘ELVAGO CANTINA’ is something a place where the variety of goods are sold to the customers. The statement motivates us to go to the restaurant business in India. We have suggested this because there is no branded restaurant until now. The tag line for ELVAGO CANTINA is

” TASTY; BUT CHEAPER”

To become the most preferred restaurant among the people by treating the people in the way they like to be treated.

For every business, location plays a vital role. The success and the future of the company depend on that place from the selling of the product and availability of the required raw materials at least cost. The location of our restaurant is in the heart of Kochi, i.e., Vytilla.

BUSINESS OBJECTIVES

  • To establish a working store for the restaurant.
  • To provide the true flavor of India at reasonable costs.
  • To understand the taste of the customers.
  • To balance our business goal with one financial objective.
  • To provide the best quality food to the customers.

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY

The initial summary of management depends on the founders, and there are various another working inside the company. As we grow, we will take an additional held in certain key areas.

At present, the ELVAGO CANTINA has two founders, Head offices, Eco, Sheffs, Managers, Waiting staff, etc.

The restaurant aims to be a stone in the community creating a neighborhood atmosphere where the customers feel safe and comfortable.

We target all the age groups of people from small children to teenagers and adults to the old aged people also. Our company’s culture is to satisfy in every way all the customs stepping into ‘ELVAGO’ especially with our special mems including:

  • Muttons Biryani
  • Elvago’s Special Biriyani
  • Vegetable Biryani.
  • Egg Biryani
  • Elvago’s Special Fried Rice
  • Green Chicken Rice.
  • Chicken Chops
  • Elvago’s Special Butter Chicken
  • Elvago’s Special Chicken Curry.

MARKET & COMPETITION

We are the startup company and are looking forward to earning a good share of the market. The other important things are customer satisfaction. The competitions are common in every society between Various enterprises

Our competitors are: –

Pai Brothers.

Sardarji ka Dhabha.

INFRASTRUCTURE

ELVAGO CANTINA provides great infrastructural facilities. Over 45 seats and family rooms are provided with a good air conditioning system. The infrastructure in our restaurant is very attractive. The restaurant has mainly two floors for the customers.

PHYSICAL PLANT

Area: – The piece of land which is required to organize the whole set up is about 1,600 sq. feet

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT

  • Refrigerators

FINANCIAL RESOURCES

It is SBA’s most basic and common loan program. These loans are mostly available through various commercial institutions, and most American banks participate as lenders in this program. Lenders typically grand loans up to £ 2,00,000.

FRIENDS & FAMILIES

Friends and family members might be the most lenient member of the ELVAGO CANTINA launch. They don’t tend to make you pledge your house and may even agree to sell their interest in your company back to you for a nominal return.

PERSONNEL PLAN

The personnel plan is based on operating 24/7 hrs and falls in with how EAVAGO CANTINA operates throughout the week.

Any additional price will be part-time & devoted to expansion on any catering functions, as well as increased capacity of private party function.

The enterprise currently has 100 employees. There are about 100 employees & 30 executive staff.

MARKET STRATEGY

Our strategy is based on serving our markets well. The concentration will be on providing fresh & quality good items.

A combination of local media & local store marketing programs will be utilized at each location. By providing a fun & entertaining environment with high-quality goods (foods at a reasonable rate, we will be coming shortly on top of the town.

UNIQUE SELLING PROPORTION

There are many restaurants in India. What gives a competitive advantage to the product of “ELVAGO CANTINA” is that it produces good and quality food. When compared to other restaurants, what makes us special is that we have many varieties of foods. The other restaurants charge a very high price in their foods; we charge only a reasonable price.

By analyzing the product,

  • I could easily find the customer’s taste and preferences in the area.
  • It could also analyze the price of Various products.
  • By writing a business plan, it is necessary to know about the starling of a business enterprise.

CONCLUSIONS

A Business plan is an important document that is essential for every business firm. This is valuable not only for the entrepreneurs but also for all the stakeholders who access the firm directly or indirectly. There are various components of a business plan which is prepared to depend upon the entrepreneur’s enterprise and knowledge.

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the project is an authentic record of the work done by ROHITH S. BOBBY , class XII.D during 2017-2018 towards the partial fulfillment of the AISSCE course prescribed by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE). The student has done the project with his/her effort & with the guidance of a concerned teacher.

Teacher In-charge

External Examiner

DECLARATION

I, XYZ do at this moment declare that the project entitled “BUSINESS PLAN” is a bonafide record of the project work done by me and was under the guidance of Mrs. SANILA MANOJ, also declare this project or any part of it has not been submitted by me fully or partially for any other examination before.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • NCERT textbook (Class XII) –
  • [email protected]

In order to download the PDF, You must follow on Youtube. Once done, Click on Submit

Subscribed? Click on Confirm

Download Entrepreneurship Project Business Plan- CBSE Class 12 PDF

Related articles.

entrepreneur business plan project

Social Science Project Topics For Class 10 CBSE

entrepreneur business plan project

Solar Vacuum Cleaner & Floor Cleaner Robot Project

entrepreneur business plan project

Cam Shaft Mechanism DIY Ventilator Project

entrepreneur business plan project

Android Hostel Management System

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

entrepreneur business plan project

Please Enable JavaScript in your Browser to Visit this Site.

Get started

  • Project management
  • CRM and Sales
  • Work management
  • Product development life cycle
  • Comparisons
  • Construction management
  • monday.com updates

Project management for entrepreneurs

entrepreneur business plan project

When you imagine a startup, you likely imagine sharp professionals who think fast and act faster, responding to market changes and new developments with poise and zeal. And while there’s some truth to that inherent agility, the reality is that a great business rarely comes without sufficient planning.

A simple take on small businesses and startups is that a successful entrepreneur is an equally successful project manager.

Throughout this project management for entrepreneurs guide, you’ll learn about best practices for managing  budding business projects effectively, and we’ll give some real-world examples of project management in an entrepreneurial environment. You’ll also see how project management software , such as monday.com, makes all the difference in the world of startups. But first, let’s find out why project management for entrepreneurs matters.

Project management for entrepreneurs isn’t just a buzzy phrase

In most big businesses, the processes and frameworks of project management are fairly standard. Project managers define scopes, scheduling, and budgets and assign team members tasks. But in startups and small businesses, project management disciplines are eschewed in favor of flexibility and fast responses. It’s easy to understand why — when you’re in the early stages of a business, agility is prized highly. Yet for new founders , taking pages from the more disciplined aspects of  project management is incredibly valuable.

Whether you’re creating a new business or looking for investors for your new venture, if any activity requires a series of steps, you should manage it like a project.

Leveraging a thorough project management process has a significant impact on success. Statistically, it equates to higher chances  of delivering on time and under budget.

Project management is all about defining goals, devising strategies to reach those goals, and prioritizing the necessary actions to execute those strategies. These skills are invaluable to an entrepreneur. When an entrepreneur develops and leverages skills in management, operations, and strategy, even the smallest efforts can result in big payoffs. And those efforts apply in almost every business instance that matters from managing resources to strategizing

From collaboration to resources, project management is an important skill for entrepreneurs

If you want your new business endeavor to succeed, it’s important to see it for what it is: one big project made up of smaller projects and tasks that when managed effectively, provides higher chances of success. Learning the foundations of project management will help entrepreneurs of every type overcome any kind of startup challenge, such as those we’ve outlined below.

