How to Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu Server 22.04

In this post, we will cover how to set static ip address on Ubuntu server 22.04.

It is highly recommended to have a static ip on linux server because it would be persistent across the reboot. Static IP plays an important role for servers like Mail Server, Web Server and File server etc.

Prerequisites

  • Minimal Installed Ubuntu Server 22.04
  • Regular User with sudo admin rights

In Ubuntu server 22.04, networking is controlled by netplan utility , so we will use netplan to configure static ip address on Ubuntu server.

Note: we cannot use nmcli utiltity as it is not the part of default installation on Ubuntu server.

Setting up Static IP address on Ubuntu Server 22.04

Login to your Ubuntu server 22.04, look for the netplan configuration file. It is located under /etc/netplan directory.

Run below cat command to view the contents of ‘00-installer-config.yaml’

Note: Name of configuration file may differ as your per setup. As it is an yaml file, so make sure to maintain the indentation and syntax while editing.

Default-Content-netplan-ubuntu-server

As per above output, it says that we have ens33 interface and it is getting ip from dhcp server. Alternate way to view interface name is via ip command.

Now, to configure static ip in place of dhcp, edit netplan configuration file using vi or nano editor and add the following content.

save and close the file.

Updated-Netplan-Config-File-Content-Ubuntu-Server

In the above file we have used following,

  • ens33 is the interface name
  • addresses are used to set the static ip
  • nameservers used to specify the DNS server ips
  • routes used to specify the default gateway

Note: Change the IP details and interface name as per your environment.

To make above changes into the effect the apply these changes using following netplan command,

Run following ip command to view the ip address on interface,

To view the default route, run

Output of above commands,

ip-addr-route-command-output-ubuntu-server

Perfect, above commands’ output confirms that static ip and route has been configured successfully.

That’s all from this post. Kindly do post your queries and feedback in below comments section.

11 thoughts on “How to Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu Server 22.04”

How do I use Netplan to set up a static IP address on WIFI?

change the network device “ens33” to something else, it will be listed when you run “ip a”; it;s probably wlan0 but that’s not guaranteed.

there will be a config file for the wifi interface. look for something like 00-installer-config-wifi.yaml

Hey! thanks I had problems before setting up the DNS and none config would work! This one did and you made this post really simple to follow!

Your text for configuring a static IP address does not work in my Ubuntu 20.04.5 server’s NIC. No matter how I space or tab the indentations, I get “Ivalid YAML: inconsistent indentation: addresses:

I’ve been at the problem for a couple of weeks, with no fix in site; no spacing or tabbing change I make fixes it. Can anyone please advise me? Thanks.

try paste the YAML into here ‘https://www.yamllint.com/’

Copy paste not work here, you should try typing instead or if you paste, try to delete all the space before each line and tab key until the same format

The spacing must be done with the space key. If you try to make spaces in a yaml file with the tab key it will not work. Also you should let yamllint.com correct the file for you

Your article is quite nice and clear! but after followed, following error occurred when ping google.com: “temporary failure in name resolution”, meanwhile localhost can be visited. Is anyone facing this issue as well? I’ll quite appreciate it if can get some advise.

can we use default DHCP ip configuration along with another static ip in ubuntu 22.04 ? i already have ens33 then i added eth0 as static ip , netplan apply did not thrown any errors but unable to see my static ip , when i do ifconfig 🙁 even after reboot its not applying, any suggestions..

i successfully set up my static ip but I cant ping to 192.168.1.1 why

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Learn Ubuntu

Static IP in Ubuntu

Set static IP in Ubuntu using Terminal

Pratham Patel

Table of Contents

Normally, the router's DHCP server handles assigning the IP address to every device on the network, including your computer.

The DHCP server may also give you a new IP address occasionally. This could cause a problem if you have a home lab or server setup that works on a fixed IP address.

You need to set a static IP address on your Ubuntu system to avoid problems.

Please enable JavaScript

Step 1: Identify the correct network interface

The first step is always to know the name of your network interface.

"But why?" you might ask. That is because since Ubuntu 20.04, the network interfaces are named using predictable network interface names . This means your one and only ethernet interface will not be named 'eth0'.

Ubuntu Server and Ubuntu Desktop use different renderers for 'netplan', they are 'systemd-networkd' and 'NetworkManager', respectively. So let's go over their differences.

Ubuntu Server

To see available network interfaces on Ubuntu Server, run the following command:

Doing so will show a similar result:

The output enumerates network interfaces with numbers.

From this, I can see that the ethernet interface is 'enp1s0'.

Ubuntu Desktop

The advantage (at least in my opinion) of having Ubuntu Desktop is having NetworkManager as the renderer for netplan .

It has a pretty CLI output :)

Run the following command to view the available network interfaces:

That will give you the device name, type, state and connection status.

Here is what it looks like on my computer:

This is more readable at first glance. I can make out that my ethernet interface is named 'enp1s0'.

set ip ubuntu server

Step 2: See current IP address

Now that you know which interface needs to be addressed, let us edit a file .

Before I change my IP address/set a static one, let us first see what my current IP address is .

Nice! But let's change it to '192.168.122.128' for demonstration purposes.

Step 3: See the gateway

A gateway is a device that connects different networks (basically what your all-in-one router is). To know the address of your gateway, run the following command:

The gateway address will be on the line that begins with "default via".

Below is the output of running the ip command on my computer:

On the line that starts with "default via", I can see that my gateway address '192.168.122.1'

Make a note of your gateway address.

Step 4: Set static IP address

Now that you have detail like interface name and gateway address, it is time to edit a config file.

Step 4-A: Disable cloud-init if present

The easiest way to know if cloud-init is present or not is to check if there is a package with that name.

Run the following command to check:

If you get an outupt, you have 'cloud-init' installed.

Now, to disable could-init, create a new file inside the /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg.d directory. The name does not matter, so I will call it '99-disable-cloud-init.cfg'.

Add the following line to it:

Please reboot your Ubuntu system now so that cloud-init does not interfere when we set our static IP address in the next step. :)

Back to Step 4

Once the 'cloud-init' related configuration is complete, we must now edit the netplan configuration to add our static IP address.

Go to the /etc/netplan directory. It is better if there is one file (easier to know which one to edit), but in some cases, there might also be more than one file with the extension '.yml' or '.yaml'.

When in doubt, grep for the name of your network interface. Use the following command if you are not comfortable with grep:

Since the name of network interface for my ethernet is 'enp1s0', I will run the following command:

running this command shows that the file I am looking for is '00-installer-config.yaml'. So let us take a look at it.

You might have noticed a line that says 'ethernet' and our network interface name under that. Under this is where we configure our 'enp1s0' network interface.

Since we do not want DHCP assigned IP address, let us change that field from true to no .

Add a field called addresses . Write the IP address you wish to assign your computer along with the network prefix. So I will write 192.168.122.128/24 in the addresses field.

Finally, we also need to specify DNS nameservers. For that, create a new field called nameservers and under that, create a field called addresses which contains the IP address for your DNS servers . I used Cloudflare's DNS servers but you can use whatever you want.

This is what my '00-installer-config.yaml' file looks like after editing it to my liking.

To apply the settings, run the following command:

This will take only a few seconds, and the IP address will be updated once it is done.

You can check the IP address using the hostname -I command.

Perfect! The IP address has now changed successfully.

set ip ubuntu server

I know that it feels complicated but this is the proper procedure when you are trying to assign static IP via the command line in Ubuntu.

Let me know if you are stuck at some point or encounter any technical issues.

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How-To Geek

How to set a static ip address in ubuntu.

When static is the way forward.

Quick Links

What is a static ip address, setting a static ip in ubuntu, set a static ip in ubuntu with the gui, connection convenience, key takeaways.

After gathering your connection name, subnet mask, and default gateway, you can set a static IP address in the terminal using the nmcli command. Or, in the GNOME desktop, open your connection settings and click the + icon, then enter the info for your static IP address there.

Your home network relies on IP addresses to route data between devices, and sometimes on reconnecting to the network a device's address can change. Here's how to give an Ubuntu Linux computer a permanent IP address that survives reboots.

Everything on your network home network, whether it's using a wired connection or Wi-Fi, has an IP address . IP stands for Internet Protocol. An IP address is a sequence of four numbers separated by three dots. Each IP address that is unique within that network.

IP addresses act as numeric labels. Your router uses these labels to send data between the correct devices. Usually, your router assigns IP addresses. It knows which IP addresses are in use and which are free. When a new device connects to the network, it requests an IP address and the router allocates one of the unused IP addresses. This is called DHCP, or dynamic host configuration protocol .

When a device is restarted or powered off and on, it may receive its old IP address once more, or it might be allocated a new IP address. This is normal for DHCP and it doesn't affect the normal running of your network. But if you have a server or some other computer that you need to be able to reach by its IP address, you'll run into problems if its IP address doesn't survive power downs or reboots.

