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science research papers for high school students

Inflammatory Disease Emergence Linked to Epigenetic Factors

Advancements in solar cells with perovskites, policy effects on e-cigarette behaviors among high school students: agent-based simulations, double bunked races in the u.s. house of representatives, the role of liquid biopsy biomarkers in lung cancer: current and future applications, most viewed, tracking enzymatic hydrolysis of an amide bond using highly simplified 4-nitroanilide colorimetric substrates, 3d bioprinted organs and their effects, harvesting geothermal energy on mars for future settlement, plant-based bioremediation in water: the antibacterial and flocculating capabilities of moringa oleifera lam. seed extracts in combination with oligodynamic metal as a purifier for..., myopia: unveiling the efficacy of treatment options in adults and adolescents, human stem cell-derived organoids address top medical leading causes of death in the us, genome editing tools and their implications in agriculture, effects of nutrition on cognitive health, computer science, early detection of crop diseases using cnn classification, evaluation of computer vision models on car crash detection, 3d lidar-based object conditions in adverse weather conditions, how hashtags are used on instagram following a globally known event and their relevance, hydrogen production from wastewater using microorganisms – a review, monitoring the concentration of carbon dioxide by measuring the change in the resistance of tio2 nanowires doped with potassium, powering the future:  comprehensive strategies for enhancing efficiency and stability in organic photovoltaic cells, comparison of plastics bags and it’s most common alternatives, stay connected, how can deep learning improve lidar and radar data analysis in object detection for self-driving cars, a comparative analysis of sentiment classification models for improved performance optimization, a literature review of data ethics in autonomous vehicles, partnerships, why every high school researcher interested in biology should be reading nature, partnership spotlight: grammarly, various approaches to infinite slope stability in the prediction of shallow rain-induced landslides, black holes’ information paradox and it’s complexity, geometric investigation of tandem flapping hydrofoils under wave orbital motion, how did early stages of the universe shape its evolution into its current state, how does economic discrimination of schedule castes in india compare with economic discrimination of the black race in the usa, the malice that creeps in exploring the influence of bullying and revenge-themed k-dramas on viewers’ perceptions and attitudes from cultivation theory media and cultural..., an empirical analysis of companies in the s&p 500: testing the efficacy of esg scores and the existence of greenwashing in the wider market, environmental science, the role of women in shaping climate policy: an empirical analysis, revealing regional disparities: how fractals uncover global warming’s varied impact, carbon accounting in schools – an analysis of emissions in montgomery county public schools, popular categories.

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The National High School Journal of Science is a free, online, student-run and peer-reviewed research journal that is targeted towards high school students. Striving to bring science to a wider audience and engaging students in learning beyond the classroom walls, our journal hopes to expose young people to new ideas and topics. This high school student-run science journal always welcomes aspiring scientists to submit articles and to get involved with our publishing process.

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science research papers for high school students

HS Research Articles

  • Treatment Optimization for Tumor Growth by Ordinary Differential Equations Kenneth Chan; Chiu-Yen Kao, Jennifer Gordinier, Katherine Ganden 11-30-2023
  • The Bracero Program: A Catalyst for Social Justice Teddy Fleiss; Michele Santosuosso 11-30-2023
  • Spatial Distribution of Microplastics and Mesoplastics in Sediments across Hsinchu, Taiwan Devin Kang; Alexander Kunz, Toulouse-Antonin Roy 11-30-2023
  • The Role and Therapeutic Potential of α-secretase in Alzheimer’s Disease Vandana Peddapalli; Patricia Van Oosten-hawle 11-30-2023
  • Ethical Considerations and Societal Impact of Personalized Advertising Algorithms Anirudh Parasrampuria; Katherine Williams 11-30-2023
  • Towards Sustainable AI: Mitigating Carbon Impact Through Compact Models Eddie Zhang, Jixiu Chang, Ashley Yang 11-30-2023
  • Research on the Synthesis Process of the Key Intermediate T18 in Nirmatrelvir Mengyu Zhang 11-30-2023
  • The Myth of the Female Muse: The Underrepresentation of Female Artists in the 21st Century Stella Lee; Elias Swapna 11-30-2023
  • Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia Using Machine Learning and EEG Andrew Yao; Guillermo Goldsztein, Alfred Renaud 11-30-2023
  • K-band Absolute Magnitude Relations of Red Clump Stars Separated by Age Tiffany Zhang; Nicole Spinelli 11-30-2023
  • The Handover of 1997 and Its Effects on the Hong Kong Aviation Industry Gareth Fung; Suraj Nair 11-30-2023
  • Genetic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with the Pathogenesis of Autism Spectrum Disorder Katherine Hua 11-30-2023
  • Investigation of Anatomy of Zooplankton by DAPI, Nile Red and Phalloidin Staining Houyu Tong; Jingwen Huang 11-30-2023
  • MRI Detection of Osteoporosis Bone Fractures Opposed to DEXA Scan Mansi Velagapudi; Jothsna Kethar 11-30-2023
  • Cytogenetics and Molecular Diagnosis in Horse Infertility Jiwon Choi; Mayra Cerna, Terje Raupsepp 11-30-2023
  • Treatment Options for High Cardiometabolic Risk Patients with Atherosclerosis Tanay Gour 11-30-2023
  • Collagen as a Nanonization Strategy for Enhancing Natural Antioxidants in Cancer Treatment Amber Lin; Dr. Juin-Hong Cherng 11-30-2023
  • Using Behavioural Economics to Explain Substance Abuse Among Indian Adolescents Ayaan Bhatt; Avani Desai 11-30-2023
  • Modelling Optical Invisibility in a Lenticular Microlens array with methods of Geometrical Optics and Weber's Contrast Daniel Vorobiev 11-30-2023
  • Machine Learning for Risk Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease: Current Advances and Future Prospects Abhaya Saridena, Ananya Saridena; Jothsna Kethar 11-30-2023
  • Antibacterial Properties of Manuka Honey and the Role of Methylglyoxal Youlin Feng 11-30-2023
  • A Comparative Analysis of CNNs and RNNs for EEG-based Motor Imagery Classification in BCIs Yat Hei Vanessa Lam; Leo Lui 11-30-2023
  • Running-Specific Prosthesis The Key for Continued Involvement in Sports for Youth with Lower Leg Amputations Oluranti Olatosi 11-30-2023
  • Deep-Learning Based Automatic Ergonomic Assessment Using Webcam Data Owen Lu; Clark Hochgraf 11-30-2023
  • The Role of Government in Combating Child Labor: India as a Case Study Aaliya Gupta 11-30-2023
  • Using Heuristic Algorithms to Solve the 0-1 Knapsack Problem Sanatan Mishra; David Perkins 11-30-2023
  • Understanding Dog Behavior through Visual and Auditory Sensing Using Machine Learning Amy Lin; Mark Eastburn 11-30-2023
  • Supervised Fusion Music Composition Through Long Short-Term Memory and Stochastic Modelling Matthew Lee 11-30-2023
  • A Method for Training Object Scale Estimation System using Feature Extraction Enhancement with Depth Estimation Kyungryun Kim 11-30-2023
  • Kavain Hydroxylation in Kava Metabolism: Computational Analysis Youlin Feng 11-30-2023

Announcements

Call for papers: volume 13 issue 3.

If you are a high school student or a recent high school graduate aspiring to publish your research, we are accepting submissions. Submit Your Article Now!

Deadline: 11:59 p.m. May 31, 2024

A guide to writing a scientific paper: a focus on high school through graduate level student research

Affiliation.

  • 1 NIEHS Children's Environmental Health Sciences Core Center, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, USA. [email protected]
  • PMID: 23094692
  • PMCID: PMC3528086
  • DOI: 10.1089/zeb.2012.0743

This article presents a detailed guide for high school through graduate level instructors that leads students to write effective and well-organized scientific papers. Interesting research emerges from the ability to ask questions, define problems, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and make critical connections. This process is incomplete, unless new results are communicated to others because science fundamentally requires peer review and criticism to validate or discard proposed new knowledge. Thus, a concise and clearly written research paper is a critical step in the scientific process and is important for young researchers as they are mastering how to express scientific concepts and understanding. Moreover, learning to write a research paper provides a tool to improve science literacy as indicated in the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards (1996), and A Framework for K-12 Science Education (2011), the underlying foundation for the Next Generation Science Standards currently being developed. Background information explains the importance of peer review and communicating results, along with details of each critical component, the Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion. Specific steps essential to helping students write clear and coherent research papers that follow a logical format, use effective communication, and develop scientific inquiry are described.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Communication
  • Education, Graduate
  • Guidelines as Topic*
  • Peer Review*
  • Science / education*
  • Science / methods
  • Universities

Grants and funding

  • R25 OD011142/OD/NIH HHS/United States
  • P30ES004184/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
  • R25RR026299/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HIGH SCHOOL RESEARCH 

Peer-reviewed by faculty and professionals and open source.

IJHSR has been published since 2019 and is the leading high school research journal. All manuscripts published by IJHSR are indexed internationally by EBSCO and Google Scholar , which makes it available to be searched by most libraries around the world. IJHSR selects the highest quality of high school student research work in all areas of science, including the behavioral and social sciences, technology, engineering, and math. IJHSR publishes both original research or literature review articles. Six issues are published each year. IJHSR has a rolling admission without a deadline and has an open access to public. A publication is a higher level of presentation and requires higher level of detail and work, therefore it is more  highly valued when compared to poster or oral presentations.

IJHSR is a publication of  Terra Science and Education,  a 501.c.3. nonprofit organization. 

Terra STEM Scholars

Terra STEM Scholars Program connects STEM scholars with students in their classrooms to increase STEM engagement in schools and help teachers to identify the experts in their region. Read More

Journal of High School Research

Get your high school research published in a peer review journal which is managed by Terra Science and Education. Year around submissions are accepted for quarterly issues. Read More

Terra Educational Data Solutions

TEDS signature program, called TEDS-Pool focuses on creating a single platform where multiple data points about a student from different sources(e.g. SchoolTool, Reneissance, Edoctrina, NYSED) can be pooled in a single location. Read More

Capacity Building Grants

Terra provides up to $5000 as part of its capacity building program. Apllications are due October 1st. Read More

science research papers for high school students

2024 - Accepting

science research papers for high school students

Past Issues

2019 - 2021 

IJHSR Categories for publication

How to Submit?

IJHSR Template for submission

Answers for frequently asked questions

AFfiliated organizations

science research papers for high school students

Information about IJHSR

science research papers for high school students

Editorial Staff

IJHSR Editorial Staff

science research papers for high school students

Editorial Board

Editorial Review Board

Partner Organizations

GENIUS Olympiad is an international high school project competition about environmental issues.

ACASU is a rigorous accredidation program with 20 standards for international schools and universities.

International Research Collaborations is a global colloborative scientific research between schools.

  • Volume 3 Issue 1  - March 2021
  • Volume 3 Issue 2  - May 2021
  • Volume 3 Issue 3  - July 2021
  • Volume 3 Issue 4  - September 2021
  • Volume 3 Issue 5  - November 2021
  • Volume 3 Issue 6  - December 2021
  • Volume 2 Issue 1  - March 2020
  • Volume 2 Issue 2  - July 2020
  • Volume 2 Issue 3  - September 2020
  • Volume 2 Issue 4  - December 2020
  • Volume 1 Issue 1  - February 2019
  • Volume 1 Issue 2  - September 2019
  • Volume 5 Issue 1  - February 2023
  • Volume 5 Issue 2  - April 2023
  • Volume 5 Issue 3  - June 2023
  • Volume 5 Issue 4  - August 2023
  • Volume 5 Issue 5  - October 2023
  • Volume 5 Issue 6  - November 2023
  • Volume 5 Issue 7  - December 2023
  • Volume 6 Issue 1  - January 2024
  • Volume 6 Issue 2  - February 2024
  • Volume 6 Issue 3  - March 2024
  • Volume 6 Issue 4  - April 2024
  • Volume 6 Issue 5  - May 2024
  • Volume 6 Issue 6  - July 2024
  • Volume 4 Issue 1  - February 2022
  • Volume 4 Issue 2  - April 2022
  • Volume 4 Issue 3  - June 2022
  • Volume 4 Issue 4  - August 2022
  • Volume 4 Issue 5  - October 2022
  • Volume 4 Issue 6  - December 2022

RESEARCH AT BAHAMAS

science research papers for high school students

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Contact Dr. Richard Beal to set up a meeting to discuss the details of your needs.

Terra Science and Education created Terra STEM Scholars Program to connect STEM scholars with schools in their areas to increase STEM engagement in schools and help teachers to identify the experts in their region. Terra connects STEM experts to school classrooms.

The Terra STEM Scholars is made up of local college faculty, STEM practitioners, and graduate students who are ready to interact with school students and their teachers. Scholars can share their expertise through interactive lectures, classroom activities, field experiences, tours, or job shadowing. Extended mentoring opportunities can also be explored in select cases.

School Registration

School Name, Age/Grade level, Interested STEM Area, Interested specific topic (if there is), Month of the year when the Scholar is expected, and any other related information to make the Scholar better prepared.

Scholar Registration

Scholars can expect one volunteered presentation per year, and additional visits in a year will be paid up to $100. You may choose how many engagements you would like to do in a year. Terra will place you within 25 miles of your home or work address.

If you have further questions before committing, please email Dr. Rick Beal ( [email protected] ).

If you are ready to volunteer please Register here!

Terra Science and Education is happy to announce the founding of the Terra Traveling STEM Show. In this program Terra provides STEM educational programing to summer camps organized by area schools and community groups. Terra Traveling STEM Shows can be 1 to 5 days in length and we can fit our programming to meet your STEM content and scheduling needs.

Terra Traveling STEM Shows are presented by the Terra STEM Scholars which is made up of local college faculty, undergraduate and graduate students, teachers, and STEM practitioners who are ready to bring STEM to kids.

One week of programing costs approximately $7,000. Contact our program coordinator for more information or fill out this Interest Form.