Collaborative environments

For entrepreneurs managing a team, collaboration is the bread and butter of business success. A solid vision is one thing, but maximizing a team’s efforts requires collaboration and communication. What’s more, great collaboration tools help entrepreneurs widen their nets and start their venture with the perfect team members.

For bootstrappers in particular, being able to choose talent from across the globe gives a sharp edge over the competition. But entrepreneurs need equally powerful tools in place to make this level of collaboration possible.

Limited resources

One of the biggest challenges of new business is managing tight resources

Project management is the key to managing these resources. It gives you the tools and techniques to see exactly where your resources go — in terms of money and time. The cherry on top is that when investors start looking at your business, you can demonstrate how well you manage your resources with real data.

Learning and strategizing

Good decisions and solid strategies are key to success in the early days of a business. For this reason, it’s crucial to measure both individual project outcomes and how those fit with the larger business plan. With good project management practices in place, tasks, activities, and all their results are thoroughly documented, providing leaders with hard data for making decisions.

For business owners, this means reaching goals more quickly and efficiently while building a valuable information cache for future strategies. If you want to maximize these results, however, you need the right tool for the job.

Entrepreneurs can use monday.com for seamless project management

If you began your venture with a business plan in place, you took a great first step. But if you want to maximize the strategies you defined, you need a Work OS that helps you plan, measure, and optimize your actions and provides you with useful insights into their efficacy. monday.com gives you all of that.

A data-first Work OS, such as monday.com, helps you play the long game by giving you effective insights into workflows, task progression, and more. And with dozens of integrations, monday.com can turn the data from all your other tools into action items that help you strategize even further.

monday.com’s intuitive task boards mean you can effectively manage the process to help build your business by delegating tasks to your startup team. And with visual tools, such as Kanban boards, Gantt charts, and pre-set templates you can track progress with the click of a button, leaving you to focus on your overall business strategy.

Templates from monday.com can help you create workflows fast

Single project template.

Time is everything for an entrepreneur, and there’s rarely enough of it. This  single project template gives you some of your time back by providing you with everything you need to organize a single project. You can jump straight into planning and onto getting things done and monday.com’s flexible customizations mean you can add the functionality and workflows you need with ease.

For the information-hungry startup founder, the following questions and answers will round out your project management knowledge.

Why should an entrepreneur prepare the project themself?

The skills that lead to entrepreneurial success are often the very same skills required of a project manager. Project success means clearly defining goals, planning strategies for achieving those goals, and identifying possible pitfalls along the way. From an entrepreneurial perspective, these same principles apply to business research, sales strategies, market analysis, and operations. When a founder plans a project themselves, they can align goals to larger business strategies to help reduce risks, map challenges, and devise the best path forward for the overall business.

What are the five stages of project management? 

The five stages of project management methodology, developed by the nonprofit Project Management Institute, include:

  • Conception and initiation:  During this stage, the project manager defines the project in broad terms, sometimes defined by a business charter.
  • Planning: The planning stage is paramount to project success and involves defining the project’s scope and creating a roadmap for a team to follow.
  • Execution: During the execution stage, the team works through tasks and activities and produces deliverables to move the project along.
  • Performance monitoring: Using key performance indicators, or KPIs, the project manager measures the results of the execution to determine whether a project is on track.
  • Project close: The final stage is the formal project closer, where the team measures their successes and setbacks and identifies pain points where they can improve for future projects.

Use the right entrepreneurial tools for the job

Creating and running a startup is risky. But with a project management mindset, entrepreneurs can learn from the  10%  of startups that succeed every year and turn their small business into a results powerhouse.

One of the most prized and valuable qualities of a startup is its agility. But that doesn’t mean project management is something you should ignore. Instead, find valuable project management tools for entrepreneurs that champion that same agility and enable simplicity in workflows, so you can focus on results.

Related: Project management industries , Project management software for startups , Project management for non-project managers , Project management software for freelancers , Interior design project management , Project management software for sales

entrepreneur business plan project

Send this article to someone who’d like it.

Money Prodigy

23+ Free Entrepreneur Lesson Plans (Projects, Worksheets, etc.)

By: Author Amanda L. Grossman

Posted on Last updated: December 14, 2022

Need free entrepreneurship curriculum, lesson plans, and projects? Here's entrepreneur lesson plans for high school, middle school, and elementary.

group of tweens working together, text overlay

So, you’re looking for entrepreneur lesson plans to help turn your kids or students into the innovators of tomorrow.

And not just to make them into entrepreneurs, but to benefit your kids and students with the following results of teaching entrepreneurship :

  • Improved academic performance
  • Increased problem-solving and decision-making capabilities
  • Improved interpersonal relationships
  • Higher self-esteem

But, exactly how are you supposed to teach entrepreneurship?

Entrepreneurs, among other qualities, need to be able to recognize opportunities in the marketplace. This means finding a need, and figuring out how to solve that need in a profitable way.

This can be as simple as a kidpreneur/kidpreneurship (or kidpreneur-in-the-making) opening a lemonade stand on a smoldering July day near a construction site, and as complicated as creating a machine knob specifically for tea growers in Japan.

And having this ability doesn't have to result in a person starting their own business; it works equally as well for your child if they work for someone else in the form of more merit raises, one-time bonuses for one-off projects, promotions, leverage in salary negotiations, etc.

In fact, the skill of recognizing an opportunity, and seizing it by writing my own job description resulted in me snagging my first job out of college (worth an awesome $40,000 + benefits to me at the time). More on that in a bit.

What are the other skills a child needs to learn to help them as an entrepreneur?

Psst: you'll also want to check out my resource list of youth entrepreneurship programs , entrepreneur biographies for kids , kid entrepreneur kits , and full review of the Teen Entrepreneur Toolbox . 

Article Content

How Do You Teach Entrepreneurship?

Teaching entrepreneurship is a bit trickier than, say, teaching algebra. With algebra, the equations come out with the same solutions, every time. But with entrepreneurship?

There are an endless number of variables that go into it, and an endless number of outcomes that can come out of it.

How are you supposed to teach for that?

One of the best ways to teach entrepreneurship is to choose entrepreneurial projects, activities, and lesson plans that aim at nurturing these entrepreneur skills:

  • Ability to identify opportunities
  • Self confidence
  • At least basic knowledge of business finances/financial literacy
  • Knows how to take measured risk
  • Vision and creativity

Elementary School Entrepreneurship Curriculum

Excited to start teaching your elementary school-aged kids about entrepreneurship? Let me share some entrepreneurship lesson plans, resources, and curriculum with you.

Also, check out these 3 kid business plan examples .

1. Venture Lab

Who It’s For : Grades 1-12

Financial Aid : ( Free for non-commercial use ) Curriculum that organizations can purchase to use with students

Length of Program : 90-minute lessons

Location : N/A

Venture Lab offers a curriculum suited for 1st – 12th graders (curriculum is divided into lower elementary, upper elementary, and middle school/high school.) This is a course in a box with all of the lesson plans already completed and is meant to be utilized as part of regular coursework, after school programs, or camps.