Pinning a specific IP address to a computer is called allocating a static IP address . A static IP address, as its name suggests, isn't dynamic and it doesn't change even if the computer is power-cycled .

Nmcli is the command-line network manager tool , and can be used to change your IP address, configure network devices, and --- relevant to our purposes --- set up a static IP in Ubuntu.

We're demonstrating this technique on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS, but it ought to work on any Linux distribution, including Ubuntu 23.04. The nmcli tool was released in 2004, so it should be present on just about any standard distribution.

Let's take a look at the network connections that already exist on the computer. We're using the connection command with the show argument.

nmcli connection show

This displays some information about each connection. We only have a single connection configured.

The output is wider than the terminal window. This is the information that we're shown.

  • Name : Our network connection is called "netplan-enp0s3."
  • UUID : The universally unique identifier Linux uses to reference this connection internally.
  • Type : This is an ethernet connection.
  • Device : This connection is using the "enp0s3" network interface. It's the only network card in this computer.

We can use the ip command to discover the IP address this computer is using.

In the output we can see the "enp0s3" entry, and its current IP address, 192.168.86.117. The "/24" is a shorthand way of saying that this network uses a 255.255.255.0 subnet mask . Take a note of this number, we'll need to use it later.

We need to choose the IP address we're going to set as our static IP address. Obviously, you can't use an IP address that is already in use by another device. One safe way to proceed is to use the current IP address assigned to the Ubuntu system. We know for certain that nothing else is using that IP address.

If we want to use a different IP address, try pinging it. We're going to test whether IP address 192.168.86.128 is in use. If everything else on your network uses DHCP and you get no response to the ping command, it should be safe to use.

ping 192.168.86.128

Even if another device had previously used that IP address, it'll be given a new IP address when it next boots up. Nothing responds to the ping requests, so we're clear to go ahead and configure 192.168.86.128 as our new static IP.

We also need to know the IP address of your default gateway , which will usually be your broadband router. We can find this using the ip command and the route option, which we can abbreviate to "r."

The entry that starts with "default" is the route to the default gateway. Its IP address is 192.168.86.1. Now we can start to issue commands to set up our static IP address.

The first command is a long one.

sudo nmcli con add con-name "static-ip" ifname enp0s3 type ethernet ip4 192.168.86.128/24 gw4 192.168.86.1

Taken in small chunks, it's not as bad as it looks. We're using sudo . The nmcli arguments are:

  • con : Short for "connection."
  • add : We're going to add a connection.
  • con-name "static-ip" : The name of our new connection will be "static-ip."
  • ifname enp0s3 : The connection will use network interface "enp0s3."
  • type ethernet : We're creating an ethernet connection.
  • ip4 192.168.86.128/24 : The IP address and subnet mask in classless inter-domain routing notation . This is where you need to use the number you took note of earlier.
  • gw4 192.168.86.1 : The IP address of the gateway we want this connection to use.

To make our connection a functioning connection, we need to provide a few more details. Our connection exists now, so we're not adding anything, we're modifying settings, so we use the mod argument. The setting we're changing is the IPv4 DNS settings. 8.8.8.8 is the IP address of Google's primary public DNS server , and 8.8.4.4 is Google's fallback DNS server.

Note that there is a "v" in "ipv4." In the previous command the syntax was "ip4" without a "v." The "v" needs to be used when you're modifying settings, but not when adding connections.

nmcli con mod "static-ip" ipv4.dns "8.8.8.8,8.8.4.4"

To make our IP address static, we need to change the method which the IP address obtains its value. The default is "auto" which is the setting for DHCP. We need to set it to "manual."

nmcli con mod "static-ip" ipv4.method manual

And now we can start or "bring up" our new connection.

nmcli con up "static-ip" ifname enp0s3

We didn't get any error messages which is great. Lets use nmcli to look at our connections once more.

nmcli con show

Here's the output:

Our static-ip connection is active and using device "enp0s3." The existing connection "netplan-enp0s3" is no longer associated with a physical network interface because we've pinched "enp0s3" from it.

Click the icons at the far-right end of the system bar to show the system menu, then click on the "Wired Connected" menu option. If you're using a wireless connection, instead click the name of your Wi-Fi network.

The available connections are displayed. A dot indicates which is in use. Click the "Wired Settings" or "Wi-Fi Settings" menu option. The details of the active connection are displayed.

If you followed our previous instructions the new connection will be the active connection. We can see our new "static-ip" connection has the IP address, default gateway, and DNS servers that we set for it.

To create a new connection using the "Settings" application, click the " + " icon on the "Networks" page, above the list of wired connections.

A dialog appears. We need to provide a name for our new static IP connection.

We're calling our new connection "static-2." Click the "IPv4" tab.

Select the "Manual" radio button, and complete the "Address", "Netmask", and "Gateway" fields. Also complete the DNS field, and then click the green "Apply" button. Note the comma between the DNS entries.

Our new connection is listed in the "Wired" connections pane.

You can swap between the available connections by clicking directly on their names.

If you want to modify a connection after you create it, click the cog icon. In this case, we'll enter the settings for the "static-ip" connection.

A dialog box opens. Click on the "IPv4" tab.

Because we set our new IP address to be static, the "Manual" radio button is selected. You could change this back to DHCP by selecting the "Automatic (DHCP)" radio button, and clicking the green "Apply" button.

Using the nmcli command or the GNOME desktop and apps, you can hop between network connections very easily and very quickly.

It's more convenient to have a selection of connection profiles and move between them as you need to, rather than to have one that you keep editing. If something goes horribly wrong with the connection you're editing or adding, you can always fall back on one of the existing connections.

Setting a Static IP in Ubuntu – Linux IP Address Tutorial

Zaira Hira

In most network configurations, the router DHCP server assigns the IP address dynamically by default. If you want to ensure that your system IP stays the same every time, you can force it to use a static IP.

That's what we will learn in this article. We will explore two ways to set a static IP in Ubuntu.

Static IP addresses find their use in the following situations:

  • Configuring port forwarding.
  • Configuring your system as a server such as an FTP server, web server, or a media server.

Pre-requisites:

To follow this tutorial you will need the following:

  • Ubuntu installation, preferably with a GUI.
  • sudo rights as we will be modifying system configuration files.

How to Set a Static IP Using the Command Line

In this section, we will explore all the steps in detail needed to configure a static IP.

Step 1: Launch the terminal

You can launch the terminal using the shortcut Ctrl+ Shift+t .

Step 2: Note information about the current network

We will need our current network details such as the current assigned IP, subnet mask, and the network adapter name so that we can apply the necessary changes in the configurations.

Use the command below to find details of the available adapters and the respective IP information.

The output will look something like this:

image-14

For my network, the current adapter is eth0 . It could be different for your system

  • Note the current network adapter name

As my current adapter is eth0 , the below details are relevant.

It is worth noting that the current IP 172.23.199.129 is dynamically assigned. It has 20 bits reserved for the netmask. The broadcast address is 172.23.207.255 .

  • Note the subnet

We can find the subnet mask details using the command below:

Select the output against your adapter and read it carefully.

image-15

Based on the class and subnet mask, the usable host IP range for my network is: 172.23.192.1 - 172.23.207.254 .

Subnetting is a vast topic. For more info on subnetting and your usable IP ranges, check out this article .

Step 3: Make configuration changes

Netplan is the default network management tool for the latest Ubuntu versions. Configuration files for Netplan are written using YAML and end with the extension .yaml .

Note: Be careful about spaces in the configuration file as they are part of the syntax. Without proper indentation, the file won't be read properly.

  • Go to the netplan directory located at /etc/netplan .

ls into the /etc/netplan directory.

If you do not see any files, you can create one. The name could be anything, but by convention, it should start with a number like 01- and end with .yaml . The number sets the priority if you have more than one configuration file.

I'll create a file named 01-network-manager-all.yaml .

Let's add these lines to the file. We'll build the file step by step.

The top-level node in a Netplan configuration file is a network: mapping that contains version: 2 (means that it is using network definition version 2).

Next, we'll add a renderer, that controls the overall network. The renderer is systemd-networkd by default, but we'll set it to NetworkManager .

Now, our file looks like this:

Next, we'll add ethernets and refer to the network adapter name we looked for earlier in step#2. Other device types supported are modems: , wifis: , or bridges: .

As we are setting a static IP and we do not want to dynamically assign an IP to this network adapter, we'll set dhcp4 to no .

Now we'll specify the specific static IP we noted in step #2 depending on our subnet and the usable IP range. It was 172.23.207.254 .

Next, we'll specify the gateway, which is the router or network device that assigns the IP addresses. Mine is on 192.168.1.1 .

Next, we'll define nameservers . This is where you define a DNS server or a second DNS server. Here the first value is   8.8.8.8 which is Google's primary DNS server and the second value is 8.8.8.4 which is Google's secondary DNS server. These values can vary depending on your requirements.

