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April 18, 2019 6-8-geometry

Printable raft writing surface area activity, grades 6–8, by: jeff todd.

Today I'm sharing a surface area activity I've used in middle school classrooms since the mid-90s. I have since developed it to become a RAFT writing assignment. In this article, you'll find free printable instructions and rubrics for scoring this toy company themed surface area activity!

Surface Area Activity That Incorporates The RAFT Writing Strategy

This surface area RAFT activity is perfect for middle school students learning about surface area of rectangular prisms. Students imagine that they are a marketing company president and are pitching to a toy company a design proposal for a box for shipping square toy blocks. They need to propose a shipping container for the toy blocks that is not too expensive (i.e., conserves surface area) and provides ample space for a powerful marketing message (i.e., has a large side to display the marketing message).

raft-writing-strategy-surface-area-activity-750px.png

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Using the raft writing strategy in mathematics.

If you haven’t used the RAFT writing strategy in math before, let me introduce you to the format. RAFT stands for Role, Audience, Format, and Topic. With the RAFT writing strategy students are given a role in a real-life writing topic, a specific audience, a pre-defined format, and a specific topic.

Here is how this surface area activity works using a RAFT writing model:

Role—You are the President of a marketing company that is submitting a proposal to design the packaging for a product.

Audience—You are writing to the President of a toy company, who will make a decision on which proposal to accept.

Format—You are writing a business letter that includes an attachment showing your marketing design for the packaging of the product.

Topic—You are addressing two areas of concern about the package: the cost of the cardboard and the design of the main face (side) of the package.

The surface area activity is framed in this way: You are to create a design proposal for the packaging (a box) of ABC blocks (children’s toys) that will be used to display a set on the shelf of a store. The package contains 48 one-inch cubes. You must identify the dimensions of the box. The toy company wants to keep the cost of the cardboard used to make the packaging as low as possible, but would also like to have one face of the package designed to capture the customers’ attention.

Individual and Group Work

I have done this activity both as an individual and as a group activity. If it is used as group work, the surface area activity lends itself to having “departments.” There could an art department that designs the package, a writing department for writing the letter, a technical department calculating the dimensions of the package, and a manager to coordinate the group’s activities.

The scoring rubric for the RAFT activity includes criteria for students to communicate mathematically when writing the letter. Specifically, students can address the Standard for Mathematical Practice 3, which includes students constructing a viable argument as to why the toy company should use their design. These goals are also consistent with the ELA writing standards for grade 6–8, where students are required to write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

In Conclusion

If you would like to use this RAFT writing surface area activity in your class, click on the link below to download the instructions for students and the scoring rubric to grade their work.

raft examples math

Kelly Harmon

R.A.F.T. Writing in MATH

  • by Kelly Harmon
  • Jan. 11, 2019, 1:46 p.m.

When I started using the  6+1 Traits of Writing  9 years ago, I loved the strategy of RAFT to get students focused on a specific message for a specific audience.  RAFT   stands for Role, Audience, Format, and Topic.  It really helped my students zone in on what was most important. Then as my instruction evolved, I found that RAFT was also an awesome strategy for writing in math.

In math, this strategy is great for getting students to think deeply about mathematical ideas. In RAFT, student construct an explanation or argument to a prompt. The prompt asks them to use their conceptual or procedural knowledge to address a prompt in a specific format for a specific audience and topic

raft examples math

Here are a few example prompts:

R: You are a big number.

A: Your audience is a smaller number.

F: The format is a letter.

T: The topic is "Ways we can become equal"

R: You are a math strategy for adding numbers (or multiplying)

A: Your audience is another strategy

F: The format is a debate

T: The topic of the debate is "How and why your strategy is better than the other strategy"

R: You are a square.

A: Your audience is a rectangle.

F: The format is a Venn Diagram.

T: The topic is "Ways you are the same and how you are different"

The response to the prompt will provide you and the student with data about the students' current understanding and reasoning about critical math concepts or procedures. Be sure to develop a rubric that includes the learning targets you are looking for students to demonstrate through the writing.