Terra professional development is rigorous, current, relevant and appropriate for the professionals in the target audience. Terra continually updates and validates its activities based on emerging research, identified best practices, and student feedback. Terra specializes in professional development focused on education, educational administration, and numerous STEM topics. We can work with you to deliver the professional development experience that you need!

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Post Event Evaluation

Terra’s educational programming is open to local public and private schools.

Terra Science and Education offers new school development including charter schools for writing/managing school proposals. Our team includes experienced school developers, charter school proposal writers, new school program implementers, and establishing new schools, including budgeting, board development, staff recruitment.

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It’s a wonderful world — and universe — out there.

Come explore with us!  

Science News Explores

Taylor Swift is looking at the viewer.Her hair is up and she is wearing huge diamond and purple gem earrings. with a navy blue outfit is covered in glittering beads.

Artificial intelligence is making it hard to tell truth from fiction

Experts worry that by making it harder to tell what’s true, AI can threaten people’s reputations, health, fair elections and more.

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Elusive worm-lizards sport weird, spooky skulls

a dropper builds tiny channels of liquid in a petri dish

Lego bricks inspired a new way to shape devices for studying liquids

science research papers for high school students

Let’s learn about particles that help us peer inside objects

science research papers for high school students

Check out the magnetic fields around our galaxy’s central black hole

Earthquake sensor: taylor swift fans ‘shake it off’, with measles outbreaks in 49 countries, should you worry, word of the week.

a cluster of orange blobs that look sort of like baby carrots stand out against a blue background

Scientists Say: Genetic Engineering

Genetic engineering involves adding, changing or removing certain pieces of DNA from a living thing to give it desired traits.

Experiments

a "voltaic stack" of pennies and nickels sits atop a piece of tin foil atop a sponge; one metal clip of a multimeter lead touches the top of the voltaic stack, while the other touches the tin foil

Experiment: Make your own cents-able battery

Make your own ‘voltaic pile’ with pennies and nickels, and find out how many coins will make the most electricity!

Technically Fiction

a photo of Archax, a giant mecha

Could we build a mecha?

In the movies, mechas come equipped with all kinds of abilities. But real giant robots would first have to master simpler actions, like walking and jumping.

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Weekly updates to help you use Science News Explores in the learning environment

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What's Hot

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Explainer: Earth — layer by layer

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The science of ghosts

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Scientists Say: Periodic table

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Top 10 tips on how to study smarter, not longer

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The weird sky glow called STEVE is really confusing scientists

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Explainer: How do mass and weight differ?

Taylor Swift is looking at the viewer.Her hair is up and she is wearing huge diamond and purple gem earrings. with a navy blue outfit is covered in glittering beads.

All About Bugs

science research papers for high school students

Explainer: What is metamorphosis?

Insects, amphibians and some fish undergo metamorphosis. But they’re not the only ones.

Explainer: What are cicadas?

Invertebrates are pretty clever, but are they conscious, explainer: insects, arachnids and other arthropods.

science research papers for high school students

Air pollution can make it harder for pollinators to find flowers

Pollutants that build up in night air can break down the scents that attract pollinating hawkmoths to primrose blooms, disrupting their pollination.

science research papers for high school students

Turning jeans blue with sunlight might help the environment

science research papers for high school students

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science research papers for high school students

What the weird world of protists can teach us about life on Earth

science research papers for high school students

A new tool could guard against deepfake voice scams

More stories.

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Scientists Say: Supercontinent

Experiment: can plants stop soil erosion.

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Did James Webb telescope images ‘break’ the universe?

Explainer: what is the solar cycle, scientists say: digital footprint, scientists say: bionic, environment.

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Scientists Say: Carbon capture

Bottled water hosts many thousands of nano-sized plastic bits, new ultrathin materials can pull climate-warming co 2 from the air, dancing spiders inspired this biologist to teach others, among mammals, males aren’t usually bigger than females.

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Handwriting may boost brain connections that aid memory

Scientists say: confirmation bias, brain scans hint at how well teens will manage pandemic stress.

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Forests could help detect ‘ghost particles’ from space

Health & medicine.

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Too much noise can harm far more than our ears

A new type of immune cell may cause lifelong allergies.

Inspirit AI

15 Research Journals for High School Students

High school students interested in pursuing academic research often face the challenge of finding accessible and reputable platforms to publish their work. Engaging in scholarly research not only enriches their educational experience but also fosters critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and a deeper understanding of their chosen subjects. To aid aspiring young researchers, here's a curated list of 15 research journals tailored to high school students across various disciplines.

science research papers for high school students

Interested in learning more about AI and its impacts on research ahead of college? Find out how YOU can apply artificial intelligence to subjects like science and engineering in InspiritAI’s AI Scholars Program . Students in the Inspirit AI Scholars program craft interdisciplinary AI projects engaging subjects of personal interest to them. Additionally, many students who have participated in the AI+X Individual Research Mentorship have gone on to win prestigious awards at various science fair competitions ! Also be sure to check out our previous blog post on learning AI . 

Why Publish Research in High School?

Publishing research as a high school student offers numerous benefits and opportunities for academic and personal growth. While the idea of scholarly publication may seem daunting to some, especially at a young age, the advantages of sharing your work with a broader audience are significant. Here are several compelling reasons why high school students should consider publishing their research:

1. Validation and Recognition: Publishing research provides validation for your academic efforts and achievements. It offers tangible recognition of your hard work, dedication, and intellectual abilities. Seeing your name in print alongside your research can be incredibly rewarding and can boost your confidence in your academic abilities.

2. Contribution to Knowledge: By publishing your research, you contribute to the body of knowledge in your chosen field or discipline. Your findings and insights can potentially influence and inform future research and scholarship. Even as a high school student, your perspectives and discoveries have the potential to make meaningful contributions to your field of study.

3. Skill Development: Engaging in the process of preparing a research manuscript for publication helps you develop essential academic and professional skills. Writing a research paper requires critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and effective communication skills. Additionally, navigating the peer-review process teaches you how to incorporate feedback, revise your work, and adhere to scholarly standards.

4. College and Career Opportunities: Publishing research as a high school student can enhance your college applications and attract the attention of admissions officers. It demonstrates your intellectual curiosity, initiative, and commitment to academic excellence, setting you apart from other applicants. Furthermore, having publications on your resume can open doors to scholarship opportunities, internships, and research positions in college and beyond.

5. Networking and Collaboration: Publishing research exposes you to a wider network of scholars, researchers, and professionals in your field. It provides opportunities for collaboration and mentorship, allowing you to connect with experts who can offer guidance, support, and advice as you continue your academic journey.

6. Personal Growth and Fulfillment: Finally, publishing research as a high school student is a deeply fulfilling experience that can foster personal growth and intellectual curiosity. It allows you to explore topics of interest in depth, pursue your passions, and develop a sense of agency and autonomy in your academic pursuits. Moreover, seeing your work published can instill a sense of pride and accomplishment that motivates you to continue pursuing your academic goals.

In summary, publishing research as a high school student offers a unique opportunity to contribute to academic discourse, develop valuable skills, and position yourself for future success in college and beyond. Whether you're passionate about science, history, literature, or any other field, sharing your research with the world can be a transformative experience that shapes your academic journey and opens doors to exciting opportunities.

1. The Concord Review

The Concord Review stands as a beacon for high school historians and social scientists, providing a prestigious platform for the publication of outstanding research papers. Founded in 1987, this journal has garnered international recognition for its commitment to promoting historical scholarship among secondary school students. Each issue showcases meticulously researched and eloquently written essays that delve into various historical events, themes, and perspectives. By publishing in The Concord Review, high school students not only gain recognition for their scholarly achievements but also contribute to the advancement of historical understanding and discourse. The journal's rigorous peer-review process ensures the quality and integrity of published works, setting a high standard for excellence in historical research within the secondary education community.

2. Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI)

With a focus on STEM fields, the Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI) offers high school students a unique opportunity to share their scientific discoveries and innovations with a global audience. Established in 2008, JEI serves as a platform for aspiring young scientists to publish their research findings, experimental methods, and scientific insights. The journal's peer-review process, conducted by graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, ensures the accuracy and credibility of published articles, while providing valuable feedback and mentorship to student authors. JEI encourages interdisciplinary collaboration and creativity, welcoming submissions across a wide range of scientific disciplines, including biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and environmental science. By participating in JEI, high school students not only contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge but also develop essential skills in critical thinking, problem-solving, and scientific communication.

3. Young Scientists Journal (YSJ)

As the world's only international peer-reviewed science journal entirely run by and for high school students, the Young Scientists Journal (YSJ) offers a dynamic platform for young researchers to showcase their scientific inquiries and discoveries. Founded in 2006, YSJ aims to inspire and empower the next generation of scientists by providing a space for them to publish original research, experimental findings, and scientific perspectives. The journal covers a diverse array of scientific topics, ranging from biology and chemistry to physics and environmental science, reflecting the multifaceted interests and passions of high school scientists worldwide. Through its rigorous peer-review process and editorial guidance, YSJ fosters a culture of academic excellence and scientific inquiry, nurturing the development of critical thinking, research skills, and scientific literacy among its contributors.

4. Teen Ink

While not a traditional research journal, Teen Ink offers high school students a creative outlet to express themselves through writing and artwork, covering a wide spectrum of topics and themes. Since its inception in 1989, Teen Ink has provided a platform for young writers and artists to share their perspectives, experiences, and voices with a global audience. The journal publishes poetry, fiction, nonfiction, essays, and artwork created by high school students, offering a glimpse into the diverse minds and talents of today's youth. By contributing to Teen Ink, high school students not only hone their writing and artistic skills but also engage in meaningful expression, reflection, and dialogue on issues that matter to them, from personal experiences and social concerns to cultural observations and creative imaginings.

5. The High School Journal

Published by the University of North Carolina Press, The High School Journal provides a scholarly platform for high school students, educators, and researchers interested in educational issues. Established in 1918, this journal has a long-standing tradition of publishing research articles, essays, and reviews that contribute to the understanding and improvement of secondary education. Through its rigorous peer-review process, The High School Journal ensures the quality and relevance of published works, fostering dialogue and collaboration among scholars, practitioners, and policymakers in the field of education. By publishing in The High School Journal, students have the opportunity to share their insights, experiences, and research findings on topics such as curriculum development, pedagogy, school reform, and educational equity, making meaningful contributions to the advancement of educational practice and policy.

6. Journal of High School Science (JHSS)

The Journal of High School Science (JHSS) serves as a platform for high school students to publish their scientific research, experimental findings, and innovative ideas in various fields of science. Founded with the aim of promoting scientific inquiry and excellence among young scholars, JHSS encourages students to explore their scientific interests and contribute to the body of knowledge in disciplines such as biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. Through its peer-reviewed publication process, JHSS provides students with valuable feedback and mentorship from experienced scientists and educators, helping them develop their research skills and scientific literacy. By participating in JHSS, high school students not only gain recognition for their scientific achievements but also inspire their peers and contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge and discovery.

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7. youth voices.

Youth Voices offers high school students a digital platform to explore social justice issues, activism, and personal narratives through writing and multimedia expression. Founded on the belief that young voices have the power to drive positive change in society, Youth Voices provides a space for students to share their perspectives, experiences, and visions for a better world. Through its online community and collaborative projects, Youth Voices fosters dialogue, empathy, and understanding among young people from diverse backgrounds and cultures. By contributing to Youth Voices, high school students not only amplify their voices on important social issues but also engage in meaningful dialogue, reflection, and action to create positive social change in their communities and beyond.

8. Lexington Review

The Lexington Review offers high school students a platform to engage in literary analysis, criticism, and creative expression. Founded with the goal of promoting literary appreciation and critical thinking skills among young writers and readers, The Lexington Review publishes essays, reviews, and creative works on literature, culture, and the arts. By providing a space for students to explore and interpret literary texts, The Lexington Review encourages deeper engagement with literature and fosters a community of literary enthusiasts and scholars. Through its publication process, The Lexington Review offers students valuable feedback and mentorship from experienced writers and educators, helping them develop their analytical and creative writing skills. By contributing to The Lexington Review, high school students not only showcase their literary talents but also enrich the literary landscape with their unique perspectives and insights.

9. Journal of Youth Development

The Journal of Youth Development serves as a scholarly platform for high school students interested in youth development and psychology. Established to address the unique needs and challenges faced by young people, this interdisciplinary journal welcomes submissions that explore various aspects of youth development, including social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral factors. By providing a space for students to share their research, insights, and experiences, the Journal of Youth Development contributes to the understanding and promotion of positive youth development. Through its peer-reviewed publication process, the journal ensures the quality and rigor of published works, fostering dialogue and collaboration among students, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in the field of youth development. By publishing in the Journal of Youth Development, high school students have the opportunity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge and practice in youth development, making meaningful contributions to the well-being and success of young people worldwide.

10. International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology (IJSRA)

The International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology (IJSRA) offers high school students a platform to publish their research findings, fieldwork experiences, and reflections in the fields of archaeology and anthropology. Founded with the aim of promoting archaeological inquiry and scholarship among young researchers, IJSRA welcomes submissions that explore various archaeological topics, methodologies, and discoveries. By providing a space for students to share their research and experiences, IJSRA fosters a community of aspiring archaeologists and anthropologists, encouraging collaboration, learning, and innovation in the field. Through its peer-reviewed publication process, the journal ensures the quality and credibility of published works, providing students with valuable feedback and mentorship from experienced archaeologists and anthropologists. By contributing to IJSRA, high school students not only gain recognition for their scholarly achievements but also contribute to the preservation and understanding of human history and culture.

11. The Apprentice Writer

The Apprentice Writer, published by the Susquehanna University Writers Institute, offers high school students a platform to showcase their creative writing talents. Founded with the aim of nurturing young writers and fostering a love for literature and creative expression, The Apprentice Writer publishes poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and artwork from emerging writers across the globe. By providing a space for students to share their literary creations, the journal celebrates the diversity and creativity of young voices in the literary world. Through its publication process, The Apprentice Writer offers students the opportunity to receive feedback and mentorship from experienced writers and educators, helping them refine their craft and develop their unique voices. By contributing to The Apprentice Writer, high school students not only gain recognition for their literary talents but also inspire and connect with fellow writers and readers, enriching the literary landscape with their imaginative works.