Step 4: Apply and test the changes

We can test the changes first before permanently applying them using this command:

If there are no errors, it will ask if you want to apply these settings.

Now, finally, test the changes with the command ip a and you'll see that the static IP has been applied.

image-17

How to Set a Static IP Using the GUI

It is very easy to set a static IP through the Ubuntu GUI/ Desktop. Here are the steps:

  • Search for settings .
  • Click on either Network or Wi-Fi tab, depending on the interface you would like to modify.
  • To open the interface settings, click on the gear icon next to the interface name.
  • Select “Manual” in the IPV4 tab and enter your static IP address, Netmask and Gateway.
  • Click on the Apply button.

image-16

  • Verify by using the command ip a

image-18

In this article, we covered two methods to set the static IP in Ubuntu. I hope you found the article useful.

What’s your favorite thing you learned from this tutorial? Let me know on Twitter !

You can read my other posts here .

I am a DevOps Consultant and writer at FreeCodeCamp. I aim to provide easy and to-the-point content for Techies!

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RaspberryTips

How to Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu Server (Step-by-step)

Most networks automatically assign IP addresses, which is quite convenient for desktop computers. But for a server, it’s recommended to configure it with a static IP, often outside the DHCP range, so it’s always available at the same address. How do you configure this without a GUI ? Let’s find out.

On Ubuntu Server, the network configuration is managed by the netplan utility, with the configuration file located in /etc/netplan. It’s possible to set a static IP by editing this file.

Before making any changes, make sure you understand your network configuration and find a free IP address for your server (I will explain how to do this). Only then you can edit the netplan configuration file to assign a static IP address to your server.

Prerequisites: Understand the network configuration

I guess if you’re installing a server on your network, you already know your network pretty well. However, I want to make sure what we are doing is clear for everyone, so I’ll take a few minutes to explain what you need before changing anything.

Feel free to skip this section if you already know the exact network configuration you want to apply to your server.

Get your current IP configuration

On Ubuntu Server, you can use the following command to get your current IP address: ip a

set ip ubuntu server

You’ll get a list of all the network interfaces, with their names, IP addresses and subnet mask.

In my example, I have:

set ip ubuntu server

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  • Interface name : eth0
  • IP address : 192.168.0.33/24 (assigned by the DHCP)

To find the router or default gateway on your network, you can then use: ip r

set ip ubuntu server

I now have a better sense of my network configuration.

set ip ubuntu server

If you’re new to the Linux command line, this article will give you the most important Linux commands to know, plus a free downloadable cheat sheet to keep handy.

(Optional) Find the DHCP range

If you have a DHCP server enabled on the network, it’s a good idea to access the router configuration and check the current DHCP range. If possible, you don’t want to set a static IP inside that range.

All router interfaces are different, so I won’t explain everything in detail here, but you should easily find a section with the start and end IP address for the DHCP range. Try to pick an IP on the same subnet but outside that range for your server.

In my example, the router is 192.168.0.254, the DHCP range is from 192.168.0.10 to 192.168.0.50. I can safely set my server to 192.168.0.150 if it’s not already used by another server.

Note : You can use a network scanner if you don’t have a list of all IP addresses already used on your network (most routers will list them). You can use the ‘nmap’ command on Linux or Advanced IP Scanner from a Windows computer on the same network.

Set the static IP to your Ubuntu Server

At this point, you must know which IP address you’ll use for your server, the network gateway, and probably the DNS server if one is required (on small networks, it’s often the same as the gateway).

In my case, I’ll use the following configuration:

  • IP address : 192.168.0.150
  • Gateway : 192.168.0.254
  • DNS : 8.8.8.8

Make sure to change these values with yours in the following sections.

Open the network configuration file

As mentioned in the introduction, the network configuration file on a fresh Ubuntu Server installation is now located under /etc/netplan .

I think the file name can be slightly different depending on your setup, so it’s probably best to go inside this folder and check what’s available. You can do it with: cd /etc/netplan ls -l

set ip ubuntu server

In my case, the file name is “50-cloud-init.yaml” because I’m testing this on a virtual machine, but adapt the following commands to yours if it’s different.

You can see the current configuration with: sudo cat 50-cloud-init.yaml

set ip ubuntu server

And it’s probably a good idea to create a backup of this file just in case something goes wrong. sudo cp 50-cloud-init.yaml ~/50-cloud-init.yaml.default

You can now open the file in edit mode with: sudo nano 50-cloud-init.yaml

Set your static IP address

To set the static IP address, we’ll slightly edit this file to add the IP address, gateway and DNS server information.

Once the file opens with Nano, or your favorite text editor, make the changes to make it look more like this:

Warning : this file is in YAML format. It’s essential to keep the file structure and indentation, or it won’t work. Make sure only to use spaces (no TAB).

Save your changes and exit Nano (CTRL+X).

You can test your configuration file without rebooting with: sudo netplan try

If it works, your IP address will change directly. But if there is any issue, it will give you the error message, without losing the connection (as with the next command).

Apply the changes

To apply the new network configuration persistently, you must run this command: sudo netplan apply

After doing this, your new network configuration will be applied automatically on boot, and you should always get the same IP address, gateway and DNS server used on this server.

Verify the new configuration

You can verify the new configuration with the same commands used at the beginning of the article: ip a ip r

In my example, I now have:

set ip ubuntu server

Related questions

How to set up a secondary dns server in netplan.

In the Netplan configuration, a secondary DNS server can be set by appending the server’s IP address to the addresses list under the nameservers section.

I recommend always having a backup DNS server in your configuration to make sure everything keeps working even if the main DNS server is unreachable.

To add this in Netplan, you just need to edit your YAML file and include the second DNS server’s IP address right after your primary one, separated by a comma.

Is it better to set a static IP on the router instead?

Setting a static IP on the router, often referred to as DHCP reservation, is considered more manageable and flexible compared to configuring a static IP on individual devices.

If you can, I recommend setting this static IP directly on the router, especially if you’re managing multiple devices. This way, your router automatically assigns the same IP to your server each time it connects.

It’s easier to configure, you keep track of all your servers in one place, and you avoid conflicts. The only requirement is that you have a router that handles this properly (and that the Ubuntu server you’re setting up now is not your DHCP server).

Can we use “nmcli” instead of editing the Netplan configuration manually?

nmcli, a command-line tool for Network Manager, presents an alternative to Netplan for network configuration on Ubuntu, offering a more interactive and user-friendly approach.

If you’re not a fan of editing YAML files for network settings, nmcli is your friend. It’s straightforward and interactive, making network configuration less intimidating. You can view, modify, and manage all your network connections just with simple commands.

Just keep in mind that on Ubuntu Server, nmcli is not included by default as it is part of the Network Manager package, that must be installed manually. This installation introduces a different network management tool that may override existing network configurations managed by Netplan.

To install NetworkManager, you just need to run: sudo apt install network-manager After installation, you can start using nmcli to change your network configuration in a more user-friendly way: sudo nmcli

How do you restore the original network configuration?

If you followed this tutorial, but something didn’t work as expected, or you want to get back the DHCP configuration (maybe to try to configure everything from the router instead), you can restore the backup configuration file we created.

  • Restore the original file with: sudo cp ~/50-cloud-init.yaml.default /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml Make sure to change the file name if it was something else on your system.
  • Apply the configuration with: sudo netplan apply

That’s it, you are now back to the default configuration, with the DHCP assigned IP address.

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How to Assign Static IP Address on Ubuntu Linux

Dimitrios

Brief: In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to assign static IP address on Ubuntu and other Linux distributions. Both command line and GUI methods have been discussed.

IP addresses on Linux Systems in most cases are assigned by Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) servers. IP addresses assigned this way are dynamic which means that the IP address might change when you restart your Ubuntu system . It’s not necessary but it may happen.

Dynamic IP is not an issue for normal desktop Linux users in most cases . It could become an issue if you have employed some special kind of networking between your computers.

For example, you can share your keyboard and mouse between Ubuntu and Raspberry Pi . The configuration uses IP addresses of both system. If the IP address changes dynamically, then your setup won’t work.

Another use case is with servers or remotely administered desktops. It is easier to set static addresses on those systems for connection stability and consistency between the users and applications.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to set up static IP address on Ubuntu based Linux distributions. Let me show you the command line way first and then I’ll show the graphical way of doing it on desktop.

Method 1: Assign static IP in Ubuntu using command line

Static IP set up Ubuntu

Note for desktop users : Use static IP only when you need it. Automatic IP saves you a lot of headache in handling network configuration.

Step 1: Get the name of network interface and the default gateway

The first thing you need to know is the name of the network interface for which you have to set up the static IP.

You can either use ip command or the network manager CLI like this:

In my case, it shows my Ethernet (wired) network is called enp0s25:

Next, you should note the default gateway IP using the Linux command ip route :

As you can guess, the default gateway is 192.168.31.1 for me.