I love this strategy because it gets kids to think and develop new ideas. Learning happens when we are in a productive struggle and RAFT will take your students there!

raft examples math

RAFT Writing

RAFT Writing: Teaching students to analyze writing prompts

I first heard of RAFT writing several years ago as a strategy for students to show their content knowledge beyond just writing reports.  Most of the suggestions for use have been in upper grades classrooms, especially in middle school and high school.  It’s also a common format for writing in content areas to have students demonstrate their understanding of the topic that has been learned- often as a product at the end of the unit. RAFT Writing has students respond when the Role, Audience, Format, and Topic are laid out for students to do their writing, often showcasing their content knowledge.  It’s also a great tool to help teachers write prompts for those content areas.

Over the years, however, I’ve used RAFT as a writing strategy for analyzing prompts in elementary school with students as young as first grade.  RAFT has allowed me to give students experience and exposure with various writing types, build in creative writing into our writing centers, and give students a tool to use for state testing to analyze the prompts their given and respond appropriately.

RAFT is an acronym identifying the four aspects of a writing prompt:

R- Role (who is the character/narrator and their point of view)

A- audience (who is the writing for), f- format (what type of writing is expected), t- topic (what you are writing about).

RAFT Writing anchor chart: role, audience, format, topic

Examples of RAFT in content areas could be: ~Write an article as if you were a water droplet going through the water cycle.

~Write a story as a water droplet going through the water cycle.

~Pretend you are a child in 1774 in what will eventually be America. Describe what your life is like.

RAFT Writing is commonly used as essay responses at the end of units to measure students’ content knowledge.  It’s also used in more open ended ways allowing for differentiation; the role and audience may be the only pieces given and students are able to choose the format and specific topic.  Or, students are given the topic and format, but can choose their role and the audience.  This is most often done in intermediate classrooms and higher as the focus is on the subject and content that has been taught, and not on the writing itself.

I’ve used RAFT as a strategy in other ways in my elementary classroom, and with other classes and groups of students, with good success.

RAFT Writing in the Primary Grades

I have used RAFT Writing with students as young as first grade as a way of building creative writing. In first grade I introduce it by explaining each of the components.  We then generate, together, several different items for each component. We generally do about 4-6 and often use students in the class or people in the school as the role and audience. This helps make the task relevant to students. We then roll a dice to choose which item from each category we’ll use.  We do a shared writing of it together, the first time. Then, we select another for the students to complete independently.  After students are familiar with RAFT and how it can be used to generate a writing task, I use my RAFT Writing cards as an option during our centers to build students’ creative writing.

raft examples math

RAFT Writing as a Test Prep Strategy

I also really like using RAFT as a test prep strategy.  On the state tests, students are given an on-the-spot prompt to respond to.  Often, it’s in response to reading, and students are expected to respond from a range of genres.  In my experience, students struggle to identify the proper genre to respond to or miss out on other key pieces of information, such as writing from a character’s perspective.  With my third graders, it’s so important to me that they have a strategy to “attack” a difficult task that is given to them.  RAFT is a strategy that can make them break down the prompt and help them feel ready to respond successfully.

We do our main writing work during our writers workshop four days a week. However, one day a week, we do specific RAFT practice. I begin the year doing various narrative writing tasks with RAFT, though I introduce it with examples of all 3 genres. I want my students to be successful with it so I don’t typically do much of the other genres until we have explicitly done them together. However, I will occasionally do something like a how-to, or something opinion based that I know they have strong feelings about. Our weekly RAFT practice gives my students an opportunity to work through the genres in a more spiral way than we typically do during writers workshop. It also allows me to continue to do focused lessons on specific strategies I want to see in their writing.  This pre-writing step has made a world of difference for my students as they tackle the demands of state testing writing prompts!

After I’ve introduced and practiced RAFT with my students, we begin analyzing prompts. Using the strategy to think through and plan writing with the acronym is why it’s so effective and useful. This easy form is one I use when I begin having students independently analyze their writing prompts.  I have students identify each area of RAFT and then I work to correct any misconceptions.  You can download the free page by clicking the image below.

RAFT the Writing Prompt

I also offer a variety of free RAFT writing resources in my free library. As we practice RAFT throughout the year, we move on to students writing based on the the prompt information. These printables and templates have us up and working with a prompt in just a few quick seconds. I have 5 ready to print digital RAFT prompts ready to go!

RAFT Writing Strategy Digital Prompts

You can download each of them from my Free Library. To access it, sign up for my newsletter. After confirmation, you’ll receive an email with the link and password to access each of the files for yourself.