12. Journal of Student Research

The Journal of Student Research (JSR) serves as a multidisciplinary platform for high school students to publish original research across diverse fields of study. Established with the goal of promoting academic inquiry and excellence among young scholars, JSR welcomes submissions that explore various topics and methodologies, including scientific research, humanities, social sciences, and interdisciplinary studies. By providing a space for students to share their research findings and insights, JSR contributes to the advancement of knowledge and scholarship in multiple disciplines. Through its peer-reviewed publication process, the journal ensures the quality and rigor of published works, providing students with valuable feedback and mentorship from experts in their respective fields. By publishing in JSR, high school students have the opportunity to showcase their intellectual curiosity and scholarly achievements, making meaningful contributions to their chosen fields of study and inspiring others to pursue academic inquiry and excellence.

13. The Artifice

The Artifice is a digital magazine that offers high school students an opportunity to explore and analyze various aspects of popular culture, including film, literature, gaming, and entertainment. While not exclusively dedicated to young writers, The Artifice welcomes submissions from aspiring critics and analysts interested in examining the cultural significance and artistic merits of contemporary media. Founded on the belief that thoughtful analysis and discourse enrich our understanding of popular culture, The Artifice provides a platform for students to share their insights, interpretations, and critiques with a global audience. Through its publication process, The Artifice offers students the opportunity to refine their analytical skills, engage in critical dialogue, and contribute to the ongoing conversation surrounding popular culture. By contributing to The Artifice, high school students not only gain valuable experience in cultural criticism and analysis but also shape the cultural discourse of today and tomorrow, offering fresh perspectives and interpretations on the media they consume.

14. Journal of Student Science and Technology (JSST)

The Journal of Student Science and Technology (JSST) serves as a platform for high school students to publish their scientific research and technological innovations. Founded with the aim of promoting STEM education and fostering innovation among young scientists and engineers, JSST welcomes submissions that explore various fields of science and technology, including biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, computer science, and environmental science. By providing a space for students to share their research findings, experimental methods, and technological developments, JSST contributes to the advancement of scientific knowledge and technological innovation. Through its peer-reviewed publication process, the journal ensures the quality and credibility of published works, providing students with valuable feedback and recognition for their scientific achievements. By publishing in JSST, high school students have the opportunity to showcase their passion for science and technology, inspire their peers, and make meaningful contributions to the scientific community.

15. Phi Alpha Theta Journal of Undergraduate Historical Studies

Although primarily aimed at undergraduate students, the Phi Alpha Theta Journal of Undergraduate Historical Studies welcomes exceptional submissions from high school scholars interested in historical research and analysis. Founded by the prestigious history honor society Phi Alpha Theta, this journal offers a platform for young historians to share their research findings, interpretations, and insights on various historical topics and periods. By providing a space for students to engage in rigorous historical inquiry and scholarship, the journal fosters a deeper understanding of the past and its relevance to the present. Through its peer-reviewed publication process, the Phi Alpha Theta Journal ensures the quality and rigor of published works, providing students with valuable feedback and recognition for their scholarly achievements. By publishing in the journal, high school students have the opportunity to contribute to the academic discourse surrounding history, making meaningful contributions to the study and interpretation of the past.

Engaging in research as a high school student can be a rewarding experience, offering opportunities for intellectual growth and exploration. These 15 research journals provide platforms for young scholars to share their insights, discoveries, and creative endeavors across a variety of disciplines. By participating in academic discourse and contributing to scholarly communities, high school students can develop valuable skills and make meaningful contributions to their fields of interest. Whether exploring scientific phenomena, delving into historical events, or expressing artistic creativity, these journals offer avenues for young researchers to shine.

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12 Research Journals for High School Students

  • Last modified 2024-03-28
  • Published on 2023-07-20

science research papers for high school students

1. The Concord Review

Introduction: The Concord Review (TCR) is an academic research journal dedicated to publishing historical research papers written by high school students in English. In the spring issue, the quarterly journal has published 1,362 research papers from authors in 46 states and 41 countries. Many TCR authors have gone to prestigious universities and colleges across the U.S. and worldwide. Aralia also published the Guide to the Concord Review to guide students through the process of submitting for the Concord Review, along with the introduction of the Historical Research and Writing class.

Competition Format: All essays should be on a historical topic, although the topic can be in any time period from ancient to modern, and any area from domestic to foreign. Essay submissions must be 5,000-9,000 words, with Chicago-style endnotes and a bibliography. The student must be the sole author of the submission, and the research paper may not be published elsewhere except for a publication of the secondary school the student attends. Students can submit more than one research paper.

Eligibility : Secondary students from all countries and schools can participate.

Deadline : Summer Issue – February 1 / Fall Issue – May 1 / Winter Issue – August 1 / Spring Issue – November 1

Fee : Range from $70 – $150 depending on which type of membership level students want to sign up for. Each author who submits a paper and submission fee, receives the next four issues of the journal in eBook (or print for $30).

Membership Details (Annual Fee): 

  • Author – eBook – $70.00 (USD): With your essay submission fee of $70, you will receive a complimentary 1-year subscription to the Electronic (eBook) Edition of The Concord Review. You can choose the Print Edition instead for an additional $30 + shipping and handling.
  • Author – Print US – $110.00 (USD): Your essay submission fee of $100 + s&h entitles includes a 1 year subscription to the Print Edition of The Concord Review delivered to your US address.
  • Author – Print International – $150.00 (USD): Your essay submission fee of $100 + s&h includes 1 year subscription to the Print Edition of The Concord Review delivered to your address outside the United States.

2. (JEI) Journal of Emerging Investigators

Introduction : The Journal of Emerging Investigators is an open-access science journal and mentorship program that publishes research by middle and high school scientists. JEI is a non-profit organization operated by graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and professors across the United States. Graduate students contribute to the editorial and review processes, as well as the management of the journal. Since 2012, JEI has published over 250 papers by pre-college students. A sample research paper written by students and published in this journal, titled “A simple printing solution to aid deficit reduction” , was covered by CNN .

Submissions go through 4-6 stages of review after the manuscript is received. Summer and fall tend to be busier times for JEI, so research submitted at these times may take longer to go through the review process.

Eligibility : Middle and high school students.

Topic Guideline : Students have the freedom to choose their research topic. However, for all research related to vertebrate animal/human subjects , students are required to adhere to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) guidelines for ethical research.

Review Timeline : Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis. 

Fee : The subscription is free for students. 

3. Columbia Junior Science Research Journal

Introduction : The Columbia Junior Science Journal is a high school research journal for students with an interest in the natural sciences, physical sciences, engineering, and social sciences. CJSJ originated from the Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal, a professional-level science journal for scholars. The editorial team of the Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal also oversees CJSJ.

Eligibility : High school students worldwide can submit a single one to two-page research paper, or four to five-page review paper. Students can also collaborate with peers and mentors on their submissions.

Submission Deadline : Sep 30, 2024 (based on last year’s deadline)

4. Journal of Student Research

The Journal of Student Research (JSR), an academic, multidisciplinary, and faculty-reviewed journal, is based in Houston, Texas. This journal is devoted to the rapid dissemination of current research published by high school, undergraduate, and graduate students. It accepts AP, IB, Honors Research Articles, Review Articles, Research Projects, Research Posters, and more. Over 2,000 student authors from high schools and universities worldwide have had their work published in JSR.

Only five authors (including advisors) are allowed per submission. If you would like to include more contributors, you must pay $25 per individual. For a fast-tracked review, you can contact the journal and pay a fee.

Fee : $50 at submission for pre-review, and $200 post-review for articles chosen for publication upon notifying the authors.

Deadline : February 29, 2024

5. The Young Researcher

The Young Researcher is a peer-reviewed journal for secondary school students. The editor board includes expert researchers – typically, academics who work as professors in universities, or people with extensive research and publication experience.

List of the editors .

Submission Guideline: Submissions should be no more than 5,000 words, excluding references and appendices (in English). Articles should have:

  • Abstract + 4-6 keywords
  • Introduction
  • Literature Review
  • Method, Process, or Approach
  • Findings or Results
  • Analysis, and/or Evaluation
  • Conclusion and Future Directions

The paper can be formatted in any acceptable citation style (MLA, APA, and Chicago). Upon submission, at least three expert editors will review the submission and will provide revisions upon selection for publication.

Deadline : May 1, 2024 (based on last year’s deadline)

6. International Journal of High School Research

International Journal of High School Research is an open-source and peer-reviewed journal that was started in 2019. IJHSR is open to receiving work in all areas of science and surrounding disciplines, including behavioral and social sciences, technology, engineering, and math. International Journal of High School Research primarily focuses on publishing articles containing new experimental data. It also requires “literature reviews”, which are a survey of previously published research, as well as sections where you are expected to draw new conclusions from your research, or discuss what you plan to publish next. The publication notes that the process for literature reviews is extremely selective, as they only publish 2 – 3 articles per issue (6 issues per year).

Submission Guideline: Students can publish articles in either the research or review sections. Research articles should include a discussion and presentation of original research, as well as new experimental data.

Review articles go through an extremely selective process because there is a limitation of 2-3 review articles published per issue. The purpose of the literature review is to provide a summation and evaluation of previous data published by researchers that has influenced your topic. There is no page limit for submissions.

All papers should be submitted in Arial font:

  • Body/Paragraph Text: 10pt font
  • Sub Headers: 12pt font, italicized, bold
  • Section Headers: 14 pt font, bold
  • Paper Title: 16pt font, bold

Fee : Upon acceptance for publication, students will pay $200. A copy of the printed journal will be mailed to the author. If for any reason students can’t pay the fee, they can contact [email protected] for support.

Evaluation Progress: Upon submission, the Editor in Chief will check for format, styling, and citations, and may send it back to the author for corrections. Next, they will review the paper for publication with two or more outside reviewers that have expertise in the respective field. After review, the paper will either be accepted or rejected. Upon acceptance, payment will be requested. Once paid, the paper is sent to copy editors and then sent for production. The whole process may take 2-4 months.

Deadline: IJHSR accepts submissions on a rolling basis.

7. The Schola

Introduction : The Schola is a quarterly journal of humanities and social sciences written by high school students worldwide, and is the only international academic journal for students. It is an online journal with a subscription fee of $120 per year.

Submission Guideline: The essay must be 4,000 words long, written in English, and have the student as the sole author. The essay topic can be in philosophy, history, art history, economics, political theory, comparative government, public policy, international relations, or sociology. The whole review process can take up to 7 months to be published (meaning that once students submit their essay, they will be considered for the next three quarterly issues).

Eligibility : The Schola accepts submissions from high school students around the world.

Deadline : Essays are accepted year-round.

8. Journal of High School Science

Focused on science research by students. 

Journal of High School Science (JHSS) is a quarterly journal published in March, June, September, and December. JHSS is a STEM-focused journal that publishes research related to biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, technology, and/or an amalgamation of these disciplines. The editorial board is composed of various experts in the field of science across the United States.

Submission Guidelines: Authors can submit either a Review Article or an Original Research Article, and submissions are accepted at any time.

9. Critical Debates in Humanities, Science, and Global Justice

Hosted by Adelphi University, The Critical Debates in Humanities, Science, and Global Justice Journal invites young scholars in high school to submit original scholarly work and opinion perspectives for this peer-reviewed journal on critical debates that face society.

Submission Deadline: June 1, 2024

Article Types: AP Research, IB Research, Honors Research, Research Projects, Review Articles of Research/Ideas and Innovation, Perspectives, Opinions, Book Reviews, Blog entries (1000 words), and Creative work /Activist projects

10. Young Scientist Journal

Founded at The King’s School in 2006, the Young Scientist Journal is the  largest and oldest journal of its kind. The journal encourages young scholars to conduct original research and be published in a peer-reviewed journal. 

Types of article:

  • Original Research: Scientific investigation which has never been done before
  • Review Articles: A summary and your take on the research done, drawing from previously published articles and papers.
  • Blog or Magazine Article: An opinion piece or news story, sharing your view on a scientific topic. It can include interviews and profiles.

Eligibility : 12-20 year olds

Topics : STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and related topics.

11. National High School Journal of Science

National High School Journal of Science, or NHSJS, is a free, online, student-run, and peer-reviewed research journal for high school students, run by students. Students can submit original research and short articles in the form of reports, policy, media, technical comments, and letters. Students can submit essays related to any STEM topics including, but not limited to, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Environment, Policy, etc.

Deadline: Rolling Admission

Website : https://nhsjs.com/

12. The Journal of Research High School (JRHS)

The Journal of Research High School (JRHS) is an open-access online research journal for high school researchers. Accepted research topics include Engineering, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Social Sciences, among other fields of study. The editors are volunteers with backgrounds as professional scientists, researchers, teachers, and professors in various disciplines. Approximately 30% of submitted papers have been published.

Deadline : Rolling admissions and the general timeline is approximately 3-6 months.

Website : https://www.journalresearchhs.org/

High school research journals offer students an opportunity to explore their interests, build important research skills, practice formal research presentations, and demonstrate their knowledge. From niche topics to more general science-related fields, there are a variety of reliable resources that provide quality content and platforms to showcase student work. For ambitious learners looking to push themselves and develop their academic careers, these research journals can serve as the perfect medium.

Spend the summer researching with Aralia College Accelerator Program

Aralia College Accelerator Program offers a diverse range of research classes designed to nurture profound interests and showcase students’ potential for future success to admission officers. Our research classes are tailored to various interests, including Business, History, Language & Literature, Mathematics, Reading and Writing, Social Science, Speaking, and Visual Arts. Our teachers will guide students in preparing a college-ready research paper for college applications and writing portfolios. 

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100 Interesting Research Paper Topics for High Schoolers

What’s covered:, how to pick the right research topic, elements of a strong research paper.

  • Interesting Research Paper Topics

Composing a research paper can be a daunting task for first-time writers. In addition to making sure you’re using concise language and your thoughts are organized clearly, you need to find a topic that draws the reader in.