Step 2: Locate Netplan configuration

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and later versions use Netplan for managing the network configuration. Netplan configuration are driven by .yaml files located in /etc/netplan directory.

By default, you should see a .yaml file named something like 01-network-manager-all.yaml, 50-cloud-init.yaml, 01-netcfg.yaml.

Whatever maybe the name, its content should look like this:

You need to edit this file for using static IP.

Step 3: Edit Netplan configuration for assigning static IP

Just for the sake of it, make a backup of your yaml file.

Please make sure to use the correct yaml file name in the commands from here onward.

Use nano editor with sudo to open the yaml file like this:

Please note that yaml files use spaces for indentation . If you use tab or incorrect indention, your changes won’t be saved.

You should edit the file and make it look like this by providing the actual details of your IP address, gateway, interface name etc.

In the above file, I have set the static IP to 192.168.31.16.

Save the file and apply the changes with this command:

You can verify it by displaying your ip address in the terminal with ‘ip a’ command.

If you don’t want to use the static IP address anymore, you can revert easily.

If you have backed up the original yaml file, you can delete the new one and use the backup one.

Otherwise, you can change the yaml file again and make it look like this:

Method 2: Switch to static IP address in Ubuntu graphically

If you are on desktop, using the graphical method is easier and faster.

Go to the settings and look for network settings. Click the gear symbol adjacent to your network connection.

Assign Static IP address in Ubuntu Linux

Next, you should go to the IPv4 tab. Under the IPv4 Method section, click on Manual.

In the Addresses section, enter the IP static IP address you want, netmask is usually 24 and you already know your gateway IP with the ip route command.

You may also change the DNS server if you want. You can keep Routes section to Automatic.

Assigning static IP in Ubuntu Linux

Once everything is done, click on Apply button. See, how easy it is to set a static IP address graphically.

If you haven’t read my previous article on how to change MAC Address , you may want to read in conjunction with this one.

More networking related articles will be rolling out, let me know your thoughts at the comments below and stay connected to our social media.

Dimitrios is an MSc Mechanical Engineer but a Linux enthusiast in heart. His machines are powered by Arch Linux but curiosity drives him to constantly test other distros. Challenge is part of his per

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How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS and 22.10

Switching from dynamic IP allocation to static IP addresses is easy on Ubuntu 22.04 "Jammy Jellyfish" and 22.10.

The IP addresses of most devices today are generated by Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) servers. A DHCP server assigns a dynamic IP address to your device when it's connected to a network. Thus, you have the chance to change this IP address from time to time.

On the other hand, a static IP refers to a fixed, immutable address, different from dynamic IPs. You can set static IP settings for Ubuntu 22.04 LTS and 22.10 in three different ways. Here's how to get started.

Understanding IP Configuration in Ubuntu

Ubuntu's progression in network management has made configuring settings like the static IP more user-friendly. The feature to set a static IP in Ubuntu 22.04, in particular, has advantages in terms of network efficiency and stability.

Unlike dynamic IPs, which might vary over sessions, a static IP in Ubuntu remains consistent. This is especially advantageous for servers where consistent address recognition is paramount. For these servers, static IP configurations can become a necessity.

While the graphical interface offers a more intuitive way to handle IP configurations, using the static IP command line can offer more precision. For users who want granular control over their network configurations, command-line methods are a preferred choice. By mastering this method, users can ensure optimal Ubuntu IP configuration for their needs.

However, the benefits of a static IP in Ubuntu, especially in the 22.04 version, come with responsibilities. Ensuring that these IPs are correctly set up is crucial, as misconfigurations can lead to network vulnerabilities.

So follow the steps below to configure a static IP address on your Ubuntu machine correctly.

Set a Static IP on Ubuntu With the nmcli Command

It's pretty easy to configure Ubuntu 22.04 static IP settings using the nmcli command . nmcli is a text-based utility used to check the status of the wired connections you are using on your device.

With this command, you can access additional networking information such as your connection status, the name of your host device, and general permissions in your network configuration. If you're aiming to set a static IP on an Ubuntu server, this command proves invaluable.

You can get information about your connection with:

The output of this command will be as follows:

Create a static link with the command given below. Then, manually configure the enp0s3 and ipv4 settings with the appropriate parameters in the nmcli command:

If you use the nmcli connection show command again, you can see that the static link has been added.

After this process, add the static connection you created to the DNS IP:

Now use the command below to activate the connection:

If the output displays "connection successfully activated," you've successfully set up a static IP address on your machine.

You can consider using static IP addresses to avoid connection problems caused by dynamic IP addresses. A static IP address allows you to have a fixed identity and location when connected to the internet.

You can verify the static IP you want to assign to your device by running:

Using netplan for Static IP Settings on Ubuntu

Just like nmcli, another command you can use for setting a static IP on Ubuntu is netplan. You can easily make Ubuntu static IP settings using the netplan command in 22.04 LTS and 22.10 versions. To do this, follow the steps below.

First, find out the name of your network interface using:

What you see here is your network interface name. This name may be different on each device.

Now, create a file named 01-netcfg.yaml in the /etc/netplan folder. Edit it with your favorite text editor.

Add the following lines to the file:

As you can see, you have disabled the DHCP IP setting with the dhcp4: no statement. You've then added the IP address and DNS settings assigned by Google.

After saving this file, run the following to apply the changes:

Configure Static IP Settings on Ubuntu Graphically

The graphical network interface in Ubuntu 22.04 is quite useful if you don't want to use the command line. So much so that you can easily set the Ubuntu static IP address using this interface.

To do this, click on the Network icon in the upper right corner of your desktop. Then, select Wired Settings from the drop-down menu. Click on the Gear icon to open the settings window.

Then, switch to the IPv4 tab in the window that opens.

As you can see, DHCP is enabled by default. Change the IPv4 Method to Manual as you want to use a static IP instead of a dynamic one. Next, change your address, netmask, and gateway settings. Finally, modify your DNS setting and click the Apply button.

You must restart this wired connection for all these actions to take effect. To do this, simply toggle the switch next to the network name on and then off.

Why Should You Use Static IP Addresses on Ubuntu?

You've now understood how to configure a static IP in Ubuntu, especially in the "Jammy Jellyfish" 22.04 LTS version and 22.10, using both graphical and command-line methods with nmcli and netplan.

Due to insufficient IP addresses, some service providers may assign the same address to two different users. In this case, connection problems can occur. Using static IP addresses instead does not cause such problems as it is user-specific, but beware as someone can misuse your IP address in several ways.

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How to set a static ip address in Ubuntu Server 20.04

When you install Ubuntu server, its network setting defaults to dynamic IP addressing, that is, the network management daemon in Ubuntu searches for a DHCP server on the connected network and configures the network with the IP address assigned by DHCP. Even when you start an instance in the cloud, the network is configured with dynamic addressing using the DHCP server setup by the cloud service provider. In this chapter, you will learn how to configure the network interface with static IP assignment.

Follow these steps to connect to the network with a static IP:

Step 1 : Open /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml and find the following lines:

set ip ubuntu server

Step 2 : Change the preceding lines to add an IP address, net mask, and default gateway (replace samples with the respective values):

set ip ubuntu server

Step 3 : Then run sudo netplan apply

set ip ubuntu server

Step 4 : Try to ping a remote host to test the network connection

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How to configure a static IP address in Ubuntu Server 18.04

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From the office of, “If it’s not broken don’t fix it” comes this: In Ubuntu Server , there’s a brand new method of setting IP addresses. Gone are the days of manually editing the flat text /etc/network/interfaces file. In its place is netplan. That’s right, Ubuntu fans, the method you’ve known for years is now a thing of the past. Instead of a very simple text file, Ubuntu Server requires editing a .yaml file (complete with proper adherence to correct code indent for each line of the block), in order to configure your IP addressing.

Before you panic, it’s not all that challenging. In fact, it’s really just a matter of understanding the layout of these .yaml files and how networking is now restarted. I’m going to show you just that, such that you can configure a static IP address in Ubuntu Server 18.04 as easily as you could in 16.04.