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RAFT is such a useful writing strategy that can be incorporated in so many different ways in the classroom.  In addition to our writing block, I also use digital prompt writing and journals to give students much needed practice responding to prompts on a regular basis.  You can read more about that by clicking the link below.

Journals in the Classroom

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I'd done it often in 4th grade, but not with much success in 2 nd. They have so much trouble, it seems, with " role" ( writing from that perspective) . I do love the format and the creativity it allows.

I started with silly ones like kindergartener. They were so excited to write with incorrect spelling and backwards letters. I let them do it once, but then they got it! Maybe it's also a developmental shift for them right about that age.

Cute idea! (You know that this is Debi, don't you, not Kelley? I can't figure out how to get her name off the account.)

Yes, I just figured you were on the wrong account 🙂

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Helping Multilingual Learners Thrive

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RAFT (Role, Audience, Format, Topic) Assessment: Great way to assess Multilingual Learners

raft examples math

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Choice in writing and assessment can be motivating and builds in differentiation, so you don't have to create a bunch of assignments for each student to meet them where they are. One of the most versatile and creative writing strategies is the RAFT (Role, Audience, Format, Topic). As the teacher, you can provide parameters for this assignment connected to a goal or standard from your content area. This assignment/assessment leads students to understand the purpose for writing, the audience they are writing to, the varied formats of writing in everyday life, and the specific topic that will be their theme. It's fantastic for Multilingual Learners because they can delve deep into a topic without providing a language-heavy document. All students benefit from higher-order thinking, creatively stretching and focusing directly on how they need to write to address specific audiences.

Thanks for reading Helping Multilingual Learners Thrive! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.

The following questions help students define with more depth the different aspects of the RAFT paper.

Role of the Writer: Who or what are you as the writer? An activist? A soldier? The President? Audience: To whom are you writing? A friend? Your teacher? Readers of a newspaper? Format: In what format are you writing? A letter? A poem? A speech? Topic and strong verb: What are you writing about? Why? What's the subject or the point?

Ways to teach RAFT explicitly, especially the first time you introduce it.

Project a completed RAFT example.

Describe each of the components of the RAFT: role, audience, format, and topic. (It may be helpful to have students in small groups create a large chart paper or a bulletin board for future reference).

raft examples math

On a projector, model how to write responses to the prompts and discuss the key elements as a class. Keep this as simple and concise as possible for newcomers to the language.

Have students practice responding to prompts individually or in small groups. At first, it may be best to have all students react to the same prompt so the class can learn from varied responses.

The RAFT strategy has been adapted for students from K-12 and beyond. I use RAFT in my college classroom. Thinking of these four different aspects pushes them to think more deeply. I have listed some strategies that are particularly useful for MLs.

MLs can review the RAFT concept and assignment orally first. Have students work in pairs to explain what is meant by role, audience, format, and topic.

In small groups, students can create anchor charts describing and illustrating each of the elements of RAFT.

Have students role-play explanations of the different aspects of RAFT assignment.

Allow students to create bi- or multi-lingual responses to the RAFT assignment.

Encourage less language-heavy formats such as brochures, slides, or posters for those at the beginning stages of proficiency.

Pair students together to create RAFT assignments with clear expectations for both students. Be mindful of the linguistic capabilities of both students for the final product.

Provide models of RAFTs for students to use as scaffolding for completing their own.

MLs who know the content or topic of the RAFT may be able to produce more depth within the RAFT, especially if they are encouraged to look up material in their primary language.

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Sample RAFT for a math class!

raft examples math

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Have you used the RAFT before with Multilingual Learners?

Share your experience.

Thank you for reading Helping Multilingual Learners Thrive. This post is public so feel free to share it.

raft examples math

Ready for more?

Anchor chart for the RAFT strategy

Reading and Writing Strategies

RAFT Writing

The RAFT strategy encourages students to write creatively, consider a topic from a different perspective, and to gain practice writing for different audiences.

Download a Graphic Organizer

RAFT is a writing strategy that helps students understand their role as a writer, the audience they will address, the varied formats for writing, and the topic they’ll be writing about. 

  • R ole of the Writer: Who are you as the writer? A pilgrim? A soldier? The President?
  • A udience: To whom are you writing? A political rally? A potential employer?
  • F ormat: In what format are you writing? A letter? An advertisement? A speech?
  • T opic: What are you writing about?