CollegeVine is here to help you brainstorm creative topics! Below are 100 interesting research paper topics that will help you engage with your project and keep you motivated until you’ve typed the final period. 

A research paper is similar to an academic essay but more lengthy and requires more research. This added length and depth is bittersweet: although a research paper is more work, you can create a more nuanced argument, and learn more about your topic. Research papers are a demonstration of your research ability and your ability to formulate a convincing argument. How well you’re able to engage with the sources and make original contributions will determine the strength of your paper. 

You can’t have a good research paper without a good research paper topic. “Good” is subjective, and different students will find different topics interesting. What’s important is that you find a topic that makes you want to find out more and make a convincing argument. Maybe you’ll be so interested that you’ll want to take it further and investigate some detail in even greater depth!

For example, last year over 4000 students applied for 500 spots in the Lumiere Research Scholar Program , a rigorous research program founded by Harvard researchers. The program pairs high-school students with Ph.D. mentors to work 1-on-1 on an independent research project . The program actually does not require you to have a research topic in mind when you apply, but pro tip: the more specific you can be the more likely you are to get in!

Introduction

The introduction to a research paper serves two critical functions: it conveys the topic of the paper and illustrates how you will address it. A strong introduction will also pique the interest of the reader and make them excited to read more. Selecting a research paper topic that is meaningful, interesting, and fascinates you is an excellent first step toward creating an engaging paper that people will want to read.

Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is technically part of the introduction—generally the last sentence of it—but is so important that it merits a section of its own. The thesis statement is a declarative sentence that tells the reader what the paper is about. A strong thesis statement serves three purposes: present the topic of the paper, deliver a clear opinion on the topic, and summarize the points the paper will cover.

An example of a good thesis statement of diversity in the workforce is:

Diversity in the workplace is not just a moral imperative but also a strategic advantage for businesses, as it fosters innovation, enhances creativity, improves decision-making, and enables companies to better understand and connect with a diverse customer base.

The body is the largest section of a research paper. It’s here where you support your thesis, present your facts and research, and persuade the reader.

Each paragraph in the body of a research paper should have its own idea. The idea is presented, generally in the first sentence of the paragraph, by a topic sentence. The topic sentence acts similarly to the thesis statement, only on a smaller scale, and every sentence in the paragraph with it supports the idea it conveys.

An example of a topic sentence on how diversity in the workplace fosters innovation is:

Diversity in the workplace fosters innovation by bringing together individuals with different backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences, which stimulates creativity, encourages new ideas, and leads to the development of innovative solutions to complex problems.

The body of an engaging research paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next. Create an outline before writing and order your ideas so that each idea logically leads to another.

The conclusion of a research paper should summarize your thesis and reinforce your argument. It’s common to restate the thesis in the conclusion of a research paper.

For example, a conclusion for a paper about diversity in the workforce is:

In conclusion, diversity in the workplace is vital to success in the modern business world. By embracing diversity, companies can tap into the full potential of their workforce, promote creativity and innovation, and better connect with a diverse customer base, ultimately leading to greater success and a more prosperous future for all.

Reference Page

The reference page is normally found at the end of a research paper. It provides proof that you did research using credible sources, properly credits the originators of information, and prevents plagiarism.

There are a number of different formats of reference pages, including APA, MLA, and Chicago. Make sure to format your reference page in your teacher’s preferred style.

  • Analyze the benefits of diversity in education.
  • Are charter schools useful for the national education system?
  • How has modern technology changed teaching?
  • Discuss the pros and cons of standardized testing.
  • What are the benefits of a gap year between high school and college?
  • What funding allocations give the most benefit to students?
  • Does homeschooling set students up for success?
  • Should universities/high schools require students to be vaccinated?
  • What effect does rising college tuition have on high schoolers?
  • Do students perform better in same-sex schools?
  • Discuss and analyze the impacts of a famous musician on pop music.
  • How has pop music evolved over the past decade?
  • How has the portrayal of women in music changed in the media over the past decade?
  • How does a synthesizer work?
  • How has music evolved to feature different instruments/voices?
  • How has sound effect technology changed the music industry?
  • Analyze the benefits of music education in high schools.
  • Are rehabilitation centers more effective than prisons?
  • Are congestion taxes useful?
  • Does affirmative action help minorities?
  • Can a capitalist system effectively reduce inequality?
  • Is a three-branch government system effective?
  • What causes polarization in today’s politics?
  • Is the U.S. government racially unbiased?
  • Choose a historical invention and discuss its impact on society today.
  • Choose a famous historical leader who lost power—what led to their eventual downfall?
  • How has your country evolved over the past century?
  • What historical event has had the largest effect on the U.S.?
  • Has the government’s response to national disasters improved or declined throughout history?
  • Discuss the history of the American occupation of Iraq.
  • Explain the history of the Israel-Palestine conflict.
  • Is literature relevant in modern society?
  • Discuss how fiction can be used for propaganda.
  • How does literature teach and inform about society?
  • Explain the influence of children’s literature on adulthood.
  • How has literature addressed homosexuality?
  • Does the media portray minorities realistically?
  • Does the media reinforce stereotypes?
  • Why have podcasts become so popular?
  • Will streaming end traditional television?
  • What is a patriot?
  • What are the pros and cons of global citizenship?
  • What are the causes and effects of bullying?
  • Why has the divorce rate in the U.S. been declining in recent years?
  • Is it more important to follow social norms or religion?
  • What are the responsible limits on abortion, if any?
  • How does an MRI machine work?
  • Would the U.S. benefit from socialized healthcare?
  • Elderly populations
  • The education system
  • State tax bases
  • How do anti-vaxxers affect the health of the country?
  • Analyze the costs and benefits of diet culture.
  • Should companies allow employees to exercise on company time?
  • What is an adequate amount of exercise for an adult per week/per month/per day?
  • Discuss the effects of the obesity epidemic on American society.
  • Are students smarter since the advent of the internet?
  • What departures has the internet made from its original design?
  • Has digital downloading helped the music industry?
  • Discuss the benefits and costs of stricter internet censorship.
  • Analyze the effects of the internet on the paper news industry.
  • What would happen if the internet went out?
  • How will artificial intelligence (AI) change our lives?
  • What are the pros and cons of cryptocurrency?
  • How has social media affected the way people relate with each other?
  • Should social media have an age restriction?
  • Discuss the importance of source software.
  • What is more relevant in today’s world: mobile apps or websites?
  • How will fully autonomous vehicles change our lives?
  • How is text messaging affecting teen literacy?

Mental Health

  • What are the benefits of daily exercise?
  • How has social media affected people’s mental health?
  • What things contribute to poor mental and physical health?
  • Analyze how mental health is talked about in pop culture.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of more counselors in high schools.
  • How does stress affect the body?
  • How do emotional support animals help people?
  • What are black holes?
  • Discuss the biggest successes and failures of the EPA.
  • How has the Flint water crisis affected life in Michigan?
  • Can science help save endangered species?
  • Is the development of an anti-cancer vaccine possible?

Environment

  • What are the effects of deforestation on climate change?
  • Is climate change reversible?
  • How did the COVID-19 pandemic affect global warming and climate change?
  • Are carbon credits effective for offsetting emissions or just marketing?
  • Is nuclear power a safe alternative to fossil fuels?
  • Are hybrid vehicles helping to control pollution in the atmosphere?
  • How is plastic waste harming the environment?
  • Is entrepreneurism a trait people are born with or something they learn?
  • How much more should CEOs make than their average employee?
  • Can you start a business without money?
  • Should the U.S. raise the minimum wage?
  • Discuss how happy employees benefit businesses.
  • How important is branding for a business?
  • Discuss the ease, or difficulty, of landing a job today.
  • What is the economic impact of sporting events?
  • Are professional athletes overpaid?
  • Should male and female athletes receive equal pay?
  • What is a fair and equitable way for transgender athletes to compete in high school sports?
  • What are the benefits of playing team sports?
  • What is the most corrupt professional sport?

Where to Get More Research Paper Topic Ideas

If you need more help brainstorming topics, especially those that are personalized to your interests, you can use CollegeVine’s free AI tutor, Ivy . Ivy can help you come up with original research topic ideas, and she can also help with the rest of your homework, from math to languages.

Disclaimer: This post includes content sponsored by Lumiere Education.

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25 Research Ideas in Physics for High School Students

Research can be a valued supplement in your college application. However, many high schoolers are yet to explore research , which is a delicate process that may include choosing a topic, reviewing literature, conducting experiments, and writing a paper.

If you are interested in physics, exploring the physics realm through research is a great way to not only navigate your passion but learn about what research entails. Physics even branches out into other fields such as biology, chemistry, and math, so interest in physics is not a requirement to doing research in physics. Having research experience on your resume can be a great way to boost your college application and show independence, passion, ambition, and intellectual curiosity !

We will cover what exactly a good research topic entails and then provide you with 25 possible physics research topics that may interest or inspire you.

What is a good research topic?

Of course, you want to choose a topic that you are interested in. But beyond that, you should choose a topic that is relevant today ; for example, research questions that have already been answered after extensive research does not address a current knowledge gap . Make sure to also be cautious that your topic is not too broad that you are trying to cover too much ground and end up losing the details, but not too specific that you are unable to gather enough information.

Remember that topics can span across fields. You do not need to restrict yourself to a physics topic; you can conduct interdisciplinary research combining physics with other fields you may be interested in.

Research Ideas in Physics

We have compiled a list of 25 possible physics research topics suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors. These topics are separated into 8 broader categories.

Topic #1 : Using computational technologies and analyses

If you are interested in coding or technology in general , physics is also one place to look to explore these fields. You can explore anything from new technologies to datasets (even with coding) through a physics lens. Some computational or technological physics topics you can research are:

1.Development of computer programs to find and track positions of fast-moving nanoparticles and nanomachines

2. Features and limitations to augmented and virtual reality technologies, current industry standards of performance, and solutions that have been proposed to address challenges

3. Use of MATLAB or Python to work with existing code bases to design structures that trap light for interaction with qubits

4. Computational analysis of ATLAS open data using Python or C++

Suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors at University of Cambridge, University of Rochester, and Harvard University.

Topic #2 : Exploration of astrophysical and cosmological phenomena

Interested in space? Then astrophysics and cosmology may be just for you. There are lots of unanswered questions about astrophysical and cosmological phenomena that you can begin to answer. Here are some possible physics topics in these particular subfields that you can look into:

5. Cosmological mysteries (like dark energy, inflation, dark matter) and their hypothesized explanations

6. Possible future locations of detectors for cosmology and astrophysics research

7. Physical processes that shape galaxies through cosmic time in the context of extragalactic astronomy and the current issues and frontiers in galaxy evolution

8. Interaction of beyond-standard-model particles with astrophysical structures (such as black holes and Bose stars)

Suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors at Princeton University, Harvard University, Yale University, and University of California, Irvine.

Topic #3 : Mathematical analyses of physical phenomena

Math is deeply embedded in physics. Even if you may not be interested solely in physics, there are lots of mathematical applications and questions that you may be curious about. Using basic physics laws, you can learn how to derive your own mathematical equations and solve them in hopes that they address a current knowledge gap in physics. Some examples of topics include:

9. Analytical approximation and numerical solving of equations that determine the evolution of different particles after the Big Bang

10. Mathematical derivation of the dynamics of particles from fundamental laws (such as special relativity, general relativity, quantum mechanics)

11. The basics of Riemannian geometry and how simple geometrical arguments can be used to construct the ingredients of Einstein’s equations of general relativity that relate the curvature of space-time with energy-mass

Suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors at Harvard University, University of Southampton, and Pennsylvania State University.

Topic #4 : Nuclear applications in physics

Nuclear science and its possible benefits and implications are important topics to explore and understand in today’s society, which often uses nuclear energy. One possible nuclear physics topic to look into is:

12. Radiation or radiation measurement in applications of nuclear physics (such as reactors, nuclear batteries, sensors/detectors)

Suggested by a Lumiere PhD mentor at University of Chicago.

Topic #5 : Analyzing biophysical data

Biology and even medicine are applicable fields in physics. Using physics to figure out how to improve biology research or understand biological systems is common. Some biophysics topics to research may include the following:

13. Simulation of biological systems using data science techniques to analyze biological data sets

14. Design and construction of DNA nanomachines that operate in liquid environments

15. Representation and decomposition of MEG/EEG brain signals using fundamental electricity and magnetism concepts

16. Use of novel methods to make better images in the context of biology and obtain high resolution images of biological samples

Suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors at University of Oxford, University of Cambridge, University of Washington, and University of Rochester

Topic #6 : Identifying electrical and mechanical properties

Even engineering has great applications in the field of physics. There are different phenomena in physics from cells to Boson particles with interesting electrical and/or mechanical properties. If you are interested in electrical or mechanical engineering or even just the basics , these are some related physics topics:

17. Simulations of how cells react to electrical and mechanical stimuli

18. The best magneto-hydrodynamic drive for high electrical permittivity fluids

19. The electrical and thermodynamic properties of Boson particles, whose quantum nature is responsible for laser radiation

Suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors at Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, and Harvard University.

Topic #7 : Quantum properties and theories

Quantum physics studies science at the most fundamental level , and there are many questions yet to be answered. Although there have been recent breakthroughs in the quantum physics field, there are still many undiscovered sub areas that you can explore. These are possible quantum physics research topics:

20. The recent theoretical and experimental advances in the quantum computing field (such as Google’s recent breakthrough result) and explore current high impact research directions for quantum computing from a hardware or theoretical perspective

21. Discovery a new undiscovered composite particle called toponium and how to utilize data from detectors used to observe proton collisions for discoveries

22. Describing a black hole and its quantum properties geometrically as a curvature of space-time and how studying these properties can potentially solve the singularity problem

Suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors at Stanford University, Purdue University, University of Cambridge, and Cornell University.