The new method

Open up a terminal window on your Ubuntu 18.04 server (or log in via secure shell). Change into the /etc/netplan directory with the command cd /etc/netplan . Issue the command ls and you should see a file named 50-cloud-init.yaml . If you don’t also see a file named 01-netcfg.yaml , create it with the command sudo touch 01-netcfg.yaml . Before we edit that file, we need to know the name of our networking interface. Issue the command ip a and you should see your system network interface listed by name ( Figure A ).

set ip ubuntu server

Now we’re going to create a new netplan configuration file. If you don’t see the 01-netcfg.yaml file, create one with the command sudo nano 01-netcfg.yaml . Our file is going to look like that which you see in Figure B .

set ip ubuntu server

What’s crucial about the layout of this file is not using the exact same spacing as my example, but that you’re consistent. If you’re not consistent with your indents, the file will not work. What you see in that sample file is all you need to configure that static IP address. Do notice, you aren’t setting the address is the same fashion as you did with Ubuntu 16.04. With the old method, you set IP address and netmask like so:

address = 192.168.1.206 netmask = 255.255.255.0

With netplan, these are set with a single line:

addresses : [192.168.1.206/24]

Restarting/testing networking

With the new method, you must restart networking using netplan. So once you’ve configured your interface, issue the command:

sudo netplan apply

The above command will restart networking and apply the new configuration. You shouldn’t see any output. If networking fails to function properly, you can issue the command:

sudo netplan --debug apply

The output of the command ( Figure C ) should give you some indication as to what’s going wrong.

set ip ubuntu server

That’s all there is to it

There ya go. That’s all there is to configuring a static IP address in Ubuntu Server 18.04. Remember, you’ll have to do this for each interface you have on your server. Make sure to name the files something like 01-netcfg.yaml and 02-netcfg-yaml. It’s not terribly difficult, once you’re used to not working with that old-school interfaces file.

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Tecmint: Linux Howtos, Tutorials & Guides

How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04

Usually, when a client system connects to a network via WiFi or an ethernet cable, it automatically picks an IP address from the router. This is made possible through the DHCP server which auto-assigns IP addresses to clients from a pool of addresses.

The drawback with DHCP is that once the DHCP lease time has lapsed, the IP address of a system changes to a different one, and this leads to a disconnection in case the system was used for a particular service such as a file server. For this reason, you may want to set a static IP address so that it never changes even when the lease time is up.

In this guide, you will learn how to configure a static IP address on Ubuntu 20.04 server and desktop.

Network Configuration

Ubuntu uses the NetworkManager daemon for managing network configuration. You can configure a static IP either graphically or on the command line.

For this guide, we will focus on setting a static IP address using both the GUI and on the command line, and here is the IP configuration:

This information will be different for you, so replace the values accordingly according to your subnet.

On this page

  • Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04 Desktop
  • Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04 Server

How to Set Static IP Address On Ubuntu Desktop

To get started, Launch ‘ Settings ’ from the application menu as shown.

Ubuntu Settings

On the window that appears, click on the ‘ Network ’ tab at the left sidebar and then hit the gear icon on the network interface that you wish to configure. In my case, I’m configuring my wired interface.

Ubuntu Network

In the new window that appears, your interface’s network settings will be displayed as shown. By default, the IP address is set to use DHCP to automatically pick an IP address from the Router or any other DHCP server.

In our case, the current IP address assigned is 192.168.2.104 .

Ubuntu Network Configuration

Now select the IPv4 tab to start setting the static IP address. As you can see, the IP addressing is set to Automatic (DHCP) by default.

Ubuntu Network Method

Click on the ‘ Manual ’ option and new address fields will be displayed. Fill out your preferred static IP address, netmask, and default gateway.

Set Manual Network

The DNS is also set to automatic. To manually configure the DNS, click on the toggle to turn off Automatic DNS. Then provide your preferred DNS entries separated by a comma as shown.

Set Network DNS

Once all is done, click on the ‘ Apply ’ button at the top right corner of the window. For the changes to apply, restart the network interface by clicking on the toggle to disable it and enable it again.

Enable Network Connection

Once again, click on the gear icon to reveal the new IP configuration as shown.

Verify Network Configuration

You can also confirm the IP address on the terminal by running the ifconfig or ip addr command .

Check IP Address

To confirm the DNS servers, run the command:

Check DNS Servers

How to Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu Server Using Netplan

We have seen how we can configure a static IP address graphically on Ubuntu 20.04 desktop. The other option is configuring a static IP address on the terminal using Netplan .

Developed by Canonical, Netplan is a command-line utility used to configure networking on modern Ubuntu distributions. Netplan makes use of YAML files to configure network interfaces. You can configure an interface to acquire an IP dynamically using DHCP protocol or set a static IP.

Open your terminal and head over to the /etc/netplan directory. You will find a YAML configuration file which you will use to configure the IP address.

In my case the YAML file is 01-network-manager-all.yaml with the default settings as shown.

Netplan YAML File

For the Ubuntu server, the YAML file is 00-installer-config.yaml and these are the default settings.

Default Network Settings

To configure a static IP, copy and paste the configuration below. Be mindful of the spacing in the YAML file.

Next, save the file and run the netplan command below to save the changes.

You can thereafter confirm the IP address of your network interface using the ifconfig command .

Check Ubuntu Server IP Address

This wraps up today’s article. We hope you are now in a position to configure a static IP address on your Ubuntu 20.04 desktop & server system.

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21 thoughts on “How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04”

DHCP is that once the DHCP lease time has lapsed, the IP address of a system changes to a different one, and this leads to a disconnection in case the system was used for a particular service such as a file server.

For this reason, you may want to set a static IP address so that it never changes even when the lease time is up.

Thanks for documenting this. However, after a reboot, I am left with the old IP address (DHCP). Guess there is another process that overrules the yaml file, but what??

Hey Pieter, that’s awkward. Ideally, the IP should not change since it’s a static IP. Did you try out both procedures. I’m just curious.

I had a static IP in the yaml file and this does not get an update if you adjust its IP via.

netplan ip a prior to gui adjustments gui DHCP => ip DHCP Gui static ip b => ip a It seems that netplan is not updated via GUI adjustments Enjoy the coffee ‘)

Could this lead to a clash of IP addresses between two computers on the same network? Another computer (computer B) which gets its IP address dynamically comes online when the computer with the static IP (computer A) is offline.

The dhcp server could assign the IP to computer B. Subsequently, when computer A comes online and tries to join the network there would be an IP conflict and both computers could end up not being able to connect to network resources or perform other network operations.

In some routers, this can be managed by restricting the range of IP addresses that the router can dynamically assign. Many routers don’t have that option.

To avoid the potential of such conflicts, I assign static IP addresses on the dhcp server to computers on the network based on the MAC addresses of their NICs.

I would appreciate your thoughts on how to prevent IP conflicts when the network is made of some devices that have static in and others have dynamic IP addresses assigned to them. This scenario is more common today where network devices like smart phones, tablets, smart TVs, and media streaming devices connecting to the network.

Managing IP addresses by MAC addresses is a pain and it would be very helpful if there is an easier way to prevent IP conflicts.

Your concern is very valid. To avoid a conflict in IP address assignment in a network, as you have just described, consider reserving the IP assigned to the server on the router. Say for example, if you want to assign Server A an IP of 172.16.0.100, simply login into your router and reserve the IP address. This prevents the IP from being made available to client PCs & other network devices via the DHCP protocol.

Ideally, before the static assignment, proper mapping of your network is advised so as to know which device is using which IP address. You can use nifty tools like Nmap to scan your network to get to know which IP addresses are in use to avoid assigning a duplicate IP statically on the server.

I hope this answers your question.

Wonderful post. Very simple and to the point. Thank you!!!! Keep it up!!!

Thank you very much Jaidev Shah. Keep it Tecmint.

Hi, why when we use the desktop method, the interfaces file does not get updated ? Where does the desktop tool write the information ?

That’s actually a very interesting question and I did not think about it before. I just configured a static IP on one of my Ubuntu boxes and used grep from /etc/ folder recursively to search for that IP. The IP address was written in:

/etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/Wired\ connection\ 1

So if you need to look where the desktop tool has written your settings, you can look at:

/etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/

Hey Marin, thanks for your contribution. I hadn’t actually seen it from that angle. Quite interesting I must say.

Great article just wondering about this part: “Remember to replace “enp0s3” with the name of your network adapter??? what do u mean by this? do you mean we should not change this name enp0s3 or changed with our network adapter? Cheers

Means, you should change “enp0s3” with your network adapter name for example, eth0 or eth1..

Sorry for my english, I would put a secondary IP in the same interface, like old versions (eth0 192.168.1.100… eth0:1 10.10.0.100) I know how to do it in the old versions, but in version 15.10, they have changed the commands. Can you help me?

Hello Nikon,

As the answer of this question is too long for the comment section, I would recommend you to submit your question to our Linuxsay discussion forum, where we will gladly provide more details:

http://linuxsay.com/

Where do the Nameserver numbers obtained? Elaborate on “Make sure to use your own settings depending on the network to which you are connected to.”

Can you please expand on this? IMPORTANT NOTE: For the purpose of this tutorial, I will be using the following settings:

IP Address: 192.168.0.100 Netmask: 255.255.255.0 Gateway: 192.168.0.1 Nameserver: 8.8.8.8 Nameserver: 8.8.4.4 Make sure to use your own settings depending on the network to which you are connected to. Where do you obtain the Nameserver numbers?

This depends on few things:

If your machine is connected to a router, you should see the settings in there.

If you are plugging your ISP’s internet cable directly to your computer (i.e no router, modem etc), you should use your ISP’s settings.