Its focus is on teaching girls components of entrepreneurship such as STEAM concepts and design thinking.

2. Money Monsters Start their Own Business

Who It’s For : 4th – 8th grade

Students will read through the Money Monsters Start their Own Business book (PDF provided – 51 pages), and then play a game that has them experience the ups and downs of starting a business.

I love how a Toy Store Income Tracker is included so that each student can track their own earnings and see the numbers for themselves.

Psst: you'll also want to check out Federal Reserve Bank's webinar on teaching kids entrepreneurship , which will give you some lesson plan ideas. 

Starting a Business Lesson Plans for Middle School

Do you want to teach your middle school kid (or student) how to start a business, and you need a lesson plan? I’ve actually created a Take Your Child to Work Day printable which will give you lots of ideas for your starting a business lesson plan.

More middle school business lesson plans for how to start a business (all free):

  • Federal Reserve Bank's Jay Starts a Business (Grades 3-6; comes with teacher's manual with lesson plans)
  • Free Kid Business Plan Templates
  • Biz Kid’s Crash Course on Entrepreneurship for Middle School
  • EverFI’s Venture Entrepreneurial Expedition (for grades 7-10).
  • Small Business Administration’s Young Entrepreneurs course
  • Foundation for Economic Education’s Booms and Busts , What is Entrepreneurship? , What is the Entrepreneur’s Role in Creating Value? , etc. (students can earn a Certificate of Achievement)
  • TeenBusiness’s Entrepreneur Lesson Videos series
  • Parade of Entrepreneurs Lesson Plan
  • Lemonade Stand Worksheets , and my best Lemonade Stand Ideas
Psst: Try holding a market day in your class. Here are 22 things for kids to make and sell , 17 boy crafts to sell , and help pricing their products in this market day lesson plan .

Teaching Entrepreneurship to High School Students – Free Entrepreneurship Curriculum

There are some great curriculum and materials out there for teaching entrepreneurship in high school, many of which include entrepreneur worksheets for students.

Psst: you also might want to check out these 5 business books for teens , and 11 business games for students .

1. Alison’s Entrepreneurial Skills Path

Who It’s For : Business students, and people interested in learning about creating a business

Financial Aid : Free

Length of Program : 6 lessons, each between 1 and 3 hours

Alison is a free, online platform with tons of courses, and one of the paths you can go down is an entrepreneurial skills one.

Teachers of the courses include venture capitalists, professors at Harvard, and professional entrepreneurs.

Lessons include:

  • Characteristics of the Successful Entrepreneur
  • Critical Skills for Entrepreneurs
  • Creating an Entrepreneur’s Checklist for Success
  • Entrepreneurship – Creating the Business
  • Key Elements of Entrepreneurial Success
  • Why Entrepreneurs Should Think Big

2. Youth Entrepreneurs

Who It’s For : Students

Financial Aid : Schools pay for this program, with the cost based on how many students get free and reduced lunches

Length of Program : 1 year

With this program, students first focus on economics, then they focus on starting their own businesses.

3. Diamond Challenge Business Curriculum

Who It’s For : Kids and teens

Length of Program : 14 modules

Looking for a video business curriculum with instructional guides? The Diamond Challenge’s program covers the following:

  • What is Entrepreneurship?
  • Opportunity Recognition
  • Opportunity Screening
  • Types of Businesses
  • Building a Business like a Scientist
  • Using a Business Model Canvas

They also offer a Social Curriculum track that’s 6 video modules long, including:

  • What is Social Entrepreneurship?
  • Wicked Problems and Grand Challenges
  • Social Entrepreneurship Processes and Challenges

4. INCubateredu

Who It’s For : 10th and 12th graders

Financial Aid : Free (at schools where it’s available)

Length of Program : 1 year (followed by acceleratoredu for the 2nd year)

Through Uncharted Learning’s program, 10 th to 12 th graders develop their own business, pitch their idea ta a shark-tank style event, and even have a chance at receiving funding.

5. JA BE Entrepreneurial®

Who It’s For : Grades 9-12

Financial Aid : Free for students

Length of Program : 7, 45-minute sessions

Location : Anywhere

Through your child’s school, they can take Junior Achievement’s Entrepreneurial program. The course teaches students how to create a business plan, plus how to start a venture.

Lessons covered include:

  • What’s My Business?
  • Who’s My Customer?
  • What’s My Advantage?
  • Competitive Advantages
  • Ethics are Good for Business
  • The Business Plan

6. JA Company Program Blended Model

Length of Program : 13 classes (2 hours/class), or as a 1-year program with 26 classes (1 hour/class)

Location : Anywhere (online course)

This is an online program that teaches high schoolers how to solve a problem/fill a need in their community through entrepreneurship.

  • Start a Business
  • Vet the Venture
  • Create a Structure
  • Launch the Business!
  • Run the Business

7. The Mint's Be Your Own Boss

Who It’s For : Teens

Length of Program : 3 lessons

Starting with the Be Your Own Boss Challenge , The Mint takes your teen through the following three lesson:

  • Planning Your Business
  • Money & Your Business
  • The Law & Your Business

8. Wharton High School's Entrepreneurship

Who It’s For : High School students

Length of Program : 50+ lesson plans

These lesson plans go through the following:

  • Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurial Opportunities
  • Global Markets
  • Business Plans

9. YE$ Youth Entrepreneurship

Who It's for : high school students

Cost : Free

Location : Anywhere (it's a PDF)

Here's a free PDF with tons of entrepreneur lesson plans and research done for educators, that is meant to go along with a 4-H program. You'll find some nuggets in here, plus, it's free!

Now let’s take a look at entrepreneurial projects that can teach your kids and teens all about starting a business with hands-on experiences.

10. Build a Business Plan

Who It's For : Middle School and High School

Location : Anywhere (online)

Check out this plug n' play business plan creator! You could send your students to this page to work through a business idea of theirs.

Then, at the end, they can print out their business plan!

Questions they'll need to answer include:

  • Your big idea
  • Who will buy
  • How you'll spend and make money

Entrepreneur Worksheets for Students

While I would recommend taking on one of the projects below, or one of the hands-on lesson plans from above, there are also entrepreneur worksheets students can use to learn about businesses.

Here's a few of my favorites (all free):

  • Lemonade Stand Free Printables (here's my best lemonade stand ideas , too)
  • Lemonade Stand Worksheets
  • Family Guide to Getting a Family Business Going (kid-centered)
  • Small Business Administration's Lean Startup Business Plan
  • Take your students through the DECA Idea Challenge (you'll need to pick your own everyday item to challenge students with, as the competition has ended for the year)
  • Take your students through the DECA Entrepreneur of Tomorrow Challenge (again, the competition is over, but the PDF is still available for you to set up your own)
Psst: you might want to check out my review on the Teen Entrepreneur Toolbox .