Why use the RAFT strategy?

Students must think creatively and critically in order to respond to prompts, making RAFT a unique way for students to apply critical thinking skills about new information they are learning. RAFT writing can be used across disciplines as a universal writing approach.

How to create and use the strategy

  • Walk students through the acronym RAFT and why it’s important to consider various perspectives when completing any writing assignment.
  • Display a RAFT writing prompt to your class and model how you would write in response to the prompt.
  • Have students react to another writing prompt individually, or in small groups. It works best if all students react to the same prompt so the class can learn from each other’s responses.
  • As students become comfortable in reacting to RAFT prompts, you can create more than one prompt for students to respond to after reading, a lesson, or a unit of study. Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content.

Sample RAFT prompts

R:  Citizen A:  Congress F:  Letter T:  Taxation
R:  Scout Finch  A:  Community of Monroeville, Alabama F:  Eulogy for Atticus Finch T:  Social Inequality

Strategy in action

For more RAFT prompts, review Doug Fisher and Nancy Frey’s compiled list of Picture Book RAFT prompts . You may also find a RAFT scoring rubric and additional RAFT examples helpful as you implement the RAFT strategy in your class. Now, let’s watch as a teacher uses the RAFT writing strategy in her science class.

Tips for success

  • It’s important for students to learn how their writing may change for different perspectives. It’s helpful to show students examples of writings on the same topic and format but with different roles of the writer or audience.
  • Once students are fluent using the RAFT strategy, they can take any topic and choose the role, audience, and format on their own.

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Using the RAFT Writing Strategy

Using the RAFT Writing Strategy

About this Strategy Guide

This strategy guide introduces the RAFT technique and offers practical ideas for using this technique to teach students to experiment with various perspectives in their writing.

Research Basis

Strategy in practice, related resources.

The more often students write, the more proficient they become as writers.  RAFT is a writing strategy that helps students understand their role as a writer and how to effectively communicate their ideas and mission clearly so that the reader can easily understand everything written.  Additionally, RAFT helps students focus on the audience they will address, the varied formats for writing, and the topic they'll be writing about. By using this strategy, teachers encourage students to write creatively, to consider a topic from multiple perspectives, and to gain the ability to write for different audiences. In the book, Strategic Writing , Deborah Dean explains that writing for differing purposes and audiences may require using different genres, different information, and different strategies. Developing a sense of audience and purpose in writing, in all communication, is an important part of growth as a writer.

RAFT assignments encourage students to uncover their own voices and formats for presenting their ideas about content information they are studying.  Students learn to respond to writing prompts that require them to think about various perspectives:

  • R ole of the Writer: Who are you as the writer? A movie star? The President? A plant?
  • A udience: To whom are you writing? A senator?  Yourself? A company?
  • F ormat: In what format are you writing? A diary entry? A newspaper?  A love letter?
  • T opic: What are you writing about?

Santa, C., Havens, L., & Valdes, B. (2004). Project CRISS : Creating Independence through Student-owned Strategies . Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt.

Dean, Deborah. 2006. Strategic Writing: The Writing Process and Beyond in the Secondary English Classroom . Urbana, IL: NCTE.

  • Explain to your students the various perspectives writers must consider when completing any writing assignment.  Examples of different roles, audiences, formats, and topics can be found in a list of Picture Book RAFTs by Doug Fisher and Nancy Frey .
  • For instance, if students are reading To Kill a Mockingbird , you may have students respond to the issues in the story as various characters to different audiences in multiple formats.
  • Have a class think-aloud to come up with ideas for the piece of writing that you will create as a group.  Model on a whiteboard, overhead projector, or chart paper how you would write in response to the prompt.  Allow student input and creativity as you craft your piece of writing.
  • Give students another writing prompt (for which you have already chosen the role, audience, format, and topic) and have students react to the prompt either individually or in small groups. It works best if all students follow the same process so the students can learn from the varied responses of their classmates.
  • Choose a few students to read their RAFT aloud.  Have a class discussion about how each student created their own version of the RAFT while using the same role, audience, format, and topic.
  • As students become comfortable in reacting to RAFT prompts, give students a list of options for each component and let them choose their role, audience, format, and topic.
  • Eventually, students may choose a role, audience, format, and topic entirely on their own.  Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content when shared.
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Watch CBS News

Read the full decision in Trump's New York civil fraud case

By Graham Kates

Edited By Stefan Becket, Paula Cohen

Updated on: February 16, 2024 / 8:27 PM EST / CBS News

The judge overseeing the civil fraud case in New York against former President Donald Trump and the Trump Organization has issued his long-awaited ruling , five weeks after the  trial in the case concluded . 