Topic #8 : Renewable energy and climate change solutions

Climate change is an urgent issue , and you can use physics to research environmental topics ranging from renewable energies to global temperature increases . Some ideas of environmentally related physics research topics are:

23. New materials for the production of hydrogen fuel

24. Analysis of emissions involved in the production, use, and disposal of products

25. Nuclear fission or nuclear fusion energy as possible solutions to mitigate climate change

Suggested by Lumiere PhD mentors at Northwestern University and Princeton University.

If you are passionate or even curious about physics and would like to do research and learn more, consider applying to the Lumiere Research Scholar Program , which is a selective online high school program for students interested in researching with the help of mentors. You can find the application form here .

Rachel is a first year at Harvard University concentrating in neuroscience. She is passionate about health policy and educational equity, and she enjoys traveling and dancing.

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Social Science Research for High School Students

Social science aims to understand human interactions, institutions, and cultures through empirical research and analysis. Most commonly known as sociology, you can also find elements of social science in psychology, anthropology, economics, political science, design and user experience, criminal justice, data science, and public health. By studying patterns and trends, social scientists seek to improve our daily lives in all sorts of ways: policy development, public health strategies, and economic planning.

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Types of Social Science Research and Careers

Social science research takes various forms, including quantitative surveys, experiments, qualitative interviews, case studies, and observational studies to address different social challenges. Here are some examples:

Community psychologists may use surveys and interviews to explore how online interactions influence well-being, contributing valuable insights for mental health interventions. They would then collaborate with local communities to address mental health disparities. 

Sociologists might analyze data on community involvement and crime statistics to inform policies that enhance public safety. 

Political scientists might complete a comparative analysis of different voting mechanisms to provide recommendations for improving democratic processes. Governmental agencies also hire political scientists to inform public policies. 

Social workers , often equipped with backgrounds in sociology or psychology, provide essential support to individuals and communities facing challenges. 

Human rights advocates , informed by political science and international relations, work to address social injustices globally. 

Environmental sociologists contribute to more sustainable practices by studying human-environment interactions. 

Anthropologists work to preserve cultural heritage and understand human evolution. 

Market researchers , drawing on social science methodologies, help businesses understand consumer behavior, fostering economic growth. Market researchers may be employed by private companies to enhance product development. 

All of these examples underscore the breadth of social science impact, influencing policies, shaping societal perceptions, and contributing to positive change at local and global levels.

It’s worth mentioning that while sociology and psychology have different focuses, they do overlap in certain areas, particularly in social psychology. Social psychology is a subfield that bridges the gap between sociology and psychology, examining how individual behavior is influenced by social factors and the impact of individuals on society. It explores topics like conformity, group dynamics, prejudice, and interpersonal relationships, merging insights from both disciplines. Social psychology is a growing field. Advances in technology and neuroscience allow for more nuanced research into topics such as social cognition, group dynamics, prejudice, and interpersonal relationships.

How to Get into Social Science

To kickstart your journey, consider chatting with your school guidance counselor or a teacher who's into social sciences—they're like built-in advisors. You can even reach out to local sociologists, social workers, urban planners, anthropologists, or market analysts. Consider job shadowing or interviewing one of them for your school paper; it's a low-key way to learn more about different careers in the field. Participate in classes or extracurricular clubs like debate, sociology, or psychology to explore your passions and meet like-minded friends. Start reading! Books, articles, and documentaries can give you a deeper understanding of social science topics. If your school offers research projects or science fairs, dive into a social science-related topic. It helps you apply what you're learning, plus it looks great on college applications.

Finally, stay curious and open-minded. Keep a journal. Travel as much as you can and observe cultures different from your own. Social science is all about understanding people and societies, so keep exploring different perspectives. Attend lectures, watch TED Talks, and follow current events to stay informed. Here are some more detailed ideas to get you going. 

1. Take a Class in High School

Most high schools offer at least a few of the courses listed below. You can also look for courses at your local community college or seek out online versions. Consider taking a mix of foundational and diverse courses.

Sociology (if available) -This one is a no-brainer. It will introduce you to the basic concepts and methods used in sociological research, giving you a solid foundation.

Psychology - Understanding human behavior is a key aspect of sociology. Psychology provides insights into individual and group behavior, helping you grasp the psychological underpinnings of social phenomena.

Statistics or Data Analysis - Sociologists often use statistical methods to analyze data. Taking a course in statistics or data analysis will equip you with the quantitative skills needed for sociological research.

Cultural Studies or Anthropology - These courses explore the diversity of cultures and societies. Understanding cultural dynamics is essential for sociologists who study how societies function and evolve.

History - Sociologists often examine social phenomena in a historical context. Studying history will provide you with a broader understanding of how societies have developed over time.

Literature or Creative Writing - Sociologists need strong communication skills. Literature or creative writing courses can enhance your ability to express complex sociological concepts clearly and persuasively.

Philosophy - Philosophy courses help develop critical thinking skills and encourage a deeper understanding of societal structures, norms, and values.

Ethics - Sociologists often grapple with ethical considerations in their research. This class will help you navigate the ethical challenges of studying human behavior.

In today's digital age, having a foundational understanding of computer science can significantly enhance your skills and versatility in the social sciences. Although it might be hard to come by these in high school, you may be able to find online versions or take one at a local community college

Machine Learning - While more advanced, a basic understanding of machine learning can be valuable. Machine learning techniques can be applied to social science data for predictive modeling or identifying patterns in complex datasets.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - GIS is used to analyze spatial data, making it useful for sociologists studying the geographic aspects of social phenomena, such as urbanization or migration patterns.

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) - HCI courses explore how people interact with technology. For sociologists interested in the impact of technology on society, HCI provides insights into user behavior and the societal implications of digital interfaces.

2. Read a Book

Here’s a list of foundational works and contemporary perspectives, providing a well-rounded intro to the social sciences and their evolving landscape.

Foundational Classics:

The Sociological Imagination by C. Wright Mills (1959) - Mills introduces the concept of the sociological imagination, encouraging individuals to connect personal experiences with larger societal structures. It's a cornerstone text in sociology, urging readers to think critically about the interplay of biography and history.

The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud (1899) - Although primarily a psychology classic, Freud's exploration of dream analysis has influenced social scientists by highlighting the significance of the unconscious mind and its impact on human behavior.

The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels (1848) - A seminal work in political science and sociology, it lays out the basic tenets of Marxism, addressing class struggle and societal transformation. Understanding Marxist theory is fundamental for social science students.

The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir (1949) - A foundational feminist text, de Beauvoir's exploration of women's oppression and the concept of "the other" has been influential in gender studies and sociology.

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber (1905) - Weber's examination of the relationship between religious beliefs and economic systems is a key work in sociology. It introduced the concept of the Protestant work ethic and its impact on capitalism.

Recent and Game-Changing Works:

Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman (2011) - Kahneman, a Nobel laureate in economics, explores the two systems of thinking that influence decision-making. This book is crucial for understanding behavioral economics and how cognitive biases shape human choices, impacting fields like psychology, sociology, and economics.

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond (2016): This Pulitzer Prize-winning book delves into the housing crisis in America, offering a poignant exploration of poverty, inequality, and the impact of eviction on individuals and communities.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (2010) - Alexander examines the racial dimensions of mass incarceration in the United States, highlighting how the criminal justice system perpetuates racial inequality.

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari (2014) - Though not purely a social science text, Harari's exploration of human history provides valuable insights into the development of societies and cultures, making it relevant for social science enthusiasts.

Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy by Cathy O'Neil (2016) - O'Neil critically examines the societal impact of algorithms and big data, emphasizing how these tools can reinforce inequality and bias.

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert (2014) - A compelling exploration of the impact of human activities on biodiversity and the environment, addressing pressing issues in anthropology, sociology, and environmental studies.

Books are a great start, but as in all sciences, sociology is constantly evolving. To stay current in the social sciences, check out reputable academic journals such as the "American Sociological Review," "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology," and "Political Science Quarterly" publish cutting-edge research and studies. Podcasts like "The Social Breakdown," "The Hidden Brain," and "Freakonomics Radio" feature accessible and fascinating discussions on various social science topics. In social media, you can check out @zeynep (Zeynep Tufekci is a sociologist and contributing writer for The Atlantic who provides insightful commentary on technology and society) @Soc_Imagination (The Sociological Imagination shares sociological perspectives on contemporary issues), @SocSocMed (Social Science & Medicine offers updates on health-related social science research) and @danariely (Dan Ariely, a behavioral economist, who shares perspectives on (sometimes humorous) human behavior, decision-making, and societal issues).

3. Extracurricular Study

Remember that quality is often more important than quantity when it comes to extracurricular activities. Choose activities that genuinely interest you.

Model United Nations (MUN) - Participating in MUN builds strong research, public speaking, and negotiation skills. It exposes you to international relations, political science, and global issues, fostering a deeper understanding of diplomacy and societal challenges.

Community Service Projects - Engaging in community service allows you to interact with diverse populations directly. This hands-on experience provides insights into societal issues, develops empathy, and enhances your understanding of community dynamics—an essential aspect of social sciences.

Youth Advocacy Groups - Joining or starting a youth advocacy group provides a platform to address social issues relevant to your community. It develops leadership, teamwork, and organizational skills while allowing you to actively contribute to positive social change.

Debate Club - Debate sharpens critical thinking and argumentation skills, crucial for social sciences. Exploring and defending various perspectives fosters an open-minded approach, and engaging in debates on social issues hones your ability to articulate and defend your opinions.

Toastmasters - Developing strong public speaking skills is invaluable for presenting research findings, defending arguments, and engaging in discussions—a crucial aspect of social science careers. Joining a public speaking or Toastmasters club provides a supportive environment for honing these skills.

Documentary Filmmaking Club or Project - Creating documentaries on social issues allows you to combine storytelling with research and visual communication. It enhances your ability to convey complex social concepts to a broader audience, a valuable skill in the social sciences. For some inspiration, you could check out "The Corporation" (2003), "The Social Dilemma" (2020) and "Super Size Me" (2004).

Philosophy Club - Joining a philosophy club exposes you to critical philosophical thinking, enhancing your ability to analyze and evaluate ideas. It provides a theoretical foundation that complements social science studies and encourages deep reflection on societal values and norms.

Writing Workshops - Participating in creative writing workshops allows you to explore storytelling as a means of expressing societal narratives. It nurtures your ability to communicate complex ideas effectively and fosters creativity, both valuable in social science research and analysis.

If you could use some help developing your own independent sociology research project, our Pathfinders program gives you access to psychology mentors who can listen to your ideas and provide valuable feedback.

Social Science Research Opportunities 

Finding good social science research opportunities as a high school student can be tough but not impossible. Reach out to professors, local researchers, or community organizations that align with your interests. Here are some ways to find or create research opportunities.

Find research programs close to home

We’ll go into summer social science programs in more depth in the next section, but if you want to find all types of established social science research opportunities close to home, our High School Student Research Opportunities Database is an excellent resource. Click on your state, then search based on your location, institution, event type (in-person or virtual), and tuition (paid or free). 

Work with a professor

If you have a clear idea of your passions, you can reach out to professors in your field to see if they are open to collaborating with you. Refer to our Guide to Cold-Emailing Professors (written by Polygence literature research mentor Daniel Hazard , a Ph.D. candidate at Princeton University).

Engage in your own research project

Students with initiative and focus can opt to tackle research independently. Carly Taylor , a Stanford University senior who has completed several research projects this way, outlined a guide about how to write a self-guided research paper . 

Enter a competition

Competition deadlines provide a very helpful structure to keep your social science research moving forward. For some ideas, check out these competition options . Some of them include social sciences as a category. Another benefit to attending a competition is meeting other students, teachers, and even experts in the field you love most. 

Summer Programs in Social Science

Here are some top picks for summer social science research programs. We chose them based on their affordability, name recognition, social opportunities, and academic rigor.

1. EXPLO Psychology + Neuroscience

Hosting institution: Wellesley College

Cost: Residential: $7,895; Commuter: $3,995

Format: In-person (Norwood, MA)

Application deadline: Rolling admissions

Even though it is billed as a psychology and neuroscience program, this EXPLO Pre-College Career Concentrations program gives high school students interested in the social sciences the chance to deep dive into highly specific topics. Key benefits for participants include the chances to learn from industry experts, such as Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett – one of the most-cited scientists in the world for her psychology and neuroscience research – who was a guest instructor in 2023; and earn credits at Sarah Lawrence College, Hampshire College, or Wheaton College . Check the site for the most current application information.

2. Telluride Association Summer Seminar (TASS)     

Hosting institution: Telluride Association

Format: In-person (Cornell University, University of Maryland, and University of Michigan)

Application deadline: Early January 

Here is a great option for those interested in history, politics, literature, and art. This 6-week program features seminars about how power and privilege affect social structures, community activities, outings, and service projects. Tuition, books, room and board, and field trips are free. Check the site for the most current application information.

3. Pomona Academy for Youth Success (PAYS)

Hosting institution: Pomona College  

Cost: Free       

Format: In-person

Application deadline: Late February

Calling students in Los Angeles, CA, and neighboring areas: This is an unusual program in that it lasts for three years, you must apply in 9th grade, and it incorporates both a residential summer program as well as year-round academic enrichment. In addition to taking classes and participating in organized social activities, you are matched with a faculty member who will mentor you in a research project. This wonderful program is primarily geared toward populations traditionally underrepresented in college. It’s an amazing opportunity… if you can get in. Check the site for the most current application information.

Check our High School Student Research Opportunities Database for more ideas. 

Social Sciences Internships for High School Students 

1. dsi summer lab.

Hosting institution: The University of Chicago

Cost: Free + paid internship

Format: In-person (Chicago, IL)

Application deadline: Mid-February

DSI Summer Lab is an immersive 10-week paid internship program at the University of Chicago for high schoolers (and undergrads). You’ll be paired with a data science mentor in various domains, including computer science, data science, social science, climate and energy policy, public policy, materials science, and biomedical research. Your mentor will help you hone your skills in research methodologies, practices, and teamwork. You may also be eligible for projects in their Social Impact Track. No prior research experience is needed to apply. Check the site for the most current application information.  