2 Entrepreneurial Projects – What is an Entrepreneurial Project?

Entrepreneurial projects are a smart way to teach entrepreneurship to kids, because, as with any project, it gives them a chance to dive deeper into a topic that interest them (all under the guise of teaching them how to start and run a business).

Entrepreneur Project #1: Winter Beverage Outdoor Tasting Contest

It’s soooooo easy to sit inside all winter long and slowly accumulate cabin fever (plus a few pounds). That's why you've got to look for fun things to do in the winter.

Well today? We’re going to switch things up. I’ve created a family date night for you ( family winter activities !) that has both an indoor AND an outdoor component.

But don’t worry – with this fun winter activity we’ll keep things toasty throughout.

So, what’s the game plan? Each of your kid(dos) will make (rather,  create ) a warm winter beverage recipe  indoors . Then here's the twist: you’re going to host a family taste testing contest around your fire pit in the backyard.

Not only will this make a fun family memory, but your kid(dos) will actually walk away with more money knowledge in the process centered around the all-important lesson of how to make a profit!

Psst: Now that’s a money lesson I could have used as a kid, specifically as I’ve gone into biz for myself as an adult.

Host a Winter Beverage Outdoor Taste Testing

Finding fun things to do in the winter doesn't have to mean you're freezing your tootsies off. There's nothing better to keep you warm outdoors in the wintertime than a toasty drink. Well, a toasty drink around a roaring fire.

Here’s how it’s going down:

Step #1: Choose an Event Date

Build the anticipation for your family by choosing a date 1 to 2 weeks out (so that there’s time for you guys to complete the rest of the prep work).

Fill out the invitation on Page 1 of the free printable, and display prominently on your family’s bulletin board/gathering center in the kitchen so everyone knows the date of the big event.

Set the stage for the competition by having your family read their mission out loud. Other cool factors you can add in: make it a Friday or Saturday family date night, under the stars. Let the kids stay up a little past bedtime to complete.

Step #2: Your Kid(dos) Research Hot Drink Ideas to Enter into the Competition

Your kids are the ones entering the competition. They’ll be in the driver seat of actually creating their own recipe from scratch (with some inspiration from below).

There are lots of toasty, kid-friendly drink recipe ideas to get them started:

  • Hot caramel apple cider
  • Vanilla steamer with cinnamon
  • Harry Potter Warm Butterbeer

They’ll get lots of help not only from looking up recipe examples on sites like Pinterest, but also from the worksheet in the free printable (Page 2).

Step #3: Shop for the Ingredients

Once your budding restaurant consultant has determined possible ingredients they’ll need for their signature drink, they’ll need you, Mama Bear, to purchase them.

Take the list your kid(dos) have created and go to the store (solo, or with them) to make the purchases.

Having trouble coming up with a pool of possible ingredients to buy? Use the lists below for inspiration of what to pick up (a few of these ingredients you probably already have at home) and let your kids create what they can from it:

  • Bases : hot cocoa, apple cider, chai tea, milk
  • Flavors : cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla extract, flavor syrups
  • Sweeteners : sugar, brown sugar, caramel
  • Creamers : milk, half & half, almond milk, heavy cream, etc.
  • Top-offs : whipped cream, caramel sauce, orange peels for zesting

Save your store receipt, as your kid(dos) will need this information to price their drinks later on.

Step #4: Your Kid(dos) Tinker + Perfect their Drink

Using the purchased ingredients as well as anything in your home they can find, host a kitchen lab session where your kid(dos) tinker with ingredients and perfect their super-secret, signature recipes (talk about fun things to do in the winter inside!).

They’ll write down the exact portion sizes to each ingredient that they use as they go along, which is important for the next step.

Step #5: Your Kid(dos) Figure Out the Profit Margin of their Signature Drink

Remember, the goal is to create a new drink for this restaurant that not only costs less than $5, but has at least a 60% profit margin for the owner.

Ahem: between you and me, that means their cost needs to come in under $2.00.

So, as your kid tinkers with ingredients, they need to keep price in mind.

Note: this step can seem a bit unwieldy, but is SO important for the whole process. Just know – I’m outlining both how to do this all by hand, as well as giving you shortcuts to online calculators where your kid(dos) will still learn the process by setting up the inputs and thinking through how it all fits together.

Of course, we’re not talking about the cost of the entire ingredient that you’ve purchased. After all, it’s unlikely they’ll use an entire carton of milk to create one drink. We’re talking about the small portion size that they used of the product.

In other words, they’re not going to get the cost of a single drink they’ve created from your grocery store receipt as it is now. They need to do some calculating based on the measurements of each ingredient that goes into each drink.

You need to know how much it costs to create just ONE of your super-secret signature drinks so that you can calculate the profit margin.

What’s a profit margin? It’s the percentage of what you keep as profit from each $1.00. For example, a 20% profit margin means that we earn $0.20 on every dollar. That means that the other 80% or $0.80 are expenses. Remember that Jack, the man from The Yeti Slide, needs a 60% profit margin, or $0.60 on each dollar in profit after expenses are taken out.

Step #1: Write down your ingredients + quantities.

Step #2: Convert each quantity in your recipe to the quantity on the product label.

Divide your ingredients up by dry ones (like cocoa powder), and wet ones (like heavy cream or vanilla extract).

Then use the appropriate table below to convert the amount in your recipe to the amount that’s found on the ingredient’s product label (front of package).

For example, if you used 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder (dry ingredient), then your conversion is to a ½ ounce (the cocoa powder can is in ounces). Or if you used 2 tablespoons of almond milk, you find on the Wet Conversion table that you used 1 fl. Oz. (the almond milk carton is in Fl. Oz.).

Hint: Can’t find the conversion or a little confused? You can plug the exact quantity of your ingredients into  this liquid converter  or  this dry converter calculator  online and convert it into the measurement found on your product label).

Conversion tables:

Dry Conversions

Liquid Conversions:

Step #3: Calculate the cost of each quantity of ingredient used.

Now you need to price each converted quantity of ingredient by figuring out how much each ounce or fluid ounce costs, and then multiplying it by the amount you’ve used.

Hint: A good estimate to use for dashes of spices such as cinnamon or nutmeg is $0.05.

  • Write down the overall price of each ingredient used.
  • Write down the converted amount you used of it.
  • Divide the total amount in the product package by its price to find what each ounce or fluid ounce costs.
  • Then multiply that by the converted amount you used.
  • Write down the cost. Then add all of the individual ingredient costs to get your total expense to create the drink.

Example: I used 1 tablespoon (tbsp.) of heavy cream. One 8 fl. oz. container of heavy cream at the store costs $2.99. That is $0.37/ounce. I look at the conversion chart below, and see that 1 tbsp. converts to ½ ounce. So, I divide $0.37/2 ounces, and see that this ingredient for just one drink costs $0.186 (you can round up to $0.19).

Ingredient Cost:   $2.99 _ Converted Amount Used:  ½ fl. Oz.  Total Product Amount:  8 fl. Oz.   Cost per ounce:  _$0.37/fl. Oz.  Cost of Ingredient Used:  $0.37 X ½ = $0.186 .

Looking for a shortcut?  Here’s a free online tool for pricing out beverages . You’ll need the converted amounts.