I want 1st IP by DHCP and 2nd static but, in Ubuntu 15.10 mi interface isn’t eth0 it is eno1 and if I put eno1:1 don’t works.

Actually the init script does exactly that – it calls systemctl. You can see it in the screenshot:

“restarting networking (via systemctl): networking service”

Both scripts do the same.

Why not use systemd to restart networking directly?

`systemctl restart network`

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How to setup a static IP on Ubuntu Server 18.04

I've seen some people saying the file to set static ip is still /etc/network/interfaces

And I've seen other people saying that in 18.04 it's now on /etc/netplan (which people seem unhappy about)

I've tried putting this:

In my /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml and doing sudo netplan apply but that just kills the servers connection to the internet.

Pablo Bianchi's user avatar

  • 1 Is it a desktop or a server? –  user68186 Apr 29, 2018 at 5:10
  • 1 Is this a fresh 18.04 install or upgrade from another version? –  WinEunuuchs2Unix Apr 29, 2018 at 5:16
  • Sorry I should've said this in the text, its a fresh install of 18.04 server. –  final20 Apr 29, 2018 at 5:25
  • The most simple solution for me was, to specify a static IPv4 address right during installation (together with subnet, gateway, etc.). Simply fill out some wizard fields, no messing with configuration files. –  Uwe Keim Oct 9, 2018 at 10:01
  • You can also do this on routers. Steps are self-explanatory in the router config. –  EODCraft Staff Jan 12, 2019 at 10:25

11 Answers 11

All the answers telling you to directly edit /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml are wrong since CloudInit is used and will generate that file. In Ubuntu 18.04.2 it is clearly written inside the file :

So you should not edit that file but the one under /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg.d/ if you still want to use CloudInit.

Another way is to completely disable CloudInit first by creating an empty file /etc/cloud/cloud-init.disabled (see https://cloudinit.readthedocs.io/en/latest/topics/boot.html ) and then the other answers are OK. Under Ubuntu 18.04.2 I had to use dpkg-reconfigure cloud-init to let it take into account the file /etc/cloud/cloud-init.disabled . I think this is a little bit weird.

I suggest you to rename the file (not the right name since 50-cloud-init.yaml let us think it still uses CloudInit).

Then you may end up with a file name /etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml which contains the configuration below. Note the use of the networkd renderer instead of NetworkManager because the configuration is on a server.

Ludovic Kuty's user avatar

  • 4 It works great. This should be the best answer. 50-cloud-init.yaml as stated shouldn't be modified. –  Relic Jun 26, 2019 at 13:11
  • 3 If still using CloudInit, you need to do a sudo cloud-init clean -r to get the change to take, as per veperr's answer (at least for me on Ubuntu Server 18.04.3). –  Stuart Rossiter Aug 8, 2019 at 11:59
  • 1 ...plus the renderer line is no longer valid it seems (and is missing in the base version of the file that you edit). –  Stuart Rossiter Aug 27, 2019 at 10:26
  • Simply adding a custom file under /etc/netplan/##-*.yaml works as well. Such as: "/etc/netplan/99-custom-network.yaml". This also follows the netplan.io/examples instructions. In "conf.d" type config areas you should always opt for a custom/new file if possible instead of editing installed package files. It's why we have these "numbered file" areas. These default #'ed files can frequently get overwritten. And YES: If you have a "50-cloud-init.yaml", it should NOT be used. It is system generated as noted in comments. Why people keep posting this as an answer is anyone's guess? –  B. Shea Dec 13, 2021 at 15:59
  • 1 Yep. But, you can add it directly to /etc/netplan . Any new files under this area will persist through reboots. I gave you +1 for 1: saying not to edit cloud-init, and 2: Creating a new file in a numbered area (& not editing ANY preexisting/system ones). Note: You do not even necessarily need to disable anything so long as you are updating the same network interface. A higher numbered yaml will override all previous repeated directives (or should). So "50-" will be read in AFTER "01-". If you renamed your file "99-" you wouldn't have to disable "50-" - if that makes sense. See my answer –  B. Shea Dec 13, 2021 at 16:34

This is set a static IP instruction in Ubuntu-Server 18.04 and 20.04

Then replace your configuration, for example, the following lines:, apply changes:.

In case you run into some issues execute:

  • /24 is equivalent with 255.255.255.0
  • ens160 is your ethernet name, you can get it using $ ifconfig
  • Ubuntu 16.04 and 14.04 network-interface configuration have a different method.
  • The file is in YAML format : Use spaces, no tabs.

Benyamin Jafari's user avatar

  • not able to ping after assigning static IP address –  gjois Mar 3, 2019 at 14:55
  • OK....I'm able to ping after doing service networking restart –  gjois Mar 3, 2019 at 15:42
  • 7 I wouldn't do that since that file is generated by CloudInit –  Ludovic Kuty Mar 13, 2019 at 7:48
  • only works if your ethernet is "ens160", check your ethernet "ls /sys/class/net/" and replace "ens160" with it. –  sailfish009 Mar 17, 2020 at 3:40
  • @sailfish009 I mentioned it before in the NOTE section in my answer. –  Benyamin Jafari Mar 17, 2020 at 6:11

I've found another way using cloud-init.

  • Edit the file /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg.d/50-curtin-networking.cfg - the contents seem to be the same as they would be in /etc/netplan.

clean, reboot and re-initialize cloud-init with this command:

That's it! Your system will reboot, cloud-init will re-initialize and pickup the change in /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg.d/50-curtin-networking.cfg and apply them to /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml and all will be well. Verify with ifconfig .

zx485's user avatar

  • 1 2 things. -> 1. Better to create your own "99-myconfig.cfg" file under /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg.d/ so it's read in last and will overwrite any previous configs and will not be overwritten by possible system updates. 2. ifconfig is defunct . Use ip command now. For example ip addr will show same thing as ifconfig use to. –  B. Shea Dec 7, 2021 at 16:11

Ubuntu 18.04 uses now Netplan to configure the network interfaces, so the configuration must be done in the file /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml , the documentation advises not to mess anymore with the old file /etc/network/interfaces . I have used this configuration with my Ubuntu Server virtual machine and it works so far, just make sure the info is correct; the optional: true setting supposedly speeds up the booting time by not verifying if the interface is connected or not, this is default, also there is no need to declare values not used, for example DHCP, if they are absent they are taken as disabled, also the default renderer in Ubuntu Server is networkd so there is no need to declare it. Taking the information from your post, it should be like this:

Once you save the file, run sudo netplan --debug apply the debug flag will output more info and can help to detect any errors. Check the ethernet cable, if in virtual review the VM configuration. If using a WLAN I have read that it is a bit more tricky to setup but I haven't yet set up a machine connected to WiFi with this server version.

If you want more info about Netplan there is a website, it has some basic configuration examples.

https://netplan.io/

badger_8007's user avatar

  • 1 Wrong. DO NOT EDIT 50-cloud-init.yaml , or any existing system generated files! –  B. Shea Dec 13, 2021 at 16:40

Config file is in YAML format : Don't use TAB when configuring the file. It only works with SPACE .

HubbleT's user avatar

Writing a new answer as so many are just wrong.

Do not edit 50-cloud-init.yaml , 00-installer-config.yaml or ANY system generated files/package files.

From https://netplan.io/examples/ :

"To configure netplan, save configuration files under /etc/netplan/ with a .yaml extension (e.g. /etc/netplan/config.yaml) .."

The installer/ system did that. Now you need to override it.

Also consult man netplan-generate for the rules governing how the network configurations are read from /etc/netplan/*.yaml (and elsewhere).

To correctly update the netplan area to use a static IP over the default DHCP:

Edit/Create a new file (the prepended number+dash and .yaml extension are important):

sudo nano /etc/netplan/99-custom-network.yaml

Add your properly formatted YAML to this file. A static IP example:

(Note: My network device is ens160 - not eth0 - adjust as needed.) Save. Then do a sudo netplan apply . Make sure your network interface looks right and is working ( ip ad / ping ). Then do a reboot. Retest.

This follows the netplan.io instructions as well as the general rule of not editing any existing/installed files when possible. In /etc/netplan/ and similar conf.d/ type config areas you should always opt for a high numbered custom/new file (if possible) instead of editing any installed package files.

It's why they have numbered files in these configuration areas (in /etc/netplan/ and others). The higher the number on the file equates to when it is read in.

Therefore, something with "99-" prepended on it will generally be read in last and OVERRIDE anything that repeated before it. Therefore, if a network interface is set to DHCP in "00-installer-config.yaml", and/or "50-cloud.init.yaml", the settings for the same interface in a "99-*.yaml" file will override everything else read in previously.

Generally these installed YAML files will NOT get overwritten, but that isn't valid logic to not follow the conf.d "standard" of using custom files to override and avoid editing any installed files. It doesn't take any extra time. Drop a file in netplan. Done. So, there's no excuse as I have witnessed in comments of "well, it's worked so far..".