Judge Arthur Engoron ordered Trump and his company to pay $354 million in fines — a total that jumps to $453.5 million when pre-judgment interest is factored in. It also bars them from seeking loans from financial institutions in New York for a period of three years, and includes a three-year ban on Trump serving as an officer or director of any New York corporation. 

Additional penalties were ordered for Trump's sons, Eric and Donald Trump Jr., who are executives at the company, and two former executives, Allen Weisselberg and Jeffrey McConney.

New York Attorney General Letitia James  brought the civil suit  in 2022, seeking a  penalty that grew to $370 million  and asking the judge to bar Trump from doing business in the state. 

Judge Engoron had already ruled in September that Trump and the other defendants were  liable for fraud , based on the evidence presented through pretrial filings. 

The judge had largely affirmed James' allegations that Trump and others at his company had inflated valuations of his properties by hundreds of millions of dollars over a the course of a decade and misrepresented his wealth by billions in a scheme, the state said, intended to trick banks and insurers into offering more favorable deal terms.

Trump and his legal team long expected a defeat, with the former president decrying the case as "rigged" and a "sham" and his lawyers laying the groundwork for an appeal before the decision was even issued. He is expected to appeal.

Read Judge Engoron's decision here :

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Graham Kates is an investigative reporter covering criminal justice, privacy issues and information security for CBS News Digital. Contact Graham at [email protected] or [email protected]

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Idea Sheets are cross-referenced to subjects listed in the Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards, and California Content Standards.

Mathematical Practices: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. ||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 3||Mathematical Practices|||Mathematical Practices: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. ||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 4||Mathematical Practices|||4.MD.1. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two- column table. For example, know that 1 ft is 12 times as long as 1 in. Express the length of a 4 ft snake as 48 in. Generate a conversion table for feet and inches listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), …||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 4||Measurement And Data||Solve Problems Involving Measurement And Conversion Of Measurements From A Larger Unit To A Smaller Unit|||Mathematical Practices: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. ||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 5||Mathematical Practices|||5.MD.1. Convert among different-sized standard measurement units within a given measurement system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05 m), and use these conversions in solving multi-step, real world problems.||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 5||Measurement And Data||Convert Like Measurement Units Within A Given Measurement System|||Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system. [Examples of scale properties include the sizes of an object’s layers (such as crust and atmosphere), surface features (such as volcanoes), and orbital radius.] ||Next Generation Science Standards||Middle School||Earth and Space Science||Earth’s Place in the Universe|||Mathematical Practices: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. ||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 6||Mathematical Practices|||6.RP.1. Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship between two quantities. For example, “”The ratio of wings to beaks in the bird house at the zoo was 2:1, because for every 2 wings there was 1 beak.”” “”For every vote candidate A received, candidate C received nearly three votes.””||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 6||Ratios And Proportional Relationships||Understand Ratio Concepts And Use Ratio Reasoning To Solve Problems|||6.RP.2. Understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated with a ratio a:b with b =? 0, and use rate language in the context of a ratio relationship. For example, “”This recipe has a ratio of 3 cups of flour to 4 cups of sugar, so there is 3/4 cup of flour for each cup of sugar.”” “”We paid $75 for 15 hamburgers, which is a rate of $5 per hamburger.””1||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 6||Ratios And Proportional Relationships||Understand Ratio Concepts And Use Ratio Reasoning To Solve Problems|||6.RP.3. Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations.||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 6||Ratios And Proportional Relationships||Understand Ratio Concepts And Use Ratio Reasoning To Solve Problems|||Mathematical Practices: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. ||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 7||Mathematical Practices|||7.RP.2. Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities.||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 7||Ratios And Proportional Relationships||Analyze Proportional Relationships And Use Them To Solve Real-World And Mathematical Problems|||Mathematical Practices: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. ||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 8||Mathematical Practices