Step #4: Calculate Your Profit Margin

Figure out how high your profit margin is if you sell the drink for $5.00.

Profit on Drink: $5.00 –  total drink cost  = _ $ _________.

Profit Per Dollar:  Your answer from above  \  Cost drink is sold for ($5.00)  =  $ Profit

Profit Margin:  $ Profit  X 100 =  Profit Margin%

Step #6: Taste Judging Begins

By now you’ve set the scene for some fun things to do in the winter outdoors – think a crackling bonfire out in the backyard (or in your fire pit. Heck, you can de-hibernate the grill for some winter outdoor cooking/heating), plus a table/flat surface where your kids can place their super-secret signature creations.

Bust out some blankets, cover straw bales with table cloths…you get the idea. (And if you’re in Houston like we are? Well, a hoodie should suffice).

Have your kid(dos) place their drinks on the tasting mat, as well as fill in how much their drink costs and what the profit margin is (all calculations they’ll be guided through on the free printable).

Now they get to take a break, while the parents taste + score each one!

Included in the printable are both a tasting mat as well as a score card with specific criteria, such as inventiveness, taste, and profit margin.

Step #7: Declare the Winners

There are winners in a variety of categories, and then an overall drink that is chosen for The Yeti Slide's Yeti Roasts:

  • Most Inventive
  • Best Money-Maker
  • Newest Yeti Slide Signature Drink

Looking for fun things to do in the winter? This two-part activity for your child that will leave them understanding profit margins like a pro, plus give your family an awesome family date night under the stars on a winter evening when you might otherwise be watching tv.

What could be better than that? If nothing else, you’ll have created quite the memory.

Entrepreneur Project #2: A System for Your Child to Identify a Need in Your Home + Propose a Solution

We want to encourage your child to come to you with things they see that could use improvement, and ways they could add value or provide a solution for you.

Let's go through how to do this.

Step #1 : Discuss with your child the idea that people need things + services.

Here's a conversation outline for you with a few blanks to fill in (where underlined) :

“People need things and services in their lives. They need things to maintain their health, they need things to make life more enjoyable. They need parts to make repairs to their belongings. They need really cool items to buy as gifts for others. They need better systems or processes to make things work more efficiently, which just means taking less time and less money and getting the same (or better) results. All over the world, people need things. In my own life, three needs that I've satisfied through purchasing something include  X ,  Y , and  Z . By purchasing them, they made my life easier because  <<FILL IN SPECIFIC INFORMATION FOR EACH EXAMPLE YOU GAVE>> . Generally, when people need something, they are willing to pay money for the solution. That's why there are so many companies, all which provide products + solutions for people's needs.”

Pssst: MAN I wish I could go back 17 years and give myself this talk! Would've saved me several adult years of banging my head against the wall trying to understand how to make money.

Step #2 : Task your child with identifying a need around the house/property/car.

What could this look like?

A Few Examples for you + your kiddo :

  • Find a more efficient way to organize the “command center” in your home.
  • Use Google Maps or another program to find a more efficient route for your commute.
  • Organize the wood pile + create newspaper logs that are fireplace-ready.
  • Find a better way to organize/clean/maintain the video game center in your home.
  • Clean out your car (I used to do this for my parents!) + add a car trash can to the back area so that in the future the kids can just use that instead of throwing things on the ground.
  • Introduce a better laundry system for the family's clothes so that they actually  all  end up in the laundry room, sorted, and ready to be washed.

The possibilities are endless, and specific to what needs your child sees in your family life.

Step #3 : Once they've identified a need and come to you with it, you must decide if it's worth it to you to move forward. Don't be afraid if, after they've told you a need they  think  you have but that you don't  actually  have, to tell them that it isn't a current need of yours. Hey, the road to success is paved with failed products! This is excellent feedback so that they start to understand their “customer” and dig deeper. Perhaps they'll even start to ask YOU what you want from them!

Step #4 : What are both of your expectations for this job so that you know when the job is completed correctly?

Let them tell you what they propose to accomplish and what that would look like.

Then you share what you, as a paying customer, expect in results. Hash this out if need be (just like a real negotiation between a biz and their potential client).

This includes a deadline.

Step #5 : Now you need to ask them for a price.

I know, I know. You might be wondering, “why on earth am I going to let my child choose how much I'm willing to pay them for something they want to do around the house? Isn't it MY money?”

I totally get that. But remember that the nature of this lesson is to ignite that entrepreneurial spirit in them. Instead of you offering what you're willing to pay, have them go through the exercise of pricing their efforts. Then the negotiations start.

This sets them up for good negotiation + valuation skills in the future.

Determine the market price you'll pay, which is where their price (the supplier) and your price (based on how much you need what they're offering + a dash of several other things) meets. $__________.

Step #6 : Your child completes the work + notifies you.

Step #7 : Using the checklist you both created, provide oversight and see if everything is as it was supposed to be.

Step #8 : Pay the agreed upon rate once everything is up to par. And if they don't quite complete the project + deliver what they promised, it's up to you whether you want to make a partial payment, or not pay at all (satisfaction guaranteed could be added to this lesson as well).

If your child makes it through this process, then they will have successfully figured out a “market” need, fulfilled it, and gotten paid from their initiative. This is something that will no doubt shape their futures.

And if they don't quite succeed? Well the lessons are vast for all entrepreneurs as they traverse through the mistakes, failures, and successes.

It's really a win-win situation.

Let me show you what I mean, with an example in my own life.

How I Used this Skill Set to Write My Own First Job Offer Worth $40,000 + Benefits

While some of my dorm mates were floundering around trying to find employment, I was busy enjoying my last two months of college before entering the “real world”.

Why is that? Because I had a job waiting for me. And the only reason why I had that job was I spotted a need in a local company, and wrote my way into it.

I had interned for an organization in my small college town, and they ended up building a start-up company set to open its doors sometime around when I was due to graduate. One day I asked them if I could have a full-time job there come June. The director looked at me, and said, “go ahead and write up a job description of what you propose you would do here. Then we'll see.”

So I went back to my college dorm and worked on a job description. I thought about what the company was trying to achieve, and tied this into what I wanted to do with my life (at least what I thought I wanted to do at the time).

I wish I had saved a copy of the actual job description, but my sharp memory tells me it went something like this:

“Amanda L. Grossman will be the International Marketing & Sales contact at Chesapeake Fields. The International Marketing & Sales Person is responsible for researching new markets around the world where Chesapeake Fields' products would be well received. Primary responsibilities include understanding these markets, making contact with potential wholesalers and distributors, sending samples, and being the brand ambassador for Chesapeake Fields within these markets.”

With one minor change − they put sales in front of marketing in my job title − I got an offer from them for $40,000 + benefits to do just that. Within the one year I worked there, I ended up negotiating an initial container load of $27,000 worth of our product to a major food retailer in Taiwan.

Unfortunately, my job AND that company went under not long after my first and only year there. But writing my way into a company right out of college based on a need I saw that I could fill? Well that was enough to impress future employers who then hired me.

See how lucrative learning this skill could be for your child? I'd love to hear below what needs (perceived or actual ones) your child comes up with to fulfill.