So, editing the default netplan *.yaml(s) will technically (usually) "work", but you should avoid using them when possible.

B. Shea's user avatar

Network configuration in 18.04 is managed via netplan and configured with cloud-init. To change your network configuration edit the 50-curtin-networking.cfg file in /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg.d/ . If this file does not exist then create it.

Find your interface name

Edit / create the cloud-init network configuration file

To set a static IP address, use the addresses key, which takes a list of (IPv4 or IPv6), addresses along with the subnet prefix length (e.g. /24). Gateway and DNS information can be provided as well:

You can find more configuration options at https://netplan.io/examples

Reload the cloud-init configuration. This will reboot your server.

Ryan's user avatar

This is the setting what make it work.

restart the server

change eth0 to your adapter, find out your adapter using ifconfig.

Digerate's user avatar

  • 1 Wrong. DO NOT EDIT 50-cloud-init.yaml, or any existing system generated files! –  B. Shea Dec 13, 2021 at 16:41

To find available ethernet interfaces use ip link show

Then edit the 50-cloud-init.yaml file using $sudo nano /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml

Add the configuration for available interfaces like eth0: and eth1:

Then use command $sudo netplan apply to apply the changes.

Anand Prakash Singh's user avatar

Then edit the 50-cloud-init.yaml file using $sudo vim /etc/netplan/50-cloud-init.yaml

$ sudo netplan apply

Community's user avatar

  • 1 I wouldn't do that since that file is generated by CloudInit. –  Ludovic Kuty Mar 13, 2019 at 7:47
  • 1 Why oh why is every guide to setting a static IP on 18.04 telling me to edit a yaml file that says it is a dynamically created file that will not persist? Another cruel joke from the Ubuntu developers that think it is ok to just break things by default... –  Bigtexun Mar 20, 2019 at 18:13
  • 1 Wrong. DO NOT EDIT 50-cloud-init.yaml, or any existing system generated files! –  B. Shea Dec 13, 2021 at 16:42
  • @B.Shea I have 20+ servers running for 4 years with regular upgrades and maintenance. Never once, 50-cloud-init.yaml has been reset or overwritten. For what I have noticed, cloud-init (as the name says) is run once, at server creation and then it won't be automatically reissued again. –  Dario Fumagalli Mar 2, 2022 at 3:34
  • 1 @DarioFumagalli Only 4 years? You're using broken logic: Just because nothing "broke" doesn't mean you are doing it the proper way. You should NEVER edit system installed config files if there is a way to avoid it. And there is clearly a way to avoid it in this case.. –  B. Shea Mar 2, 2022 at 13:07

This worked for me:

[172.23.4.2/24, ] is the additional thing I did on the yaml file.

Reference: https://serverspace.io/support/help/how-to-configure-static-ip-address-on-ubuntu-18-04/

BeastOfCaerbannog's user avatar

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set ip ubuntu server

ITzGeek

How to Set a Static IP Address On Ubuntu 22.04

set ip ubuntu server

The first task anyone would do after installing Ubuntu is setting an IP address to a system to connect to the network/internet. If the Wi-Fi router, ISP, or network doesn’t provide DHCP services, you must manually assign IP addresses.

Here, we will see how to set a static IP Address on Ubuntu 22.04, using,

  • GNOME Control Center
  • NetworkManager

You can use any method to set a static IP address on Ubuntu 22.04.

Find Network Interfaces on Ubuntu 22.04

You can run any of the below commands in a terminal to get a list of network interfaces available on the system.

The output of the ifconfig command on a desktop:

The output of the ifconfig command on a laptop:

Here, we will see how to configure a static IP for enp0s3 (Wired) / wl01 (Wi-Fi).

IP Address : 192.168.0.10 Netmask : 255.255.255.0 Gateway : 192.168.0.1 DNS Server 1 : 192.168.0.1 DNS Server 2 : 8.8.8.8 Domain Name : itzgeek.local

Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu 22.04 Desktop

1. using gnome network manager.

Using the GNOME network control center to set a static IP address on In Ubuntu 22.04 desktop is straightforward.

Set IP for Wired Interface using GNOME

Open the Gnome control center using the gnome-control-center network command or go to Activities >> Settings >> Network .

Click on the gear icon on the Wired interface page and then IPv4 tab >> Manual >> Enter IP address, Netmask, Gateway, DNS (Toggle to disable Automatic DNS configuration) >> Apply .

Set IP for Wired Interface

Finally, use the toggle in the Network page to disable and enable the network interface to apply the IP address.

Set IP Address for Wi-Fi using GNOME

Open the Gnome control center using the gnome-control-center wifi command or go to Activities >> Settings >> Wi-Fi .

Click on your Wifi router name and then enter the router’s password to connect. Your laptop will automatically receive an IP address from a Wi-Fi router with a built-in DHCP service on a successful connection.

Wi-Fi Access Points

To assign a static IP address or Wi-Fi interface, click on the gear icon on the Wi-Fi interface page and then IPv4 tab >> Manual >> Enter IP address, Netmask, Gateway, DNS (Toggle to disable Automatic DNS configuration) >> Apply .

Set IP for Wired Wi-Fi

Finally, disable and enable the Wi-Fi interface to apply the IP address.

2. Using Netplan

Netplan is a utility for easily configuring networking on a Ubuntu system. It reads the configuration files .yaml present in the /etc/netplan directory.

This utility supports both networkd and Network Manager as backends. However, using Network Manager as a backend renderer: NetworkManager is recommended for the Ubuntu desktop. The remaining configurations are the same as that of the networkd .

3. Using NetworkManager CLI

Set ip for wired interface using nmcli.

First, let us list the available network connections.

Then, configure static IP address to wired interface.

Finally, run the below commands to apply the IP address.

Set IP Address for Wi-Fi using nmcli

First, list the available Wi-Fi access points using the below command.

Next, connect to the Wi-Fi access point.

And then, configure static IP address to Wi-Fi interface.

Finally, run the below commands to apply the IP address

Set Static IP Address Using NetPlan on Ubuntu 22.04 Server

Netplan is a network configuration utility that reads YAML files and generates all network configurations for the renderer tool (NetworkManager or networkd) to configure the network on a system.

Netplan configuration files are found in the /etc/netplan/ directory.

Remove any configuration files .yaml present in the /etc/netplan directory.

Set IP for Wired Interface using Netplan

Now, create a new netplan configuration for the wired network interface.

Then, make changes to the below information and use it for your requirement.

And then generate the required configuration for the renderers.

Finally, apply all network configurations and restart renderers.

Set IP Address for Wi-Fi using Netplan

Wi-Fi Interface Name : wl01 Wireless Access Point Name : Raj Wireless Access Point Password :  MyPass

First, create a new netplan configuration for the wired network interface.

Verify Static IP Address on Ubuntu 22.04

Verify the static IP address using the below commands.

Also, verify the DNS server’s entries.

That’s All.

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set ip ubuntu server

How to set up remote game streaming using Moonlight and Sunshine

Y ears ago, it was impossible to imagine running games on a remote system and streaming them to the device of your choice. Thanks to advancements in hardware capabilities and network bandwidth, today, you can not only broadcast your entire library from a cutting-edge PC , but also enjoy high graphical fidelity and solid frame rates while doing so.

However, you’ll need to configure some third-party applications to set up remote game streaming on your devices. Since this process can get rather cumbersome, we’ve created a step-by-step guide to help you set up remote game streaming via Moonlight and Sunshine.

How to remote desktop to Ubuntu

Setting up sunshine.

Sunshine is an application that lets you convert a powerful PC into a server capable of rendering games and sending the stream to any client device. It’s also quite easy to configure as all you have to do is:

  • Head to Sunshine's official GitHub link and download the portable version of the app.
  • Extract the folder and run sunshine.exe as an administrator.
  • Copy the Configuration UI link from the Sunshine terminal onto your web browser.
  • Pick a username and password and click on Log in before signing in with the newly-set account credentials.
  • (Optional) If you prefer playing with controllers, you’ll need to download and install the ViGEmBus drivers .

Setting up Moonlight

With localhost set up, you’ll need to download Moonlight, an application that allows you to connect a client device to the Sunshine server.

  • Download the latest version of Moonlight from the GitHub link .
  • If you’re using the portable version, simply extract the folder you just downloaded and run Moonlight.exe with admin privileges.
  • If your firewall tries to block Moonlight, click on the Allow access button.
  • Assuming your Sunshine host and Moonlight client are on the same network, the server will appear inside the Moonlight client.

Pairing the Sunshine server with a Moonlight host

Now that you've installed Sunshine and Moonlight on your PCs, it’s time to pair them over the LAN/Wi-Fi.