2. SHTEM: Summer Internships for High Schoolers

Hosting institution: Stanford

Cost: Unpaid internship

Format: Online or in-person (Stanford, CA) 

Application deadline: Mid-March

In this 8-week internship, you work on interdisciplinary projects directly with Stanford faculty and graduate students. Past multifaceted projects have incorporated themes from psychology, neuroscience, design, linguistics, technology, and more. This is an unpaid internship; you will be expected to work anywhere from 30 to 40 hours per week. You will work directly with a mentor once assigned a project. Check the site for the most current application information.

3. Student Volunteer Program

Hosting institution: United States Secret Service (USSS)

Format: In-person (various)

Application deadline: Various

If you’re interested in sociology, criminal justice, history, government, homeland security, and other related fields, the Secret Service Student Volunteer Program is a unique, hands-on, and fast-paced opportunity. It gives high school students insight into the nature and structure of the USSS while teaching important “soft skills”, such as excellent communication, analytical observation, and problem solving. Student volunteers must be at least 16 years old and devote at least 12 hours per week. While the positions are unpaid, you may receive academic credit for your time. Check the site for the most current application information.

Be sure to check our High School Student Research Opportunities Database for more ideas. 

Social Science Project Ideas and How to Brainstorm Your Own

Finding a compelling focus for your social science research paper starts with what genuinely interests you. Reflect on social issues, personal experiences, or current events that ignite your curiosity. Ask questions, read diverse perspectives, and explore topics aligning with your passion. Engage in discussions with teachers, peers, or family members to gather insights. Consider real-world problems or social issues that really confuse you. This process allows you to find a subject that not only captivates you but also contributes meaningfully to the broader conversation. Trust your instincts, and let your enthusiasm guide you toward a research topic that truly resonates.

Polygence Scholars Are Also Passionate About

Here are some ideas from some of our Polygence mentors to get you inspired:

The fear of missing out (FOMO), or anxiety that others may be having rewarding experiences that you aren't taking part in, is likely something most of us can relate to. Higher levels of FOMO have been found to be associated with increased social media use , texting while driving, and decreased life satisfaction. This suggests there may be an effect of FOMO on moral cognition - doing things that we know are wrong but we choose to do them anyway. There is little to no current research done in this area, so a paper discussing how FOMO may influence our moral cognition and resulting behaviors would be an incredibly interesting and meaningful contribution to the field!

Idea by sociology research mentor Paul

Disability in other cultures

Disability has many definitions, thus leading to its lack of clarity. What's more unknown, however, is how disability is defined in other cultures. In this project, investigate the literature on how disability is defined, and second, identify how these varied definitions of disability are defined in different cultural contexts.

Idea by sociology research mentor Victoria

Cancel culture

We hear in the news that a beloved celebrity cheated on their spouse, a famous YouTuber gives a half-hearted apology, or a politician is involved in a money-laundering scandal. Just one immoral action can lead to public "cancellation". A few different research questions can emerge from this topic: What is the function of publicly signaling moral praise or blame of individuals? Can immoral or "canceled" individuals be redeemed in the public eye or forgiven? What would it take to do so? You could first start by looking at examples in pop culture - what seems the same or different between those who are "loved" vs those who are "hated" in the public eye? Next, turn to the academic literature to see what research exists on this topic. Then, you could develop a research question and think of ways to test it. Idea by sociology research mentor Alexa

Check out even more project ideas on the 12 Sociology Passion Project Ideas For High School Students post. 

Brainstorm your own project ideas based on what social science trends interest you. If you want support, the Pathfinders program gives you the chance to meet with three different mentors who specialize in your field of interest. You can discuss your project ideas with them, and they can help you grow your idea, discover new research techniques, and point the way to great resources and alternative options. 

Social Science Projects from Polygence Scholars

For a sense of how varied the subjects and methods for social science projects can be, take a look at topics covered by some of our Polygence Scholars.

Sanaya looked at why Serbian radios in Croatia led to a rise in nationalism , exploring what occurs when two different groups of people disagree on politics and historical events. Sanaya wrote a research paper to discuss her findings and also presented it at the Polygence Symposium of Rising Scholars .

Joanne addressed the unique educational challenges faced by Somali refugee children in American classrooms. Drawing from firsthand tutoring experiences and a comprehensive literature review, Joanne identified issues such as difficulty focusing (potentially stemming from past traumas) and discussed best practices for teachers to support these students, emphasizing cultural sensitivity and understanding family values. You can watch her Symposium of Rising Scholars presentation here .

Check out more social science projects done by Polygence Scholars . 

Writing a Social Science Research Paper: 

Select a social science topic that genuinely interests you—something you're curious to explore. Once you have your subject, conduct thorough research using reputable sources, such as academic journals, books, and online databases. Take detailed notes, citing your sources carefully. As you read articles or books to support your thesis, you should skim their introduction and conclusion first to make sure they’re worth reading all the way through. 

As you do this research, you may also want to start forming an outline of your research paper to give your research more direction. Also, create a clear thesis statement that encapsulates the central argument or question your paper will address. You can always come up with a preliminary or working thesis and then refine it or completely revise it as you learn more.

Structure your paper logically, including an introduction, a body presenting your research and analysis, and a conclusion summarizing your findings. Ensure a smooth flow between paragraphs, with each one contributing to the overall narrative of your paper. Don't just present facts; discuss and interpret them in the context of your thesis. Address counterarguments to showcase a nuanced understanding of your topic. Finally, be sure to use proper citations for all sources, following a citation style (such as APA or MLA) specified by your instructor.

If you need more general guidance overall, here’s a great article on how to write a good research paper . 

Finally, pay attention to the details. Proofread your paper for grammatical errors, typos, and formatting consistency. A well-edited and polished paper reflects your commitment to producing high-quality work. Seek feedback from teachers, peers, or mentors to refine your work. 

If you have some ideas and want to conduct social science research with the guidance of an experienced mentor, apply to be a part of our flagship mentorship program . 

Journals in Social Science

Once you’ve researched, written, and perfected your research paper, it’s time to introduce it to the world. You could enter it into a competition , as mentioned earlier in this post, create a podcast, do a YouTube video about it, or publish it in a journal. Publishing your research in a peer-reviewed journal can take the great work you’ve already done and add credibility to it. It also makes a stronger impression than unpublished research. The process of having your work peer-reviewed by advanced degree researchers can be a valuable experience in itself. You can receive feedback from experts and learn how to improve upon the work you’ve already done. 

Here are some publications you could look into. 

1. Concord Review

The Concord Review is a quarterly journal that publishes exceptional essays written by high school students. The journal has been around since 1987 and has a great reputation, with many student winners going to great universities. Further, if your paper is published, your essays will be sent to subscribers and teachers all around the world, which is an incredible achievement.

Papers submitted tend to be around 8,000 words, so there is definitely a lot of writing involved, and the Concord Review themselves say that they are very selective, publishing only about 5% of the essays they receive.

We’ve posted our complete guide on publishing in the Concord Review here.

Cost: $70 to Submit and $200 Publication Cost (if accepted)

Deadline: Fixed Deadlines in Feb 1 (Summer Issue), May 1 (Fall), August 1 (Winter), and November 1 (Spring)

Subject area: History / Social Sciences

Type of research: All types of academic articles

2. Whitman Journal of Psychology

This journal dedicated to psychology does also include social psychology as one of its categories. The WWJOP is a publication run entirely by students, where research and literature reviews in the field of psychology are recognized. The journal is run out of a high school with a teacher supervisor and student staff. The WWJOP uniquely also accepts podcast submissions, so if that’s your preferred format for showcasing your work, then this could be the journal for you!

Deadline: Rolling

Type of research: Original research, podcasts

3. The Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI)

JEI is an online, peer-reviewed journal that publishes research by middle and high school students in various scientific disciplines, including sociology. Please note that JEI requires that a teacher, mentor, or Principal Investigator of a lab submit your research on your behalf. 

Type of research: Original research that is written by middle and high school students. 

4. Journal of High School Science

The Journal of High School Science is a peer-reviewed quarterly publication showcasing high school student research in science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics.

Type of research:   STEAM-based research or innovations by high school students.

Regarding getting your project accepted and published at these or any other peer-reviewed journal: “Be prepared for the possibility of rejection or revisions. Scientific publishing is a competitive process, so maintain a positive attitude and be persistent in your efforts to improve and disseminate your research.” (Quote from The Journal of High School Science website)

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Social Science projects

Car Dependency and Decreased Mobility Timeline in the Los Angeles Area Through GIS

Car Dependency and Decreased Mobility Timeline in the Los Angeles Area Through GIS

Liam

What is the relationship between poverty and educational attainment/access among coffee farm workers in Latin America?

Edwin

What are some significant factors that affect the prejudice between East Asian countries, China, Japan, and Korea specifically?

Julie

Why did Serbian radios in Croatia influence the subsequent rise in nationalism?

Sanaya

Does fear explain the attraction of women towards male serial killers?

Noor

The Story of a Theater Lover — How Diversity Affects Theatrical Storytelling

Ziyi

Development and Initial Validation of a Psychometric Scale for Immigration Stress Caused by Backlog in the Green-Card Application Process for Visa Holders

Lakshanyaa

Ready to start your own project?

Work 1 on 1 with an expert mentor on a project built around your passions.

Propositions on the effects of Emotions on the Stock Market based on Appraisal theory, Approach and Avoidance Motivations.

Propositions on the effects of Emotions on the Stock Market based on Appraisal theory, Approach and Avoidance Motivations.

Thrista

From Democracy to Dynasties: Analyzing Political Corruption and Nepotism in 50 Years of India’s History

Nandini

Processed Meat Carcinogen Warning Labeling

Evie

What are the roles of genetics, environmental factors, and psychology in athletic performance-related traits?

Rishika

How important are the social benefits of laughter for patients in palliative care?

Sanaa

The Primary Market of Concert Ticketing: Evaluating Live Nation Entertainment's Involvement with Recent Inefficiencies

Parker

Effects of Social Support on Adolescent Identity Development

Christine

Racial Disparities in Maternal Mortality: Social and Clinical Considerations

Viranshi

What are the most critical information and resources immigrants need to navigate naturalization successfully, and how can an online website guide effectively provide support to address their challenges?

Zara

Improving Mental Health Services for Filipino-American Adolescents in the Bay Area: Addressing Disparities

Chloe

What is the link between mental health issues and school shootings, and does mental health play a role in the sentencing these shooters get in court?

Anwita

The Learning Experience of Somali Refugee Children in America: Best Practice Suggestions for Schools

Joanne

Inuit Health and Wellbeing In Response to Climate Change

Anh

Social Science mentors

Hope

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

PhD candidate

Elizabeth

University of Washington

Emily

University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)

Domenic

Cornell University

Emily

Cambridge University

Eli

Columbia University

Vicky

George Washington University

Susan

Indiana University at Bloomington

david

Harvard University

Colette

Indiana University - Bloomington

Henry

Oxford University

Abigail

New York University

MA candidate

Alexander "Hutch"

Alexander "Hutch"

Indiana University

Michelle

Virginia Commonwealth University

Social Science scholars

Cameron Boros

Project: “The whys of climate change inaction.“

Asher Cohen

Project: “Identity Politics and Campaign Strategy Re-Formation“

Anwita Gudivada

Project: “What is the link between mental health issues and school shootings, and does mental health play a role in the sentencing these shooters get in court?“

Harshitha Harinarayanan

Project: “To what degree have US government regulations on bank runs changed since 1850, and how successful/effective have they been in offsetting and controlling bank runs in the US? What solutions can we bring about to improve on these regulations?“

Chloe Juni

Project: “Improving Mental Health Services for Filipino-American Adolescents in the Bay Area: Addressing Disparities“

Joanne Lee

Project: “The Learning Experience of Somali Refugee Children in America: Best Practice Suggestions for Schools“

Joshua Lee

Project: “Overcoming Academic Procrastination: A Behavioral-Cognitive Approach“

Ziyi Lei

Project: “Our Voices: A Call for a Diverse Theater Industry“

Lakshanyaa Rajkumar Sudhakar

Project: “Development and Initial Validation of a Psychometric Scale for Immigration Stress Caused by Backlog in the Green-Card Application Process for Visa Holders“

Rishika Rastogi

Project: “What are the roles of genetics, environmental factors, and psychology in athletic performance-related traits?“

Michael Ross

Project: “Unmasking Intentions: analysis of US aid to Ukraine amidst Russian invasion“

Noor Syed

Project: “Does fear explain the attraction of women towards male serial killers?“

Kaitlyn Uesugi

Project: “Breaking the Cycle: A Comparative Review of Four Non-Retributive Juvenile Justice Models“

Parker Upton

Project: “The Primary Market of Concert Ticketing: Evaluating Live Nation Entertainment's Involvement with Recent Inefficiencies“

Priya Verma

Project: “Overcoming Barriers to Implementing Community Health Initiatives to Address Social Determinants of Health“

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High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into a model that can predict neurotransmitters

by Howard Hughes Medical Institute

High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into innovative research tool

Like many good ideas in science, it started with a walk in the woods. During a stroll through the Berlin Botanic Garden in 2019, HHMI Janelia Research Campus Group Leader Jan Funke and some of his scientific colleagues started chatting about a familiar topic: How to get more information out of insect connectomes.

These wiring diagrams give researchers unprecedented information about brain cells and how they connect to each other, but they don't tell scientists how the signal from one neuron affects the other neurons in its network.

The group wondered if they might be able to use information from previous experiments identifying the neurotransmitters released from some neurons to predict the neurotransmitters released from others in the connectome. Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate with each other, with different chemicals responsible for different signals.

The human eye can't tell the difference between the synapses on neurons where different neurotransmitters are released, but perhaps a computer model could. Funke and his colleagues were skeptical, but they thought it might be worth giving it a try.

"This is basically where we left it: We have the data, I guess we could try," Funke says. "We were not particularly optimistic."

High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into innovative research tool

Back at Janelia, Funke decided to give the project to Michelle Du, a high school student who was starting a summer internship in his lab. The project would allow Du to learn how to train a neural network to recognize images—a useful skill for a budding computer scientist even if the project did not yield results.