  • Latest Posts

My Facebook profile

Amanda L. Grossman

Latest posts by Amanda L. Grossman ( see all )

  • 50 Banking Activities for Kids (Student Financial Literacy) - February 14, 2024
  • 14 Christmas Activities for High School Students (they’ll Actually Find Cool) - December 1, 2023
  • 3 Fun Selfie Scavenger Hunts for Teens (Christmas, Fin Lit, etc.) - November 27, 2023

Thursday 8th of June 2017

Uh, I totally love this post! My hubby and I are both entrepreneurs and want to instill the same in our children... definitely going to use these tips!!

Friday 9th of June 2017

*Squee*! Thanks, Lauren. I'd love to hear what your kiddos come up with:).

web analytics

  • Starting a Business
  • Growing a Business
  • Business News
  • Science & Technology
  • Money & Finance
  • Subscribers For Subscribers
  • ELN Write for Entrepreneur
  • Store Entrepreneur Store
  • Spotlight Spotlight
  • United States
  • Asia Pacific
  • Middle East
  • South Africa

Copyright © 2024 Entrepreneur Media, LLC All rights reserved. Entrepreneur® and its related marks are registered trademarks of Entrepreneur Media LLC

Outline of a Sample Business Plan Not sure how to format your business plan? Here are step-by-step instructions.

By Stever Robbins • Jun 19, 2000

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Q: I want to know what questions I need to answer in my business plan. Do you have a format I can follow to write it?

A: Address your audience's questions. Professional investors want to know how big the opportunity is, why your team will make it happen and how much money you need. Help them know if they're not the right match as soon as possible so you don't waste their time and yours. Here are the elements you should remember to include in your business plan:

  • Executive summary. Begin your plan with an executive summary, which you should write last. The summary condenses your main points into two or three pages so investors can quickly decide if the opportunity suits them enough to keep reading.
  • Product. What are you selling? Describe your product, giving enough information to imagine the product. Eliminate the technical details-if you can't get the idea across quickly, you haven't thought it through enough.
  • Marketing. Who buys, why and how? Who are your customers? What need are you filling? Give numbers and sources to give a feel for the opportunity size. For example, " Tractors Quarterly , May 2000, says 20,000 tractor manufacturers need 15 hours to change production lines. Our patent-protected TractorGizmoT reduces that to 12 seconds, saving an estimated $55 billion yearly."

Forget markets such as "suburban teenagers"-that's way too broad. Address the market you can reach, and give your plan for reaching it. It isn't feasible to reach all suburban teenagers, but teenage boys who play multiplayer Internet-enabled games might be easy to reach through targeted publications and Web sites. Say so and put the cost of advertising in those magazines and Web sites into your financials.

Mention the "value proposition"-how valuable your product is to your customers. Cuticle clippers fill a real need, but $1,000 clippers won't sell. Amazingly, $15 cuticle clippers sell easily. Cuticles are evidently a $15 problem for many people.

  • Business model. Show where the money comes from. Gillette loses money on razors, but makes money-lots of money-selling blades. Discuss who pays you, how much they pay and how often. See http://www.venturecoach.com/resources/bizmodel.htm for examples of different business models.
  • The team. Introduce your team and advisory board. Good ideas are common; talented managers aren't. Show you have the right team for the idea by highlighting the relevant background of your team members. If you make ball bearings, emphasize your experience in manufacturing, not your time as a college newspaper editor. (Yes, this really happened.)

Business Plan Guide »

  • How Long Should Your Plan Be?
  • When Should You Write It?
  • Who Needs A Business Plan?
  • Why Should You Write A Business Plan?
  • Determine Your Goals and Objectives
  • How To Write A Business Plan
  • Marketing Plan
  • Updating Your Business Plan
  • Enhancing Your Business Plan
  • Business Plan Software
  • Books and How-to Manuals
  • Business Plan Templates
  • Sample Business Plans
  • Competition. What's your competition and why will you win? Competition may not be a company. Personal checkbook program Quicken considered pencil and paper, not other computer programs, the biggest competition.
  • Financing. How much money do you have? Where did it come from? How much do you want? How will you use it? What return are you promising investors?

Include two to five years of financial projections (called pro formas). Even if you can't predict the future exactly, creating the projections forces you to identify and double-check your assumptions.

  • Operations. Eventually you'll need to get things done. Describe how you'll deliver your product, the problems you expect and how you'll master them. If your business allows 100,000 people a year to order custom-made suits by telephone, here's where you say how you'll actually make and deliver 100,000 suits.
  • Scale. How will you grow? A diner isn't run the same way as a 250-table restaurant. Explain your growth plans and how your idea scales.
  • Development. How are you doing so far? If you're already under way, talk about your progress. In any event, lay out the next few months' milestones so you and your investors can track your progress.

As an entrepreneur, technologist, advisor and coach, Stever Robbins seeks out and identifies high-potential start-ups to help them develop the skills, attitudes and capabilities they need to succeed. He has been involved with start-up companies since 1978 and is currently an investor or advisor to several technology and Internet companies including ZEFER Corp., University Access Inc., RenalTech, Crimson Soutions and PrimeSource. He has been using the Internet since 1977, was a co-founder of FTP Software in 1986, and worked on the design team of Harvard Business School's "Foundations" program. Stever holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and a computer science degree from MIT. His Web site is a http://www.venturecoach.com .

The opinions expressed in this column are those of the author, not of Entrepreneur.com. All answers are intended to be general in nature, without regard to specific geographical areas or circumstances, and should only be relied upon after consulting an appropriate expert, such as an attorney or accountant.

Stever Robbins is a venture coach, helping entrepreneurs and early-stage companies develop the attitudes, skills and capabilities needed to succeed. He brings to bear skills as an entrepreneur, teacher and technologist in helping others create successful ventures.

Want to be an Entrepreneur Leadership Network contributor? Apply now to join.

Editor's Pick Red Arrow

  • 'The IRS is Coming in Hot': Jason Tartick Says All Business Owners Should Do This 1 Thing Before Filing Taxes — Or Risk a Potentially Pricey Audit
  • Lock What Is a 'Dry Promotion' — and Has It Happened to You? Employees in This Specific Group May Be the Most Likely Victims .
  • I Was a 25-Year-Old Nurse When I Started a Side Hustle to Combat Anxiety. It Made $1 Million in 7 Months — Then Sold for a Life-Changing Amount.
  • Lock 2 Phrases I Learned From a Senior CIA Officer That Changed My Leadership Style
  • The U.S. Justice Department Is Suing Apple in a Groundbreaking iPhone Monopoly Lawsuit — Here's Why
  • Lock I Built My Company to 23 Profitable Stores. Here's My Advice to Small Business Owners Who Want to Grow Their Retail Presence.

Most Popular Red Arrow

Why dei still matters for small businesses and startups.

DEI shouldn't be just a buzzword.

Mark Zuckerberg Told Meta Engineers to 'Figure Out' Snapchat's Privacy Protections: 'We Have No Analytics on Them'

Recently unsealed court documents detail "Project Ghostbusters," Meta's project to work around Snapchat's end-to-end encryption to intercept data.