4.d. The Earth is one of several planets that orbit the sun, and the moon orbits the Earth.||CA Science||Grade 3||03. Earth Sciences||4. Objects in the sky move in regular and predictable patterns.|||5.b. The solar system includes the Earth, moon, sun, eight other planets and their satellites, and smaller objects such as asteroids and comets.||CA Science||Grade 5||03. Earth Sciences||5. The solar system consists of planets and other bodies that orbit the sun in predictable paths.|||5.c. The path of a planet around the sun is due to the gravitational attraction between the sun and the planet.||CA Science||Grade 5||03. Earth Sciences||5. The solar system consists of planets and other bodies that orbit the sun in predictable paths.|||4.e. The appearance, general composition, relative position and size, and motion of objects in the solar system, including planets, planetary satellites, comets, and asteroids.||Grade 8||01. Physical Sciences||4. Earth in the Solar System||4. The structure and composition of the universe can be learned from the study of stars and galaxies, and their evolution.

  • Earth and Space Science

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  1. RAFT examples for math

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  3. RAFTs

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  4. Math RAFT by Stephanie Seretis

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  5. Raft Writing Template

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  6. RAFT Reveiw

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  1. Raft Foundation Numerical || 2023 PU || Factor of Safety calculation

  2. THE FINAL RAFT WARS! Cool Math Games #4 (#1 wouldnt upload)

  3. Raft: LIVE

  4. 6 BIG MISTAKES IN RAFT FOUNDATION

  5. கணக்கு எண்ணும் எழுத்தும் வகுப்பறை வளங்கள்

  6. 101 Raft Tips: #72: Difficulties

COMMENTS

  1. Printable RAFT Writing Surface Area Activity, Grades 6-8

    Using the RAFT Writing Strategy in Mathematics If you haven't used the RAFT writing strategy in math before, let me introduce you to the format. RAFT stands for Role, Audience, Format, and Topic. With the RAFT writing strategy students are given a role in a real-life writing topic, a specific audience, a pre-defined format, and a specific topic.

  2. RAFT

    Students are applying math concepts that they learned in a fun way. Here is how you can implement this strategy into your classroom. Using RAFT 1. Develop a list or brainstorm with students choices for: • Role of the writer (reporter, observer, eyewitness) • Audience for the writing (teacher, other students, parent, someone in the community)

  3. PDF Examples of RAFT Assignments Role Audience Format Topic

    RAFT Examples for Math Role Audience Format Topic Zero Whole numbers Campaign speech Importance of the number 0 Scale factor Architect Directions for a blueprint Scale drawings Percent Student Tip sheet Mental ways to calculate percents Repeating decimal Customers Petition Proof/check for set membership ...

  4. RAFT

    Display a completed RAFT example on the overhead. Describe each of these using simple examples: role, audience, format, and topic. (It may be helpful to write the elements on chart paper or a bulletin board for future reference). Model how to write responses to the prompts, and discuss the key elements as a class.

  5. R.A.F.T. Writing in MATH

    Here are a few example prompts: R: You are a big number. A: Your audience is a smaller number. F: The format is a letter. T: The topic is "Ways we can become equal" R: You are a math strategy for adding numbers (or multiplying) A: Your audience is another strategy F: The format is a debate

  6. A Guide to the RAFT Writing Strategy Across Content Areas

    R.A.F.T. can help you identify and incorporate the elements of effective writing. The R.A.F.T. strategy engages students in explaining what they know about a topic and then elaborating. In addition, it provides students with a choice that is on grade level.

  7. K20 LEARN

    50-60 minutes Essential Questions How does the RAFT instructional strategy lead to authentic learning in a classroom environment? How is authenticity supported when using the RAFT instructional strategy? Learning Goals Participants will identify how the RAFT strategy can be used as a tool to support literacy in all content areas.

  8. RAFT Writing

    Examples of RAFT in content areas could be: ~Write an article as if you were a water droplet going through the water cycle. ~Write a story as a water droplet going through the water cycle. ~Pretend you are a child in 1774 in what will eventually be America. Describe what your life is like.

  9. ERIC

    RAFT, an acronym for Role of the Writer, Audience, Format, and Topic, allows students to practice using different voices and topics as they write. This article describes the author's implementation of the RAFT instructional strategy with her math students. RAFT examples that can be used in a math class are provided.