  • Inside the Moonlight app, click on the Sunshine server .
  • Note the PIN displayed by Moonlight and switch to the other PC.
  • Click on the PIN tab of the Sunshine UI and enter the four-digit code before clicking on the Send button.
  • The lock icon on the host/server PC will disappear from Moonlight, and you're free to use it from the client system.

(Optional) Optimizing the video settings on Moonlight

Once you’ve set up both Sunshine and Moonlight, you can click on the server name in Moonlight and begin broadcasting your games and even the desktop screen to the client system. However, you’ll notice that the image quality on Moonlight can be somewhat lacking. To fix this, simply adjust the video settings on Moonlight by following these steps:

  • Click on the Settings icon in Moonlight.
  • Increase the resolution and FPS by clicking on the arrows and choosing the ideal values in accordance with your network bandwidth and speed.
  • You can also modify the image quality with the help of the Video bitrate slider .

(Optional) Setting up ZeroTier to stream games over the Internet

So far, you're limited to streaming games across devices connected to the same network. But for those who want to stream games over the Internet, the ZeroTier application serves as a nice solution.

  • Download the ZeroTier app on both the server and the client system from the official link .
  • Run zerotier_desktop_ui.exe on both devices.
  • Right-click on the ZeroTier app icon in the Taskbar and pick the Join new network… option to open a new dialog box.
  • Switch to your web browser, and sign up on ZeroTier to gain access to the Network settings page.
  • Click on the default Network created by ZeroTier.
  • Choose 10.147.17.* as the IPv4 Auto-Assign range. Also, ensure that all the IPv6 Auto-Assign settings are disabled.
  • Copy the Network ID into the Join ZeroTier Network dialog box and hit Join. Repeat this step for the client device.
  • Head back to ZeroTier's Network page on your web browser, and enable the checkbox under the Auth? column for the server and client systems.
  • Switch to the client system that’s running Moonlight and click on the Add PC manually button.
  • Copy and paste the Managed IP of the server into the blank and hit OK .

Once the server shows up in the Moonlight app, you can access it from any network, not just your home Wi-Fi/LAN.

Wrapping up the procedure to set up Sunshine and Moonlight

Remote gaming is quite a neat facility, especially if you wish to play your PC games on other devices like a portable laptop, gaming handheld, or smartphone. It’s also a better alternative to cloud gaming as you retain full control over the actual hardware and games.

If you encounter random slowdowns during your remote gaming sessions, chances are your Wi-Fi router isn’t powerful enough to stream your games. So, you should turn down the resolution or upgrade to a high-speed router . But if that doesn’t work, the server PC could be the culprit, and it might be the time to upgrade to better components .

How to use Steam Link for remote play on your smartphone

How to set up remote game streaming using Moonlight and Sunshine

IMAGES

  1. How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04

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  2. How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04?

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  3. Configuring static and dynamic IP Addresses in Ubuntu using Netplan

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  4. How To Assign Static Ip Address On Ubuntu 20 04 Lts

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  5. How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04

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  6. How to Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu 22.04

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04

    Depending on the interface you want to modify, click either on the Network or Wi-Fi tab. To open the interface settings, click on the cog icon next to the interface name. In "IPV4" Method" tab, select "Manual" and enter your static IP address, Netmask and Gateway. Once done, click on the "Apply" button.

  2. How to Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu Server 22.04

    Setting up Static IP address on Ubuntu Server 22.04. Login to your Ubuntu server 22.04, look for the netplan configuration file. It is located under /etc/netplan directory. Run below cat command to view the contents of '00-installer-config.yaml'. Note: Name of configuration file may differ as your per setup.

  3. Change IP address on Ubuntu Server

    Changing to a static IP address will allow you to manually choose an IP address on Ubuntu Server. On the other hand, using DHCP leaves it up to the router or DHCP server's configuration to choose which IP address your machine will have. Follow the step by step instructions below to change the IP address on server by setting a static IP.

  4. Set static IP in Ubuntu using Command Line

    gateway4: 192.168.122.1. nameservers: addresses: [1.1.1.1, 1.0.0.1] version: 2. To apply the settings, run the following command: sudo netplan apply. This will take only a few seconds, and the IP address will be updated once it is done. You can check the IP address using the hostname -I command. $ hostname -I.

  5. How to Set a Static IP Address in Ubuntu

    Set a Static IP in Ubuntu with the GUI. Click the icons at the far-right end of the system bar to show the system menu, then click on the "Wired Connected" menu option. If you're using a wireless connection, instead click the name of your Wi-Fi network. The available connections are displayed.

  6. Configuring networks

    To configure a default gateway, you can use the ip command in the following manner. Modify the default gateway address to match your network requirements. sudo ip route add default via 10.102.66.1. You can also use the ip command to verify your default gateway configuration, as follows: ip route show.

  7. Setting a Static IP in Ubuntu

    To open the interface settings, click on the gear icon next to the interface name. Select "Manual" in the IPV4 tab and enter your static IP address, Netmask and Gateway. Click on the Apply button. Manually setting a static IP using Ubuntu Desktop. Verify by using the command ip a.

  8. Ubuntu Static IP configuration

    In this tutorial, you will learn all about Ubuntu static IP address configuration. We will provide the reader with a step by step procedure on how to set static IP address on Ubuntu Server via netplan and Ubuntu Desktop using NetworkManager.Static IP address is recommended for servers as the static address does not change as oppose to a dynamic IP address assignment via DHCP server.

  9. Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 22.04|20.04|18.04

    $ ifconfig -a ## OR $ ip addr. If you cannot see ip address, gateway, and netmask info, restart your computer. Just type the command reboot on the terminal. sudo reboot Method 2: Use Netplan YAML network configuration. On Ubuntu 22.04|20.04|18.04, you can use Netplan which is a YAML network configuration tool to set static IP address.

  10. How to Set Static IP Address on Ubuntu Server (Step-by-step)

    Set the static IP to your Ubuntu Server. At this point, you must know which IP address you'll use for your server, the network gateway, and probably the DNS server if one is required (on small networks, it's often the same as the gateway). In my case, I'll use the following configuration: IP address: 192.168..150; Gateway: 192.168..254

  11. How to Assign Static IP Address on Ubuntu Linux

    Method 2: Switch to static IP address in Ubuntu graphically. If you are on desktop, using the graphical method is easier and faster. Go to the settings and look for network settings. Click the gear symbol adjacent to your network connection. Next, you should go to the IPv4 tab.

  12. How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS and 22.10

    A DHCP server assigns a dynamic IP address to your device when it's connected to a network. Thus, you have the chance to change this IP address from time to time. On the other hand, a static IP refers to a fixed, immutable address, different from dynamic IPs. You can set static IP settings for Ubuntu 22.04 LTS and 22.10 in three different ways ...

  13. How to set a static ip address in Ubuntu Server 20.04

    When you install Ubuntu server, its network setting defaults to dynamic IP addressing, that is, the network management daemon in Ubuntu searches for a DHCP server on the connected network and configures the network with the IP address assigned by DHCP. ... Step 2 : Change the preceding lines to add an IP address, net mask, and default gateway ...

  14. How to configure a static IP address in Ubuntu Server 18.04

    The new method. Open up a terminal window on your Ubuntu 18.04 server (or log in via secure shell). Change into the /etc/netplan directory with the command cd /etc/netplan. Issue the command ls ...

  15. How to configure static IP address on Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa Desktop

    By default your current Ubuntu system uses DHCP server to configure its networking settings. Hence, the configuration of your IP address is dynamic. In many scenarios, simply configuring your router or local DHCP server is a preferred way to set a static address to any host regardless of the operating system in use.

  16. How to Configure Static IP Address on Ubuntu 20.04

    Ubuntu Network Method. Click on the ' Manual ' option and new address fields will be displayed. Fill out your preferred static IP address, netmask, and default gateway. Set Manual Network. The DNS is also set to automatic. To manually configure the DNS, click on the toggle to turn off Automatic DNS.

  17. networking

    Get the IP address from the server using: sudo dhclient eth0; Assign the first ip addresses like this: sudo ip addr add 192.168.20.222/24 dev eth0, and repeat for other IP addresses. Add the default route using: sudo route add default gw <internet gateway ip address> If you do step 2, step 4 is not required. Hope that helps.

  18. Netplan static IP on Ubuntu configuration

    Select IPv4 from the top menu. Select IPv4 to start configuring a new IP address. Choose Manual for the IPv4 settings, enter your desired configuration and hit Apply . Set your desired static IP address. Restart your network by ON/OFF switch. Restart to apply new network settings.

  19. How to setup a static IP on Ubuntu Server 18.04

    I have used this configuration with my Ubuntu Server virtual machine and it works so far, just make sure the info is correct; the optional: true setting supposedly speeds up the booting time by not verifying if the interface is connected or not, this is default, also there is no need to declare values not used, for example DHCP, if they are ...

  20. How to Set a Static IP Address On Ubuntu 22.04

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