Save $240 on a Lifetime Subscription That Provides More Than 1,500 Book Summaries

With Headway Premium, you can gain knowledge at a rapid rate.

Sam Bankman-Fried Sentenced to 25 Years in Prison for Multibillion-Dollar Crypto Fraud

Southern District of New York Judge Lewis Kaplan said that the loss amount to the victims of Bankman-Fried's crimes surpassed $550 million.

The Brand Whiz Behind Sun Bum Is Famous For Making Boring Products Fun. Then, This One Stumped Him.

Everything Tom Rinks touched turned to gold until he took on a brand launch at Target that fizzled. Then, he found a creepy doll on Ebay, and he saw a way forward.

How To Improve Your Soft Skills and Emotional Intelligence in 7 Easy Steps

Using these simple but effective approaches will help a person in their business, life and relationships.

Successfully copied link

comscore

Select Region or Brand

  • Charleston, SC
  • Columbia, SC
  • Greenville, SC
  • Pennsylvania
  • Lehigh Valley, PA
  • Long Island, NY
  • Mecklenburg, NC
  • New Orleans, LA
  • Oklahoma City, OK
  • Rochester, NY
  • South Carolina
  • Color Magazine
  • Massachusetts
  • North Carolina
  • Rhode Island
  • Milwaukee, WI
  • Designers Today
  • Furniture Today
  • Gifts & Decorative Accessories
  • Home Accents Today
  • Home Furnishings News
  • Home Textiles Today
  • Manage Your Print or Online Subscription
  • Manage Your Email Subscriptions

Upcoming Event

Health Care Heroes Awards and Summit

  • Reader Rankings
  • Summer Camp Program
  • Directories
  • Events Calendar
  • Submit an Event
  • Advertising
  • Free eGuide
  • Event Sponsorships
  • Print Advertising
  • Classifieds
  • Public Notice Advertising
  • Editorial and Special Products Calendar
  • Latest News
  • Construction
  • Health Care
  • Manufacturing
  • Real Estate
  • Women in Business
  • Best Places to Work in PA
  • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Summit
  • Empowering Women
  • Fastest Growing Companies
  • Forty Under 40
  • Health Care Heroes Awards & Summit
  • Icon Honors
  • Nonprofit Innovation Awards
  • Reader Rankings Contest
  • Real Estate Development Summit and Top Projects
  • Veterans in Business
  • Women of Influence
  • Virtual Panel Discussions
  • Movers and Shakers Submissions
  • Movers and Shakers
  • Public Notices
  • Whiteboards
  • Power List Recommendation Form
  • Power Lists
  • The Power 100
  • Central Penn Parent
  • Leads & Data Center
  • Book of Lists
  • Add My Business
  • Contact Leads & Data
  • About Leads & Data
  • Merchandise
  • Plaques & Permissions
  • Business Lists
  • 2024 Editorial Calendar
  • Free Email Newsletter
  • Help & FAQ
  • Contact CPBJ

Harrisburg entrepreneur’s airport shuttle business taking flight

Ed Gruver // April 1, 2024 //

entrepreneur business plan project

Gary Grant’s Relax and Ride transportation business is now focusing on airport shuttles.  PHOTO/PROVIDED BY GARY GRANT 

entrepreneur business plan project

Share this!

Related Content

entrepreneur business plan project

Shapiro’s energy plan draws reactions from Pa. labor, industry leaders

Pennsylvania’s labor and industry leaders continue to address Gov. Josh Shapiro’s energy plan that the gov[...]

April 1, 2024

entrepreneur business plan project

Famed School of Rock celebrates opening in York

The famous School of Rock recently celebrated its opening in York.

March 29, 2024

entrepreneur business plan project

Measure to make Hershey’s Kisses state candy passes Pa. House

Rep. Tom Mehaffie, R-Dauphin, said legislation to name Hershey’s Kisses Pennsylvania’s official state cand[...]

March 28, 2024

entrepreneur business plan project

New state initiative could quicken capital project completion time

Gov. Josh Shapiro announced a new directive for Pennsylvania agencies under his jurisdiction to evaluate and i[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Lancaster tax firm listed among USA Today rankings

USA Today has named Lancaster-based CPA and advisory firm RKL to its list of America’s Most Recommended Tax [...]

March 27, 2024

entrepreneur business plan project

Maley selected for ABA Community Bankers Council

Lori Maley, president, and CEO of Bank of Bird-in-Hand has been chosen by the American Bankers Association to [...]

CPBJ Daily Newsletter

Sign up for your daily digest of Central Pa. News.

  • By signing up you agree to our
  • Privacy Policy

Top Stories

entrepreneur business plan project

UPMC in Central Pa. offers team approach to spine care

entrepreneur business plan project

York sports complex a step closer to reality

entrepreneur business plan project

SBA offers disaster relief to South Central Pa. small businesses

entrepreneur business plan project

Movers & Shakers

entrepreneur business plan project

FEATURED MOVER: Christina Ward | Diamond Wealth Advisor

Listen to this article Christina Ward Diamond Wealth Advisor Diamond Wealth Advisors is pleased to a[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Jay Jajich | River Wealth Advisors

Listen to this article Jay Jajich River Wealth Advisors River Wealth Advisors is pleased to announce[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Kaylah Dailey | River Wealth Advisors

Listen to this article Kaylah Dailey River Wealth Advisors Kaylah Dailey has been promoted to Client[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Andrew R. Essis | Flowers & Flowers, CPAs

Listen to this article Andrew R. Essis Flowers & Flowers, CPAs Flowers & Flowers, CPAs, is p[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Trisha Parks| River Wealth Advisors

Listen to this article Trisha Parks River Wealth Advisors Trisha Parks has been promoted to Client S[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Eric Stankiewicz | Lee & Associates of Eastern Pennsylvania LLC

Listen to this article Eric Stankiewicz Lee & Associates of Eastern Pennsylvania LLC Eric Stanki[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Jesse Robinson | River Wealth Advisors

Listen to this article Jesse Robinson River Wealth Advisors Jesse Robinson has been promoted to Seni[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Janice Stratton | Fulton Private Bank

Listen to this article Janice Stratton Fulton Private Bank Fulton Private Bank welcomed Janice Strat[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

USA Today has named Lancaster-based CPA and advisory firm RKL to its list of America’s Most Recomm[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Lori Maley, president, and CEO of Bank of Bird-in-Hand has been chosen by the American Bankers Assoc[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Family Care Act draws support of small business; others cite tax increase

More than 100 small business owners signed a letter of support this week for a statewide family leav[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

West Shore Home and First National Bank earn top workplace honors

West Shore Home and First National Bank, a subsidiary of F.N.B. Corp., each earned a Top Workplaces [...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Savant Wealth Management named among 10 Best Financial Advisors

Savant Wealth Management has been named to CNN Underscored’s list of the 10 Best Financial Advisor[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Warren Stumpf, principal, Capital Region Insurance Agency, talks about computerization, automation, and rising costs in insurance

Warren Stumpf, 70,founded Capital Region Insurance Agency in 1996 and has spent more than 40 years i[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Gettysburg receives federal funding for welcome center

The Borough of Gettysburg has received $1,272,436 in Congressionally Directed Funding to construct t[...]

entrepreneur business plan project

Horst Insurance acquires Manheim brokerage firm

Lancaster-based Horst Insurance has acquired Ruhl Insurance, an insurance brokerage firm based in Ma[...]