A few days into her internship, Du showed up in Funke's office, having trained the model on published data and evaluated its performance on test data. Though Funke had little hope it would work, the model was more than 90% accurate in predicting some neurotransmitters.

"I couldn't believe it," Funke says. "The numbers were way too good."

After checking the data and the model, Funke, Du, and their colleagues were convinced that the numbers weren't a mistake: The model could predict neurotransmitters. But the team was still cautious, and they didn't have a good grasp on how the network was making the predictions.

"I should have been very happy, but instead I was worried because we didn't understand what was going on," Funke says.

After ruling out possible confounders that could be skewing their results, the team developed a way to understand what the network was seeing that allowed it to make predictions.

High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into innovative research tool

First, they used their network to predict a neurotransmitter from a known image, which it did successfully. Then, they asked a separate network to take that known image and change it slightly to create an image corresponding to the release of a different neurotransmitter—essentially identifying the minimum traits that need to be changed for the model to predict one neurotransmitter over another. Lastly, the team developed a separate method to identify these distinct traits.

From this information, the team understood the different features their original network used to make predictions. This gave them the confidence to release their method to the wider neuroscience community in 2020.

"What most of the neuroscience community has seen from this work is the predictions," Funke says. "They were happy to use it, but for us, it was very important to make sure it was actually working."

Five years later, Du is now an undergraduate at Duke University, and the method she helped develop has been used to predict neurotransmitters in connectomes of the fruit fly hemibrain, ventral nerve cord, and optic lobe created by Janelia researchers and collaborators, as well as the adult fly brain connectome created by FlyWire.

The information helps scientists understand how neurons in a circuit affect each other so they can then form hypotheses about the function of brain circuits that can be tested in the lab.

"It really all started with a bit of a crazy idea, something that no one was really too optimistic about. And what do you do with a crazy idea? You give it to a high school student as a learning experience ," Funke says. "We were very fortunate that Michelle was extremely talented."

The paper is published in the journal Cell .

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ScienceDaily

High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into innovative research tool

Like many good ideas in science, it started with a walk in the woods.

During a stroll through the Berlin Botanic Garden in 2019, HHMI Janelia Research Campus Group Leader Jan Funke and some of his scientific colleagues started chatting about a familiar topic: how to get more information out of insect connectomes.

These wiring diagrams give researchers unprecedented information about brain cells and how they connect to each other, but they don't tell scientists how the signal from one neuron affects the other neurons in its network.

The group wondered if they might be able to use information from previous experiments identifying the neurotransmitters released from some neurons to predict the neurotransmitters released from others in the connectome. Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate with each other, with different chemicals responsible for different signals.

The human eye can't tell the difference between the synapses on neurons where different neurotransmitters are released, but perhaps a computer model could. Funke and his colleagues were skeptical, but they thought it might be worth giving it a try.

"This is basically where we left it: we have the data, I guess we could try," Funke says. "We were not particularly optimistic."

Back at Janelia, Funke decided to give the project to Michelle Du, a high school student who was starting a summer internship in his lab. The project would allow Du to learn how to train a neural network to recognize images -- a useful skill for a budding computer scientist even if the project did not yield results.

A few days into her internship, Du showed up in Funke's office having trained the model on published data and evaluated its performance on test data. Though Funke had little hope it would work, the model was more than 90 percent accurate in predicting some neurotransmitters.

"I couldn't believe it," Funke says. "The numbers were way too good."

After checking the data and the model, Funke, Du, and their colleagues were convinced that the numbers weren't a mistake: The model could predict neurotransmitters. But the team was still cautious, and they didn't have a good grasp on how the network was making the predictions.

"I should have been very happy, but instead I was worried because we didn't understand what was going on," Funke says.

After ruling out possible confounders that could be skewing their results, the team developed a way to understand what the network was seeing that allowed it to make predictions.

First, they used their network to predict a neurotransmitter from a known image, which it did successfully. Then, they asked a separate network to take that known image and change it slightly to create an image corresponding to the release of a different neurotransmitter -- essentially identifying the minimum traits that need to be changed for the model to predict one neurotransmitter over 4another. Lastly, the team developed a separate method to identify these distinct traits.

From this information, the team understood the different features their original network used to make predictions. This gave them confidence to release their method to the wider neuroscience community in 2020.

"What most of the neuroscience community has seen from this work is the predictions," Funke says. "They were happy to use it, but for us it was very important to make sure it was actually working."

Five years later, Du is now an undergraduate at Duke University, and the method she helped develop has been used to predict neurotransmitters in connectomes of the fruit fly hemibrain, ventral nerve cord, and optic lobe created by Janelia researchers and collaborators, as well as the adult fly brain connectome created by FlyWire.

The information helps scientists understand how neurons in a circuit affect each other so they can then form hypotheses about the function of brain circuits that can be tested in the lab.

"It really all started with a bit of a crazy idea, something that no one was really too optimistic about. And what do you do with a crazy idea? You give it to a high school student as a learning experience," Funke says. "We were very fortunate that Michelle was extremely talented."

  • Neuroscience
  • Educational Psychology
  • K-12 Education
  • Behavioral Science
  • Telecommunications
  • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Double blind
  • Neurotransmitter
  • Earth science
  • Brachiosaurus
  • Positron emission tomography

Story Source:

Materials provided by Howard Hughes Medical Institute . Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference :

  • Nils Eckstein, Alexander Shakeel Bates, Andrew Champion, Michelle Du, Yijie Yin, Philipp Schlegel, Alicia Kun-Yang Lu, Thomson Rymer, Samantha Finley-May, Tyler Paterson, Ruchi Parekh, Sven Dorkenwald, Arie Matsliah, Szi-Chieh Yu, Claire McKellar, Amy Sterling, Katharina Eichler, Marta Costa, Sebastian Seung, Mala Murthy, Volker Hartenstein, Gregory S.X.E. Jefferis, Jan Funke. Neurotransmitter classification from electron microscopy images at synaptic sites in Drosophila melanogaster . Cell , 2024; 187 (10): 2574 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2024.03.016

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Veritas AI

10 Summer Research Programs for High School Students in 2024

science research papers for high school students

Engaging in a summer research program as a high school student offers a myriad of benefits that can significantly enhance one's educational trajectory and personal growth. These programs provide an early exposure to rigorous academic research, allowing students to delve deep into subjects of their interest under the guidance of experienced mentors. This not only bolsters their understanding of complex topics but also sharpens critical thinking and problem-solving skills. 

Participation in summer research can be particularly transformative for students considering careers in fields like science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). It introduces them to the methodologies and challenges of real-world research, providing a solid foundation for future studies and innovations. Additionally, these experiences make students more attractive candidates for competitive college programs, as they demonstrate initiative, intellectual curiosity, and a commitment to learning beyond the typical high school curriculum.

In this blog, we explore 10 summer research programs tailored for high school students!

1. Lumiere Research Scholars Program

The Lumiere Research Scholar Program is a rigorous research program tailored for high school students. It is an extensive one-on-one research opportunity that allows students to work on 1-1 independent research projects under the guidance on expert PhD mentors. 

At the end of the program, you’ll develop a fully fleshed out independent research paper. You can choose topics from subjects such as psychology, physics, economics, data science, computer science, engineering, chemistry, international relations, and more. You can apply here!

Here is our review of Lumiere Education! 

Location: Virtual

Cost: Lumiere Individual Research Program – $2,800; Lumiere Premium Research and Publication Program – $4,800; Lumiere Research Fellowship – $8,400

Application Deadline: Upcoming summer cohort - May 12, 2024. You can apply here !

Program Dates: 12 weeks in the summer

Eligibility: High school students 

2. Veritas AI Fellowship with Publication & Showcase

Veritas AI is founded and run by Harvard graduate students and our programs are geared towards high school students who want to build individual projects from scratch. Through the AI Fellowship program, you work 1-1 with PhD mentors from top universities over 12-15 weeks.  

You can pick any field you are interested in that intersects with AI, ML, data science, or computer science to create a unique project (research paper, model/software, app, presentation) that you can submit to high school journals for publication or use on college applications. In the past students have worked on projects to predict breast cancer from genes, make stock market predictions, classify genres of music based on the waveform, classify asteroids, and more! Here are some more projects students have worked on in the past!  

Cost: $4900 for the AI Fellowship with Publication & Showcase Program

Location: Remote - you can participate in this program from anywhere in the world!

Application Deadline: Upcoming cohort - May 19, 2024. You can apply here!

Program Dates: Summer cohort - June 3, 2024

Eligibility: You must be a high school student with some python experience or have complete the Veritas AI Scholars Program  

3. MIT’s Research Science Institute

The Research Science Institute (RSI) is a prestigious summer program at MIT, designed for highly talented high school juniors interested in advancing their knowledge and skills in STEM fields. Sponsored by the Center for Excellence in Education (CEE), RSI brings together 80 exceptional students from around the globe for a r igorous six-week, fully-funded immersion in research and learning. Despite its enriching offerings, RSI maintains an exclusivity with an acceptance rate of under 5%, making it one of the most competitive programs of its kind.

The program kicks off with a week of extensive STEM classes taught by faculty, providing students with foundational knowledge and advanced concepts in their chosen areas of interest. The core of RSI, however, is the subsequent five-week research internship. Here, students have the unique opportunity to conduct independent research in areas like computer science, working under the guidance of experienced scientists and researchers. This immersive research experience is designed to push students' boundaries and deepen their understanding of complex scientific questions.

RSI culminates in a formal presentation of research findings, where students deliver their results in both oral and written reports styled after professional academic conferences. 

Here is everything you need to know about RSI! 

Cost: No Cost

Location: MIT Campus, Cambridge MA

Application Deadline (based on previous year’s dates):

January 15 (U.S. Citizens) 

March 15(International Students) 

Program Dates: June 25to August 5 (based on previous year’s dates) 

Eligibility:  

Students who are rising seniors (you will have to apply in the middle of your junior year). High school seniors are not eligible to apply. 

It is recommended that PSAT Math Scores be at least 740 (or higher) and Evidence-Based Reading/ Writing Scores be 700 (or higher). ACT math scores should be at least 33, and verbal scores should be at least 34. However, you can offset lower scores through recommendations, high school grades, and science activities. 

Note. There are different application processes for U.S. Citizens/Permanent Residents and International Applicants. You can look here for specific details!

4. The University of Chicago’s Data Science Institute Summer Lab

The DSI Summer Lab at the University of Chicago offers a unique 10-week, paid summer research opportunity for high school and undergraduate students, emphasizing applied, interdisciplinary data science research. This program provides an invaluable platform for students to delve into the world of data science across various domains such as computer science, climate and energy policy, and more.

Participants in the DSI Summer Lab will be paired with a data science mentor, creating a nurturing environment that focuses on sharpening their research skills, methodologies, and teamwork capabilities. Throughout the program, students will not only learn fundamental data science methodologies but will also receive specialized training tailored to their specific areas of interest.

The program culminates in a distinctive presentation format, where students will produce and present videos that summarize their research findings from the summer. These presentations will take place in a professional conference setting, allowing students to engage with their peers, field questions, and discuss their projects, providing a comprehensive end to their immersive summer research experience. 

Cost: No cost; stipend provided ($6,000)

Location: University of Chicago Campus, IL

Application Deadline: While the application deadline has not been specified, you can check their website in the fall-winter 2024 for updates. 

Program Dates: June 12 - August 18, 2024 (tentative, based on previous year’s dates) 

Eligibility: 

Open to all high school students.

Familiarity with at least one programming language and relevant coursework (e.g., computer science, statistics, and math) is preferred. 

5. Northeastern University’s Young Scholars Program

This program offers an opportunity for students to engage directly with cutting-edge research at Northeastern University's Colleges of Engineering, Science, and Health Sciences. As a participant, you'll have the unique experience of working alongside a professor in a research laboratory, assisting with practical and theoretical aspects of their ongoing projects.

For example, one notable project from the 2023 cohort, led by Marvin Onabajo, focused on 'Programmable Signal Acquisition and Calibration of Temperature Sensors for Detection of Power Dissipation on Chips'. This project, like many others, demonstrates the program’s commitment to addressing real-world technological challenges through innovative research. Interested individuals can explore more about past projects and their impacts by checking out the presentations from the 2023 cohort here .

In addition to hands-on research, the program enriches your experience with an educational seminar series titled ‘Introduction to Engineering’. This series covers a range of topics including robotics, chemical analysis, and microwave materials, providing a broad understanding of various engineering disciplines. Furthermore, the program includes field trips and career counseling sessions offered by the Department of Cooperative Education. 

Cost: No cost

Location: Northeastern University, Boston 

Application Deadline: Not specified, but applications opened January 2024!

Program Dates: June 26, 2024 - August 3, 2024 (tentatively, based on previous year’s dates)

Students must be permanent Massachusetts residents (live and go to school in MA throughout the year). 

Must enter 12th grade in the fall (current juniors when applying). 

Must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident. 

6. NYU’s ARISE Program

ARISE at NYU is a compelling seven-week summer program specifically designed for 10th and 11th graders residing in New York City. This program is an exceptional opportunity for students to engage directly with some of NYU’s top research faculty across a range of cutting-edge disciplines, including computer science, machine learning, and robotics. Offered free of charge, ARISE aims to provide high school students with first-hand experience in research, equipping them with the skills and knowledge pertinent to advanced academic and professional fields.

The structure of the program is divided into two main components. The initial two weeks are dedicated to intensive workshops that prepare students for the hands-on research they will conduct. Following this preparatory phase, the remaining five weeks are spent in the lab, where students work closely with their assigned mentors on actual research projects. This immersive experience not only enhances technical skills but also develops professional competencies through training in college-level research methodologies, professional development workshops, and participation in colloquia.

For those interested in applying to this enriching program, a comprehensive guide is available to help navigate the application process and provide further insights into the specific subject areas offered in 2023. You can access more detailed information and view the potential research areas by checking this complete guide to the ARISE program .

Cost: No cost.