  10. PDF Occasions for an Equation

    For example if the equation is 2(x + 1) + 7x =? and the number rolled is an 11, the x would be set equal to 11 giving: 2(11 + 1) + 7(11) = 2(12) + 7(11) = 24 + 77 = 101 6. Players compare answers; if the answers are different players work the calculations together to determine the correct answer.

  11. RAFT (Role, Audience, Format, Topic) Assessment: Great way ...

    Ways to teach RAFT explicitly, especially the first time you introduce it. Project a completed RAFT example. Describe each of the components of the RAFT: role, audience, format, and topic. (It may be helpful to have students in small groups create a large chart paper or a bulletin board for future reference).

  12. PDF R.A.F.T. Writing Assignments

    Secondary R.A.F.T. Examples 6th Grade Math: Types of Angles Role Audience Format Topic Vertical angle Opposite vertical angle Poem It's like looking in a mirror Acute angle Missing angle Wanted Poster Wanted: My complement Any angle less than 180 degrees Supplementary angle Persuasive speech Together we make a straight angle

  13. RAFT Writing

    Display a RAFT writing prompt to your class and model how you would write in response to the prompt. Have students react to another writing prompt individually, or in small groups. It works best if all students react to the same prompt so the class can learn from each other's responses. As students become comfortable in reacting to RAFT ...

  14. R.A.F.T.

    R.A.F.T. - The Math of Kaan! R.A.F.T. Example Links Click on the RED title to link. RAFT info and examples from Tantasqua School District in MA. RAFT info and examples from Somers Central School District in NY. RAFT info, examples and rubric from Saskatoon Public School District in Canada.

  15. Results for raft examples

    Browse raft examples resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, a marketplace trusted by millions of teachers for original educational resources.

  16. MATH RAFT CARDS

    This RAFT Card is designed for third grade level. Informative statement on how much money is in each drawer, for whole bank deposit. Count, read, and writes whole numbers 1 to 10,000. A game show host of a popular TV game show with audience. Math drills-Contestants in pairs of two compete by answering questions.

  17. Using the RAFT Writing Strategy

    RAFT is a writing strategy that helps students understand their role as a writer and how to effectively communicate their ideas and mission clearly so that the reader can easily understand everything written.

  18. Free math lesson plan idea sheet for STEM & STEAM game

    For example, when rolling a number cube 600 times, predict that a 3 or 6 would be rolled roughly 200 times, but probably not exactly 200 times.||Common Core Mathematics||Grade 7||Statistics And Probability||Investigate Chance Processes And Develop, Use, And Evaluate Probability Models|||Mathematical Practices: 1.

  19. Occasions for an Equation!

    Students can either evaluate or solve algebraic equations. Both games reinforce order of operations, evaluating equations, and solving equations. Grades covered: 4 through 8 Curriculum Topics: Manipulate and Solve Equations, Order of Operations, Solving for Variables Download Sheet Standards

  20. RAFT

    RAFT for MATH.docx RAFT for MATH.pdf RAFT for SCIENCE.docx RAFT for SCIENCE.pdf RAFT for SOCIAL STUDIES.docx RAFT for SOCIAL STUDIES.pdf ... "How would you modify the content area RAFT examples so that they would work with a particular unit or topic as an end-of-unit assessment in your classroom?" I would keep the audience and format

  21. Math Action Goes Both Ways

    Download Sheet Standards Idea Sheets are cross-referenced to subjects listed in the Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards, and California Content Standards. Common Standards Click to View California Standards (Click to View) Categories include: Grades K-2 Grades 3-5 Math Tags: Problem Solving, Addition & Subtraction, Counting

  22. RAFT examples for math

    Scale/Balance Algebra students Advice Column Keep me in mind when solving an equation Standard Form (Ax + By = C) Slope Intercept Form (y=mx+b) Friendly Letter September 2013 Krystal Coker We are just alike Free essays, homework help, flashcards, research papers, book reports, term papers, history, science, politics

  23. Read the full decision in Trump's New York civil fraud case

    The judge's ruling orders former President Donald Trump and his company to pay $354 million in fines, plus almost $100 million in interest, and restricts Trump's business activities in the state.

  24. Space Stuff to Scale

    Idea Sheets are cross-referenced to subjects listed in the Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards, and California Content Standards. Common Standards Click to View. California Standards (Click to View) Categories include: Earth and Space Science. Grades 3-5. Grades 6-8. Science. Math.