Privacy Overview

IMAGES

  1. How to create a perfect Business Plan? Steps to create a successful plan

    entrepreneur business plan project

  2. Simple Business Plan Template For Startup Founders

    entrepreneur business plan project

  3. Free business plan templates and examples for your startup

    entrepreneur business plan project

  4. Business plan for entrepreneurship

    entrepreneur business plan project

  5. Business Plan

    entrepreneur business plan project

  6. Business Plan Examples For Students Entrepreneurship PDF (2022)

    entrepreneur business plan project

VIDEO

  1. How to Write a Business Plan

  2. Entrepreneurship Business plan on Chocolate Project for Class 12 CBSE 2022-23/Business plan project

  3. Business Plan, Meaning, Content, Need, Innovation and entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship Development

  4. Business Plan Writing 101: Wharton Entrepreneurship Series

  5. How to Write a Business Plan Step by Step in 2024

  6. Developing a business plan, elements, feasibility analysis, innovation and entrepreneurship, dwivedi

COMMENTS

  1. How To Write A Business Plan (2024 Guide)

    Describe Your Services or Products. The business plan should have a section that explains the services or products that you're offering. This is the part where you can also describe how they fit ...

  2. How to Write a Business Plan

    Add in the company logo and a table of contents that follows the executive summary. 2. Executive summary. Think of the executive summary as the SparkNotes version of your business plan. It should ...

  3. How to Write a Business Plan: Guide + Examples

    Download Now: Free Business Plan Template. Writing a business plan doesn't have to be complicated. In this step-by-step guide, you'll learn how to write a business plan that's detailed enough to impress bankers and potential investors, while giving you the tools to start, run, and grow a successful business.

  4. How To Write A Business Plan

    Within the overall outline of the business plan, the executive summary will follow the title page. The summary should tell the reader what you want. This is very important. All too often, what the ...

  5. 11.4 The Business Plan

    The IndUS Entrepreneurs, one of the largest global networks of entrepreneurs, also holds business plan competitions for students through its Tie Young Entrepreneurs program. In contrast, business plans submitted for that competition can usually be up to twenty-five pages. ... Facebook and Twitter updates of the project coupled with educational ...

  6. How To Write A Business Plan: A Guide For Entrepreneurs (2023)

    With Marketing Calendar, you can coordinate, execute, and share your business plan, so everything goes smoothly from start to finish. 1. Create A Project For Your Business Plan. Add a business plan project to your calendar on the day you intend to publish the post. 2. Schedule Your Business Plan Projects.

  7. Simple Business Plan Template for Entrepreneurs

    Simple Business Plan Template for Entrepreneurs. Follow This Business Plan Outline to Write Your Own. By. Susan Ward. Updated on October 13, 2022. Reviewed by. Thomas J. Catalano. Fact checked by Leila Najafi. In This Article.

  8. The Essential Guide to Writing a Business Plan

    A typical business plan is 15 to 25 pages. Its length depends on a variety of factors, such as whether your business is introducing a new product or belongs to a new industry (which requires ...

  9. Business Plan: What It Is + How to Write One

    A business plan is a written document that defines your business goals and the tactics to achieve those goals. A business plan typically explores the competitive landscape of an industry, analyzes a market and different customer segments within it, describes the products and services, lists business strategies for success, and outlines ...

  10. 550+ Sample Business Plan Examples to Inspire Your Own

    The business model canvas is a one-page template designed to demystify the business planning process. It removes the need for a traditional, copy-heavy business plan, in favor of a single-page outline that can help you and outside parties better explore your business idea. The structure ditches a linear format in favor of a cell-based template.

  11. How to Write the Perfect Business Plan: A Comprehensive Guide

    For many entrepreneurs, developing a business plan is the first step in the process of deciding whether to actually start a business. ... We project first-year revenue of $720,000 and a 10 percent ...

  12. Simple Business Plan Template (2024)

    This section of your simple business plan template explores how to structure and operate your business. Details include the type of business organization your startup will take, roles and ...

  13. Business Plan: What It Is, What's Included, and How to Write One

    Business Plan: A business plan is a written document that describes in detail how a business, usually a new one, is going to achieve its goals. A business plan lays out a written plan from a ...

  14. 1.1: Chapter 1

    As the road map for a business's development, the business plan. Defines the vision for the company. Establishes the company's strategy. Describes how the strategy will be implemented. Provides a framework for analysis of key issues. Provides a plan for the development of the business. Helps the entrepreneur develop and measure critical ...

  15. Free editable and printable business plan templates

    That's why every entrepreneur—seasoned or novice alike—needs a business plan. A business plan acts as a compass for the owner, ... We have a wide range of detailed project plan templates perfect for startups. If you want to focus on marketing or public relations strategies for your presentation, we have free business plan templates geared ...

  16. Entrepreneurship Project Business Plan- CBSE Class 12

    There are various components of a business plan which is prepared to depend upon the entrepreneur's enterprise and knowledge. CERTIFICATE This is to certify that the project is an authentic record of the work done by ROHITH S. BOBBY , class XII.D during 2017-2018 towards the partial fulfillment of the AISSCE course prescribed by the Central ...

  17. An Introduction to Business Plans

    The classic business plan writer is an entrepreneur seeking funds to help start a new venture. Many, many great companies had their starts on paper, in the form of a plan that was used to convince ...

  18. The Complete Guide To Project Management For Entrepreneurs

    The five stages of project management methodology, developed by the nonprofit Project Management Institute, include: Conception and initiation: During this stage, the project manager defines the project in broad terms, sometimes defined by a business charter. Planning: The planning stage is paramount to project success and involves defining the ...

  19. 23+ Free Entrepreneur Lesson Plans (Projects, Worksheets, etc.)

    9. YE$ Youth Entrepreneurship; 10. Build a Business Plan; Entrepreneur Worksheets for Students; 2 Entrepreneurial Projects - What is an Entrepreneurial Project? Entrepreneur Project #1: Winter Beverage Outdoor Tasting Contest; Entrepreneur Project #2: A System for Your Child to Identify a Need in Your Home + Propose a Solution

  20. How To Start A Business From Scratch: 5 Easy Steps

    5. Make Your First Sale. The best feedback on your business new idea comes from your customer's wallet. If someone is willing to spend money on something, then you have uncovered a genuine need ...

  21. Business Plan: Outline of a Sample Business Plan

    The team. Introduce your team and advisory board. Good ideas are common; talented managers aren't. Show you have the right team for the idea by highlighting the relevant background of your team ...

  22. Harrisburg entrepreneur's airport shuttle business taking flight

    The Harrisburg-area entrepreneur's transportation business, first begun in 2013 with his Personal Care Transport, evolved by 2017 to include Central PA Winery & Brewery and Relax and Ride. Today ...