Location: New York University Campus, NY (Specific Area depends on subject area/ lab choice)

Application Deadline: March 6 (tentatively, based on previous years)

Program Dates: June 3 - August 9 (tentatively, based on previous years)

Eligibility:

Rising juniors and rising seniors.

Must be based in New York City.

7. Anson L. Clark Scholars Program

The Anson L. Clark Scholars Program is a prestigious 7-week research initiative hosted by Texas Tech University. This program provides high school students with an exceptional opportunity to engage in hands-on research under the guidance of Texas Tech faculty. Designed for highly motivated students, t he Clark Scholars Program offers a rigorous and enriching academic experience that combines direct mentorship, weekly seminars, academic discussions, and field visits.

With an acceptance rate of less than 3% and limited to only 12 students per cohort, being selected as an Anson L. Clark Scholar is a distinct honor that significantly enhances college applications. In addition to the invaluable research experience and academic enrichment, scholars also receive a $750 tax-free stipend, making it not only a prestigious but also a rewarding summer opportunity.

For those considering applying, a detailed guide to the Clark Scholars Program is available here . This guide provides prospective students with all the necessary information to understand the application process, program expectations, and the benefits of participation.

Location: Texas Tech University

Application Deadline: Not announced for next year 

Program Dates: June 16 - August 1, 2024

Eligibility: Applicants must be at least 17 years of age by the program start date and should graduate in 2023 or 2024 (U.S. and International)

8. UCSD’s and SDSC’s Annual Research Experience for High School Students (REHS)

The UC San Diego and San Diego Supercomputer Center have joined forces to offer an 8-week research program that provides students with a unique opportunity to delve into advanced research projects, including those in computer science and artificial intelligence. This collaboration equips students with the tools and mentorship needed to tackle complex research questions in a structured and supportive environment.

Participants in this program work closely with UC San Diego faculty mentors to select and develop a research project that aligns with their interests. Throughout the program, students learn vital research skills such as hypothesis formulation, computational experimentation, and data analysis. This hands-on approach allows students to apply their theoretical computer science knowledge to practical challenges, enhancing their understanding and skills in real-world applications.

If you are eager to engage in a focused research project and enhance your capabilities under the guidance of experienced faculty, this 8-week program at UC San Diego is an excellent opportunity to explore the depth of computer science and artificial intelligence research.

Cost: 

Program with research project - $1,500 

Program without research project - Free. 

Location: On Campus (UC San Diego, California) & Virtual

Application Deadline: March 15 (tentatively, based on previous year’s deadline) Program Dates: June 19 - August 11, 2024 (tentatively, based on previous year’s deadline) Eligibility: Rising 10th grader

Note. The program is focused on students from San Diego county but if you have summer housing accommodations, your application will be accepted. 

9. Johns Hopkins’ Biophysics Research for Baltimore Teens

The Biophysics Research for Baltimore Teens (BRBT) program offers a distinctive internship opportunity for Baltimore City high school students at Johns Hopkins University. This program is specifically designed to immerse students in the fields of biophysics and biomedical research, providing hands-on experience and foundational scientific knowledge directly applicable to real-world challenges.

During the internship, participants will engage in various laboratory activities, such as preparing reagents and materials for biophysical studies, and mastering techniques in microbiology, DNA, and protein engineering. These activities not only enhance practical lab skills but also deepen the students' understanding of complex biological processes and the biophysical methods used to study them.

Additionally, the BRBT program facilitates engagement with a vibrant academic community. Participants have the opportunity to connect with graduate students, post-doctoral researchers, and faculty members, gaining insights from their expertise and experience. This networking aspect of the program is invaluable, as it allows students to receive mentorship, discuss their interests and potential career paths, and see firsthand the day-to-day realities of biomedical research. Through these interactions, students are better equipped to make informed decisions about their future studies and careers in the sciences.

Location: Johns Hopkins University

Application Deadlines: April 7 (tentative, based on previous year’s deadline) 

Program Dates: June to mid-August

Eligibility: Open to high school students in the Baltimore City area. 

10. SPARK Summer Internship Program

SparkSIP is an innovative internship program that offers high school students the unique opportunity to select from a variety of projects aligning with their interests and career aspirations . This structured program enables you to choose 5-6 projects during the application process, after which you are paired with a sponsor who will guide you through your chosen project. This mentorship is instrumental in providing practical experience and insights into the professional world.

For the Summer of 2023, SparkSIP included an intriguing array of projects across various disciplines, particularly focusing on real-world applications in engineering. Some notable topics included:

Engineering sales and marketing, providing a blend of technical knowledge and business acumen.

Interfacing and visualizing data with West Virginia University, which involves creating tools to better understand and present complex datasets.

Developing a Python script for crossbar architecture, exploring the non-idealities and performance parameters of this innovative technology.

Software internships based in Bellevue, which offered roles ranging from frontend web development to native mobile development and customer usage analysis.

These projects not only enhance technical skills but also offer a comprehensive view of the diverse career paths within engineering and technology. Moreover, the experience gained through SparkSIP is invaluable during college applications and beyond, helping students stand out with practical experience and a deeper understanding of their field. The program emphasizes real-world engineering scenarios, such as the Bellevue software internship, which tasked students with engaging in substantive software development and data analysis, thereby preparing them for future challenges in technology-oriented careers.

Cost: No Cost; Stipend provided ($500) 

Location: Greater Seattle Area

Application Deadline: Varies based on the project, but expect it to be between the months of March-May.

Program Dates: 6-8 weeks, June to August

Must be a U.S. Citizen or have permanent resident status.

Can commit to working for 40 hours/week for 8-12 weeks.

Image Source - Lumiere Education Logo

10 Coding Internships for High School Students

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COMMENTS

  1. 20 Journals to Publish Your Research in High School

    2. The Concord Review. Submission Deadline: August 1 (Winter), November 1 (Spring), February 1 (Summer) and May 1 (Fall). The Concord Review, one of the most popular journals to publish your research, is a quarterly publication showcasing history essays authored by high school students.

  2. 15 Journals to Publish Your Research in High School

    Curieux: The Curieux Academic Journal is a youth-led nonprofit founded in 2017 to publish research by high school and middle school students. They currently operate in California but have editors from across the nation. Submitting your paper to Curieux is a great way to get experience in the craft of academic writing.

  3. Guide to High School Science Research

    CUSJ Guide to High School Research Introduction Hi! We are college students in CUSJ, the Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal. From high school, we became interested in trying out research and working to make scientific discoveries. We put together this high school guide to research with all of the information that we wish we had known

  4. How to Publish a Research Paper In High School: 18 Journals and

    Type of research: Including but not limited to research papers, review articles, and humanity/social science pieces. Curieux Academic Journal is a non-profit run by students and was founded in 2017 to publish outstanding research by high school and middle school students. Curieux publishes one issue per month (twelve per year), so there are ...

  5. A Guide to Writing a Scientific Paper: A Focus on High School Through

    For student researchers, writing a well-organized research paper is a key step in learning how to express understanding, make critical connections, summarize data, and effectively communicate results, which are important goals for improving science literacy of the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards, 4 and A ...

  6. Home

    The National High School Journal of Science is a free, online, student-run and peer-reviewed research journal that is targeted towards high school students. Striving to bring science to a wider audience and engaging students in learning beyond the classroom walls, our journal hopes to expose young people to new ideas and topics. This high ...

  7. Journal of Student Research

    Journal of Student Research (JSR) is an Academic, Multidisciplinary, and Faculty-reviewed Journal (Houston, Texas) devoted to the Rapid Dissemination of Current Research Published by High School Edition, Undergraduate and Graduate students. Articles Indexed in Scholarly Databases. The journal seeks articles that are novel, integrative, and ...

  8. Upper high school Archives

    Lower high school (84) Middle school (11) Upper high school (95) Scientific Topic. Biodiversity and Conservation (25) ... Socially Important Scientific Research in 2024 Election Year ... Science Journal for Kids is a 501(c)(3) registered non-profit organization. ...

  9. HS Research Articles

    Call for Papers: Volume 13 Issue 3 March 4, 2024. If you are a high school student or a recent high school graduate aspiring to publish your research, we are accepting submissions. Submit Your Article Now! Deadline: 11:59 p.m. May 31, 2024. 2301. ARTICLES PUBLISHED: 4713. STUDENT

  10. A guide to writing a scientific paper: a focus on high school through

    This article presents a detailed guide for high school through graduate level instructors that leads students to write effective and well-organized scientific papers. Interesting research emerges from the ability to ask questions, define problems, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and make critical connections.

  11. Home

    IJHSR is published since 2019 and is the leading high school research journal to select the highest quality of high school student research work in any area of science, including behavioral and social sciences, technology, engineering, and math. ... (this may be electronic and/or paper records) and copies of all program and promotional ...

  12. The Complete Guide To Publishing Your Research In High School

    Publishing academic research is becoming a common way for the top high school students to distinguish themselves in the admission process. Yet, for many students what publication is and how to approach it is unclear and confusing. This guide's goal is to provide a starter for any students interested in research and publication. It comes from the result of working with 500+ students as part ...

  13. How to Write a Research Paper as a High School Student

    Create a folder on your computer where you can store your electronic sources. Use an online bibliography creator such as Zotero, Easybib, or Noodletools to track sources and generate citations. You can read research papers by Polygence students under our Projects tab. You can also explore other opportunities for high school research.

  14. 20 Science Research Competitions for High Schoolers

    3. Regeneron International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) Grades: 9-12. Type: Local, Regional, and International. The Regeneron ISEF is the world's largest international pre-college science competition—more than 1,800 high school students, representing more than 75 countries, regions, and territories, take part.

  15. Science News Explores

    Founded in 2003, Science News Explores is a free, award-winning online publication dedicated to providing age-appropriate science news to learners, parents and educators. The publication, as well as Science News magazine, are published by the Society for Science, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) membership organization dedicated to public engagement in scientific research and education.

  16. A Guide For Pursuing Independent Scientific Research ...

    NHSJS is a free, online, student-run and peer-reviewed research journal that is targeted towards high school students. To be published in this journal, students don't have to do independent ...

  17. 15 Research Journals for High School Students

    3. Young Scientists Journal (YSJ) As the world's only international peer-reviewed science journal entirely run by and for high school students, the Young Scientists Journal (YSJ) offers a dynamic platform for young researchers to showcase their scientific inquiries and discoveries.

  18. 12 Research Journals For High School Students

    1. The Concord Review. Introduction: The Concord Review (TCR) is an academic research journal dedicated to publishing historical research papers written by high school students in English. In the spring issue, the quarterly journal has published 1,362 research papers from authors in 46 states and 41 countries.

  19. 100 Interesting Research Paper Topics for High Schoolers

    The program pairs high-school students with Ph.D. mentors to work 1-on-1 on an independent research project. The program actually does not require you to have a research topic in mind when you apply, but pro tip: the more specific you can be the more likely you are to get in! Elements of a Strong Research Paper Introduction

  20. Science Journal for Kids and Teens

    Cutting edge scientific research accessible to kids. A free STEM teaching resource. Skip to content. Home; Scientific Articles. ... Lower high school (247) Middle school (185) Upper high school (95) Scientific Topic. Biodiversity and Conservation (85) ... Science Journal for Kids is a 501(c)(3) registered non-profit organization. ...

  21. The impact of high school science pedagogies on students' STEM career

    Recent research by Chen, Sonnert, Sadler, and Sunbury in biology education showed that students only achieved conceptual change when their teachers could predict the students' pre-existing misconceptions, but the 78 high school life science teachers sampled in that study could predict these misconceptions correctly only 31% of the time.

  22. 25 Research Ideas in Physics for High School Students

    Some ideas of environmentally related physics research topics are: 23. New materials for the production of hydrogen fuel. 24. Analysis of emissions involved in the production, use, and disposal of products. 25. Nuclear fission or nuclear fusion energy as possible solutions to mitigate climate change.

  23. 10 Research Ideas in STEM for High School Students

    One of the issues you might face when looking to pursue research in STEM areas as a high school student is how to get started. To help you get things rolling, in this blog, we detail 10 research ideas in STEM for high school students. 1. Biomedical Engineering. Biomedical Engineering is one of the fastest-growing interdisciplinary sciences.

  24. Social Science Research for High School Students

    Type of research: Original research that is written by middle and high school students. 4. Journal of High School Science. The Journal of High School Science is a peer-reviewed quarterly publication showcasing high school student research in science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. Cost: Free. Deadline: Rolling

  25. High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into a model that can

    Like many good ideas in science, it started with a walk in the woods. During a stroll through the Berlin Botanic Garden in 2019, HHMI Janelia Research Campus Group Leader Jan Funke and some of his ...

  26. High school students can experience scientific discovery in UCLA labs

    For high school senior Prabhas Kolluri, participating in the program confirmed a true passion for medical research. As a student in Dr. Vondriska's lab last summer, he contributed to several ongoing studies, performing biomedical research techniques many high school students only get to read about, including Western blots, gel electrophoresis ...

  27. The Effect of Case-Based Learning on Students ...

    This investigation stems from the observed low problem-solving skills among students as indicated in prior research. The primary objective is to evaluate the impact of employing case-based learning on students' problem-solving aptitude concerning buffer solutions. Carried out during April-May 2023, the study involved 11th-grade students at a public high school in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  28. Sense of relatedness and science engagement among Filipino high school

    This cross-sectional study explores the associations of sense of relatedness to mother, father, science teachers, friends, classmates, and neighbors with behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and social engagement in science. Four hundred and thirty-eight high school students completed an online survey that included scales to assess demographic ...

  29. High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into innovative

    High school student helps transform 'crazy idea' into innovative research tool. ScienceDaily . Retrieved May 9, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com / releases / 2024 / 05 / 240509124703.htm

  30. 10 Summer Research Programs for High School Students in 2024

    UCSD's and SDSC's Annual Research Experience for High School Students (REHS) The UC San Diego and San Diego Supercomputer Center have joined forces to offer an 8-week research program that provides students with a unique opportunity to delve into advanced research projects, including those in computer science and artificial intelligence.